©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
13
Table 2.2 Differences in internationalisation behaviour 
Source: Bell et. al (2003, Table 2) 
How to convert pdf into powerpoint - control SDK system:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
How to convert pdf into powerpoint - control SDK system:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
14
2.21  Table 2.2 summarises the three contrasting approaches to internationalisation, 
based mostly on case study evidence that Bell and his associates have collected 
in recent years. 
Theoretical Models of Internationalisation 
(a) Process models  
2.22  Traditional  process/stage  models  consider  internationalisation as incremental 
and based on a risk-adverse and reluctant adjustment to changes in a firm or its 
environment (Johanson and Vahlne, 1997, 1990). Initially firms operate in the 
vicinity of their existing knowledge and supply only to domestic markets unless 
provoked,  pushed,  or  pulled  by  events  such as unsolicited export  orders  or 
adverse conditions in the home market. Once initiated, internationalisation starts 
in markets with the lowest uncertainty and risk (i.e. firms start in ‘psychically 
close’ markets) and with an entry mode that requires relatively few resources 
(e.g.  exporting).    The  speed  and  ability  to  accumulate  knowledge  through 
exposure  to  overseas  markets  then  determines  the  subsequent  pace  of 
internationalisation, as it positively feeds back to decisions to commit resources 
for future activities in foreign markets. So typically firms internationalise one 
market at a time and concentrate on a small number of key markets, adapting 
their existing goods and services to the needs of each new market (Bell et. al. 
2003).  
2.23  The process is seen as being reactive with little use for strategic choices when 
increasing exposure to overseas markets; indeed internationalisation proceeds 
irrespective of whether strategic decisions are taken by management (Johanson 
and Vahlne, 1990) and this deterministic aspect of the model is an important 
(and often criticised) feature of the model (especially in the literature on ‘born-
global’ firms – cf. Turnbull, 1987; Andersen, 1993; McDougall et. al. 1994; 
Bell, 1995; Oviatt and McDougall, 1997; Leonidou and Katsikeas, 1997). In this 
traditional  approach,  the  main  goals  of  the  firm  are  described  as  ensuring 
survival  through  increasing  sales  volume,  greater  market  share,  and/or 
extending  product  life  cycles.  In  comparison,  the  ‘born-global’  literature 
(encompassing smaller firms that are early to internationalise) emphasised the 
formation of new ventures capable of competing in foreign markets almost from 
control SDK system:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag-and-drop your pptx or ppt file into the drop area.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value. value, The char wil be added into PDF page, 0
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
15
(or indeed at) inception, which was argued to be inconsistent with the process 
model  (cf.  Bell,  1995;  Knight  and  Cavusgil,  1996;  Madsen et. al.,  2000; 
McDougall et. al., 1994; Moen,  2002;  Moen and  Servais, 2002; Oviatt  and 
McDougall, 1997, 1999; Roberts and Senturia, 1996; Shrader et. al., 2000). 
2.24  Despite criticisms of the process/stages model outlined above, there is empirical 
evidence that many firms do indeed internationalise in incremental stages, first 
entering those foreign markets that are most similar to their home market (cf. 
Bilkey,  1978;  Cavusgil,  1980;  Reid,  1981;  Czinkota,  1982;  Barrett  and 
Wilkinson, 1985; Moon and Lee, 1990; Lim, et. al., 1991; Crick, 1995; Burgel 
and Murray, 2000).  They also tend to increase the level of commitment and 
resources  over  time  as  internationalisation  proceeds  in  stages.  Much  of  the 
recent criticism of the process model comes from recent evidence of the ‘born-
global’  firm  (see  below)  which  enters  foreign  markets  at  a  time  (and  in  a 
manner)  that  appears  inconsistent  with  the  notion  of  incremental  stages  of 
internationalisation.  However,  if  due  emphasis  is  placed  on  the  role  and 
importance of the accumulation of knowledge for internationalisation, and the 
availability of complimentary resources and capabilities (and thus absorptive 
capacity – see below for details), then the process model simply states that those 
firms  that  lack  the  means  and  the  relevant  conditions  for  rapid 
internationalisation will be best served by proceeding in a more cautious and 
incremental  fashion.  As  Erikson et. al.  (1997,  p.  353)  state  “in 
internationalizing,  a  firm  must  develop  structures  and  routines  that  are 
compatible with its internal resources and competence, and that can guide the 
search for experiential knowledge about foreign markets and institutions”.  
2.25  This  points  to  the  need  to  augment/extend  process/stage  models  of 
internationalisation to include (or place more emphasis on) other perspectives 
that incorporate resource-based theories, organisational capability perspectives, 
knowledge – and/or learning-based views (e.g. Autio and Sapienza, 2000; Autio 
et. al. 2000; Madsen and Servais, 1997; Zahra et. al. 2003)
.  
(b) Other behavioural factors  
2.26  A more eclectic set of influences on internationalisation, that can be labelled as 
belonging  to  the  class  of  behavioural  models,  includes  the  importance  of 
control SDK system:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
with specified zoom value and save it into stream The magnification of the original PDF page size Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified resolution and
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:RasterEdge XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET - SDK for PowerPoint Document
Convert. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Convert PowerPoint to ODP/ ODP to PowerPoint. Document & Page Process. PowerPoint Page Edit. Insert Pages into PowerPoint File
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
16
networks, trust, and the use of inter-personal relationships (Turnbull and Valla, 
1986; Lindqvist, 1997; Coviello and Munro, 1997; Dana et. al., 1999; Jones, 
1999; Harris and Wheeler, 2005); the importance of individuals in the firm with 
prior  exposure  to  international  markets;  and  also  the  role  of  ‘luck’  (or 
serendipity) – cf. Crick and Spence (2005). Others emphasise the need to apply 
a cognitive  perspective  to  the internationalisation process  and  examine how 
entrepreneurs  recognise  and  exploit  opportunities  in  international  markets 
(Zahra et. al. 2005).  
2.27  Networks  are  expected  to  be  more important to SMEs when  they  begin to 
internationalise, as  the acquisition  of  experiential  knowledge  about  overseas 
markets is crucial when selecting which markets to entry and/or expand into. 
Access to, and encounters with, potential partners and clients allow firms to 
familiarise themselves with the ‘culture’ of business in overseas markets, and to 
build  up  trust  as  relationships/joint  activities  are  established  (Wilson  and 
Mummalaneni, 1990).
9
2.28  Crick and Spence (2005) found in their study of 12 high-tech UK SMEs that 
networks developed previously by the firms’ owner/managers were important in 
determining the internationalisation strategy of these firms. They also found that 
previous  managerial  experience  of  operating  in  international  markets  was 
crucial  (and  where  this  was  not  available,  recruitment  of  an  appropriate 
executive with the requisite contacts through networks took place). In short, the 
Crick and Spence study found that the main initial ‘triggers’ of an international 
strategy was  (1) the availability and use of existing contacts, supporting the 
importance of networks; (2) the development and use of resources (especially 
managerial experience); and (3) serendipitous encounters, or ‘luck’.  
2.29  A  recent  paper  by  Harris  and  Wheeler  (2005)  also  considers  in  detail  the 
important of inter-personal relationships in the internationalisation process for 
SMEs, noting that researchers are less clear about how relationships help this 
process, what are the specific origins of the most important relationships, and 
the strategies pursued that result in these relationships. What they found is that 
some of the relationships formed do not just “fulfil a marketing function, give 
9
McPherson et. al. (2001) have noted that learning is facilitated using homophilitic (‘people like us’) 
networks where more trust and experience is present with which to legitimise actions. 
control SDK system:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
with specified zoom value and save it into stream The magnification of the original PDF page size Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified resolution and
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Merge several images into PDF. Insert images into PDF form field.
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
17
information,  or yield access to networks…(they) do  much more, they direct 
strategy, and can transform the firm… (moreover) relationships rarely originate 
within (overseas) customer, supplier or distributor firms…(they) are more likely 
to be at home than abroad…these relationships need to mature and develop into 
trusted inter-personal relationships, and this is done through extensive social 
interaction”  (pp.  204-205).
10
Assuming  further  research  substantiates  these 
results, this has important implications for government policy aimed at fostering 
internationalisation (in SMEs).  
2.30  Lastly, some in the literature emphasise the importance of applying a cognitive 
perspective to internationalisation, based on how firms/entrepreneurs recognise 
and exploit opportunities in international markets (e.g. Zahra et. al., 2005). They 
argue that managers and entrepreneurs are not necessarily well-informed, and 
thus cannot  easily make rational comparisons of production  and governance 
costs  in  different  countries,  and  identify  opportunities  for  leveraging  their 
strategic  assets  in  foreign  markets.  However,  managerial  cognition  may  be 
rationally bounded and influenced by experiences and environmental conditions 
(such  as  cultural,  institutional,  political  and  technological  environments  – 
Thomas and Mueller, 2000), which often leads to cognitive biases. Such bias 
includes  temporal  and  spatial  myopia  (Levinthal  and  March,  1993), 
overconfidence (Busenitz and Barney, 1997), competitive myopia (Johnson and 
Hoopes,  2003),  and  the illusion  of  control.  Understanding  the role  of such 
cognitive factors I therefore important in understanding the internationalisation 
process.  
(c) Transaction cost models  
2.31  Transaction cost models consider the choice of optimal market entry modes, 
when the decision to internationalise is taken as given. That is, the model does 
not deal with the decision of whether or not to engage in internationalisation per 
se, but rather transaction cost approaches concentrate on comparing the 
efficiency of particular modes of entry (e.g. Williamson, 1985; Teece, 1986) 
given that asset specificity, uncertainty and information asymmetries exist.  
10
Bell (1995) found in his study of internationalising SME’s in Finland, Ireland and Norway that some 
two-thirds of the firms studies indicated that the internationalisation strategies of their domestic clients 
had been a key factor in their initial decision to export and on the choice of foreign market.  
control SDK system:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Divide PDF File into Two Using C#. This is an C# example of splitting a PDF to two new PDF files. Split PDF Document into Multiple PDF Files in C#.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
from the ability to inserting a new PDF page into existing PDF or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Bmp, Jpeg
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
18
2.32  Mode  of  entry  matters  in  particular  to  young  high-tech  firms  (where  asset 
specificity, uncertainty and information asymmetries between buyer and seller 
are especially pertinent), since if they are forced to internationalise to cover the 
fixed costs of initial development expenditures and generate enough income to 
cover ongoing development activities, the cost of entry is likely to be relatively 
high whichever course of action is taken. In principle, such firms may wish to 
internalise their overseas transactions and avoid intermediaries (either through 
direct exporting or setting up their own overseas production and/or distribution 
network), in order to avoid the fixed costs and uncertainties associated with 
operating untried technologies with the cooperation of third parties.  
2.33  However, young high tech firms often experience negative cash flow during 
their  early  years,  and  therefore  they  may  lack  the  resources  to  operate  an 
internal arrangement on their own in foreign markets. Cooperative arrangements 
with a foreign partner (to identify customers and provide pre- and after-sales 
support services) may on the surface seem a more cost effective option. The 
downside is that not only are profits shared, but additional fixed costs can arise 
for either or both parties (e.g. providing training, incentives and monitoring of 
the overseas partner; investing in co-specialised assets by the overseas partner to 
make the relationship work – cf. Teece, 1986). The partner who does not incur 
these sunk costs then has the opportunity to ‘take hostage’ the party facing such 
costs (unless contracts can be devised to minimise the risk of shirking by one of 
the parties). However, such arrangements are often difficult both in terms of the 
costs of arranging, monitoring, and enforcing, and because of the notion of the 
‘incomplete contract dilemma (Klein et. al., 1978) holds that it is unrealistic to 
specify a situation entirely.  
2.34  So a dilemma arises, which ultimately comes down to the resources available to 
meet  the  relative  costs  of  different  forms  of  market  entry  (i.e.  the  firm  is 
restrained by its resource-base). This (together with the fact that  transaction 
based theories do not consider the question of whether to internationalise, only 
what  form  it  should  take)  has  led  some  to  argue  that  the  transaction  cost 
approach has limited use (and resource-based approaches have more to offer – 
cf. Madhok, 1997).  
2.35  Others have considered more directly how firms who already experience the 
risks of relatively small size and newness (and who by definition lack large 
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
19
networks  of  foreign  subsidiaries)  also  successfully  manage  the  additional 
strategic risks of entering foreign markets early on in their existence (Shrader et 
al. 2000). The latter found evidence that such firms trade foreign location, entry 
mode, and foreign revenue exposure off against each other in each country they 
enter. That is, they found empirical support for the hypothesis that new ventures 
entering a specific foreign country simultaneously determined their degree of 
foreign market exposure, host country risk, and entry mode, and in addition that 
they traded off these three aspects such that when the level of one increased, the 
level of one or both of the others decreased. Thus, “… those entering higher-risk 
countries relied on those countries for lower percentages of their total sales, and 
chose less committed entry modes. Conversely, firms with high foreign revenue 
exposure in a specific country or using high entry mode commitment entered 
less risky countries” (Shrader et. al. op. cit. pp. 1239-1240).  
(d) Monopolistic advantage and the resource-based approach 
2.36  This theory holds that a firm can generate higher “Ricardian” rents
11
from the 
utilisation of firm specific assets which cannot be replicated by other firms. The 
thrust of these arguments are based on the established assumption (Hymer 1976) 
that despite the fact that local firms nearly always enjoy certain advantages over 
their  foreign  competitors  (such  as  greater  knowledge  of  the  culture  and  a 
superior network of local business partners), firms that go international possess 
non-tangible productive assets (such as specialised know-how about production, 
superior  management  and  marketing  capabilities`,  export  contacts  and 
coordinated, quality-orientated relationships with suppliers and customers) that 
they are able to exploit to give them a competitive advantage.  
2.37  The resource-based and organisational capabilities approach to the firm (e.g., 
Barney, 1991; Kogut and Zander, 1996; Teece et. al. 1997) is concerned with 
how resources, skills and capabilities (i.e. tangible and non-tangible assets) are 
generated, accumulated and deployed. The literature in this area concentrates on 
the  firm  defined  as  bundles  of  various  assets  (Penrose,  1959)  –  essentially 
technology, capital and labour. Thus the emphasis is on internal characteristics
11
Defined as returns in excess of their opportunity costs, to distinguish them from monopolistic rents 
when firms restrict output. 
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
20
rather than the external environment (Barney, 1991), and therefore what a firm 
possesses determines what they can accomplish (Rumelt, 1984). But in addition 
to  these  tangible  assets  which  operate  through  relatively  clearly  defined 
markets,  there  are  intangible  assets  (Griliches,  1981),  or  firm-specific 
capabilities (Teece  and Pisano, 1998; Pavitt, 1984) which largely define the 
dynamic capabilities that define the firm’s competitive advantage. 
2.38  Essentially Teece argues that the firms’ dynamic capabilities are the sub-set of 
its competences and capabilities that allow the firm to create new products and 
processes and to respond to changing market conditions; they are the core of its 
competitiveness.  According  to  Teece  and  Pisano  (1998),  these  dynamic 
capabilities  shape  (and  are  shaped  by)  (i)  the  firm’s  managerial  and 
organisational processes (i.e., its ‘routines’ or current practices and learning
12
); 
(ii) its position (current endowment of technology and intellectual property); 
and (iii) its paths (alternative available which will lock it into a trajectory i.e. 
the notion of path dependency – see David, 1985; Arthur, 1989).  
2.39  ‘Processes’ are essentially concerned with how an organisation has learned to 
behave such that its routines and practices epitomise the ‘culture’ of the firm – 
the  idiosyncratic way  the  firm  operates  covering how the firm searches  for 
opportunities,  how  it  hears  and  processes  threats  and  opportunities,  how  it 
mobilises creativity and innovation, how it manages learning and knowledge 
accumulation activities (Bessant et. al., 2001). In all such processes define the 
firm’s problem solving capability, they evolve over time and cannot be copied 
in any simple fashion. 
2.40  As  stated  above,  the  firm’s  ‘position’  reflects  its  current  endowment  of 
technology and intellectual property, but also other assets such as relationships 
with key suppliers and customers – thus such competence is firm specific and 
mostly describes the static environment in which the firm currently operates.  In 
contrast, the ‘path’ of the firm refers to the strategic direction it takes, and as 
such is both firm specific and shaped by its past experience and activities. Such 
a technological trajectory is thus path-dependent.  
2.41  Fundamentally, Teece and other proponents of the resource-based view of the 
firm argue that such competencies and capabilities by their very nature cannot 
12
Nelson and Winter (1984) refer to this as the collectivity of routines. 
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
21
be bought; they can only be built by the firm. That is, the factors that determine 
this rate and direction cannot easily be acquired, replicated, diffused, or copied 
– they therefore cannot easily be transferred or built-up outside the firm.
13
This 
in part comes from the key role that learning plays both in enabling the firm to 
align its resources, competencies and capabilities, and in allowing the firm to 
internalise outside information into knowledge; and the way the firm learns is 
not acquired but it is determined by its unique ‘routines’, culture and its current 
position (stock of knowledge).  
2.42  Thus, processes of knowledge generation and acquisition within the firm (i.e. 
internal knowledge generation) are essentially organisational learning processes 
(Reuber and Fisher, 1997; Autio, et. al., 2000). The processes of incremental 
learning are important sources of both codified and tacit knowledge which may 
have great competitive impact. Although firms could develop and acquire much 
of the knowledge internally (through their own resources  and routines), few 
(and especially SMEs) virtually possess all the inputs required for successful 
and sustainable (technological) development. Therefore, the fulfilment of firms’ 
knowledge requirements necessitates the use of external sources to acquire and 
internalise knowledge (Rosenkopf and Nerkar 2001; Almeida et. al., 2003 set 
out the main external sources of knowledge available to firms).  
2.43  The relationship between internal and external knowledge sourcing is complex 
in  nature. Much  of the theoretical literature concerned  with transaction cost 
economics  and  property  rights  considers  the  choice  between  internal 
development and external sourcing (‘make or buy’) and the conditions that may 
favour one route rather  than  the other, or not to proceed with a particular 
development at all (Coase, 1937; Williamson, 1990).  The resource based view 
of the firm stresses competences and internal capabilities as key elements in 
determining firm performance (see above) and it is appropriate to consider these 
factors  in  relation  to  the  processes  of  knowledge  acquisition,  transfer  and 
conversion. 
13
As if to emphasise the point about dynamic capabilities, Teece (1996) sets out what he considers the 
fundamental characteristics of technological development: its uncertainty, path dependency, cumulative 
nature, irreversibility, technological interrelatedness (with the complementary assets), tacitness of 
knowledge (organisational routines), and inappropriability (which means that firms’ cannot necessarily 
obtain full property rights over their technology). All of this points to the outcome that technological 
‘know-how’ is ‘locked-in’ to the firm and future alternatives are path dependent. 
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
22
Knowledge, learning and absorptive capacity 
2.44  Knowledge and  learning  can  be expected  to  have  a fundamental  impact  on 
international growth in that internationalising firms must apprehend, share, and 
assimilate new knowledge in order to compete and grow in markets in which 
they have little or no previous experience (Autio, et. al. 2000). In a seminal 
paper,  Cohen  and  Levinthal  (1990)  demonstrated  that  the  ability  to  exploit 
external knowledge is a critical component of a firm’s capabilities. They argued 
that: ‘...the ability to evaluate and utilize outside knowledge is largely a function 
of prior related knowledge. At the most elemental level, this prior knowledge 
includes basic skills or even a shared language but may also include knowledge 
of  the most recent scientific or technological developments  in a  given field. 
Thus, prior related knowledge confers an ability to recognize the value of new 
information,  assimilate  it,  and  apply  it  to  commercial  ends.  These  abilities 
collectively constitute what we call a firm’s “absorptive capacity”.
14
  
2.45  Their analysis first considered the absorptive capacity of the individual and its 
cognitive  basis,  including  the  importance  of  prior  related  knowledge  for 
learning  (i.e. assimilating  existing  knowledge),  and diversity of background. 
These  are  important  because,  even  if  knowledge  is  nominally  acquired, 
subsequently  it  will  not  be  well  utilised  if  the  individual  does  not  already 
possess the appropriate contextual knowledge and prior experience.  Problem 
solving skills represent the capacity to create new knowledge and develop in a 
similar way to learning capability. Prior knowledge and skills, which permit 
recognition of associations and linkages that may never have previously been 
considered, provide a foundation for creativity. 
2.46  In summary, the ability to assimilate information is a function of the richness of 
the individual’s pre-existing knowledge structure. This implies that learning is 
cumulative and learning performance is greatest when the object of learning is 
related to what is already known. As a result, learning is more difficult in novel 
domains, but even in this case a diverse background will increase the probability 
that incoming information will related to something already known. 
14
Note, absorptive capacity was developed by Chen and Levinthal (op. cit.) in the context of 
innovation for which outside sources of knowledge are critical. However the usefulness of the concept 
extends to all questions relating to the identification, assimilation and application of new, external 
information (Bessant et. al. 2005) 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested