©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
3
plants features as an explanation of market restructuring, with its consequent 
impact on the nation’s overall level of productivity growth. 
1.7  This emphasis on the firm level extends a somewhat older branch of the 
economics  literature  which  may  be  labelled  the  trade-growth  literature, 
which examined technological flows and spillovers across large aggregate 
units such as countries or country sectors. While this more established trade-
growth  literature,  with  its  explanation  of  indigenous  growth  being 
significantly determined by technology transfer from countries operating on 
the  frontier of technology  (with  such  transfer occurring  through specific 
mechanisms  such  as  international  trade,  including  knowledge  spillovers 
from FDI),  is still  relevant  and important, by agreement  with UKTI we 
concentrate here in this literature review on new developments related to 
firm-level adjustments.
1
1.8  Finally, in Chapter 4 we consider the role of government intervention in 
business internationalisation. As well as considering the traditional ‘market 
failure’  arguments  (together  with  an  overview  of  the  type  of  market 
inventions typically undertaken by government), we also consider some of 
the extant literature that argues for a wider response by government. This 
includes both the needs of ‘born-global’ companies, and the need to ensure 
that  all  firms  face  the  ‘right’  incentives  when  undertaking  necessary 
adjustments  to  changes  in  the  business  environment  due  to  trade  and 
investment liberalisation and other aspects of globalisation.  
1
For recent contributions in the literature dealing with the impact of technology transfer (from 
countries operating on the frontier of technology) on indigenous growth, see: Cameron, Proudman and 
Redding (2005); Kneller (2005); Griffith, Redding and Van Reenen (2004); and Keller (2001). A 
related literature looks at spillovers from FDI and their impact on domestic productivity, with again the 
presumption that the greater the TFP gap between domestic and foreign-owned plants, the greater the 
potential for technology spillovers (e.g. Girma, 2005; Gorg and Greenaway, 2004; Griffith, Redding 
and Simpson, 2004; Harris and Robinson, 2003, 2004; Griffith and Simpson, 2000; Aitken and 
Harrison 1999, Driffield 1999, Doms and Jensen 1998; and Davies and Lyons 1991). 
Change pdf to powerpoint online - SDK Library service:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Change pdf to powerpoint online - SDK Library service:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
4
[this page is blank] 
SDK Library service:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Online Powerpoint to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:RasterEdge for .NET Online Demo
Convert Word to PDF; Convert Excel to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to PDF; PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings.
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
5
2.  International Entrepreneurship  
Introduction 
2.1  Understanding why some firms internationalise (and most do not), the different 
options available (such as exporting, FDI or joint ventures), and the different 
processes involved, helps us to understand better if certain firms can benefit in 
terms of their economic performance. Moreover, while many established firms 
continue to internationalise following a slow, evolutionary path of development 
(the so-called Uppsala model – see Johanson and Vahlne, 1990), other more 
dynamic  (often  high-tech
2
)  and  newly  established  firms  have  emerged  in 
(mostly)  the  last  decade  that  internationalise  at  founding  or  very  shortly 
thereafter. Understanding the reasons why there has  been an increase in the 
speed  at  which  particularly  SME’s  can  now  internationalise  is  important, 
especially as it is predicted that early internationalisation is likely to become 
more important overtime as globalisation increases (OECD, 1997) 
2.2  There are different theoretical frameworks that have been put forward for why 
some firms internationalise (and the characteristics associated with exporting 
and/or engaging in FDI activities), that to some extent originate from different 
fields  of  research  (economics  versus  the  business  and  management  area). 
Behavioural theories include process and stage models (Johanson and Vahlne, 
1977, 1990; Cavusgil, 1980) and network theories (Turnbull and Valla, 1986; 
Johanson and Mattson, 1988; Coviello and Munro, 1997; Dana et. al., 1999). 
Economics-based  theories  include  monopolistic  advantage  theory  (Hymer, 
1976)
3
and transaction cost theory (e.g. Buckey and Casson, 1976).  
2.3  The  more  recent  economics  literature  in  particular  will  help  motivate  the 
material covered in Chapter 3 (on firm-level adjustment to globalisation), with 
its  emphasis  on  sunk  costs  and  firm-level  heterogeneity  as  explanations  of 
which firms internationalise. Such theoretical models have been developed to 
encompass and explain certain firm-level empirical facts that have emerged in 
2
Cf Crick and Spence (2005) 
3
This also covers resource-based models (e.g. Barney, 1991, Kogut and Zander, 1996; Teece et. al. 
1997) and more recent economics literature (linked to new trade theories) that includes firm 
heterogeneity and sunk costs as the major factors determining internationalisation.  
SDK Library service:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Convert Word to PDF; Convert Excel to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to PDF; PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Convert Word to PDF; Convert Excel to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to PDF; PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings.
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
6
recent years from the work of such as Bernard and Jensen (1995, 1999), and 
more recently others in different countries
4
, that: 
a.  Exporting (and importing – see Bernard, Jensen and Schott, 2005) is 
concentrated among a very small number of firms who nevertheless are 
large and account for the preponderance of trade undertaken; 
b.  Such  firms  have  a  greater  probability  of  survival,  growth  is  much 
higher  (vis-à-vis  those  not  exporting/importing),  productivity  is 
greater,  they  are more  capital-intensive,  pay  higher  wages,  employ 
more technology and have more skilled workers (after controlling for 
other relevant covariates)  
2.4  This literature considers the role of transport costs, the different relative (sunk) 
costs (such as  entry costs) of different  modes  of market access (e.g. export 
versus FDI), and the key role played by firm heterogeneity (e.g. Helpman, et. al
2004)  which  leads  to  productivity  differences  between  firms  having  an 
important role in explaining the structure of  international commerce. It also 
helps to explain whether exporting and FDI are alternative or complementary 
strategies  for  heterogeneous  firms  (e.g.  Head  and  Ries,  2004),  given  that 
statistical  evidence  seems  to  suggest  that  exporting  and  FDI  are  positively 
correlated even though  economic theory  suggests  such activities  are  usually 
substitutes.  
2.5  An older economics literature exists that considers the choice of optimal market 
entry  modes,  when  the  decision  to  internationalise  is  taken  as  given.  Here 
transaction  cost  approaches  concentrate  on  comparing  the  efficiency  of 
particular modes of entry (e.g. Williamson, 1985; Teece, 1986) given that asset 
specificity,  uncertainty  and  information  asymmetries  exist.  This  literature 
clearly complements the more recent approaches mentioned in par. 2.4, except 
that they ignore the importance of firm heterogeneity (or rather take a different 
approach when including it, since resource-based theories of why some firms 
internationalise are implicitly assuming firms differ in their ability to respond to 
market opportunities).  
2.6  The literature covered mostly in the business and management journals takes a 
different  approach  to  explaining  internationalisation,  with  its  emphasis  on 
4
See, for example, Bernard and Wagner (1997); Clerides et. al. (1998); Aw et. al. (2000) and Deldago 
et at. (2002). 
SDK Library service:RasterEdge XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET - SDK for PowerPoint Document
Add image to specified position on PowerPoint page. Next Steps. Download Free Trial Download and try PDF for .NET with online support. See Pricing
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:DocImage SDK for .NET: Web Document Image Viewer Online Demo
Try Online Demo Now. Please click Browse to upload a file to display in web viewer. Suppported files are Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, Tiff, Dicom and main
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
7
processes and its (more  recent) concentration on  the ‘born-global’ firm.  We 
follow  the  approach  taken  in  the  existing  literature  that  draws  out  the 
differences between the main theoretical frameworks that have been put forward 
for the  traditional  (cf.  Bell, 1995;  Johanson  and  Vahlne,  1990; Knight  and 
Causgil, 1996; Larimo, 2001; Moen and Servais, 2002; Wickramasekera and 
Bamberry, 2001) and ‘born-global’ models  of internationalisation (cf. Oviatt 
and McDougall, 1994, 1999; Madsen and Servais, 1997; Bell et. al. 2003).  
2.7  Traditional models consider internationalisation (to exporting and then to FDI 
activities) as incremental, and crucially determined by the speed and ability to 
accumulate knowledge through exposure to overseas markets. Additional costs 
and  uncertainties  are  faced  when  entering  a  foreign  environment,  but  this 
literature is more concerned with explaining which processes are important in 
explaining  how  such potential  barriers  are  overcome. As such,  it  has a  less 
formal and more descriptive (and often case study) approach to describing the 
role of knowledge accumulation in countering barriers to internationalisation.  
2.8  Another strand to explaining when and how certain firms internationalise can be 
linked to early theories of monopolistic advantage (e.g. Hymer, 1976) and more 
recently the resource-based view of the firm and its emphasis of organisational 
capabilities as determinants of organisational outcomes (e.g. Kogut and Zander, 
1996;  Teece et. al.,  1997).  In  this  literature,  international  activities  are 
determined by the resources and capabilities that a firm possesses and that allow 
it to overcome the initial (sunk) costs of competing in foreign markets. Here 
there is a direct link to the notion of absorptive capacity and the role of R&D 
and innovation activities  in  the  internationalisation  process, which  are  areas 
generally  not  considered in any  detail  in the economics literature. We  shall 
present  examples  of  models  that  have  been  developed  in  the  literature  that 
emphasise  the  importance  of  resources  and  capabilities  and  the  role  of 
absorptive capacity, since our reading of the literature leads us to believe that 
this is an especially important area that can help us to understand more fully 
why some firms internationalise, and the timing of such internationalisation. 
2.9  The literature that concentrates on the ‘born-global’ firm also includes resources 
and  capabilities  (and  thus absorptive  capacity) as crucial,  but  also  tends to 
emphasise  other  aspects  such  as  the  role  of  joint-ventures  as  a  means  of 
overcoming initial resource and competency gaps (i.e. sunk entry costs), since 
SDK Library service:VB.NET PDF - Create PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Convert Word to PDF; Convert Excel to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to PDF; PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: Annotate PDF Online. Click to strikethrough text on PDF page. Users can change outline color and set transparency value in properties.
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
8
such firms may not have the time to integrate prior knowledge and fully develop 
their international strategies before implementing them. Thus, this area of the 
literature (which often concentrates on particular sub-groups of firms such as 
high-tech SME’s) tries to provide alternative (more eclectic) explanations about 
how firms internationalise, including the importance and role of networks and 
the  use  of  inter-personal  relationships  (Harris  and  Wheeler,  2005),  the 
importance  of  individuals  in  the  firm  with  prior  exposure  to  international 
markets,  and also  the role of ‘luck’ (or serendipity) – cf. Crick  and Spence 
(2005).  Others  emphasise  the  need  to  apply  a  cognitive  perspective  to  the 
internationalisation  process  and  examine  how  entrepreneurs  recognise  and 
exploit opportunities in international markets (Zahra et. al. 2005).  
Background Information on the extent of Firm Internationalisation  
2.10  Information on which firms are engaged in international activities (exporting, 
importing, trading/operating abroad), and which are not, is difficult to come by. 
For the US in 2000, Bernard, Jensen and Schott (2005) report that the number of 
firms that export and import comprise 3.1 and 2.2 per cent of all firms. Eaton 
and Kortum (2004) found  that some  17.4 per  cent of French  manufacturing 
firms exported in 1986. Data for the UK is reported in the Table 2.1, showing 
that in 2000 just over 26 per cent of UK firms exported (although nearly 44 per 
cent did so in the manufacturing sector and only some 15.6 per cent in services).  
Table 2.1 Exporting (and export intensity) in UK firms, 2000 (figures are percentages) 
Employment size 
Manufacturing 
Services 
Total 
exports/sales  export>0  exports/sales  export>0  exports/sales  export>0 
0-9 
6.4 
21.7 
3.7 
9.2 
4.4 
12.2 
10-49 
8.7 
36.7 
3.8 
15.4 
5.5 
22.9 
50-249 
18.4 
64.2 
4.7 
21.9 
11.5 
42.6 
250+ 
25.9 
72.5 
4.4 
25.3 
16.4 
51.5 
Total 
11.8 
43.9 
3.9 
15.6 
6.8 
26.1 
Source: weighted data from CIS3 (authors’ own calculations) 
2.11  Table 2.1 also shows that exporting increased with firm size (with over three-
quarters of manufacturing firms employing 250 or more workers engaged in 
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
9
exporting), and that most firms that export did not specialise exclusively on 
supplying overseas markets (i.e. export intensity – exports divided by sales –  is 
significantly smaller than the proportion of firms that exported some of their 
produce). 
Figure  2.1:  Prevalence  of  different  forms  of  internationalisation among European 
SME’s, 2003 
Source: ENSR Enterprise Survey, 2003 
Figure 2.2: Internationalisation of SME’s, by size of enterprise 
Source: ENSR Enterprise Survey, 2003 
2.12  Figure 2.1 presents information for Europe from the ENSR Enterprise Survey 
for 2003 that shows that some 63% of SME’s were not engaged in international 
activities, while some 18% bought in supplies from overseas, 6% exported and 
13% had an overseas subsidiary or were engaged in more than one form of 
internationalisation.  
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
10
2.13  Larger SME’s were significantly more likely to be internationalised vis-à-vis 
smaller SME’s (Figure 2.2) and there is a significant difference in levels of 
internationalisation across different European countries; the larger the country 
the  fewer  the  proportion  of SME’s involved  in  exporting and/or  purchasing 
supplies from abroad. According to the ENSR survey, only around 20% of UK 
SME’s were involved in exporting and/or sourcing from abroad, placing it third 
lowest of the Europe-19 countries covered.
5
Traditional and ‘Born-global’ Internationalisation 
2.14  Much  of  the  early  research  on  internationalisation  was  based  on  extensive 
empirical research that observed most firms that entered foreign markets did so 
in an incremental fashion, by building up resources before proceeding beyond 
markets that were ‘close to home’ (i.e. ‘psychically close’ because competitors 
also operated there and/or ‘cultural’ barriers were lower). Thus, larger firms 
(which are older and with more resources available) were more likely to build 
up their presence in domestic markets before entering first export markets, and 
then later on engaging in FDI or joint venture activities.  
2.15  However, in the last decade attention from mostly the business and management 
literature has tended to shift to those (often much smaller, high-tech) firms that 
internationalise at founding or shortly thereafter (cf. Aspelund and Moan, 2002; 
Bell et. al. 2003; Jones, 1999; Larimo, 2001; Madsen et. al. 2000; McDougall 
et.  al., 2003; Moen, 2002; Rennie, 1993; Servais and Rasmussen, 2000). 
According to Rialp et. al. (2005), the emergence of these firms might indicate 
that important dimensions of the internationalisation process have evolved since 
the 1970s and 1980s, when much of the existing theory was developed, thus 
offering a challenge to traditional theory.  
2.16  The  drivers  of  early  internationalisation  have  been  linked  to  the  increased 
importance  of  globalisation,  which  can  be  associated  (Madsen  and  Servais, 
1997) with: (1) new market conditions in many sectors of economic activity 
(including the increasing importance of niche markets for SMEs worldwide); 
5
Aggregating firms employing 0 – 249 in Table 2.1, the CIS3 data for the UK shows that 25 per cent 
of UK SME’s exported (15.3 per cent in services and just over 42 per cent in manufacturing) with an 
associated mean export intensity of only 6.5 per cent. 
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
11
(2) technological developments in the areas of production, transportation and 
communication (leading to significant reductions in the costs associated with 
internationalisation  as  well  as  the  rising  importance  of  knowledge-based 
technologies);
6
(3) the increased importance of global networks and alliances 
(that  provide  increased  access  to  knowledge);
7
and  (4)  more  elaborate 
capabilities of people, including those of the founder/entrepreneur who starts 
early  internationalising  firms  (cf.  Knight  and  Cavusgil,  1996;  Moen,  2002; 
Servais and Ramussen, 2000).  
2.17  Thus on the ‘push’ side to early internationalisation, many new ventures that go 
international seem to be in high technology industries that may require some 
international sales as a condition of industry participation given the specialised 
global  market  niches  served  by  such  firms  (Burrill  and  Almassy,  1993; 
McDougall et. al. 1994; Lindqvist, 1990; McDougall and Oviatt, 1996; Bryan 
et. al., 1999). Thus sales to domestic markets alone would not be sufficient to 
cover  the  initial  sunk  costs  of  market  entry,  given  the  technological 
requirements  that  firms  commit  to  high  R&D  expenditures  and  product 
innovation  (or  similar  investments  in  new  technology).  Thus  where 
technological  change  is  rapid,  short  product  cycles  may  naturally  lead  to 
increased  internationalisation  (cf.  Vernon,  1966,  and  the  product  life  cycle 
model).  
2.18  On  the  ‘pull’  side, in  many  sectors  of economic  activity there  has growing 
demand for goods and services with greater commitment to differentiation and 
quality (i.e. the establishment of ‘niches’), offering firms that can differentiate 
themselves  from  indigenous  foreign  competitors  the  opportunity  to  derive 
strong sales from a foreign market. Such firms are often smaller SMEs rather 
than the traditionally larger firms that gradually internationalise incrementally. 
Moreover,  a  dramatically  increasing  number  of  people  (including  business 
executives  and  entrepreneurs)  have  gained  international  experience  during 
recent decades, with associated mobility across nations (Johnston, 1991; Reich, 
6
With recent advances in modern communication infrastructures (e.g. the internet) information once it 
is produced is now more mobile and can be reproduced and transported very quickly at little marginal 
cost. Knowledge can thus be combined with less mobile resources in multiple countries. Thus, 
knowledge-intensive industries have been globalising quickly, and it becomes easier for new ventures 
with valuable knowledge to internationalise sooner. 
7
As Hedlund and Kverneland (1985) argue, the increasing homogenisation of many markets in distant 
countries has made the conduct of international business easier to understand for all involved. 
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
12
1991), languages, and cultures and thus with enhanced capabilities on offer to 
firms involved in (early) internationalisation (cf. Madsen and Servais, 1997).
8
2.19  Whether  early  internationalisation  is  a  new  and  highly  sector-specific 
phenomenon or not is a key question and especially relevant when considering 
public sector involvement in encouraging/facilitating internationalisation. Also 
whether  it  will  become  more  important  over  time  (alongside  increasing 
globalisation), is also important. Several authors (Autio and Sapienza, 2000; 
Bell et. al., 2003; Jones, 1999; Sharma and Blomstermo, 2003) argue that early 
internationalisation is better suited to smaller knowledge-intensive firms (where 
technological intensiveness pervades). However, others have revealed that the 
phenomena  is  not  necessarily  limited  to  just  new,  high  tech  sector  firms 
(Aspelund  and  Moen,  2001;  Madsen et. al.  2000;  McDougall et. al.  2003; 
Moen, 2002; Moen and Servais, 2002). Indeed Bell et. al. (2003) argue that 
early  internationalising  firms  can  be  further  classified  as  being  either 
‘knowledge- and/or service-intensive’ or ‘knowledge-based’. The latter relates 
more to the emergence of new technologies (IT, biotechnology, etc.), involving 
developed proprietary knowledge or acquired knowledge without which they 
would not exist, and thus is by definition limited to certain high-tech sectors. In 
contrast, knowledge intensive firms use knowledge to develop new offerings, 
improve  productivity,  introduce  new  methods  of  production  and/or improve 
service delivery (e.g. CAD/CAM/JIT), and it is argued that such firms are going 
to continue to become increasingly important across more sectors and in more 
countries,  challenging  further  the  traditional  incremental  approach  to 
internationalisation.   
2.20  Lastly, so far we have focussed mostly on the dichotomy between traditional 
incremental and born-global (or early) forms of internationalisation. Bell et. al. 
(2003)  consider  ‘born  again’  global  firms  which  are  those  that  experience 
‘episodes’ of internationalisation and de-internationalisation. According to Bell, 
et. al., op. cit., they tend to emanate from traditional industries rather than high-
tech sectors, and it is certain ‘events’ (like a take-over, or technological product 
and/or process improvements in their particular industry) that increases their 
knowledge intensity and thus involvement in the internationalisation process.  
8
International financing opportunities have also become increasingly available (Patrricof, 1989; 
Valeriano, 1991). 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested