©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
33
have  been  found  to  be  important  determinants  of  internationalisation  (as 
Bernard and Jensen, 2001, and others, have shown) 
2.70  Helpman et. al (2004) develop a model with similar features to the Bernard and 
Jensen  (op. cit.)  approach.  Assuming  monopolistic  competition,  firms 
exogenously differ in their levels of productivity (captured by differences in the 
marginal costs of production); they produce a differentiated good; consumers 
have standard Dixit-Stiglitz preferences; and different modes of market entry 
(exporting versus FDI in foreign markets) have different relative costs (some of 
which are sunk – e.g. entry costs – while others vary with output – e.g. transport 
costs  and  tariffs).  Thus  this  model  not  only  determines  which  firms 
internationalise, but also the mode of entry. Firms choose FDI over exporting if 
the  benefits  from  avoiding  transportation  costs  exceed  the  fixed  costs  of 
establishing capacity in a foreign market (i.e. when transport costs are relatively 
high and when plant-level returns to scale are relatively weak). They are able to 
show that the least productive firms do not internationalise (and indeed the 
worst exit the industry), and of those that do only the most productive engage in 
FDI, while firms with intermediate productivity levels export. Thus, the extent 
of intra-industry firm heterogeneity plays a key role in determining the volume 
of FDI sales relative to the volume of exports, and thus the composition of 
trade.  
2.71  Head  and  Ries  (2003)  also  consider  differences  in  firm  productivity  as  an 
explanation of different modes of foreign market entry. Their Figure 1 (Figure 
2.5 here) shows that for firms with very low productivity levels (A<A
X
) neither 
exporting nor FDI are profitable. In terms of firms that internationalise, since 
there are additional (higher) fixed costs of establishing a foreign plant through 
FDI (i.e. K) the solid profit-productivity relationship for firms using FDI as their 
mode of entry is lower (
Π
I
), but as productivity increases FDI profits rise more 
rapidly  than  exporting  profits.
19
Thus,  at  point  A
I
,  firms  choose  FDI  over 
exporting.  Thus the model predicts that  within the  same industry  firms that 
conduct FDI and firms that export co-exist.  
2.72  The model can  also be used to  show  why an individual firm  might engage 
simultaneously in both exporting and FDI; if fixed costs differ between different 
Convert pdf slides to powerpoint online - control SDK utility:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf slides to powerpoint online - control SDK utility:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
34
markets (
1.15K<
K), a firm with productivity y will export to the high-fixed-
cost market and carry out FDI in the low-fixed-cost market. Thus, trade costs 
are positively related to FDI but negatively related to exports, whereas fixed 
sunk costs are positively related to exports but negatively related to FDI. 
Figure 2.5: Heterogeneous productivity and the export versus FDI decision 
Source: Head and Ries (2003) 
2.73  As Head and Ries (2004) point out, the empirical evidence confirms the sorting 
of plants by productivity into those that do not internationalise (with the lowest 
levels of productivity) through to those that engage in FDI (with the highest 
productivity) – cf. Head and Ries (2003), Girma et. al. (2003); Girma et. al. 
(2004); Helpman et. al. (2004). 
19
Comparative production costs in domestic and foreign markets (particularly trade costs) determine 
the slope of the profitability-productivity relationship. 
control SDK utility:VB.NET PowerPoint: Read, Edit and Process PPTX File
split PowerPoint file, change the order of PPTX sildes and extract one or more slides from PowerPoint How to convert PowerPoint to PDF, render PowerPoint to
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK utility:C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
slide processing library provides users with access to operate PowerPoint slides/pages in the simplest procedures, for instance, using online clear C# methods
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
35
Table 2.3 Probability of entering an export market in Canadian manufacturing, 1984-
1996  
Source: Baldwin and Gu (2004, Table 2) 
2.74  Others  have  examined  the  link  between  tariff  reduction  and  plant-level 
internationalisation (Bernard et. al. 2003; Melitz, 2003; Baldwin and Gu, 2004) 
using similar approaches which show that only the most productive plants enter 
the export market to overcome trade barriers. As barriers fall, export intensity 
rises  and  (the  most  productive)  non-exporters  now  internationalise  (since 
production costs fall as imports become cheaper and competitiveness rises with 
lower tariffs). Evidence is provided in Baldwin and Gu (op. cit.) who considered 
the impact of tariff reduction on Canadian manufacturing between 1984-1996. 
Table  2.3  produces  their  results,  confirming  (specification  3,  underlined 
estimates) that cuts in tariffs both increased the probability of internationlising 
for all plants and more particularly for those with the highest levels of relative 
labour  productivity.  The  results  also  show  that  larger,  younger  and  more 
productive plants are more likely to export.   
2.75  Further  empirical  evidence  on  the  factors  that  determine  whether  firms 
internationalise  is  provided  in  Bernard  and  Jensen  (2001)  for  the  US  and 
control SDK utility:VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
add image to slide, extract slides and merge library SDK, this VB.NET PowerPoint processing control powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK utility:VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
clip art or screenshot to PowerPoint document slide large amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
36
Greenaway and Kneller (2004) for the UK.
20
Lagged export status (i.e. whether 
the plant exported in the previous period) is used as a proxy for sunk costs, and 
is always highly significant as a determinant of exporting.  In the US initial 
results from Bernard and Jensen (op. cit.) found that exporting last year raised 
the probability of exporting this year by 66%, but when they allowed for fixed 
effects to allow for plant-level heterogeneity, the effect declined to 20%. The 
results for the UK showed that the impact was 83%, which seems improbably 
high  (and  presumably  is  biased  upwards  by  an  inability  to  account  for 
unobserved plant level characteristics).  
2.76  Bernard and Jensen (op. cit.) for the US also found that spillover effects were 
not significant, and that state export promotion had a slight positive effect (but it 
was insignificant). However, size, wage (representing human-capital intensity) 
and productivity were important influences on the probability of exporting, with 
larger, productive plants much more likely to export. Greenaway and Kneller 
(op. cit.) found similar results, although the impact of TFP on the probability of 
exporting  was  not  significant (although  TFP  was  significant  in  determining 
export  market  entry),  while  industry  agglomeration  effects  (which  are 
associated with spillovers) were important in the case of the UK.
21
2.77  To  summarise,  those  firms  that  internationalise  (with  most  evidence  being 
related to those that export) tend to be a non-random sample of all plants in that 
they are typically larger, more productive and have the capabilities/resources to 
overcome sunk fixed costs associated with entering foreign markets. This has 
implications  for  the discussion  in  the next  chapter on  the issue  of whether 
‘better’ plants self-select into exporting and/or whether there is any evidence 
that  plants  become  more  productive  through  internationalisation  through  a 
‘learning-by-exporting’ effect. 
20
Evidence of a similar nature for other countries is provided in Roberts & Tybout (1997) for 
Colombia; Bernard & Wagner 2001 for Germany; Clerides et al. 1998 for Columbia, Mexico and 
Morocco; and Girma et al. 2004 for the UK. 
21
Other studies for the UK using panel data provide similar results, confirming the importance of sunk 
costs and productivity, but also the role of resource, innovation and human-capital factors that all 
positively impact on the decision to export (cf. Wakelin, 1998; Bleaney and Wakelin, 2002; Roper and 
Love, 2002; and Gourlay and Seaton, 2004). 
control SDK utility:VB.NET PowerPoint: Use PowerPoint SDK to Create, Load and Save PPT
Besides, users also can get the precise PowerPoint slides count as soon as the PowerPoint document has been loaded by using the page number getting method.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK utility:VB.NET PowerPoint: Extract & Collect PPT Slide(s) Using VB Sample
want to combine these extracted slides into a please read this VB.NET PowerPoint slide processing powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
37
Conclusions 
2.78  This chapter considers the various models that have featured in the literature 
that attempts to explain why certain firms internationalise, and others do not. 
Whether the traditional, incremental model of internationalisation is considered, 
or transaction cost models (emphasising the role of sunk costs), or monopolistic 
advantage models, a strong overlapping feature is the role and importance of 
firm  specific  assets  (complimentary  resources  and  capabilities  and  thus 
absorptive capacity) and knowledge accumulation. This is also true of the more 
recent phenomenon  of ‘born-global’ or ‘born-again global’ firms, that  often 
internationalise  very  early  (and  which  are  dependent  on  knowledge-based 
technology).  
2.79  Of course, there are other factors that determine internationalisation, such as 
sector (e.g. whether high-tech or  not); the size of the firm; the presence  or 
otherwise  of  networks/agglomerations;  the  importance  of  international 
experience among the owner/managers; and even ‘luck’ etc. But a recurring 
emphasis throughout all the literature is the core and essential role of (tacit) 
knowledge  generation  and  acquisition,  both  within  the  firm  and  from  its 
external environment.  
2.80  The  more  recent  economic  models  of  internationalisation  that  have  been 
reviewed focus on the importance of sunk costs and heterogeneity across firms 
(i.e.  differences  in  productivity).  To  overcome  entry  costs,  firms  need  an 
adequate knowledge-base and complimentary assets/resources (especially R&D 
and human capital assets that lead to greater absorptive capacity); and of course 
productivity differences rely on firms having differing knowledge and resource-
bases associated with differences in rates of innovation and other aspects of 
total factor productivity (see Chapter 3 for a discussion). 
2.81  However, despite this leading role for knowledge accumulation and factors such 
as absorptive capacity, we still have little evidence on how organisations learn 
(and  what  is  most  important  for  success  in  this  area),  and  exactly  how 
absorptive capacity can be measured (and its relative importance in determining 
productivity and entry into foreign markets). Thus, there is still much work that 
needs to be undertaken to enhance the extant literature and thus ‘flesh-out’ some 
of the concepts and arguments presented here. 
control SDK utility:VB.NET PowerPoint: Merge and Split PowerPoint Document(s) with PPT
of the split PPT document will contain slides/pages 1-4 code in VB.NET to finish PowerPoint document splitting If you want to see more PDF processing functions
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK utility:VB.NET PowerPoint: Complete PowerPoint Document Conversion in VB.
It contains PowerPoint documentation features and all PPT slides. Control to render and convert target PowerPoint or document formats, such as PDF, BMP, TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
38
[this page is blank]
control SDK utility:VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
Using this VB.NET PowerPoint to PDF converting demo code below, you can easily convert all slides of source PowerPoint document into a multi-page PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK utility:VB.NET PowerPoint: Add Image to PowerPoint Document Slide/Page
insert or delete any certain PowerPoint slide without methods to reorder current PPT slides in both powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
39
3. Firm-Level Adjustment to Globalisation 
Introduction  
3.1  Alongside the issue  of  why and  how  businesses go  international is  another 
equally important question regarding the process of internationalisation – how 
do firms adjust to globalisation. Given the importance of productivity issues, the 
relationship between international trade and productivity growth is at the heart 
of our understanding of economic adjustment to globalisation. This linkage has 
been  extensively  researched  and  well  established  in  the  macroeconomic 
literature, from the conventional Heckscher-Ohlin model to new trade models. 
More recently, a rapidly growing literature has focused on globalisation and its 
impacts  on  firms,  exploiting  the  heterogeneity  of  individual  firms.  In  this 
chapter, we review this emerging literature in light of the linkage between a 
firm’s export activity and productivity growth. Exporting is believed to bring 
about several benefits from a firm perspective, including-  
ɷ
Economies of scale  and diversification of risks:  increasing exposure to 
international markets  leads to a higher demand for products. This may 
then lead to an expansion in production and thus firm size and therefore 
the  exploitation  of  economies  of  scale.  Equally,  the  diversification  of 
products  across  countries  may  also  reduce  risk  and  encourage  greater 
investment; 
ɷ
Enhanced  competence  base:  it  is  widely  believed  that  international 
exposure will improve organisational efficiency in globalised firms due to 
international competition and the exploitation of external knowledge; 
ɷ
International knowledge spillovers: as a public good, knowledge spillovers 
constitute a positive externality. Operating in global markets, firms that 
export are in a better position to exploit foreign knowledge spillovers and 
outperform  their  domestic  counterparts.  Moreover,  there  may  well  be 
positive spillover effects from exporting on indigenous non-participants, 
who can achieve higher technological standards more easily. 
3.2  In the following section, we briefly review related macro and micro models of 
international trade. In the third section, we introduce two hypotheses (and the 
evidence in the literature) with respect to the causality issue between export and 
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
40
productivity,  and then we discuss possible explanations  for  discrepancies in 
empirical  findings.  In  the  fourth  section,  we  examine  some  other  factors 
affecting firm  behaviour, such as  structural factors, industrial characteristics, 
innovation and international outsourcing. The final section describes how trade 
impacts upon aggregate productivity via reallocations of resources, bridging the 
knowledge gap in terms of the interaction of firms, industries, and the whole 
economy. 
From Macro to Micro Trade Models 
3.3  In  recent  years,  the  economics  literature  has  paid  close  attention  to  the 
characteristics of globalisation and how economies and in particular firms adjust 
to such changes. Central to this issue is the relationship between international 
trade and productivity growth, which has been extensively researched and is 
thus  well  established  in  the  macroeconomics  literature.  In  conventional 
Heckscher-Ohlin type models, comparative cost theory is employed to explain 
the  pattern  of  trade:  as  a  consequence  of  trade,  countries  shift  away  from 
producing  goods  in  most  industries  to  producing  goods  in  comparative 
advantage industries. One of the most notable feature of these models is that 
they assume homogenous productivity across countries, which is a substantial 
drawback that has given rise to a new generation of trade models – the so called 
new trade’ models,  e.g.  Krugman  (1980).  An  original  contribution  of 
Krugman’s  model  included  a  consideration  of  the  causes  of  trade  between 
economies with similar factor endowments as well as the impact of a large 
domestic  economy  on  export.  This  new  framework  incorporated  scale 
economies,  product  differentiation  and  imperfect  competition;  nevertheless, 
based  on  the  restrictive  assumption  of  homogenous  firms,  it  failed  to 
acknowledge the impact of differences in firm productivity.  
3.4  These  macroeconomics-oriented  models,  arguably,  only  provide  a  limited 
understanding of how firms behave in an increasingly globalised market, and 
thus they have a limited role in informing policy, which is to a considerable 
extent targeted at individual firms. In recent years there has been a surge of 
interest in studying the microeconomic evidence such that there is now a rapidly 
growing literature focusing on globalisation and its impact on firms, taking into 
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
41
account the importance of heterogeneity among plants. This emphasis on firm-
level evidence has been partly triggered by the availability of some quality data 
at  plant  level,  as  well as  the  recent  developments in  the  use  of  theoretical 
modelling and econometric techniques to exploit these usually more intricate 
micro data.
22 
3.5  In  addition  to  offering  new  insights  that  explain  trade-firm  productivity 
linkages, more recent studies also provide the theoretical underpinnings for a 
causal link between trade and aggregate productivity growth
23
. For instance, 
Bernard et. al. (2003) provide an extension of Ricardian theory incorporating 
several countries, the importance of geographic (trade) barriers and imperfect 
competition. They find evidence for several basic facts about the US economy 
that cannot be justified by conventional trade theory: such as the much larger 
size and higher productivity of exporters; alongside observing that only a small 
fraction of firms actually export and of these that do only a small fraction of 
their  revenues  come  from  exporting.  In  an  important  paper,  Melitz  (2003) 
extends Krugman’s  (1980) model  to accommodate  firm  level  differences  in 
productivity in order to analyse the intra-industry effects of trade. It is shown 
that as a consequence of increasing exposure to trade, the most productive firms 
are induced to participate in export markets while less productive firms continue 
to serve the domestic market only, whereas the least productive firms drop out 
the market. It follows that trade-induced reallocations towards more efficient 
firms will eventually lead to aggregate productivity gains. As an extension to 
Melitz’s model to incorporate more than just exporting as an option when firms 
go global, Helpman et. al. (2004) have identified firms sort according to their 
productivity: the most productive firms set up overseas affiliates; the next most 
productive export; the less productive firms serve only the domestic market; 
whereas the least productive leave the industry.
24
22
For the effect of globalisation on firm performance in terms of exporting see Aw and Hwang (1995); 
Bernard and Wagner (1997); Clerides et al. (1998); Kraay (1999); Wagner (2002); Delgado et al. 
(2002), Castellani (2002); Girma et al. (2004); in terms of multinationality/FDI, see Davies and Lyons 
(1991); Caves (1996); Doms and Jensen  (1998); Aitken and Harrison (1999) Gomes and Ramaswamy 
(1999); Driffield (1999); Griffith and Simpson (2000); Harris (2002); Harris and Robinson (2003).    
23
For  recent  evidence  on  the  positive  trade-growth  nexus  in  the  macroeconomic  literature,  see 
Grossman and Helpman (1991); Sachs and Warner (1995); Ben-David and Loewy (1998); Edwards 
(1998); Rodrik and Rodriguez (2000). 
24
Other most recent international trade models incorporating firm-level heterogeneity also include 
Bernard et. al.(2003) based on Richardian differences in technological efficiency; Bernard et. al.( 
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
42
3.6  Lastly,  using  longitudinal  micro  data  for  the  UK,  Criscuolo et. al.  (2004) 
decompose aggregate productivity data to find that external restructuring (entry 
and exit) has a considerable impact on aggregate productivity growth. They then 
go on to show how this can at least in part be explained by globalisation (as 
measured by sectoral import competition), and the growth in use of information 
and communication technology (ICT).  
Export-Productivity Nexus 
3.7  There are several dimensions to how firms adjust to globalisation, with the most 
rapid growth in the literature concentrating on entry into international markets 
and whether this impacts upon firm-level productivity performance (and thus 
aggregate productivity growth). Therefore, to gain a better understanding of this 
aspect of firm-level adjustment to globalisation, in this chapter we focus our 
review on the literature regarding the linkage between trade and productivity in 
a context of export market entry. 
3.8  Productivity issues are central to analysing economic welfare thus providing a 
clear policy context. It follows that productivity/performance is the principal 
concern  when  considering  the  impacts  of  globalisation,  and  a  better 
understanding  of  the  globalisation  -  productivity  relationship  will  provide 
further knowledge about how firms behave when facing intense international 
competition. It’s important to note that, ‘productivity’ is used here not as the 
definitive, single characteristic that’s crucial to export, but more as a proxy for a 
range of characteristics that distinguish the better firms from the others, such as 
absorptive  capacity,  competence  bases,  human/organisational  capital,  etc. 
(Baldwin & Gu, 2003). Our principal focus here is the linkage between export-
market participation and performance (often measured by productivity) as well 
the  potential  intervening  role  of  other  trade-induced  adjustments  that  may 
impact upon any productivity – export relationship.  
3.9  Research  on this exporting-productivity relationship was initially empirically 
driven and it is universally found in the literature that exporting is positively 
associated with firm performance  (see  Greenaway and  Kneller (2004)  for  a 
2005b) on heterogeneous productivity; and Yeaple (2005) on heterogeneous competing technologies, 
trade costs and labour skills. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested