Greater expectations: 
Keeping pace with customer service demands in Asia Pacific
20 
© Economist Intelligence Unit 2010
Part 2: Investing in customer service
Putting the customer first
G
iven the shifting priorities of consumers outlined above, many companies in Asia do not appear to be 
giving customer service the attention it needs. Around a third, 32%, invest in customer service only 
when they see a real need. Furthermore, a similar proportion agrees that investment in customer service 
is worthwhile only in high-end or luxury sectors. In other words, about a third of respondents indicate 
that customer service is not at the forefront of their corporate strategies.
More than half of companies, meanwhile, agree that customer service investment comes only after 
development of their core product. This seems to be in line with their growth strategies. When asked what 
type of investment has the biggest impact on their top line, 65% say ‘Product or service development/
innovation’. Some 56% of executives cite ‘Improving customer service’—putting it ahead of things like 
‘Marketing/advertising’ (45%) and ‘More training for existing employees’ (31%).
However, 76% of consumers say that customer service should always be a company’s top priority. This 
indicates that many firms in Asia may be prioritising product development at the expense of customer 
service initiatives. This could be because many firms are still fairly new to Asia, and are still in the process 
of developing their core offering. However, given the rapidly rising expectations of Asia’s consumers, as 
well as the risks associated with a poor customer service strategy, companies that want to succeed in Asia 
would do well to put customer service at the centre of their offering, not as an afterthought.
Do companies get it?
In several countries, companies do not seem to understand their consumers’ price/service expectations 
(see Figure 6). For instance, the average Australian consumer is willing to pay more for good customer 
service. The average firm does not think so.  On the other hand, the average Japanese firm believes that 
its consumers are willing to pay more for good service. The average Japanese consumer, however, is not.
Key points
n Companies in Asia are not putting enough emphasis on customer service. More than half of companies 
surveyed invest in customer service only after development of their core product.
n Despite popular complaints about the inadequacies of call centre service, the majority of Asian consumers 
surveyed have no fundamental objection to call centres—provided they are easy to use and provide quick 
results.
n Courteous, informed staff are possibly the most important asset for any company when delivering customer 
service. Over three-quarters of consumers surveyed say that when making a purchase, rude staff will make 
them reject a particular product.
Editing pdf open office - software control dll:C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC application
Enable C#.NET Users to Convert OpenOffice Document (Odt, Ods, Odp) to PDF
www.rasteredge.com
Editing pdf open office - software control dll:VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC application
How to Convert OpenOffice Document (Odt, Ods, Odp) to PDF with VB.NET Demo Code Samples
www.rasteredge.com
Greater expectations: 
Keeping pace with customer service demands in Asia Pacific
© Economist Intelligence Unit 2010 
21
Australian company
Strongly agree 1
2
3
4
Australian consumer
Japanese company
Japanese consumer
10
55
16
0
19
29
16
16
8
32
9
6
9
41
35
41
21
5
9
24
Disagree 5
Australian:
Strongly agree 1
2
3
4
Disagree 5
Japanese:
Figure 6
Price/service expectations
Are consumers willing to pay more for good service?
(% respondents)
The average Indonesian firm believes its customers are prepared to put up with poor customer service 
if they are getting a bargain. The average Indonesian consumer, however, is not. Compared with the Asian 
average, Malaysian respondents feel more strongly that customer service should always be a company’s 
top priority, and that the higher the value of the purchase, the better the service they expect. This 
suggests that they are more demanding than other Asians. The average Malaysian firm, however, does 
not realise this, and believes that price is more important than service. Some 72% of Malaysian corporate 
respondents say that customer service comes only after development of their core product—compared 
with the Asian average of 51%.
Similarly, the survey also shows that many companies do not understand the varied tastes and 
preferences across Asia. For instance, before buying a product, Thai consumers value courteous, informed 
staff much more highly than do Malaysian or South Korean consumers. Meanwhile, Australian consumers 
are much more likely than Indonesian consumers to reject a company because it uses foreign call centre 
staff. 
However, only about half of the companies surveyed make the effort to differentiate their service to 
suit local customer profiles in different markets (see Figure 7). A further 23% of firms differentiate to a 
lesser degree by giving higher priority to customer service in their bigger markets and lower priority in 
their smaller markets. About a quarter of the companies surveyed make no distinction at all, providing the 
same level of customer service in every market and favouring a one-size-fits-all strategy.
Thus, even though 83% of corporations surveyed say they are planning to increase customer service 
investments in the next year, the survey suggests that they may not understand their customers well 
enough. It is probable that quite a few firms will misallocate their investments, and end up not addressing 
real customer needs.
Figure 7
Customer service in different markets
(% respondents)
We tweak our service to suit the customer profiles in different markets
We give higher priority to customer service in our bigger markets; and lower priority in our smaller markets
We provide the same level of customer service in every market
53
23
24
software control dll:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
Online Guide for Viewing, Annotating, Converting and Editing PDF Document in ASP.NET with C#.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer& Editor Library.
www.rasteredge.com
software control dll:C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Accessible annotation functionalities when editing PDF file online with RasterEdge conversion actions, such as convert PDF to Microsoft Office Word (.docx
www.rasteredge.com
Greater expectations: 
Keeping pace with customer service demands in Asia Pacific
22 
© Economist Intelligence Unit 2010
Customer service through the sale, and beyond
Firms engage with their customers at many different points of the sales process. Even before any product 
is sold, companies have to provide pre-sale customer service. This includes ensuring that a product 
is easily available, having courteous, informed staff on hand to answer queries, and making product 
information clear and detailed.
Point-of-sale customer service is just as important. These interactions occur when the customer is in 
the act of buying a product. For instance, companies strive to provide efficient, flexible payment options 
and swift, hassle-free transactions.
There is also a need for after-sales service such as when a customer wants to seek help with product 
usage or pay a bill. In addition, well after a purchase is made, companies can still provide ongoing 
customer service, with an eye to future sales. Often referred to as customer relationship management 
(CRM), this includes things like customer loyalty programmes.
In Asia, companies tend to give emphasis to service in the latter half of the sales process. When asked 
about which area of customer service businesses consider most important, after-sales service comes top 
(cited by 39% of executives), followed by customer loyalty (25%). 
Many firms probably feel that they can differentiate themselves better in terms of after-sales service. 
Consumers in Asia often face a bewildering array of choices when buying a product or service. Firms that 
invest in better pre-sale service—providing better product information online, for example—may find it 
hard to stand out in the crowd. However, given that after-sales service has been mediocre in many parts 
of Asia, businesses that invest and innovate here may be able to gain a competitive advantage.
After-sales service is more important for some products. According to Philip Carmichael, Asia-Pacific 
president for Haier, a Chinese white-goods manufacturer, one of the main drivers for appliance purchases 
is the quality of service after the sale has been made. “Refrigerators are increasingly similar,” he says, 
“one way to positively differentiate your brand is through after-sales service.”
When asked to choose which aspects of customer service are important to their customers, 60% of 
firms say ‘Polite, informed staff’ and 56% say ‘Human interaction’. Only 19% cite ‘Availability of online 
information’. This is broadly in line with consumer preferences. When asked what aspects of customer 
Figure 8
Which aspect of customer service is most important to your customers?
(% business respondents)
Polite, informed staff
Human interaction
Prompt complaints resolution
Convenience/accessibility
Clear and understandable product information
Availability of online information
Providing the means for customers to resolve issues themselves
60
56
47
46
41
19
4
software control dll:C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Word
Supported annotation actions for editing PDF file online with RasterEdge XDoc. C#.NET RasterEdge HTML5 Viewer supports Microsoft Office Word versions
www.rasteredge.com
software control dll:How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
www.rasteredge.com
Greater expectations: 
Keeping pace with customer service demands in Asia Pacific
© Economist Intelligence Unit 2010 
23
service they value the most before and during a sale, many respondents chose ‘Courteous, informed 
staff’. In line with this, a majority of consumers surveyed say rude or uninterested staff are likely to make 
them reject a product.
According to the survey, 83% of companies are planning to invest in customer service in the next 
year. Of those, 69% say they are planning to invest in staff training, well ahead of investments in CRM 
technology (37%), increased headcount (36%) and a better online presence (34%).
Figure 9
What is most likely to make you reject a particular company/product/service?
(% consumer respondents)
Pre sale--Rude staff
During sale--Rude staff
Post sale--Lack of response to inquiry
60
77
55
Haier: Exporting world-class customer 
service from China
Haier, one of the world’s largest manufacturers of 
home appliances, with revenues of US$18.2bn in 
2009, is proof that good customer service can be the 
centerpiece of a corporate growth strategy. From its 
humble origins in Qingdao, it has expanded all over the 
world with a combination of competitive prices, quality 
and customer service. 
“One of the key parts of the DNA in our company 
is customer care and customer service,” says Philip 
Carmichael, Asia-Pacific president of Haier. In China, 
according to Mr Carmichael, Haier delivers almost 
instantaneous after-sales service. If a customer in a 
major city calls the Haier hotline, a Haier technician 
will typically arrive in uniform within three hours. 
If the customer lives anywhere else in the country, 
including places like the Gobi dessert and Tibet, the 
company says a technician will arrive within 24hrs.
Haier’s employees are also empowered to make 
decisions on the spot in order to deliver the best 
customer service. Mr Carmichael recounts an example 
from March this year of a customer in Sichuan Province 
who ordered a refrigerator and requested urgent 
delivery before 4pm the same day. She left only her 
mobile phone number. At 2pm, a Haier employee 
called to find out her delivery address, but was 
answered by an automated message, saying that 
her pre-paid mobile phone had run out of money. 
The boss of the Haier franchise immediately asked 
his finance department to pay RMB50 to re-activate 
the customer’s phone, and the fridge was eventually 
delivered on time. 
Haier also takes the common misconception of China 
as a low-cost exporter of subpar goods and turns it on 
its head. From its base in China, Mr Carmichael says, 
Haier exports high standards of service to other regions.  
For instance, when it entered the Malaysian television 
market, Haier realised it had to differentiate itself from 
its more established Korean and Japanese competitors. 
So while they were offering one-year warranties, Haier 
started selling TVs with two-year warranties. It had 
a relatively small impact on Haier’s bottom line, but 
was extremely popular with consumers. Soon after, 
its competitors matched it. Haier raised the bar again, 
offering three-year warranties and partnering with an 
insurance firm to offer ‘all-risk’ warranties, which covers 
things like flooding or a child accidentally knocking a TV 
over. “It’s really what the consumer wanted all along,” Mr 
Carmichael says.
Although challenging, Haier is striving to raise 
customer service in its other markets to the level in 
China, Mr Carmichael says. “Our China operation is the 
benchmark.”
software control dll:C# PDF url edit Library: insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.
Make PDF link open in a new window or tab. RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET offers C# users a variety of PDF file editing options, like options for editing PDF
www.rasteredge.com
software control dll:C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Supported annotation actions for editing PDF file with RasterEdge WinForms Viewer for C#.NET. Convert PDF to Microsoft Office Word (.docx).
www.rasteredge.com
Greater expectations: 
Keeping pace with customer service demands in Asia Pacific
24 
© Economist Intelligence Unit 2010
This suggests that companies in Asia understand the importance of quality staff to good customer 
service. It is surprising, though, that a third of companies are investing in a better online presence, 
when few regard it as very important to their customers. This could be because they consider online 
communication a cornerstone of customer engagement today—even though only a minority of 
consumers, according to the survey, value it.
Their investment decisions are also driven by past successes. When asked which customer service 
initiatives have had the most impact on customer satisfaction levels, 65% of corporate respondents 
say ‘Staff training’, followed by ‘Enhancing means of direct feedback’ (42%), and ‘Loyalty programmes’ 
(35%).
Motivating staff
Courteous, informed staff are possibly the most important asset for any company when delivering 
customer service. For many small businesses in Asia, their frontline employees are their sole customer 
service delivery channel. While poor customer service in other areas of a business can sometimes be 
mitigated, rude staff can often turn away customers altogether. For instance, 77% of consumers surveyed 
say that when making a purchase, rude staff will make them reject a particular product .
Companies across Asia use a variety of methods to incentivise their employees to provide good 
customer service. Some 53% of firms say they constantly teach and remind their workers about the 
importance of good customer service; 49% use financial incentives and 46% run employee recognition 
programmes. Only 11% of firms do not have any specific incentives in place.
UOB: Encouraging customer service innovation
UOB, one of Singapore’s biggest banks, with total assets of US$133bn 
at the end of 2009, set up a dedicated customer service unit in 2007 
to coordinate efforts across its entire group. Before that, customer 
service was formulated, implemented and tracked in individual silos, 
according to Janice  Ang, head of UOB’s customer advocacy & service 
quality division.
In consultation with the different stakeholders, the customer 
advocacy unit drew up service policies and guidelines for every unit 
in the bank. It also put in place a number of incentives to motivate 
staff to provide better customer service. There are numerous 
employee recognition programmes, including one where staff can 
nominate themselves if they feel they have provided outstanding 
service (and their managers concur). “We realise that even if they 
receive great service, not every customer will provide feedback,” 
says Ms Ang. 
Employees also have different kinds of financial incentives to 
provide good customer service, including immediate payments for 
good service and a customer service component which affects their 
annual bonus. For all these initiatives, internal customer service is 
rewarded too. “Not every employee is client-facing,” says Ms Ang. 
“It is important to recognise performance throughout the service 
supply chain.”
UOB tracks its customer service performance according to 
fixed metrics. “Service is about discipline,” says Ms Ang. Yet she 
highlights the need to balance this with the freedom to innovate. 
Amongst other ways, UOB encourages innovation by rewarding 
teams who have conceptualised and implemented successful new 
customer service initiatives. 
In addition, Ms Ang stresses the need to allow customer service 
innovation overseas. While some standard group guidelines 
and practices need to be followed, UOB allows its subsidiaries 
in Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand the freedom to tailor their 
customer service to suit the local market. “We understand that the 
customers in other markets can be quite different,” she says. Best 
practices from Singapore and other regions are shared regularly.
software control dll:C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Annotation functionalities for editing PDF file on RasterEdge WPF Viewer for C#.NET. PDF Conversion. • Convert PDF to Microsoft Office Word (.docx).
www.rasteredge.com
software control dll:C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark.
www.rasteredge.com
Greater expectations: 
Keeping pace with customer service demands in Asia Pacific
© Economist Intelligence Unit 2010 
25
Ideally, a firm can use a combination of incentives to spur better customer service. The experience of 
a large South-east Asian automotive distribution company interviewed for this report is instructive. In 
addition to employee recognition and constant teaching, it has improved its customer service in the past 
five years by changing its incentive and compensation structures. With the old structure, salespeople were 
measured and rewarded only on how many cars they sold. The new structure incentivises them to maintain 
engagement so that the customer feels constantly taken care of, and so returns to the company for car 
servicing and maintenance, helping the Group’s overall performance. In addition, the compensation of 
workshop technicians has been raised. 
“In the old days, the salespeople were put on a pedestal because they sold the cars,” says a senior 
executive at the company. “But we’ve realised that we need to pay the back-of-house employees just as 
well, because they’ll be taking care of the customers down the road.” 
Meanwhile, Nestle’s organisational structure ensures that its employees take a vested interest in their 
customers’ performance. “If an employee is the account holder for, to take one example, the Dairy Farm 
Group, they not only represent Nestle to that customer, they also represent that customer to Nestle,” 
says Suresh Narayanan, managing director in Singapore of Nestle. “They become the customer within our 
company.”
While it may be possible to teach or incentivise customer service basics, it is not so easy to raise the 
bar further. Some employees may find it challenging to be spontaneous, and engage more deeply with a 
customer to understand his or her needs. Even in Japan, with its lofty customer service standards, there 
is room for creative development, says Ms Pinto of Le Creuset. More effort is needed to make staff play a 
proactive or dynamic role versus simply being the world’s best deliverers of given plans and strategies, 
Ms Pinto says. “It’s not the execution, which is a problem. But it’s the creativity, initiative and stepping 
ahead of things to innovate.” 
The human touch
Over the course of the past decade, many companies have started using call centres to serve their 
customers. When operated well, they allow for efficient service delivery while reducing operational costs. 
However, if call centre service is implemented poorly, it can lead to shoddy service delivery and frustrated 
customers: 43% of consumers surveyed say that after a purchase, they are likely to switch products if the 
company’s call centre staff are poorly trained.
The survey suggests that call centres are not widely used in Asia. Just over half of the corporate 
respondents say their companies use them; another 10% expect to soon, while 38% of companies do not 
use call centres at all and have no plans to. 
Of those who use them, 86% have in-house call centres, while the rest outsource. Haier maintains an 
in-house Chinese national call-centre, located near its corporate headquarters in Qingdao. Mr Carmichael 
believes that Haier is most effective in service delivery when its own employees provide it. “When you 
move a part of your business outside, you send a message that it’s less important than other parts of the 
business.”
software control dll:C# PDF bookmark Library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.
C# demo code for editing PDF bookmarks in Visual Studio .NET class. Merge and split PDF file with bookmark. Save PDF file with bookmark open.
www.rasteredge.com
software control dll:VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net
Make PDF link open in a new window, blank page or tab. to C#.NET RasterEdge PDF SDK, VB.NET PDF SDK offers a variety of PDF file editing options, such as
www.rasteredge.com
Greater expectations: 
Keeping pace with customer service demands in Asia Pacific
26 
© Economist Intelligence Unit 2010
Businesses in Asia generally believe that their call centres are performing 
well. More than 80% say their customers are happy with their call-centre 
service. Another 14% have invested to improve after hearing complaints.
Just 12% of Asian consumers surveyed do not like dealing with call centres. 
And 80% say that call centre service is acceptable if efficient. This shows that 
the vast majority of Asian customers do not actually mind being served by 
somebody over the phone, it just has to be done well (see Figure 10).
The majority of consumers surveyed also say that online complaint 
management is acceptable as long as it is fast and efficient. Just 19% say they 
do not like resolving complaints through online means. In fact, the survey 
suggests that Asian consumers are becoming more comfortable with high 
technology customer service. Indeed, 19% of respondents say they prefer 
to deal with automated customer-service systems than people. 48% prefer 
people to automated systems. 33% could not decide which they prefer. 
However, it seems that while automation is perfectly acceptable, it may 
not do much to enhance customer satisfaction. When asked which customer 
service initiatives have had the most impact on customers’ satisfaction levels, 
just 22% of corporate respondents say local call centres have had much 
impact. It is a similar story for investments in automated call technology 
(16%), virtual customer service agents (13%), and overseas call centres (9%). 
Client Associates, a private wealth manager based in India, has invested 
in in-house applications which help internal CRM but also allow clients to 
monitor their portfolios. However, Rohit Sarin, the firm’s founder, is adamant 
that technology serves a purely informational function for his clients. “Technology can only serve as an 
enabler, never a substitute,” he says.
Technology is also more easily adopted for some products than others (see Figure 11). In their 
communications with companies, respondents broadly prefer human interaction to online methods. 
However, the human element is much more important for industries like restaurants and health and 
wellness. For some industries, like telecommunications and travel & transportation, respondents seem 
relatively comfortable with online engagement.
Consumers in the various countries do have different preferences for automated interaction and 
engagement. A few important distinctions include Australians, who have a much greater preference for 
direct human contact: 38% of them say they do not like dealing with call centres. Furthermore, after they 
have bought a product, 57% of Australian respondents say they are most likely to switch brands if the call 
centre staff are not local. This suggests that many Australian consumers have had negative after-sales 
experiences with foreign call centres, and the majority of them are not prepared to put up with it. On the 
other hand, just 3% of Indonesians profess discomfort with call centre service.
There are relatively more Hong Kong consumers who simply do not want to be bothered by firms. For 
instance, a quarter of respondents say that, with regards to groceries, they want as little interaction with 
the company as possible—about double the Asian average of 13%.
Figure 10
Customers are happy with call-centre service
(% saying Yes)
Asia
Companies
Consumers
81
80
Australia
China
Hong Kong
India
Indonesia
Japan
Malaysia
Singapore
South Korea
Thailand
71
60
89
73
86
75
74
87
85
93
67
71
85
89
100
88
65
84
73
80
Greater expectations: 
Keeping pace with customer service demands in Asia Pacific
© Economist Intelligence Unit 2010 
27
Groceries or household consumables
Prefer online communication
Prefer human interaction
Prefer as little interaction as possible
Don’t know
Clothing and accessories
Consumer electronics
Financial services
63
20
13
4
22
3
11
64
29
9 2
60
61
29
3
8
Travel and transportation
Telecommunications
Hospitality
55
36
3
7
52
37
3
8
66
25
3
6
Health and wellness
66
18
5
11
Restaurants
74
13
4
9
Figure 11
For the following products, who would you rather speak with?
(% respondents)
All this confirms that companies need to adopt a highly tailored and specific customer service strategy 
for the different markets in Asia. In countries where consumers prefer human contact, like Australia, 
companies who over-automate their services run the risk of annoying and eventually turning away 
customers. On the other hand, in places where consumers are quite comfortable with automation, 
like Indonesia, companies who do not automate may not be taking advantage of all the operational 
efficiencies available to enhance customer service.
28 
© Economist Intelligence Unit 2010
Greater expectations: 
Keeping pace with customer service demands in Asia Pacific
Conclusion
A
sia’s re-emergence as a global economic powerhouse has been one of the key defining trends of 
the past decade. The pace of the rise has led to phenomenal changes in almost every aspect of 
development in the region. Urbanisation rates are spiralling. Incomes have grown. Demand for basic 
necessities, natural resources and now, even luxury goods, is causing supply shortages worldwide. The 
region’s exuberance is visible almost everywhere you go. Asia’s consumers are getting richer and more 
powerful.
In step with that, this research suggests that customer service expectations have grown exponentially 
over the past few years. The companies surveyed understand this and have been investing to improve 
their service. However, they may not be doing enough. Even though most Asian consumers surveyed feel 
customer service has improved over the past five years, they are far from delighted. Businesses do not 
seem to be placing enough importance on service: although the majority of consumers say customer 
service should be a firm’s top priority, many businesses continue to put product development first. But 
Asia’s consumers are increasingly unlikely to accept shoddy service. For instance, the majority of Chinese 
consumers surveyed say that if they receive poor customer service, they will immediately switch brands 
without giving the company a second chance.
Our research also shows that Asian consumers have developed increasingly varied views on the 
different aspects of customer service. When buying a telecommunications product, for example, the 
consumers surveyed value courteous staff, flexible payment options, swift transactions, and the ability to 
handle unique customer requests, all in fairly equal measure. When buying groceries, swift transactions 
matter more than anything else. Therefore, these preferences differ depending on the product in 
question. In addition, the same customer might want to be served in a unique way at different points in 
the customer lifecycle. 
Companies who want to outperform their competitors must refine many different aspects of their 
service delivery. To do so they need to have a deep, granular understanding of their customers. 
For customer service, as with so many other things, Asia is not monolithic. For instance, the 
average Japanese consumer surveyed is not willing to pay more for good service. However, the average 
Indonesian consumer surveyed is. Rude staff, meanwhile, are much likelier to turn away the average 
Australian consumer than the average South Korean one. 
The research therefore suggests that companies doing business in Asia need to tailor their customer 
service strategies to suit the individual markets. At the moment, many companies continue to deploy a 
one-size-fits-all strategy. However, as the individual countries continue to develop along unique growth 
trajectories, their customers’ preferences will evolve along different lines. Firms that can provide highly 
customised offerings will be able to differentiate themselves and win market share.
As competition for the hearts and minds of Asia’s consumers intensifies, companies will need to move 
quickly to get it right. 
Appendix
Survey results
Greater expectations: 
Keeping pace with customer service demands in Asia Pacific
© Economist Intelligence Unit 2010 
29
Appendix: Survey results/corporate
1.  Which of the following markets does your business supply 
its products/services to?
(% respondents)
Consumers and businesses
Consumers
69
31
2.  Are you familiar with your company’s customer-service 
strategy?
(% respondents)
Yes
100
3.  Which one of the following statements best describes your 
company’s view of its current market environment?
(% respondents)
Competition is increasing
87
Competition is decreasing
2
Competition has not changed in the past year
11
4.  Do you believe customer expectations of service quality in 
your country have risen in the past five years?
(% respondents)
Yes
92
No
8
5.  If you answered yes to question 4, why do you think expectations are rising? Select all that apply.
(% respondents)
Consumers have more information
Competition is increasing
Increasing online connectivity means customers now expect constant access and immediate responses
72
69
52
Higher incomes have led to rising expectations
29
Other, please specify
0
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested