©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
43
recent survey). Nevertheless, despite this positive linkage, there is still much 
controversy about the causal direction of this link – whether causality runs from 
export  to  productivity,  or  the  other  way  around  (or  both,  i.e.  a  feedback 
relationship).  These  issues  are  often  examined  empirically  by  testing  two 
competing hypotheses, viz. self-selection and learning by exporting.  
Self-selection Hypothesis 
3.10  The self-selection hypothesis assumes that plants that enter export markets do so 
because they have higher productivity prior to entry, relative to non-entrants. 
Underlying these selection effects is substantial evidence of differences between 
those that  participate  in  export  markets  and  those that  do  not.  The  general 
consensus based on evidence from a number of countries is that exporters are, 
on average,  bigger, more  productive,  more capital intensive  and pay  higher 
wages vis-à-vis  non-participants. (e.g. Girma et al., 2004; Baldwin  and Gu, 
2004; Greenaway and Kneller, 2004). The reasons for export-oriented firms to 
exhibit  better  performance  are  intuitively  appealing:  since  increasing 
international  exposure  brings  about  more  intensive  competition,  firms  that 
internationalise are  forced  to  become  more  efficient so  as  to  enhance their 
survival  characteristics; meanwhile,  the existence of sunk entry  costs means 
exporters have to be more productive to overcome such fixed costs before they 
can realise expected profits.  
3.11  Based on evidence from industries and countries, it is broadly acknowledged in 
the  literature  that  more  productive  firms  self-select  into  export  markets.
25
However there are some disparate studies where exporters are not necessarily 
more efficient than non-exporters,  e.g. Bleaney and Wakelin (2002) with regard 
to UK manufacturing when controlling for innovating activity; Greenaway et al
(2003) for Swedish manufacturers with a relatively high level of international 
exposure on average; and Damijan et al. (2005) on firms in Slovenia where 
higher  productivity  is  required only  in  those  firms  that  export  to  advanced 
countries rather than those who export to developing nations.  
25
See Alvarez (2002) for Chile; Krray (1999) for China; Clerides et. al. (1998) for Colombia; Mexico 
and Morocco; Bernard and Wagner (1997) for Germany; Castellani (2002) for Italy; Delgado et al. 
(2002) for Spain; Greenaway and Kneller (2004) for the UK; Bernard and Jensen (1999) for the US; 
Aw and Hwang (1995) for Taiwan. 
Chart from pdf to powerpoint - software SDK dll:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Chart from pdf to powerpoint - software SDK dll:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
44
Learning-by-Exporting Hypothesis 
3.12  Turning now to the learning-by-exporting hypothesis, export-oriented firms are 
assumed to experience an acceleration in productivity growth following  entry. If 
this is not true, this has important policy implications – if better firms do self-
select into export markets, and exporting does not further boost productivity, 
then export subsidies could simply be a waste of resources (involving large-
scale dead weight and possibly even displacement effects given that firms that 
export also usually sell to domestic markets as well
26
).  
3.13  The learning-by-exporting  proposition  has, unfortunately,  received somewhat 
less support in the literature. Many early empirical studies raised doubts about 
the  causality  running  from  exporting  to  productivity,  since  they  found 
productivity growth did not increase post entry, notwithstanding that exporting 
firms  on  average  experienced  significantly  higher  growth  in  terms  of 
employment  and  wages.  (Aw  and  Hwang,  1995,  for  Taiwan;  Bernard  and 
Jensen, 1995 and 1999a, for the US; Bernard and Wagner, 1997, for Germany; 
Clerides et al., 1998, for Columbia, Mexico and Morocco; Delgado et al., 2002, 
for Spain; Wagner, 2002, for Germany). For example, applying a novel non-
parametric analysis of productivity distributions for Spanish firms, Delgado et 
al. (2002) failed to find significant differences between new exporters and 
continuing  exporters  by  analysing  the  post  entry  productivity  growth 
distribution. Analogically, exporters were found to be no different from non-
exporters,  although  limited  learning  effects  could  be  found  among  younger 
exporters. 
3.14   Nevertheless, some of the literature covered in Chapter 2, particularly in the 
business  management  field,  emphasises  the  importance  of  exporting  (or 
internationalisation  in  general)  as  a  learning  process.  The  process  of  going 
international is perceived as a sequence of stages in the firm’s growth trajectory, 
which  involves  substantial  learning  (and  innovating)  through  internal  and 
external  channels,  so  as  to  enhance  its  competence  base  and  improve  its 
performance.  Thus,  the  learning-by-exporting  proposition  is  consistent  with 
26
Robust empirical evidence shows that exporters tend to sell very small fractions of their output 
abroad (Aw et. al., 1997; Campas, 1999; Sullivan et. al., 1995). Note also, UK government policy is 
not to provide subsidies to exporters but to rather increase export market entry through combating 
market failures – see Chapter 4. However, the issue of deadweight and possible displacement is still 
relevant – see the discussion in par. 4.32 (chapter 4). 
software SDK dll:VB.NET Image: Multi-page TIFF Editor SDK; Process TIFF in VB.NET
class application. In this section, we list all supported VB.NET multi-page TIFF processing & editing APIs with following chart. If
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK dll:VB.NET TIFF: TIFF Converter Control SDK; Convert TIFF to Image &
From following chart, you will find brief summaries on each type of supported This VB.NET TIFF to PDF conversion control toolkit enables developers to perform
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
45
other  areas  of  literature  on  business  internationalisation.  Indeed,  positive 
learning effects for firms engaged in exporting have been identified, particularly 
for  some  of  the  economics  literature  and  where  different  econometric 
methodologies are adopted.  
3.15  For instance, in an attempt to examine the learning-by-exporting hypothesis, 
Kraay (1999) finds (using data for a sample of Chinese industrial enterprises) 
that past export is significantly associated with better total factor and labour 
productivity performance and he further shows that these learning effects are 
most  pronounced  among  established  exporters  although  they  can  be 
insignificant  and  occasionally  negative  in  new  entrants  to  export  markets.. 
Moreover, in  a firm-level survey on manufacturing productivity in five East 
Asian economies, Hallward-Driemeier et. al. (2002) not only identify higher 
productivity post export-market entry but go  one step further  to explore the 
sources and mechanisms of this productivity growth – it is in aiming for export 
markets  that firms consistently make a series of decisions that consequently 
accelerate  their  productivity,  with  regard  to  their  investment,  training, 
technology,  selection  of  inputs  etc.  This  is  consistent  with  the  notion  of 
absorptive capacity and the resource-based view discussed in Chapter 2.
27
3.16  What’s more, there’s also a strand of literature documenting evidence on the co-
existence of selection and learning effects. Baldwin and Gu (2003) explore the 
export-productivity linkage in Canadian manufacturing and find evidence that 
productivity  improves  following  export-market  participation;  in  contrast  to 
Kraay  (1999)  they  find  learning  effects  of  export  are  stronger  for  younger 
businesses. Using data for the UK chemical industry, Greenaway and Yu (2004) 
test both hypotheses and find strong evidence that firms self-selected into export 
markets; they however also report more varied learning effects dependent on the 
age of establishments – significant and positive for new entrants, less significant 
for more experienced exporters and negative for established exporters. More 
recently,  Girma et al. (2004)  use ‘propensity  score matching’ techniques to 
overcome  problems  of  selectivity  bias when  evaluating the  causal effect  of 
exporting on performance characteristics, and thus suggest that firms do self-
27
Castellani (2002) also reports a positive relationship between labour productivity and exporting 
intensity for Italian firms between 1989-1994– only firms substantially involved in exporting have 
significantly faster productivity growth. 
software SDK dll:C# Word: How to Read Barcodes from Word with C#.NET Library DLL
we list all supported linear and 2d barcode types in the following chart and you C# Word PDF-417 Barcode Reading Tutorial, Detecting C# ISBN Barcode from Word.
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK dll:VB.NET Image: VB.NET Sample Code to Draw EAN-13 Barcode on Image
AddFloatingItem(item) rePage.MergeItemsToPage() REFile.SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/ean13.pdf", New PDFEncoder From the chart below, you can view all the EAN-13
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
46
select  into  export  markets  but  that  exporting  also  further  boosts  firm-level 
productivity. 
3.17  Arguably the empirical evidence still remains inconclusive regarding the causal 
mechanisms  underlying  the  well-established  empirical  association  between 
export orientation and productivity growth, in particular whether the learning-
by-exporting hypothesis holds. Nevertheless, there may be several explanations 
to account for such discrepancies amongst the empirical literature in this area.  
3.18  To begin with, there are structural differences between the various databases 
used when testing for learning effects. Baldwin and Gu (2004) put forward a 
convincing explanation as to why there should be different learning effects in 
Canadian and US plants: learning from international best practices was more 
important for productivity growth in Canadian plants that export vis-à-vis US 
plants, whose principal source of raising productivity is technology developed 
domestically.  In  addition,  given  a  smaller  market  size  in  Canada  where 
competition is not as intense as in the US, exposure to international competition 
is  more  likely  to  induce  participants  to  become  more  productive  and 
competitive. Thirdly, expanding into much larger foreign markets relative to 
domestic  market,  Canadian  producers  will  benefit  from  greater  product 
specialisation  and  longer  production  runs, which  is  more  likely  to  have  an 
impact on productivity; whereas this is less of an issue in US firms given the 
already bigger domestic market. all of these will contribute to a greater export 
impact on productivity growth in Canada. 
3.19  Similar  mechanisms of raising  productivity  may  also apply in  the  UK.  For 
instance, learning benefits are likely to be less in the US firms that export vis-à-
vis UK firms, since the US firms are overall likely to be closer to technological 
frontier  (which  is  set  by  the  US),  and  they  are  also  exposed  to  a  more 
competitive  market  (Girma et al.,  2004).  In  contrast,  Sweden  has  a  high 
participation  rate  for  firms  involved  in  export  markets  and  high  degree  of 
openness, which to some extent resembles more the US economy. This may 
partly  explain  the  similar  performance  profiles  found  between  Swedish 
exporters and non-exporters (Greenaway et. al., 2003). 
3.20  In addition to these country-specific differences associated with the learning 
process, firm performance characteristics may well differ both within and across 
industries as well. From a resource-based viewpoint, in order to learn when 
software SDK dll:C# Excel: Read, Decode & Scan Barcode Image from Excel
link in the following chart. C# Excel: Read Data Matrix Barcode Image, C# Excel: Scan Interleaved 2 of 5 Barcode Image. C# Excel: Decode PDF-417 Barcode Image, C#
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
47
operating in foreign markets, and in order to internalise international knowledge 
spillovers,  a  firm  needs to  invest  more  in training  and  innovation so  as to 
enhance  its  absorptive  capability  to  exploit  and  assimilate  (often  tacit) 
knowledge that is obtained externally. This argument is substantiated by the 
evidence of significant learning effects uncovered in the UK chemical industry, 
which is a  typical  high-tech  sector that undertakes a  large amount of R&D 
expenditure. (Greenaway and Yu, 2004).      
3.21  Secondly,  the  heterogeneity  of  export  markets  may  also  play  a  role  in 
determining the extent to which participants will gain higher productivity from 
exporting.  For  instance,  Damijan et al.  (2005)  suggest  that  learning  from 
exporting is crucially dependent on the degree of competitive pressures facing 
firms  in  different  foreign  markets  –  exporting per se  does  not  warranty 
productivity gains; rather, productivity only improves significantly when firms 
are serving advanced, high-wage export markets. 
3.22  Lastly  and  most  importantly,  there  are  also  certain  methodological  issues 
involved when testing for productivity effect of exporting. A problem usually 
encountered  in  microeconometric  evaluation  studies  is sample selectivity.
28
This  problem arises when  making comparisons between  a ‘treatment group’ 
(e.g. export-market entrants) and the rest of the population, when it is known (or 
at least suspected) that the treatment group are not drawn randomly from the 
whole population. This issue is of paramount importance when interpreting the 
results obtained from comparing exporters and non-exporters, and upon which 
policy conclusions are then based.
29
3.23  More  specifically,  participants  in  export  markets  may  posses  certain 
characteristics such that they achieve better performance (in terms of higher 
productivity)  vis-à-vis non-participants  even  when  they  do  not  enter  export 
markets, and this productivity gain is correlated with the decision to participate 
28
Another possible econometric problem may arise when most of the empirical studies tend to pool 
information across all firms with heterogeneous export histories to examine these learning effects of 
exporting. In fact, distinct learning effects are uncovered amid firms of different age (Krray, 1999; 
Delgado et. al., 2002; Baldwin and Gu, 2003; Greenaway and Yu, 2004).  For instance, Krray (1999) 
allows export history to have an effect on learning effects (by allowing the coefficient on lagged export 
to vary with the export history of the plant), and finds significantly positive effects of exporting merely 
in more established Chinese firms.   
29
See Harris (2005) for a brief survey; Blundell and Costa Dias (2000) and Heckman and Navarro-
Lozano (2004) for a comprehensive review of the sample selectivity issue and various approaches to 
this. More technicalities of the selection problem are treated in the Appendix for interested readers. 
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
48
in the global market. This will mean that standard estimation techniques lead to 
biased results. These characteristics would likely include superior managerial 
capability, organisational skills, absorptive capacity, etc. They are associated 
both  with  achieving  higher  productivity  and  the decision  to  self-select  into 
export markets. 
3.24  That ignoring selectivity problem leads to biased results is indeed reinforced by 
the theoretical evidence of the heterogeneity of firm productivity prior to entry 
(Head and Ries, 2003; Melitz, 2003; Helpman et. al., 2004) and the unanimous 
empirical  evidence  of  significant  differences  between  exporters  and  non-
exporters (in terms of productivity, employment, capital-intensity, R&D, etc.), 
but similar characteristics between new exporters and continuing exporters. 
3.25  Several standard approaches have been proposed in the literature to combat this 
selection problem. One approach is ‘matching’ i.e. selecting a valid ‘control’ 
group to compare exporters’ performance with only those non-exporters with 
similar characteristics to those that export are chosen for the control group. This 
approach  therefore  assumes  that  the  treated  and  non-treated  groups  are 
effectively the same in all relevant respects (except the non-treated group do not 
export) so that the productivity outcome that would prevail in the absence of 
treatment  is  the  same  in  both  cases.  Using  a  propensity  score  matching 
approach, Girma et. al., (2004) found significantly positive post-entry learning 
effects for UK exporters.
3.26  Another technique for eliminating selectivity bias is the difference-in-difference 
estimator. For example, in conjunction with matching, Greenaway and Kneller 
(2004) use a difference-in-difference approach to control for changes in other 
observable  determinants  of  productivity  post  entry,  and  find  that  there  are 
significant productivity gains from exporting in the unmatched sample but these 
disappear when they use a matched sample. Other approaches suggested in the 
literature  to  deal  with  self-selection  bias  include  instrumental  variable 
estimation and Heckman two-stage estimation, which are closely linked in a 
way.
30,31
30
For instance, Kneller and Pisu (2005) provide an example of deploying Heckman selection process to 
model two decisions of whether to export or not and how much to export, but in a different setting - 
export spillovers from FDI. To our knowledge, there are few studies utilising instrumental variable 
estimation to examine the causality between export and productivity, possibly due to lack of 
appropriate instruments.  
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
49
3.27  In a nutshell, although the empirical literature presents compelling evidence in 
favour of the self-selection hypothesis, the  findings are less conclusive with 
respect  to  the  learning-by-exporting  hypothesis.  The  results  obtained  in  the 
literature  are  of  great  importance  for  policy  marking  and  their  policy 
implications will be discussed in Chapter 4.   
Other Characteristics of Firm-Level Adjustment  
3.28  In order to get a complete picture of firm-level adjustment to globalisation, we 
also need  to  examine some  other factors characterising firm behaviour  in  a 
global market. This will help to put the export-productivity relationship into 
context, and explain the underlying resources for such a relationship. 
Innovation 
3.29  First and foremost, innovation  is generally perceived as the major driving force 
behind exporting in trade theories (Vernon, 1966; Krugman, 1979, 1995). From 
a firm perspective, exporters need to invest in R&D and training to develop 
internally  by  absorbing,  assimilating  and  managing  technologies  and  ideas 
obtained  in  foreign  markets.  Innovation  facilitates  a  firm’s  competency 
development and brings about scale and scope economies. The resulting greater 
production  efficiency  enables  firms  to  expand  their  domestic  market  share 
through import substitution,  and most  importantly, to penetrate new foreign 
markets and increase their exports share.
32
This is in line with the notion of 
absorptive capacity and the crucial role of R&D in developing such capacity, 
thereby allowing firms to internalise external knowledge (Cohen and Levinthal, 
1989, 1990). This may help to explain how differences in productivity effect 
export-market participation as observed in heterogeneous firms, industries and 
countries.
33
Empirically,  Bleaney  and  Wakelin  (2002)  and  Roper  and  Love 
(2002) have reported significant differences in terms of R&D expenditures at 
plant level between exporters and non-exporters in UK manufacturing, and thus 
31
A comparison of relative merits of all approaches is available in the Appendix. 
32
Note, firms that export usually only sell a small proportion of their output in foreign markets. 
Therefore when they expand due to efficiency gains, they can capture additional shares in both 
domestic and foreign markets. 
33
See Aw et. al. (2000) for a comparative study between Taiwan and South Korea. 
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
50
the moderating effect of innovation on the export-productivity nexus; similar 
findings are also suggested for the US (Bernard and Jensen, 2001), and Canada 
(Baldwin and Gu, 2004). In particular, Baldwin and Gu (2004) made use of data 
for Canadian manufacturers to test whether exporters had higher levels of R&D. 
The results show that undertaking R&D is 10% higher (after controlling for 
other relevant covariates such as size) for exporters (but there is no statistically 
significant  differential  in  favour  of  exporters  prior  to  their 
internationalisation).Thus, they show some evidence for increased innovation 
activity after internationalising, which is consistent with their arguments that 
benefits from export-market entry are not ‘automatic’ – in order to achieve post-
entry productivity gains, exporters invest more in R&D and human capital to 
acquire more foreign technologies and develop enhanced absorptive capacities. 
Industrial/Spatial Agglomeration  
3.30  Others concentrate on the role of certain structural  factors in increasing the 
probability of export market entry. Firstly, the importance of geographic factors 
is captured in Overman et. al.’s (2003) survey of the literature on the economic 
geography  of  trade  flows  and  the  location of production. If  information  on 
foreign market opportunities and costs is asymmetric, then it is reasonable to 
expect  firms  to  cluster  within  the  same  industry/region  so  as  to  achieve 
information sharing and therefore minimise entry costs. Co-location may help 
improve information about foreign markets and tastes so as to provide better 
channels through which firms distribute their goods (Aitken et. al., 1997). There 
are usually two dimensions to these agglomeration effects – a regional effect 
and  an  industrial  effect.  The  former  comprises  the  spatial  concentration  of 
exporters  (from  various  industries).  Whereas  the  industry  effect  is  where 
exporting  firms  from  the  same  industry  co-locate.  Greenaway  and  Kneller 
(2004) provide empirical evidence that shows that the industrial dimension of 
agglomeration would appear to be more important for the UK while Bernard 
and Jensen (2001) found it to be insignificant in explaining the probability of 
exporting in the US. The benefits brought about by the co-location of firms on 
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
51
the export decision have also been documented in other empirical studies, for 
instance, Aitken et al. (1997) for Mexico.
34
Market Concentration 
3.31  In a similar way, market concentration is also expected to positively impact 
upon a firm’s propensity to export and its performance post entry. A high level 
of Concentration of exporters within an industry may improve the underlying 
infrastructure that is necessary to facilitate access to international markets or to 
access  information  on  the  demand  characteristics  of  foreign  consumers. 
Therefore,  we  might  expect  a  higher  propensity  for  non-participants  to  go 
international  in  a  market  with  a  higher  degree  of  concentration  of  export 
activity. Evidence for UK manufacturing covering the 1988 to 2002 period is 
provided by Greenaway and Kneller (2003).  
Export Spillovers 
3.32  Alongside  these  location  effects  is  the  impact  of export spillovers,  i.e. 
knowledge spillovers from foreign firms that impact on the export decision of 
domestic firms. These spillovers take place if there is a transfer of knowledge 
from about foreign markets to domestic firms. This linkage is derived from the 
literature on international knowledge diffusion. International trade is argued to 
be a conduit for the transfer of knowledge and thus conducive to productivity 
growth (Grossman and Helpman, 1991). From a firm perspective, participation 
in  international  markets  brings  firms  into  contact  with  international  best 
practices and facilitates learning and competency development. Following Coe 
and Helpman’s (1995) seminal piece on international R&D spillovers, there has 
been an increasing interest on the impact of spillovers. It is widely felt that such 
spillovers provide positive information externalities (Aitken et. al., 1997), and 
as a public good these knowledge spillovers cane help domestic recipients to 
achieve higher technological standards with less effort.  
3.33   The positive effect of export spillovers result from both supply and demand 
side impacts. The supply side argument is derived from the existence of sunk 
entry costs as discussed in Chapter 2. Export market entry costs arise as a result 
34
In contrast, in a recent study for US plants, Bernard and Jensen (2004) find negligible spillovers 
resulting from the export activities of other plants; nevertheless, this discrepancy between other studies 
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
52
of  imperfect  information  when  establishing  foreign  marketing  channels, 
developing  new  packaging/product  varieties,  and  learning  bureaucratic 
procedures, etc. By their very nature, information spillovers can significantly 
reduce any problems of information asymmetry and therefore lower start up 
costs, so allowing rational firms to enter export market when the present value 
of their anticipated profits exceed current fixed costs. In contrast, there may also 
be  a  demand-side  impact  associated  with  export  spillovers:  following  the 
establishment of a presence in overseas market, foreign awareness of (and thus 
demand for) domestically produced goods may also rise, pulling more domestic 
firms into export markets. 
3.34  In  addition,  Kneller  and  Pisu  (2005)  examined  the  role  of  FDI  industrial 
linkages  in explaining export activity at  the  firm-level. They found  that the 
decision to enter an export market was positively related to the  presence of 
foreign plants in the same industry and region; the decision concerning how 
much  to  export was  affected  positively by  the presence  of foreign firms in 
downstream  industries.  In  a  recent  study  using  a large  panel  of  UK  firms, 
Greenaway et. al. (2004) also find evidence of positive spillover effects from 
multinational  enterprises  (henceforth  MNEs)  on  the  decision  to  export  of 
domestic (UK) firms, and on their export propensity. 
International outsourcing 
3.35  Finally,  we  detect  a  growing  interest  in  the  literature  of  the  impact  of 
international outsourcing on productivity in globalised firms. The rationale for 
expecting  a  positive  effect  from  outsourcing  in  international  markets  is 
consistent with the notion of learning and absorptive capacity as discussed in 
Chapter 2. As pointed out by Görg, et. al. (2005), in the short run domestic 
plants that are engaged in international outsourcing may have greater access to 
internationally  traded  inputs  at  lower  costs/higher  quality  than  is  available 
domestically; in the long run, such outsourcing activity may also bring about a 
reallocation  of  factor  shares,  and  consequently  a  further  impact  upon 
productivity. Therefore we might expect the increasing use of internationally 
traded inputs to boost productivity in these ‘extroverted’ plants.  
may be explained by their sample selection criteria (restrictive to large plants only) and measures of 
industry (2 digit level) and regions (measured by states). 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested