xi
BEST PRACTICES IN PROJECT DELIVERY MANAGEMENT
Abbreviations and      
Acronyms
3-D 
Three-dimensional
AAA 
American Automobile Association
AASHTO 
American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials
ACE 
Alliance for Construction Excellence
ACEC 
American Council of Engineering Companies
ACPA 
American Concrete Pavement Association
ADOT 
Arizona Department of Transportation
AGC 
Arizona General Contractors
AIDW 
ADOT Information Data Warehouse
ARTBA 
American Road & Transportation Builders Association
ARTC 
Arizona Transportation Research Center
ASU 
Arizona State University
ATCs 
Alternate Technical Concepts
AZIPS 
Arizona Integrated Planning System
BB 
Bid-Build
BIM 
Building Information Modeling
BOS 
Board of Supervisors
CADD 
Computer-Aided Drafting and Design
CAPS 
Contract Administration and Payment System
CCP 
Communication and Community Partnership
CD 
Compact disk
CEO 
Chief Executive Officer
CEVP 
Cost Estimate Validation Process
CIA 
Community Impact Analysis
CIP 
Capital Improvement Program
CIPP 
Capital Improvement Preservation Program
CM 
Construction Management, Construction Manager
CMAR 
Construction Manager at Risk
CMGC 
Construction Manager General Contractor
CPMS 
Capital Program Management System
CRA 
Cost Risk Assessment
CSD 
Context-Sensitive Design
Converting pdf open office - C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC application
Enable C#.NET Users to Convert OpenOffice Document (Odt, Ods, Odp) to PDF
edit pdf openoffice; convert openoffice to pdf
Converting pdf open office - VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC application
How to Convert OpenOffice Document (Odt, Ods, Odp) to PDF with VB.NET Demo Code Samples
odt to pdf converter; convert pdf to word openoffice
xii
ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS
CSS 
Context-Sensitive Solutions
CTB 
Commonwealth Transportation Board
CTS 
Commitment Tracking System
DB 
Design-Build
DBB 
Design-Bid-Build
DOT 
Department of Transportation
EAS 
Engineering and Architectural Services
ECS 
Engineering Consultant Section
EIT 
Engineer in Training
ESA 
Endangered Species Act
ESO 
Environmental Services Office
ETDM 
Efficient Transportation Decision Making
FAST 
Field Office Automation System
FDOT 
Florida Department of Transportation
FHWA 
Federal Highway Administration
FICE 
Florida Institute of Consulting Engineers
FTBA 
Florida Transportation Builders Association
FTE 
Full-Time Equivalent
GEC 
General Engineering Consultant
GIS 
Geographic Information System
iPM 
Integrated Project Management
iSYP 
Integrated Six Year Program
IT 
Information Technology
ITD 
Intermodal Transportation Division
JOC 
Job Order Contracting
L&D 
Location & Design
LAS 
Letting and Award System
LD 
Liquidated Damages
LTAP 
Local Transportation Assistance Program
MAG 
Maricopa Association of Governments
MAPA 
Missouri Asphalt Pavement Association Team
MAP 
Multi-Agency Permitting Team
MoDOT 
Missouri Department of Transportation
MOU 
Memorandum of Understanding
MPD 
Multimodal Planning Division
NACE 
National Association of County Engineers
NCHRP 
National Cooperative Highway Research Program
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
C#.NET Tutorial for Converting PDF to Word (.doc/ .docx) Document with .NET XDoc.PDF Library in C#.NET Class. Best C#.NET PDF to Microsoft Office Word converter
edit pdf with openoffice; edit pdf file open office
VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
This guide give a series of demo code directly for converting MicroSoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint document to PDF file in VB.NET application.
converting pdf open office; editing pdf open office
xiii
BEST PRACTICES IN PROJECT DELIVERY MANAGEMENT
NEPA 
National Environmental Policy Act
NFPA 
National Fire Protection Association
NPDES 
National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System
NTP 
Notice to Proceed
OES 
Office of Environmental Service
PAP 
Performance Achievement Plan
PCC 
Phoenix Convention Center
PCRF 
Project Change Request Form
PCRO 
Project Control & Reporting Office
PCRS 
Project Control and Reporting System
PD&E 
Project Development and Engineering
PDBS 
Project Development Business System
PDIS 
Project Development Information System
PE 
Professional Engineer
PES 
Proposal and Estimate System
PI 
Public Information
PIE 
Partnering for Innovative Efficiencies
PIO 
Public Information Officer
PM 
Project Manager
PMG 
Performance Measurement Guide
PMI 
Project Management Institute
PMO 
Project Management Office
PMP 
Project Management Professional, Project Management Plan
PMRS 
Project Management and Reporting System
PPAC 
Priority Planning Advisory Committee
PPMS 
Program and Project Management Section
PPP 
Priority Programming Process
PRB 
Project Review Board
PRMS 
Project Management Reporting System
QC/QA 
Quality Control/Quality Assurance
QPI 
Quality Process Integration
RFQ 
Request for Quote
RLOI 
Request for Letter of Interest
ROW 
Right of Way
SAFETEA-LU 
Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users
SEP-14 
Special Experimental Projects-14
SEPA 
State Environmental Policy Act
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Microsoft Office Word 2003 (.doc), 2007 (.docx, .docm, .dotm, .dotx) and later versions are compatible with this VB.NET PDF Converting DLLs for PDF-to-Word.
convert pdf to open office writer; convert odt to pdf online
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
This PDF document converting library component offers reliable C# supports file conversion between PDF and various and images, like Microsoft Office (Word, Excel
convert pdf to openoffice spreadsheet; convert pdf to open office document
xiv
ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS
SIMS 
STIP Information Management System 
SQL 
Structured Query Language
STB 
State Transportation Board
STD 
Street Transportation Department
STIP 
Statewide Transportation Improvement Program
TEIS 
Transportation Executive Information System
TIG 
Technology Implementation Group
TIP 
Transportation Improvement Plan
TRAINS 
Transportation Accounting and Reporting System
TRB 
Transportation Research Board
UDOT 
Utah Department of Transportation
VDOT 
Virginia Department of Transportation
VE 
Value Engineering
WACA 
Washington Aggregates and Concrete Association
WSDOT 
Washington State Department of Transportation
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
image to PDF, C#.NET convert open office to PDF VB.NET PDF - Create PDF from Microsoft Office Excel in VB.NET Tutorial for Converting PDF from Microsoft Office
convert odt file to pdf; open office pdf import extension
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Best C#.NET PDF Converter SDK for converting PDF to HTML in Visual Studio .NET. This is a C# programming example for converting PDF to HTML.
convert word pdf open office; convert odt to pdf
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
here is that our PDF to text converting library is Integrate following RasterEdge C#.NET text to PDF converter SDK dlls RasterEdge.XDoc.Office.Inner.Common.dll.
can open office convert pdf to word; edit pdf files with openoffice
C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
and WinForms applications. Support converting PDF document to SVG image within C#.NET project without quality loss. C# sample code
create fillable pdf open office; create pdf forms openoffice
BEST PRACTICES IN PROJECT DELIVERY MANAGEMENT
ES-1
Executive Summary
Overview
Transportation agencies are experiencing unprecedented pressure to deliver projects for constituents. Many 
factors contribute to this high-demand environment, including increasing congestion, reduced work periods for 
construction, workforce issues, intense public interest and involvement, and severe revenue pressures. Agencies 
are seeking ways to deliver projects in the most efficient and expeditious manner possible.
The search for solutions to this situation has been a topic of intense interest for those involved in both this 
domestic scan program and its international counterpart for many years. No fewer than ten proposed topics 
were aggregated to create the topic for this particular domestic scan.
The team-defined Best Practices are those strategies and project-delivery applications that contributed to a 
state’s success in delivering projects. Many of those cited in this report are clearly best among the best. 
The analysis conducted for the desk scan refined the list of states for this scan based on several criteria:
v
Program size
v
Work complexity
v
Metrics systems
v
Performance against those metrics
Arizona, Florida, Missouri, Utah, Virginia, and Washington were chosen for visits due to a history of project 
delivery innovations and management.
The team also visited the City of Phoenix while in Arizona.
and that those common practices would exist in key areas of each agency’s organization and process. The 
scan-team defined four focus areas:
Project delivery
1. 
Performance measures–the tools used to measure, track, and adjust behavior
2. 
esults 
3. 
Community involvement activities–including outcomes from project inception through the end of construction
4. 
their preparations on the specific areas of interest to this scan topic. 
Summary of Initial Findings and Recommendations
The Best Practices are divided into the four focus areas; however, assignment of these Best Practices to a 
specific area is not always easy due to the overlapping nature of their application. The following define the four 
focus areas:
v
Project management
v
Performance measures
v
Contracting practices
v
Community involvement
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Best C#.NET PDF converter SDK for converting PDF to Tiff in Visual Studio .NET project. C# programming sample for PDF to Tiff image converting.
convert odt file to pdf online; edit pdf open office
ES-2
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Project Management
The Best Practices which the team identified in the first focus area fall into six major categories:
Project management structure
1. 
Shared leadership
2. 
Risk management
3. 
Use of consultants
4. 
Investment in GIS and data management tools for project delivery
5. 
Maintaining core competencies
6. 
om 
typical project management and delivery activities found elsewhere in the country.
Project Management Structure
Each agency had adopted and made extensive use of a project management structure with the following 
attributes of the observed practices:
v
Project management systems work well whether they use a single project manager (PM) from cradle to 
grave or a series of PMs throughout the process.
v
The best systems wer
themselves.
v
Successful systems can be either centralized or decentralized; however, roles and responsibilities must be 
clearly understood.
v
Successful systems provided for effective hand offs from one division or discipline to another and from one 
work phase to another. In some cases, concurrent reviews were used to expedite the process. 
v
The accountability to which PMs and technical support units were held was another system hallmark.
v
All agencies used a training program, some more formal than others. In addition, certain agencies included 
pr
v
Certification as a PM is not always a requirement; it is, however, sometimes listed as a desirable credential.
v
Consultants were used for much of the work; however, proper and close management of consultant 
resources and well-defined roles and responsibilities for both individuals and firms were identified. 
Shared Leadership
The Best Practices observed in the area of project management had strong elements of leadership that enabled 
both individuals at multiple levels and organizations to function well. Much attention is usually given to the 
Chief Executive Officer (CEO) or equivalent, but the contribution of leadership at multiple levels in the project 
management process is apparent. The following key observations were made:
v
Leaders drove accountability at all levels. Some responsibility was tied to performance measurement 
systems and other aspects involved in making sure that people delivered on both internal and external 
commitments.
v
Leaders were willing to give their managers the tools they needed to be successful.
v
The silo ef
Leadership’s role in removing these barriers was evident.
ES-3
BEST PRACTICES IN PROJECT DELIVERY MANAGEMENT
v
Leaders who were engaged in the process by asking tough questions, demanding accountability, and 
staying focused on the agency’s ultimate objectives seemed to get the best results.
v
t measure 
just to measure.
v
Leaders at all levels were central to developing and maintaining key relationships with third parties, such as 
resource agencies, utilities, and local and state governments.
It is clear that leadership was a key ingredient to the successful deployment of these Best Practices. However, 
the absence of a strong CEO does not dispel the possibility of implementing the kinds of programs described in 
this report.
Risk Management
v
States with effective project management systems address risk in ways that enhance the delivery process. 
Managing risks involves identification, assessment, quantification, prioritization, and deliberate actions 
focused on the big-picture objectives. 
v
The Washington State DOT (WSDOT) Cost Estimate Validation Process (CEVP) program has clearly 
addressed risks and helped manage project costs and other factors that could have had negative impacts 
on its capital program. 
v
Phoenix uses a variety of innovative project delivery tools to mitigate and manage risks. For example, using 
Construction Manager at Risk (CMAR) for $3 billion in projects has resulted in only one claim.
v
State DOTs are managing schedule risks related to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process 
by not including projects in the committed Statewide Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) until they 
emerge with a Record of Decision (ROD). The final delivery of a project is set only after the NEPA process is 
done.
v
Missouri has reduced project costs through a “Practical Design” philosophy that relies on the premise that 
good is good enough,  perfection and quality are not synonymous. 
Use of Consultants
Each agency uses outside resources to complement and enhance its project management process.  Utilization 
rates range from a low of about 20% in Missouri to more than 80% in Arizona, Florida, and Utah. Using 
consultants in a way that complements and enhances a state DOT’s project management process is clearly a 
Best Practice. The following summarize important points:
v
Private sector engineers and their firms are used for a variety of tasks to meet agency needs. Flexibility 
in how consultants were used and the skill sets required allowed DOTs to maximize their contribution to 
programs.
v
Utah Department of Transportation’s (UDOT’s) streamlined consultant selection process was noted for its 
ability to bring firms into use very quickly. 
v
Florida was the only state that utilized private sector PMs to manage projects without a DOT PM assigned 
a management role.
v
ocedures in place to assess the 
consultants’ performance and their suitability for future work.
v
Uniformly, state DOTs are concerned with maintaining core competencies for staff, even with the trend 
toward using consultants; however, no state has a Best Practice solution to this concern.
ES-4
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
States employing Best Practices in project management are using a variety of technologies to enhance their 
effectiveness in this area.
v
GIS and data management systems were clearly beneficial.
v
WSDOT’s Multi-Agency Permit Team (MAP Team) enables the DOT to better communicate and work to 
achieve the common goal of protecting the environment.
v
Data management initiatives were integrated with performance measurement and community involvement 
efforts, to the benefit of all three.
v
The use of visualization software to produce still images and renderings, three-dimensional (3D) animations, 
and 360-degree panoramas has grown; its ability to communicate important project information to 
stakeholder groups is well documented. 
v
Florida’s Efficient Transportation Decision Making (ETDM) program is a huge step forward in improving 
concurrent reviews and communication between the DOT and stakeholder groups.
Maintaining Core Competencies
Declining core competencies is a universal problem facing the agencies visited by the scan team. Outsourcing 
ranged from 20% in Missouri to more than 80% in Utah and Arizona. No Best Practice was observed regarding 
retention of core competencies for engineers and, more specifically, PMs. A clear need exists here for AASHTO, 
either on its own or through NCHRP, to do additional research into how best to deal with this grave concern 
regarding maintaining core competencies in state DOTs. 
Performance Measures
Performance Management System
e its work for 
internal and, in many cases, external purposes. Virginia, Missouri, Utah, and Washington, each have effective 
systems in place. Virginia utilizes a dashboard on its Web site to provide up-to-date and easily understood 
Missouri’s quarterly Tracker report offers a myriad of metrics that cover many areas of performance. It is 
available both as a published document and electronically on the Web. Washington’s The Gray Notebook is 
also a quarterly report, with even more detailed measurements than those found in Tracker. Utah’s ePM tracks 
many elements of the project delivery process, including schedule and finance. While useful for internal agency 
purposes, Utah’s system is less accessible to the public than those used in Virginia, Missouri, and Washington. 
v
The following salient points reflect why the systems were chosen as Best Practices:
v
The Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) has found that what gets measured gets done. 
v
Similarly, Missouri DOT (MoDOT) finds that when it is measured it becomes important to your agency.
v
Some of the systems require substantial effort to sustain; it appears that Washington’s system is the most 
demanding, followed by Missouri’s. 
v
Common to each system is the need for accountability, the ability to measure and then improve perfor-
mance, and the recognition that greater transparency is good for achieving ultimate transportation objec-
tives. 
v
Each system flourished under the influence of strong leaders who believed that a tool was needed to help 
them through project delivery and in serving the public.
v
Metrics used in these systems provided Arizona, Utah, and Washington with a means to measure contractor 
ES-5
BEST PRACTICES IN PROJECT DELIVERY MANAGEMENT
selection for other work).
Contemporary Public Accountability
Several of the performance management systems provided the public with a view into the agency. Virginia, 
Missouri, and Washington all share information of all types with those outside the DOT. The following is advice 
for others contemplating implementation of such systems: 
v
Gear the systems towar
v
Get agreement early on about baseline measurements, definition of business rules (e.g., what constitutes 
on-time or on-budget), and how the information will be used. 
v
Make sure that the systems are sustainable and maintainable. The Best Practices were agency-wide in their 
application, not limited to a single project or district. 
v
Use existing data or information normally generated as opposed to creating more work for PMs or others. 
Utah created a data wareadth 
and depth of that tool.
v
Make sure the system is a tool, not a task.
v
Use a top-driven appr
might be acceptable, but it may need a directive if it is unable to produce a system in a timely manner. 
Contracting Practices
Innovative Construction Contracting
organizations, which are viewed as leaders in project delivery, varying degrees of tool usage exists. For 
example, Florida has a long and documented history of using design-build (DB). The Florida DOT (FDOT) 
no longer consider 
equent user of 
CMAR. All but FDOT had special units that handled or assisted project implementation by using innovative 
tools, such as DB, CMGC, and CMAR.
v
Extensive use of these innovative tools set these DOTs and Phoenix apart from their peers. 
v
Benefits include fewer claims, improved relationships, faster project delivery, better quality, and better 
cost control.
v
Every state used the FHWA’s Special Experimental Projects-14 (SEP-14) process to implement some or all of 
these innovative practices. 
v
More than one state purposely avoided federal aid, allowing for more flexibility to utilize an innovative 
contracting practice that might not have been approved by the FHWA. FHWA might consider recognizing 
such practices as CMAR and CMGC as not being experimental at this point.
v
Although each state was limited by the nature of legislative authority as to which delivery practices were used, 
they leverage whatever flexibility they have to implement the innovative delivery methods available to them. 
Community Involvement
In the Best Practices the team observed, community involvement is not a singular moment but an effort from 
beginning to end. These states didn’t wait for the media to tell their story; they proactively moved information to the 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested