3-2
CHAPTER 3 : PROJECT MANAGEMENT
They believe that people make the difference—any process can be successful with the right people to make 
things happen.
v
City of Phoenix—The city has been using a project management system for a number of years. Its 
approach differs depending on which department is responsible. For example, Engineering and Architectural 
Services (EAS) and Aviation departments use a cradle-to-grave approach, whereas other departments 
typically utilize multiple PMs for different phases of the development and delivery process. 
v
Florida—FDOT has a mature project management structure, with internal PMs as well as extensive 
utilization of consultant project managers. Florida was the only state where consultant PMs functioned in 
PMs, but they always report to a state employee who is also a project manager. In Florida, the consultants 
report to the DOT management structure as if they were state employees. Florida was also the only state the 
team visited that consistently used multiple PMs to manage a project. The other states avoided changing 
PMs unless necessary due to concerns with workflow continuity. FDOT has found effective ways to deal 
with these transitions, and their program functions well.
v
Missouri—MoDOT has adopted a project manager model where PMs do not have direct reports but 
manage teams of individuals gathered based on the project’s technical needs. The PMs are mostly located 
in the district offices and call upon resources from both those offices and centralized headquarters units.  
v
Utah—UDOT PMs manage projects from beginning to end and do not change from phase to phase. They 
form technical teams comprising both internal UDOT individuals and those from the private sector to ensure 
that the proper expertise is applied. The UDOT PMs work mostly in one of the four regional offices with 
notable exceptions made for large mega-projects, such as the completed I-15 Design-Build Reconstruction 
and Legacy Parkway projects, the current I-15 Project in Utah County, and Mountainview Corridor project 
where PMs report directly to the agency’s deputy director.
v
Virginia—Virginia’s DOT (VDOT) has various types of project managers, and the project management 
function is decentralized to nine districts. Megaproject PMs (i.e., multibillion dollar projects with statewide 
significance, such as Woodrow Wilson Bridge and Springfield Interchange in Northern Virginia) have 
dedicated project teams composed of in-house and consultant staff; these PMs have the highest levels of 
authority and direct access to the Chief Engineer and the Commissioner. Dedicated PMs are responsible 
for more complex and higher risk projects while “dual-hatted” PMs are also responsible for the technical 
discipline duties, manage turn-key, and lower risk projects. Depending on the project complexity and 
requirements, VDOT employs a “cradle-to-grave” project management approach or defines a handoff 
from the Preliminary Engineering PM to the Construction PM at award phase. Virginia differentiates project 
management requirements by the project’s type and size.
v
Washington—WSDOT has used project managers for many years. Even with large projects using general 
forts. 
PMs follow assigned projects through the bidding process, after which they are turned over to a new PM 
or Resident Engineer. Resources to fill a project’s technical needs are gathered internally and externally to 
provide the needed expertise. Typically, WSDOT’s project managers are professional engineers.
Washington has established a Project Management Academy to train staff and consultants on how to 
be effective PMs. It is held once a year with training provided by internal staff and outside consultants. 
Topics include environmental processes, construction, budgeting, scheduling, and other management 
skills. WSDOT’s project management practices are divided into two systems. The first is called the Capital 
Improvement Preservation Program (CIPP) and focuses on managing projects that do not involve major 
reconstruction activities. WSDOT uses a customized version of Sciforma’s PS8 software to manage 
schedule cost and other features of these projects.
WSDOT’s second program is called the Project Management and Reporting System (PMRS) and is focused 
on the rest of its capital program. Additional information for this program can be found on the agency’s Web 
site at http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/projects/projectmgmt/.
Editing pdf open office - C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC application
Enable C#.NET Users to Convert OpenOffice Document (Odt, Ods, Odp) to PDF
change odt file to pdf; create pdf with openoffice
Editing pdf open office - VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC application
How to Convert OpenOffice Document (Odt, Ods, Odp) to PDF with VB.NET Demo Code Samples
convert open office doc to pdf online; can openoffice open pdf
3-3
BEST PRACTICES IN PROJECT DELIVERY MANAGEMENT
Centralized Versus Decentralized Project Management Functions
Project management functions varied in how they were dispersed among the Best Practices the scan team 
observed. Agencies that used a centralized approach included Arizona, Phoenix, and Missouri. Florida, Utah, 
Virginia, and Washington follow a decentralized model. Based on its findings and observations, the scan team 
fectiveness. An observed key to 
success was the deliberateness with which each agency defined and implemented procedures that clarified 
roles and responsibilities for all participants in the project development process. Without this clear definition, 
success would be marginalized. 
Another key attribute of these pr
project management is the clear definition of PM authority. The team noted that in each case the PM’s authority 
was clear and recognized by other members of the team and the agency. With authority comes accountability; 
each of these agencies combined these project attributes in a way that left no questions about who was in 
charge and responsible for project delivery.
Another important element of successful project management systems was the smooth transition between 
units and pres group or equivalent, 
developed procedures ease the “hand offs” from one project phase to another and work product transfer 
from one discipline to another
decentralized approach to project management. Virginia actually includes procedures for these “hand offs” in 
project management training, in educational materials, and on their Web site. Clearly, the Best Practices the scan 
team observed were all effective in the PM area.
Training
All the agencies visited held project manager training. At VDOT, generic project management training with 
a formal training curriculum is provided in-house. In addition, it is working with the University of Virginia at 
Arlington (UVA) and private partners to develop a Transportation Project Management Institute (PMI), which 
will be an immersive “boot camp” focused on project management and Best Practices in the context of 
transportation projects. Virginia’s project management function is guided by a formal policy memorandum 
containing 24 specific procedures available to PMs as they work. The City of Phoenix does some PM training 
in-house but also utilizes courses offered at Arizona State University (ASU) through the Alliance for Construction 
Excellence (ACE).
Certification of Project Managers
Each agency differed in how they handle project manager certification. The nearest thing to a national credential 
for project managers is the Project Management Professional (PMP) certification offered by the Project 
Management Institute (PMI). Some project managers in the states the scan team visited have obtained the PMP. 
However, no host agencies required certification for all project managers; Florida and Virginia put substantial 
emphasis on PMP. 
In lieu of a PMP certification, a professional registration or professional engineer (PE) license is the closest 
credential to be found nationally for project managers. However, even this level of licensure isn’t uniform 
egistered engineer. 
The City of Phoenix requires top-tier project managers to be licensed engineers, but on less complicated 
projects non-professional employees with substantial project experience may be managers. The Arizona DOT 
also follows this model and has produced excellent project managers who were not degreed engineers having 
professional registration or other certification.
Use of Consultants
Each reviewed agency used private-sector engineering and other specialty service firms for substantial amounts 
of work; the details of this usage will be covered later in this report. In beginning this section on Project 
Manager Structure, each agency realizes that proper management of outside resources is essential to effective 
project manager to provide 
supervision and management to the consultant PM and respective staff. This is how they infuse a checks-and-
balances approach into combined in-house and outsourced programs. Florida, Utah, Virginia, and Arizona have 
evaluation processes that assess how well a consultant performs. Utah’s program is used not only to gauge past 
performance, but also to influence future selection of a firm based on how well it delivered on past projects.
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
Online Guide for Viewing, Annotating, Converting and Editing PDF Document in ASP.NET with C#.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer& Editor Library.
format pdf open office; can openoffice edit pdf
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Accessible annotation functionalities when editing PDF file online with RasterEdge conversion actions, such as convert PDF to Microsoft Office Word (.docx
convert openoffice to pdf online; edit pdf files openoffice
3-4
CHAPTER 3 : PROJECT MANAGEMENT
Tools
Each state visited has its own version of tools to assist in project management. VDOT uses a system called 
Integrated Project Management (iPM), which integrates project information from various sources and provides 
real-time management information. Included in iPM are a series of sub-tools allowing schedule management, 
budgeting, and integration with VDOT’s Dashboard program and others. Figure 3.1 and Figure 3.2 reflect 
the versatility and content available in iPM. This system provides many benefits, including management 
accountability, a single source of information, and a standardized process for use across the agency.
Figure 3.2   VDOT’s iPM Search on “Behind Schedule”
Figure 3.1  VDOT’s iPM Web Site
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Word
Supported annotation actions for editing PDF file online with RasterEdge XDoc. C#.NET RasterEdge HTML5 Viewer supports Microsoft Office Word versions
convert pdf to openoffice spreadsheet; editable pdf openoffice
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
convert open office file to pdf; edit pdf openoffice
3-5
BEST PRACTICES IN PROJECT DELIVERY MANAGEMENT
VDOT cites the following benefits from  using iPM on projects:
v
Accountability, communication, simplicity, planning, and process improvements
v
A single source for all project information, beginning to end
v
Intuitive, fast, and reliable
v
Integration
v
Evolutionary, flexible, and iterative development approach
v
Standardized processes and tools across the agency
Clearly, VDOT’s project managers have a powerful tool in iPM to assist them in effective project delivery.
The City of Phoenix utilizes a software product called PROMIS to track project activity, scope, and schedule. 
It then uses SAS to track financial elements. Phoenix also integrates the two with another product for a full 
management solution.
Utah has a project management tool called ePM that was developed in-house and provides substantial utility 
egates information from 
disparate sources into a data warehouse and then generates reports for use by project managers. Some tools 
used by scanned states requirs 
day-to-day duties. The team was looking for tools that would not only help the PM to manage projects efficiently, 
but also were not a burden or distraction due to requirements for feeding data into the system. Of all systems 
the scan team observed, ePM is probably the tool requiring the least extra work by the PM. This is an important 
point given how busy PMs are in managing their work—that they find their tools useful in their own right and not 
just something that helps others in the organization. Figure 3.3 and Figure 3.4 show two of the available screens 
in UDOT’s ePM system. 
Figure 3.3  UDOT’s ePM Web Site
C# PDF url edit Library: insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.
Make PDF link open in a new window or tab. RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET offers C# users a variety of PDF file editing options, like options for editing PDF
convert openoffice to pdf; create fillable pdf open office
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Supported annotation actions for editing PDF file with RasterEdge WinForms Viewer for C#.NET. Convert PDF to Microsoft Office Word (.docx).
converting pdf open office; export pdf open office
3-6
CHAPTER 3 : PROJECT MANAGEMENT
Shared Leadership
The observed Best Practices in the project management area had strong elements of leadership, which created 
a positive environment for individuals and organizations. Each state had its own key leadership characteristics, 
leading to successful implementation of the processes the scan team observed and included in this report. 
The team realized that ef
agency, but a shared attribute between many individuals.
Leadership Extends Below the CEO
In some cases a strong leader emerges at the chief executive officer (CEO) level, such as Pete Rahn, director of 
the Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT). To attribute the successful program solely to him, however, 
ignores many other men and women who exercise important leadership roles at multiple levels. MoDOT’s chief 
engineer, Kevin Keith, and others, play a significant role in the changes occurring in that agency.
Significantly, Wylie Bearup, Acting Street Transportation Director, came to the City of Phoenix with a strong 
background and extensive experience in project management and, essentially, launched their PM initiative. 
Doug McDonald and his predecessor, Sid Morrison, led Washington State DOT for many years. Despite neither 
of them being engineers, under their leadership, project management programs and systems thrived. This is a 
further testament to the need for leadership at all levels to ensure successful project management practices. 
Leaders throughout these host agencies improved accountability within their specific responsibilities. The 
impacts of a key leader and a series of other leaders in an agency are felt long after one or more have left. 
ovide context to this 
element of Best Practice implementation:
Leaders imprement systems and 
other aspects, for example, making sure people deliver on both internal and external commitments.
Leaders in these organizations demanded accountability from their managers but were also willing to give 
them the tools they needed to be successful.
Figure 3.4  UDOT’s ePM Work Schedule Screen
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Annotation functionalities for editing PDF file on RasterEdge WPF Viewer for C#.NET. PDF Conversion. • Convert PDF to Microsoft Office Word (.docx).
convert openoffice file to pdf; convert pdf openoffice
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark.
edit pdf files with openoffice; converting an openoffice document to pdf
3-7
BEST PRACTICES IN PROJECT DELIVERY MANAGEMENT
These Best Practices reflect an absence or near absence of the silo effect present in so many organizations. 
Leadership’s role in removing these barriers was evident.
Leaders who engaged in the process by asking tough questions, demanding accountability, and staying 
focused on the ultimate agency objectives seemed to get the best results.
v
t measure 
just to measure.
v
Leaders at all levels seemed crucial to developing and maintaining key relationships with third parties (e.g., 
resource agencies, utilities, and local and state governments).
It is clear that leadership was a key ingredient to the successful deployment of these Best Practices. However, 
the absence of a strong CEO does not dispel the possibility of implementing the kinds of programs described in 
this report.
Risk Management
States with effective project management systems address risk in ways that enhance the delivery process. They 
recognize that risk is inherent by its nature in transportation projects but plan how to address these influences. 
The scan team observed that, at host agencies, managing risks means more than just listing them; instead, risk 
management involves identification, assessment, quantification, prioritization, and deliberate actions focused on 
big-picture objectives. These agencies adopted tangible strategies to address risks with a variety of types and 
impacts. A sampling of how these host agencies addressed project delivery risks follows.
Schedule Impacts Due to the NEPA Process
All the host agencies identified schedule risks inherent in the NEPA process as one of the most difficult to 
manage. Often the pr
predictability in the NEPA schedule forces agencies to make schedule decisions accommodating these factors. 
In several states, projects are not included in the formal plan with delivery dates until the NEPA process is over, 
which has resulted in fewer violations of public expectations when projects did not emerge on time from NEPA. 
oject 
delivery.
For example, in Arizona, scoping efforts are done and documented in a Design Concept Report. Normally, the 
relevant environmental document is prepared concurrently. Once the Design Concept Report is completed, the 
project is ready to be considered for inclusion in the STIP.
Cost and Schedule Estimating Risks
WSDOT addresses risks aggressively in the cost estimating function. WSDOT’s risk management process is 
based on the following principles:
v
Integral and sound project management
v
Encouraged early planning/action
v
Revealed threats and opportunities
v
Increased understanding
v
Greater transparency
Fundamental to the process ar
WSDOT emphasizes procedur
believes that approximately right is better than precisely wrong.
C# PDF bookmark Library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.
C# demo code for editing PDF bookmarks in Visual Studio .NET class. Merge and split PDF file with bookmark. Save PDF file with bookmark open.
convert pdf to openoffice text document; edit pdf using openoffice
VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net
Make PDF link open in a new window, blank page or tab. to C#.NET RasterEdge PDF SDK, VB.NET PDF SDK offers a variety of PDF file editing options, such as
convert open office doc pdf; convert openoffice document to pdf
3-8
CHAPTER 3 : PROJECT MANAGEMENT
Figure 3.5 graphically represents how WSDOT views risk over the life of a project. As it moves towards 
construction, the DOT has decreasing ability to address risk in a meaningful and cost-effective way. 
Washington has applied tools for assessing and managing risks on projects since 2002. The DOT utilizes a tool 
called CEVP, which has demonstrably addressed risks and assisted in managing project costs and other factors 
that ultimately could negatively impact the capital program. It reflects the most rigorous approach used by the 
agency for assessing and addressing project delivery risks.
CEVP represents a process whereby the PM, team members, and invited specialized experts review the project 
and the risk elements associated with delivering the work. From this process emerges a series of quantifiable 
oach to risk 
management.
Not all projects go through CEVP. The selected risk assessment process is a function of the project’s value and 
complexity. Table 3.1 breaks down which tools are used for each size of project based on project value. 
Figure 3.5  WSDOT Components of Cost Certainty
Table 3.1  WSDOT Tools for Projects Based on Value
Project Value
Tool Used
Projects > $10 million
Self-Modeling/Informal Workshop
Projects > $25 million
Cost Risk Assessment (CRA) Workshop
Projects > $100 million
CEVP Workshop
3-9
BEST PRACTICES IN PROJECT DELIVERY MANAGEMENT
Figure 3.6 shows the utilization history of WSDOT’s CRA/Value Engineering (VE), CRA, and CEVP tools since 2002:
Other state DOTs, including UDOT, have used CEVP with the same measure of success as that found in Washington.
Project Delivery Methods Used to Mitigate Cost and Manage Risks
The City of Phoenix uses a variety of innovative project delivery tools as a strategy to mitigate and manage risk. 
Using these contract delivery tools they gain advantages in project management practices and also reduce 
exposure to claims and cost overruns. These tools will be described in greater detail later in this report. However, 
it is significant that deliberate choices about which tool (e.g., design-build, task order contracting, construction 
manager at risk, etc.) to use are a major strategy for reducing costs and scheduling risks. The City of Phoenix 
rojects over the last few years has 
resulted in only one claim. Utah and Arizona report similar results with their use of the CMGC approach and 
oject delivery. 
Missouri has undertaken a variety of measures to reduce costs and manage its program and project delivery 
risks. It adopted a program called Radical Cost Control. MoDOT believes that the following three main elements 
help it achieve Radical Cost Control:
Practical Design
1. 
Maximizing competition
2. 
Seeking innovation
3. 
One of the three foundation elements of the Radical Cost Control program is the practical design initiative. This 
effort began because MoDOT wanted to build good projects everywhere instead of perfect projects somewhere. 
Practical design challenges engineers and other project personnel to consider the project circumstances and be 
practical in their designs. In some cases, bridges have been narrowed to better match the approach roadways or 
shoulders have been narrowed to better reduce traffic speed on a roadway. 
The second element of MoDOT’s Radical Cost Control program focuses on maximizing competition. Here the 
Figure 3.6  WSDOT Experience and History
3-10
CHAPTER 3 : PROJECT MANAGEMENT
agency encourages more contractors to compete and allows for differing proposals on materials such as pipe 
and pavement. MoDOT adheres to the premise that more competition benefits the public. 
The final element of this program is seeking innovation. MoDOT promotes innovation and proves it with 
its approach on the New I-64 Project in St. Louis. This $420 million design-build effort is currently under 
construction and represents the largest urban freeway reconstruction project in agency history. When creating 
project specifications, it focused on performance-based language and expectations. In addition, it stunned the 
industry when it announced that it would allow incorporation of any specification currently in use in another state 
DOT for this project. While review of these specs from other states has occurred, the effort is reported to be very 
successful and the contractor has responded well to this new freedom. Project staff report that this approach 
has not diminished project quality. More information can be found on MoDOT’s Web site (http://epg.modot.org/
index.php?title=Main_Page). Her
efforts of project delivery.
Use of Consultants
A variety of factors are influencing a trend by public transportation agencies toward greater reliance on using 
outside engineering firms to deliver projects. This trend yields benefits to these agencies as they are able 
to obtain critical skills for complex projects, use experienced personnel which they may be lacking, or add 
manpower to meet capital delivery schedule demands. 
The scan team found that each agency visited used outside resources for a variety of tasks and a sizeable 
portion of work. Utilization rates ranged from a low in Missouri of about 20% to more than 80% in Arizona, 
Florida, and Utah. The high level of outsourcing reported by these states is a function of historic workload 
changes. For example, about ten years ago Florida went through a significant increase in program size as part 
of the governor’s economic stimulus program, which was coupled with an initiative focused on substantially 
decreasing full-time equivalent (FTE) employees. 
Arizona passed the first of three half-cent sales tax ballot measures in 1985 and was faced with delivering a 
growing program with no increases in FTEs. That began a pattern of substantial use of consultants. Ultimately, 
states across the country find that with diminishing staff levels due to funding cuts and retirement, mounting 
workloads, and increasingly complex projects, the prospects for continued reliance by state DOTs on consulting 
professionals remains strong. Using consultants to complement and enhance a DOT’s project management 
process is clearly a Best Practice. The following are some key points:
v
Private-sector engineers and their firms are used for a wide variety of activities to meet agency needs. Flex-
ibility in how consultants are used and the skill sets required allowed DOTs to maximize contributions to 
programs.
v
Utah’s streamlined consultant selection process was noted for its ability to bring firms into use quickly. It is 
employed in all phases of the project delivery process and for all skills. More details can be found in Chapter 
5.0 in the discussion on innovative contracting practices.
v
Florida is the only state utilizing private-sector PMs to manage projects without a state DOT PM assigned for 
management role.
v
States with a high level of consultant use also have evaluation procedures in place to assess these firms’ 
performance and their suitability for future work. 
Investment in GIS and Data Management Tools
States employing Best Practices in project management also use a variety of technologies to enhance their 
effectiveness. The scan team r-aided 
drafting and design (CADD) and other r
not use technology for technology’s sake, but found ways to optimize project delivery and management by using 
3-11
BEST PRACTICES IN PROJECT DELIVERY MANAGEMENT
tools they had either procur
Best Practices. The following include some important observations:
v
The existence of GIS and data management systems was clearly a benefit. The scan team realized that this 
type of system requir
visited has some form of GIS integrated into delivery processes, which assists PMs and others in managing 
data elements along with the overall project. It is hard to quantify how this aggregation of information 
empowers the PM in the decision-making processes, but the states and scan team concur about its value.
v
WSDOT’s Multi-Agency Permit Team (MAP Team) was established as a means of better communication 
and working to protect the environment. Co-locating DOT staff and resource agency personnel improves 
coordination. The MAP Team arose from an interagency charter, established as a commitment by the 
signatories, affirming the agencies would collaborate productively. Figure 3.7 shows the charter that these 
five agencies signed in 2003.
The objectives of the MAP Team are as follows:
v
Increased permitting predictability
v
Increased interagency early project coordination
v
Increased interagency accessibility
v
Improved interagency relationships
v
Effective mitigation 
The MAP Team’s work can be characterized 
by a strong emphasis on communication, 
cooperation, and collaboration. When co-located, 
team members are better able to facilitate 
timely discussions that greatly improve permit 
processing and review. The nine members 
of the MAP Team meet each week on every 
project. Figure 3.8 shows the progress the MAP 
Team has made in timing processing permits, 
clearly illustrating the positive trend of declining 
timeframes for permits and decisions. For more 
information about WSDOT’s MAP Team, visit 
http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/environment/mapteam/
default.htm.
Data management initiatives in these states were 
also integrated with performance measurement 
and community involvement efforts so that all 
three benefited. The scan team found that data 
management systems that feed their project 
management and delivery processes also 
provide valuable information to other divisions 
of these agencies. In Missouri, project-specific 
information is fed into the Tracker system and 
then used to communicate important trend and 
project information to DOT stakeholders. Virginia’s 
Dashboard includes real-time information that the 
state’s PMs use to manage projects. The same 
information allows accountability to the public, 
plus the state’s communications staff uses the 
data to share important project-related information 
with stakeholders. 
Figure 3.7  WSDOT’s Multi-Agency Permit Team Charter
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested