BCR’s CDP Digital Imaging Best Practices, Version  
June 2008
Page 26 of 66 
Text 
Master  
Access  
Thumbnail  
File Format  
TIFF  
JPEG  
JPEG  
Bit Depth  
1 bit bitonal 
8 to 16 bit grayscale 
48 bit color  
8 bit grayscale  
24 bit color  
8 bit grayscale  
24 bit color  
Spatial 
Resolution  
Adjust scan resolution to 
produce a minimum pixel 
measurement across the 
long dimension of 6,000 
lines for 1 bit files and 
4,000 lines for 8 to 16 bit 
files 
150 – 200 PPI  
144 PPI  
Spatial 
Dimensions  
4000 to 6000 pixels across 
the long dimension 
600 pixels across the 
long dimension  
150 to 200 pixels 
across the long 
dimension  
•   
Photos
— Photographs 
can present many 
digitization challenges. We 
recommend digitizing from 
the negative (or the earliest 
generation of the 
photograph) to yield a 
higher-quality image. 
However, in the case of 
photographs developed 
according to artist 
specifications, the 
photograph itself should be 
digitized rather than the 
negative.  
When considering whether 
to capture sepia-tone 
photographs in color or 
black and white, we 
recommend digitizing them as color images to create a more accurate image. 
Digitize the backs of photographs as separate image files if there is significant 
information on the back of the photo (which may be of interest to users) that may 
not be included elsewhere. If an image of the verso of the photograph is 
available, the digital image will serve as a more successful surrogate for the 
original. 
Cowboys on a ridge in northern Wyoming, undated.  Charles J. 
Belden Papers, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming. 
Convert pdf file to excel file online - Library control component:C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online C# Tutorial for Exporting PDF from Microsoft Office Excel Spreadsheet
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf file to excel file online - Library control component:VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
VB.NET Tutorial for Converting PDF from Microsoft Office Excel Spreadsheet
www.rasteredge.com
BCR’s CDP Digital Imaging Best Practices, Version  
June 2008
Page 27 of 66 
Photographs
Master  
Access  
Thumbnail  
File Format  
TIFF  
JPEG  
JPEG  
Bit Depth  
16 bit grayscale 
48 bit color  
8 bit grayscale  
24 bit color  
8 bit grayscale  
24 bit color  
Spatial 
Resolution  
400 to 800 PPI 
150 to 200 PPI  
144 PPI  
Spatial 
Dimensions  
4000 to 8000 pixels 
across the long 
dimension, depending on 
size of original, excluding 
mounts and borders 
600 pixels across the 
long dimension  
150 to 200 pixels 
across the long 
dimension  
• 
Graphics
— Graphics include the various techniques used to reproduce words 
and images from originals such as engraving, lithography, line art, graphs, 
diagrams, illustrations, technical drawings and other visual representations. 
Nearly all graphics will be two dimensional and should be scanned using the 
following guidelines.  
Graphic Materials 
Master  
Access  
Thumbnail  
File Format  
TIFF  
JPEG  
JPEG  
Bit Depth  
16 bit grayscale 
48 bit color  
8 bit grayscale  
24 bit color  
8 bit grayscale  
24 bit color  
Spatial 
Resolution  
600 to 800 PPI 
150 to 200 PPI  
144 PPI  
Spatial 
Dimensions  
6000 to 8000 pixels 
across the long 
dimension, excluding 
mounts and borders  
600 pixels across the 
long dimension  
150 to 200 pixels 
across the long 
dimension  
Library control component:Online Convert Excel to PDF file. Best free online export xlsx
Online Excel to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a Excel File to PDF. Drag and drop your excel file into the box or click
www.rasteredge.com
Library control component:VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Convert smooth lines to curves. Detect and merge image fragments. Flatten visible layers. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
BCR’s CDP Digital Imaging Best Practices, Version  
June 2008
Page 28 of 66 
• 
Artwork/3-Dimensional Objects
— For projects where the physical dimensions 
of the non-3D artwork matches the equipment available, the following standards 
can be used. If scanning photographic copies of objects and artifacts, see 
recommended requirements in the appropriate photo and film charts above. 
Artwork/3-Dimensional Objects 
Master  
Access  
Thumbnail  
File Format  
TIFF  
JPEG  
JPEG  
Bit Depth  
48 bit color  
24 bit color  
24 bit color  
Spatial 
Resolution  
Device Maximum 
300 PPI  
144 PPI  
Spatial 
Dimensions  
100% of original  
600 pixels across the 
long dimension  
150 – 200 pixels across 
the long dimension  
• 
Maps
— Scanning maps may involve items that vary widely in size, condition 
and amount of detail. Small maps may fit easily onto a flatbed scanner, while 
large plat maps may need to be scanned in sections using a large format 
scanner or captured by a camera. The size of the image can become a problem 
for storage, but also for viewing, serving over the web or processing. 
Smaller maps (less than 36 inches on the longest dimension) should be digitized 
at 600 PPI, 48-bit color or 16-bit grayscale if possible. For larger maps, 300-400 
PPI may be more practical. If it becomes necessary to digitize a map in sections 
and stitch the image together in Photoshop, keep both the original images of the 
sections as well as the combined image. 
Maps 
Master  
Web  
Thumbnail  
File Format  
TIFF  
JPEG  
JPEG  
Bit Depth  
16 bit grayscale  
48 bit color  
8 bit grayscale  
24 bit color  
8 bit grayscale  
24 bit color  
Spatial 
Resolution  
600 PPI  
300 to 400 PPI for larger 
maps 
150 to 200 PPI  
144 PPI  
Spatial 
Dimensions  
6000 to 8000 pixels 
across the long dimension 
1078 pixels across the 
long dimension  
150 to 200 pixels 
across the long 
dimension  
• 
Film
— For duplicates (negatives, slides, transparencies), match the original 
size. However, if original size is not known, the following recommendations are 
supplied: For a copy negative or transparency, scan at a resolution to achieve 
4000 pixels across the long dimension. For duplicates, follow the scanning 
Library control component:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
SharePoint. C#.NET control for splitting PDF file into two or multiple files online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files.
www.rasteredge.com
Library control component:VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Merge Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint data to PDF Append one PDF file to the end of another one in VB library download and VB.NET online source code
www.rasteredge.com
BCR’s CDP Digital Imaging Best Practices, Version  
June 2008
Page 29 of 66 
recommendations for the size that matches the actual physical dimensions of the 
duplicate. 
Master scans of 
camera originals 
may be captured 
and saved in RGB, 
particularly those 
negatives that 
contain color information as a result of staining, degradation or intentional color 
casts. Derivative files could later be reduced to grayscale in the scanning software or 
during post-processing editing.  
Film 
Master  
Access  
Thumbnail  
File Format  
TIFF  
JPEG  
JPEG  
Bit Depth  
16 bit grayscale  
48 bit color 
8 bit grayscale  
24 bit color  
8 bit grayscale  
24 bit color  
Spatial 
Resolution  
Resolution to be 
calculated from actual 
image format and/or 
dimensions - approx. 2800 
PPI for 35mm originals, 
ranging to approx. 600 
PPI for 8x10 originals 
150 to 200 PPI  
144 PPI  
Spatial 
Dimensions  
4000 to 8000 pixels 
across long dimension of 
image area, depending on 
size of original and 
excluding mounts and 
borders 
600 pixels across the 
long dimension  
150 to 200 pixels 
across the long 
dimension  
Quality Control 
Numerous factors play an important role in the final outcome of a digitization project. 
Original condition of materials, quality and maintenance of equipment, staff training and 
external lighting are some factors that can influence the quality of images. 
A quality control program should be conducted throughout all phases of the digital 
conversion process. Inspection of final digital image files should be incorporated into 
your project workflow. Typically, master image files are inspected online for a variety of 
defects. Depending on your project, you may want to inspect 100 percent of the master 
images or 10 percent of the files randomly.  We do recommend that quality control 
procedures be implemented and documented and that you have clearly defined the 
specific defects that you find unacceptable in an image. Images should be inspected 
while viewing at a 1:1 pixel ratio or at 100 percent magnification or higher. Quality is 
Library control component:VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF file into two or multiple files in ASP.NET webpage online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files in .NET WinForms.
www.rasteredge.com
Library control component:C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Free online C#.NET source code for combining multiple Merge Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint data to Append one PDF file to the end of another and
www.rasteredge.com
BCR’s CDP Digital Imaging Best Practices, Version  
June 2008
Page 30 of 66 
evaluated both subjectively, by project staff (scanner operator, image editors, etc.) 
through visual inspection, and objectively, in the imaging software (by using targets, 
histograms, etc.).   
Tonal Dynamic Range 
As noted earlier, one of the most significant factors affecting image quality is the tonal 
dynamic range ― the color space an image occupies between pure black (0) and pure 
white (255). Reviewing histograms at the time of capture can ensure that all of the 
image’s information is being recorded. When the white and black points are not set on 
true white and black during the set up of the capture, clipping and spiking can occur.  
White & Black Points 
Optimum placement of whites and blacks is best observed through the histogram, 
although the image itself will be examined without the histogram on the screen. It is 
important to look at the number value assigned to the brightest highlight and the darkest 
shadow. Highlights should not read a number value higher than 247, and shadows 
should not be less than 7 or 8. If these numbers are exceeded, the scan must be 
redone. This is particularly vital if the original image has a short dynamic range. The 
white and black points must not be set on 0 and 255, as this will stretch the dynamic 
range of the image, creating gaps in the histograms, and thus unusable scans. These 
adjustments need to be made at the time of scanning, since adjusting images after the 
fact in image editing software introduces interpolation of the dynamic range (guessing 
what the points are in the image) and frequently results in gaps in the histogram rather 
than continuous curves. 
Clipping and Spiking 
Clipping and spiking result when the white and black points are not set on true white 
and black during the set up of the scan. If white and black are improperly set, everything 
above or below those points is clipped, or registers as the same tone. Spiking on the 
ends of the histogram usually indicates clipping. This problem also shows up in the 
image itself as blockage and pixelization in the shadows and blowouts in the highlights. 
Acceptable spikes can occur if the edge of the original negative has lost emulsion, for 
example, or the sky holds no detail and is one tone in the original. Such instances, 
however, are rare.  
Detail in the image on the left has been lost due to improperly adjusted white and black points. The histogram shows 
the “clipping and spiking” associated with incorrect points (
Rocky coastline on Forrester Island, 1920; courtesy 
Denver Museum of Nature and Science.)
. The image on the right shows properly adjusted white and black points with 
no clipping or spiking in the histogram (
Downtown Colorado Springs, 1964; courtesy Pikes Peak
Library System
). 
Library control component:C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
PDF in WPF. PDF Create. Create PDF from Word. Create PDF from Excel. Convert PDF to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File and Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files.
www.rasteredge.com
Library control component:C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
All object data. File attachment. Hidden layer content. Convert smooth lines to curves. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document.
www.rasteredge.com
BCR’s CDP Digital Imaging Best Practices, Version  
June 2008
Page 31 of 66 
Color Management 
Color management can be one of the most challenging aspects of the digitization 
workflow. Each piece of hardware in the path from source to digital file can introduce 
biases of color and tone. The goal of color management procedures is to accurately and 
predictably compensate for each of these biases across the entire workflow from 
scanner to print output or monitor display. 
Applying the practices outlined below will allow you to fine tune the color captured in the 
image. This assumes, however, that prior to capture, accurate lighting is in place, 
capture equipment and display devices have been regularly calibrated and a proper 
light source is available to accurately view analog materials. Take time to evaluate and 
test all your equipment and accessories before image capture so that you can minimize, 
if not eliminate, the need for extensive post-capture color management. 
Projects not undertaking color management should be aware that equipment will 
introduce color biases into any digitized materials. Attempting to make digitized 
materials “look good” on uncalibrated equipment may introduce these biases into the 
master images. Projects without a color management system should use available tools 
to perform basic monitor calibrations: 
•  Set to 24 millions of colors 
•  Set monitor Gamma at 2.2 (including Macintosh computers, which by default  
are set at 1.8 gamma) 
•  When using a CRT monitor, calibrate your color temperature to 6500° K 
•  If using an LCD monitor, calibrate your color temperature to 5500° K 
Targets and Color Bars 
Targets and color bars are used to measure system resolution, tonal range and color 
fidelity. Including targets in a digitization workflow allows color management systems to 
create profiles for each device or for later adjustment in projects not implementing color 
management during image capture. Targets are a way of predicting image quality and 
help ensure that the imaging system you are using is producing the best quality image it 
can and is operating at a consistent level of quality over time.  
Color targets are a scientifically created set of color patches with established numerical 
values and neutral gray. They help to ensure that the imaging system you are using is 
effective and accurate and performing in a consistent level of quality over time. Targets 
for prints and transparencies exist, and targets appropriate for the materials being 
scanned should be used (paper, film, transparency, etc.).  
Targets usually contain patches of color, black and white or shades of gray for verifying 
tone reproduction. Resolution targets allow projects to measure the level of detail a 
particular piece of equipment can capture. Resolution targets can be helpful in 
evaluating equipment before purchase or assessing the quality of output from a vendor.  
Library control component:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
PDF in WPF. PDF Create. Create PDF from Word. Create PDF from Excel. Convert PDF to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File and Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files.
www.rasteredge.com
BCR’s CDP Digital Imaging Best Practices, Version  
June 2008
Page 32 of 66 
As equipment biases can shift over time, best practice is 
to include targets on a regular basis throughout the 
course of the project. Some digitization projects also scan 
a color bar along with the original, to be included in the 
final digital image, to aid users in verifying accuracy in 
color reproduction. See Appendix E — Data Center 
Basics for a tutorial on how to use targets and color bars. 
•  GretagMacbeth 24-patch ColorChecker (shown above) 
•  Kodak Q-60, IT8.7 
•  Kodak Q-13 and Q-14 
Visual Inspection 
Things to look for during archival master visual inspection may include: (Note: If these 
attributes, with the exception of file name, are met, then you do not need to recapture 
the item.)  
•  Image is the correct size   
•  Image is the correct resolution   
•  File name is correct   
•  File format is correct   
•  Image is in correct bit depth and color mode (i.e., color image has been scaled 
as grayscale)   
•  No loss of detail in highlight or shadows  
•  No excessive noise especially in dark areas or shadows   
•  Even tonal values, no flare  
•  Correct focus  
•  Not pixilated  
•  Excessive dust spots or other objects  
•  No digital artifacts (such as very regular, straight lines across picture)   
•  Image not cropped   
•  Image not rotated or reversed   
•  Correct color balance   
•  Histogram: 
◊  No spikes or clipping 
◊  No tonal values lower than 9 or higher than 247  
If levels and curves are adjusted in the service master, then you should check the 
histogram again. 
The service master will be checked for: 
•  Image is the correct size   
•  Image is the correct resolution   
•  File name is correct   
•  File format is correct   
BCR’s CDP Digital Imaging Best Practices, Version  
June 2008
Page 33 of 66 
•  Image is in correct bit depth and color mode (i.e., color image has been scaled 
as grayscale)   
•  No loss of detail in highlight or shadows  
•  No excessive noise especially in dark areas or shadows   
•  Even tonal values, no flare  
•  Correct focus  
•  Not pixilated 
•  No digital artifacts (such as very regular, straight lines across picture)   
•  No moire patterns (wavy lines or swirls, usually found in areas where there are 
repeated patterns, such as half-tone dots)  
•  Image cropped correctly   
•  Image rotated correctly and not reversed   
•  Image centered and not skewed  
•  Correct color balance  
•  Histogram: 
◊  No spikes or clipping 
◊  No tonal values lower than 9 or higher than 247 
Describing Digital Images 
Metadata Theory and Practice 
The creation of good, high-quality metadata is a key component for the responsible 
management and long-term preservation of digital files. The term metadata is inclusive 
of the five different types of metadata information ― descriptive, technical, 
administrative, structural and preservation. 
Metadata issues must be given a high priority during the design of projects or at the 
outset of a program to ensure information about the collections can be found by users, 
shared with other institutions and managed over the life of the object. Metadata creation 
for digital objects can reuse preexisting descriptive information from its physical 
counterpart, such as accession records, finding aids or catalog records. For some digital 
objects, metadata creation will need to be created from scratch. There are numerous 
metadata schema; therefore, the institution will need to select the schema most 
appropriate to the collection, audience and institution. The most common metadata 
schemes include the following sets of information, with some overlap: 
Descriptive 
Metadata 
Metadata that describes the intellectual content of a resource and 
used for the indexing, discovery and identification of a digital 
resource. 
Administrative 
Metadata 
Metadata that includes management information about the digital 
resource, such as ownership and rights management. 
Structural 
Metadata 
Metadata that is used to display and navigate digital resources and 
describes relationships between multiple digital files, such as page 
order in a digitized book or diary. 
Technical 
Metadata 
Metadata that describes the features of the digital file, such as 
resolution, pixel dimensions and hardware. The information is critical 
for migration and long-term sustainability of the digital resource. 
BCR’s CDP Digital Imaging Best Practices, Version  
June 2008
Page 34 of 66 
The Dublin Core metadata standard has been widely implemented, containing 15 
elements. Different communities have developed Dublin Core profiles for their unique 
needs, adding elements to reflect those unique needs. Another standard which may be 
applicable to your program is VRA Core 4.0, a data standard for the cultural heritage 
community that was developed by the Visual Resources Association.  See 
http://www.vraweb.org/projects/vracore4/index.html
The CDP’s 
Dublin Core Metadata Best Practices
provides guidance in using Dublin 
Core, in a collaborative environment. See http://www.bcr.org/cdp/best/dublin-core-
bp.pdf
Preservation Metadata and METS 
Preservation metadata is information that supports and documents activities related to 
digital preservation.
10
It is information that is used in supporting the processes of 
ensuring the core preservation processes of availability, identity, understandability, 
authenticity, viability and renderability. While some of these activities require descriptive 
and structural metadata, the majority of it is administrative metadata.  
The preservation of digital objects requires extensive documentation that accumulates 
over the life of the digital object. Management of this metadata is handled through the 
PREservation Metadata Implementation Strategies (PREMIS), a set of core 
preservation metadata likely to be needed to be used to manage digital resources in a 
digital repository. Due to the limited implementation of PREMIS, Priscilla Caplan, Chair 
of the PREMIS working group, notes, “…nobody knows whether it works. That is, there 
has not been enough experience applying preservation strategies to know whether 
today’s preservation metadata schemes actually support the process of long term 
preservation.” 
11
OAIS requires packaging information to describe the various types of OAIS information 
— ingest dissemination, etc. Within the cultural heritage community, Metadata Encoding 
and Transmission Standard (METS), is the mostly commonly used standard. An XML-
based schema, METS is designed to be an overall framework in which all metadata 
associated with a digital object can be stored. The following describes the components 
of METS. 
Descriptive Metadata
— The descriptive metadata section may point to descriptive 
metadata external to the METS document (e.g., a MARC record in an OPAC or an EAD 
finding aid maintained on a WWW server) or contain internally embedded descriptive 
metadata or both. Multiple instances of both external and internal descriptive metadata 
may be included in the descriptive metadata section. 
Administrative Metadata
— The administrative metadata section provides information 
regarding how the files were created and stored, intellectual property rights, metadata 
regarding the original source object from which the digital object derives, and 
10
Caplan, Priscilla, “The Preservation of Digital Materials,” Library Technology Reports 44:2 (2008):15. 
11
Caplan, 16. 
BCR’s CDP Digital Imaging Best Practices, Version  
June 2008
Page 35 of 66 
information regarding the provenance of the files comprising the digital object (i.e., 
master/derivative file relationships, and migration/transformation information). As with 
descriptive metadata, administrative metadata may be either external to the METS 
document or encoded internally. 
File Groups
— The file group section lists all files comprising all electronic versions of 
the digital object. File group elements may be nested, to provide for subdividing the files 
by object version. 
Structural Map
— The structural map is the heart of a METS document. It outlines a 
hierarchical structure for the digital library object and links the elements of that structure 
to content files and metadata that pertain to each element. 
Behavior
— A behavior section can be used to associate executable behaviors with 
content in the METS object. A behavior section has an interface definition element that 
represents an abstract definition of the set of behaviors represented by a particular 
behavior section. A behavior section also has a behavior mechanism which is a module 
of executable code that implements and runs the behaviors defined abstractly by the 
interface definition. 
The Library of Congress provides maintenance services both PREMIS and METS 
working closely with national and international organizations. 
Storage 
Best Practices for Image Scalability and Long-term Viability   
Any discussion of sustainable digital projects must include an overview of the 
infrastructure basics of a data center.  While digital projects, i.e. scanning and digital 
photography, can be done by smaller institutions, it is in their favor when they are able 
to partner with a larger organization that is able to take their "work product" (digital 
objects and descriptive metadata) and place the content in a data center setup to 
manage data backups and has a plan to preserve the digital objects and metadata.  See 
Appendix E — Data Center Basics for additional and more detailed. See .Appendix F — 
Network Design for Data Protectionfor information about Network Design for Data 
Protection.  
Solid network design is critical to allow access to and to protect the digital objects and 
the metadata that go into the making of quality digital projects. An exhaustive treatise on 
network design is not in the scope of this document, but a general overview is important 
to give the reader the basics to protect their data. Most complex, well-designed 
networks are created by network engineers in organizations. 
The design of a basic TCP/IP network model consists of the following five layers.  They 
are:  the application layer; the transport layer; the network layer; the data link layer; and 
the physical layer. The layers near the top are closer to the user application. Those 
layers located near the bottom of the network are logically closer to the physical storage 
and transmission of the data. For additional information about Network Architecture, see 
Appendix F — Network Design for Data Protection. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested