3-12
CHAPTER 3 : PROJECT MANAGEMENT
Florida’s ETDM Process was also identified as a Best Practice for many reasons. ETDM has the goal of moving 
environmental analysis and transportation decisions through the review process in a timely manner without 
sacrificing the quality of the natural and human environments. Information materials on ETDM states:
The power of the ETDM Process can only be understood by reviewing the depth and breadth of the information 
available for each project and by witnessing the collaborative effect it has on stakeholder involvement. 
Individuals can go to http://etdmpub.fla-etat.org and use the ETDM tool to become knowledgeable and involved. 
“What is ETDM? Florida’s Efficient Transportation Decision Making (ETDM) Process is a new 
way of accomplishing transportation planning and project development for major capacity im-
provement projects. The ETDM process enables agencies and the public to provide early input to 
the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) and Metropolitan Planning Organizations 
(MPOs) about potential effects of proposed transportation projects. The goal of ETDM is to make 
transportation decisions more quickly without sacrificing the quality of the human and natural 
environments.” 
3
Figure 3.8  MAP Team Permit Decision Approval Tracking
3
Florida Department of Transportation, Central Environmental Management Office, ETDM public web site brochure
Convert pdf to openoffice word - C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC application
Enable C#.NET Users to Convert OpenOffice Document (Odt, Ods, Odp) to PDF
edit pdf files openoffice; convert pdf to openoffice text document
Convert pdf to openoffice word - VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC application
How to Convert OpenOffice Document (Odt, Ods, Odp) to PDF with VB.NET Demo Code Samples
convert pdf to word open office; create editable pdf in openoffice
3-13
BEST PRACTICES IN PROJECT DELIVERY MANAGEMENT
The site contains general information about ETDM, as well as project-specific information. Each project-specific 
link has a Project Diary category, whose pages include the following:
v
Class of Action
v
Community-Desired Features
v
Dispute Resolution Activity Log
v
Permits
v
Project Alternatives
v
Project Commitments/Responses
v
Project Description
v
PMs
v
Technical Studies
v
Transportation Plan Summary
Another category of information is found under Project Effects. Menu options in this group include the following:
v
Agency Comments—Project Effects
v
Agency Comments—Purpose and Need
v
Community Inventory
v
GIS Analysis Results
v
Screening Summaries
v
Summary Report
Figure 3.9 and Figure 3.10 show some of the Web content of the ETDM Process. FDOT has clearly raised the bar 
on how it communicates project information and the transparency with which it is done.
Figure 3.9  FDOT’s ETDM Interactive Map
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Convert PDF to Word Document in VB.NET Demo Code.
creating pdf open office; convert word pdf open office
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit OpenOffice
OpenOffice Conversion. pdf) online, export ODP to PDF document (.pdf), create Microsoft Office Word (.docx) from ODT, Convert Microsoft Office Excel
convert pdf to openoffice; convert open office doc pdf
3-14
CHAPTER 3 : PROJECT MANAGEMENT
The ETDM process focuses on making the overall planning and environmental project phases more efficient 
and more collaborative with stakeholders. FDOT funds employees in the resource agencies to advance 
decision-making by using the enhanced relationships and communication systems ETDM has in place. FDOT 
has discovered efficiencies using ETDM because early collaboration tends to focus stakeholders on a narrower 
set of alternatives based on improved knowledge of project issues. This clarity makes stakeholders more 
inclined to work with FDOT toward optimal solutions more quickly.
Use of visualization software to produce still images, renderings, 3-D animations, and 360-degree panoramas 
has grown. The ability to communicate important project information to stakeholder groups this way is well 
oject delivery 
practices. Figure 3.11 reflects how UDOT used visualization to share with stakeholders the outcomes of the 
planned improvements at Hinckley Drive. 
As is the case in each chapter of this report, the content presented on Project Management Structure is but a 
glimpse into what transportation agencies are doing to ensure more effective project delivery. 
Maintaining Core Competencies
A universal pre 
competencies. Outsourcing of engineering services ranged from 20% in Missouri to more than 80% in Utah and 
oject. 
As agencies trend more toward consultant-delivered projects, they are finding that staff are not developing the 
core competencies they should have to effectively manage the work. Functioning as a contract manager or 
contracting officer doesn’t necessarily give an employee the necessary skill set to oversee a private firm.
The scan team inquired at each site what was being done to address identified critical areas of concern. The 
most common response was they were trying to get employees to do some project work, but opportunities 
were limited. No Best Practice was observed regarding retention of core competencies for engineers and, more 
specifically, PMs.
A clear need exists here for AASHTO, either on its own or through NCHRP, to do additional research into how 
best to deal with this grave concern regarding maintaining core competencies in state DOTs.
Figure 3.10  FDOT’s ETDM Project-Specific Map
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit
Convert CSV file to PDF (.pdf). Convert CSV file to HTML (.htm, .html). Annotation. • Add, delete and save annotations to OpenOffice in preview.
convert odt file to pdf online; convert pdf openoffice
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit OpenOffice
Convert CSV file to PDF (.pdf). Convert CSV file to HTML (.htm, .html). Annotation. • Add, delete and save annotations to OpenOffice.
convert openoffice to pdf; convert pdf to open office document
3-15
BEST PRACTICES IN PROJECT DELIVERY MANAGEMENT
Figure 3.11  UDOT’s Visualization of Hinckley Drive Improvements
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to Word in C#.NET. C#.NET DLLs and Demo Code: Convert PDF to Word Document in C#.NET Project. Add necessary references:
create pdf form openoffice; convert pdf to openoffice doc
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Create PDF from Images. Create PDF from OpenOffice. Create PDF from CSV. Create PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert
editable pdf openoffice; convert pdf to word openoffice
CHAPTER 4: PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Best C#.NET component to create searchable PDF document from Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Create multipage PDF from OpenOffice and CSV file.
convert odp to pdf; convert odt file to pdf
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. C#.NET Sample Code: Convert Word to PDF in C#.NET Project.
converting openoffice to pdf; convert odt to pdf online
4-1
BEST PRACTICES IN PROJECT DELIVERY MANAGEMENT
key attribute the scan team was seeking in its search for Best Practices in project delivery 
management was evidence that a robust and effective performance management system was in place 
and actively used. Team members assumed that transportation agencies with Best Practices were also 
, using these systems gives 
agency staff the ability to change work processes based on those measurements. Each scanned agency had a 
form of performance measuroject 
delivery management and the presence of performance measurement systems reflect the complementary and 
essential nature of both systems.
Performance Management System
Each state had a performance management system to measure work for internal and, in many cases, external 
purposes. They differed in genesis, utility, and even the transparency offered to outside sources; however, 
elements of each system are presented here to highlight individual values.
Arizona
ADOT has long measured performance and reported it to the public; one such long-term effort is the semiannual 
Life-Cycle Certification report on progress with the Regional Area Road Fund used in Maricopa County for 
freeway construction. ADOT also uses a variety of project development measures daily to manage the overall 
program.
Florida
FDOT has a strong internal performance management system used extensively by staff and as a tool for 
communicating critical information to the Executive Board.
Missouri
MoDOT’s Tracker system (Figure 4.1) is a quarterly report 
chronicling the DOT’s progress against many important metrics. 
The following include several notable attributes:
v
It is organized around 18 tangible results. 
v
It contains approximately 100 individual measures.
v
The tools involve senior and midlevel managers. 
Tracker was started after Pete Rahn became director of MoDOT. 
Each district has a version of these performance measures, which 
are rolled together to create the statewide system. Tracker is 
available on the agency’s Web site (http://www.modot.mo.gov/
about/general_info/Tracker.htm). Various versions of the report 
are available, allowing the user to be specific about which 
tmeasures to review. In her presentation to the scan team, Mara 
Campbell, Organizational Results director for MoDOT, noted that, 
“performance management isn’t extra work—it is our work.” 
A similar sentiment was expressed in the other states as they 
presented performance management systems. 
CHAPTER 4
Performance Measurement
Figure 4.1  MoDOT Tracker
4-2
CHAPTER 4: PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT
Several features of the MoDOT Tracker system are worth mentioning. For example, Director Pete Rahn and 
his leadership team review Tracker information at quarterly meetings, discussing the different performance 
measures and presenting actions regarding ways to improve performance. If leaders talk about what they are 
going to do or are planning to do instead of about what they are actually doing, they risk getting a blast from 
Pete’s air horn as a warning that he is only interested in hearing about action. 
Figure 4.2 and Figure 4.3 show various extracts from the Tracker system and offer a glimpse of the available 
In addition, each Tracker page contains data from a series of supplements that serve as a resource for more 
detailed analysis of the measure in the larger report. This information is available for internal use. On each 
page of the Tracker report, a box in the lower right-hand corner illustrates the desired trend for that particular 
performance measure.
Figure 4.2  MoDOT Tracker Percent of Projects Completed
Figure 4.3  MoDOT Tracker Percent of Documented Customer Requests
4-3
BEST PRACTICES IN PROJECT DELIVERY MANAGEMENT
Another area where MoDOT has created a Best Practice is a program that recognizes employee achievements. 
The Performance Plus program is designed to reward MoDOT employees for going beyond normal duty to 
increase agency productivityocess that 
pays them a fraction of what they save the public through their actions, 
linking their performance to tangible results. Employees are eligible to 
earn up to $500 per quarter. Funds for this program are protected from 
other budgetary issues or developments. The total amount available per 
year for exceptional performance is $2,000.
Managing the final cost of projects is one way to judge whether 
employees will receive an incentive through the Performance Plus program. Figure 4.4 reflects project cost 
growth trends at MoDOT. Before the Performance Plus was implemented, process changes resulted in a 3% to 
4% cost growth. This figure shows effective cost growth management, with the ability to still save money while 
monetarily rewarding employees.
MoDOT is garnering tangible value through performance measurement processes. The agency is respected and 
project delivery is operating at a level never before achieved.
Virginia
VDOT has a sophisticated performance measurement system that was put in place by former Commissioner 
Philip A. Shucet. Prior to his arrival at VDOT, no evaluation existed to measure internal agency performance, nor 
was any effort made to disseminate information to the public. 
In establishing VDOT’s Dashboard system, Philip sought a means to communicate information in a way the 
oject delivery. He 
prevent them from “gaming” the numbers. 
The Dashboard system is a front-end reporting tool that uses information collected nightly from other sources 
to create the graphs and charts. This data is stored in a data warehouse until incorporated into the Dashboard 
system. The daily Dashboard updating makes this system the most responsive of all the states visited by the 
scan team. It offers as close to a real-time view of the agency’s performance as possible.
In the beginning, VDOT didn’
d, only about 15% of the 
data was good; however, within three months that number improved to 85%. 
Figure 4.4  MoDOT Performance Plus Cost Growth Trends 
(Compared to Nebraska Department of Roads-NE)
4-4
CHAPTER 4: PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT
Among the lessons learned from the Dashboard system is the importance of setting performance targets or 
goals and rd against which 
oject delivery process.
An interesting feature of the Dashboard is that the name of an agency champion and that person’s e-mail 
address is attached to each dial or graph so that internal and external system users have direct access to that 
edit with the 
system users but didn’t result in an overwhelming number of contacts.
The complete Dashboard system can be viewed at http://dashboard.virginiadot.org/default.aspx. Figure 4.5 through 
Figure 4.9 present some of the Dashboar
Figure 4.5  VDOT Dashboard Main Page
4-5
BEST PRACTICES IN PROJECT DELIVERY MANAGEMENT
Figure 4.7  VDOT Dashboard Watchlist
Figure 4.6  VDOT Dashboard Project Delivery
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested