©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
53
3.36  Recently Grossman and Helpman (2005) have developed a general equilibrium 
model to theoretically analyse the relationship between trade and outsourcing. 
Motivated by  this  work, several empirical  studies  have  emerged to test the 
implications of the Grossman and Helpman (op.cit) model. Egger and Egger 
(2005)  examine  the  link  between  international  outsourcing  and  labour 
productivity  (of  low  skilled  workers)  and  found  that  in  the  short  run,  the 
productivity of low skilled workers is negatively correlated with cross-border 
fragmentation in the EU; whereas in the long run, this linkage turns out to be 
positive. This turnaround is explained by short-run labour market rigidities and 
long-run  factor  mobility  respectively.  Based  on  panel  data  from  Irish 
manufacturing, Görg et al. (2005) also provide empirical evidence of positive 
productivity  gains  attributed  to  international outsourcing for  Irish firms  that 
exported. 
Microeconomic  Implications  for  Reallocations  of  Resources  and 
Aggregate Productivity 
3.37  Having  discussed  firm-level  productivity  advantages  that  are  conferred  by 
participation in global markets, we now  explore the linkage between export 
market dynamics and aggregate productivity. There is an emerging strand of 
literature that focuses on the impact of firm-level exporting (or importing) on 
inter  or  intra  industry  reallocations  of  resources  and  therefore  aggregate 
productivity growth. This approach provides a holistic view of the interaction of 
plants, industries and the aggregate economy as a whole.  
Export Market Dynamics 
3.38  The process of entry and exit in export markets 
35
differs from market entry and 
exit in the conventional sense, since the firm can continue to produce for the 
35
As discussed in Chapter 2 (and in this chapter), general empirical findings show that the 
determinants of a firm’s entry decision include trade liberalisation (Baldwin and Gu, 2004), sunk entry 
costs (Das et. al., 2001; Bernard & Jensen 2004a;  Girma et. al., 2004)  and some firm-level 
characteristics such as size (Aw and Hwang, 1995; Roberts and Tybout, 1997; Bleaney and Wakelin, 
2002; Gourley and Seaton, 2004); experience including ex-ante success (Bernard and Jensen, 1999a; 
Greenaway and Kneller, 2004; Kneller and Pisu, 2005); export spillovers (Aitken et. al., 1997; 
Greenaway et. al., 2004); foreign networks (Sjoholm, 2003). A firm’s exit decision depends mainly 
upon industrial characteristics such as the level of sunk costs; the firm will exit once it is not productive 
enough to secure non-negative profits (Das et. al, 2001; Bernard and Jensen, 2004a).         
Convert pdf to ppt - application software tool:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to ppt - application software tool:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
54
domestic  market.  Baldwin  and  Gu  (2003)  found  export  entry  to  involve 
substantial experimentation. They emphasise the importance of an ‘entry fee’ as 
an  initial  investment,  which  is  in  line  with  the  general  consensus  of  the 
importance of sunk costs.
36
Entrants to export markets have to achieve superior 
performance before they enter and are rewarded with even better performance 
after they penetrate these foreign markets.  
3.39  Export market dynamics have been modelled in recent studies by incorporating 
intra-industry heterogeneity. In their model, Bernard et al (2003) show that in a 
setting of Bertrand pricing rules, trade liberalisation expands the market shares 
of the most productive firms by providing them with large export markets, while 
at  the  same  time  such  liberalisation  forces  firms  at  the  lower  end  of  the 
productive efficiency distribution to quit as international competition intensifies. 
In a slightly different setting, Melitz (2003) develops a forward-looking model 
of  steady-state  trade with heterogeneous firms and  imperfect  competition  to 
show that trade liberalisation increases a country’s imports and erodes domestic 
sales and profits. Firms at the higher end of the productivity distribution expand 
their export sales more than they contract their domestic sales; whereas those 
non-exporters at the lowest end of the productivity distribution have to contract 
or  quit.  Consequently,  freer  trade  induces  aggregate  productivity  gains,  as 
‘better’ firms expand their market shares and the ‘worst’ firms contract or exit. 
3.40  Empirically, the effect of transitions into and out of export markets on firm 
performance is  often captured by  its export premium ,  which  measures  how 
much a firm’s performance changes when its export status changes (Bernard 
and Jensen, 1999 for the US; Aw et. al., 2000 for Korea and Taiwan; Silvente, 
2005 for the UK). The studies of the US, Korean and Taiwan found that when 
firms  switch  from  being  non-exporters  to  becoming  exporters,  their 
performance  improves,  while  switching  from  being  exporters  to  being 
domestically-oriented  firms  retards  their  performance.  In  Silvente’s  study, 
which covers a sample of UK small firms over a 7 year period, it is also shown 
36
A persistence transition in and out of exporting has been observed by Bernard and Jensen (2004) – a 
high degree of re-entry by former exporters and high propensity to stop exporting in former non-
exporters. There are at least two competing views to explain this persistence – the sunk costs argument 
(i.e. exporting begets exporting) and view of firm’s heterogeneous attributes (certain firms are more 
export-oriented). In Bernard and Jensen (op. tic), attempt to identify the roles of both sunk costs and 
plant heterogeneity and confirm the significant presence of both. Nevertheless, it remained unanswered 
as to how firms acquire these characteristics that facilitate their entry into foreign markets. 
application software tool:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Download Free Trial. Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Easy converting! We try to make it as easy as possible to convert your PPTX/PPT files to PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
application software tool:How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word
How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word. Online C# Tutorial for Converting PDF, MS-Excel, MS-PPT to Word. PDF, MS-Excel, MS-PPT to Word Conversion Overview.
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
55
that there are symmetric effects on the export premium between entrants and 
exiters – new exporters enjoy considerable gains while exiters from overseas 
markets  suffer  significant  losses  in terms  of  employment,  wages,  sales  and 
productivity growth rates.
37
Figure 3.1  Paths of TFP for Different Types of Firms in US Manufacturing 
(purged of industry and year effects) 
Source: Bernard and Jensen (2004b) 
3.41  Figure  3.1  reports  productivity  differentials  between  distinct  sub-groups  of 
firms in US manufacturing. New entrants into export markets are rewarded with 
a surge in TFP especially during the first year post entry, and thereafter their 
productivity  path  becomes  flatter,  following  that  of  continuous  exporters 
(although with significantly lower productivity levels). In contrast, those that 
exit  from  exporting  are  characterised  by  ea  substantial  deterioration  in 
productivity to eventually resemble the flat growth trajectory of continuous non-
exporters. On the whole, firms that always export achieve TFP growth that is 8 
to 9 percent higher than those that never enter export markets. Thus, changing 
export status is indeed associated with considerable fluctuations in productivity. 
Nevertheless, these drastic changes in  TFP during transition do not seem to 
37
The results from these studies control for the impact of covariates, such as size and industry effects.  
application software tool:How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF
How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF. Online C# Tutorial for Converting MS Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint to PDF. How to C#: Convert PPT to PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
application software tool:C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document. Provide Free Demo Code for PDF Conversion from Microsoft PowerPoint in C# Program.
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
56
persist  in  the  long  run,  and  with  reference  to  the  learning-by-exporting 
hypothesis, continuous export behaviour does not appear to lead to more rapid 
productivity growth; rather, TFP growth slows down. 
3.42  Similarly, Baldwin and Gu (2003) also point to a negative impact for those that 
exit  -  the  ‘ebb  and  flow’  induced  by  international  competition  culls  some 
participants from export markets. The least successful entrants have to withdraw 
back  to  domestic  markets  and  then  lag  further  behind  those  that  continue 
serving foreign markets. That is, productivity growth is lower for quitters than 
continuers, and substantially lower when compared to new entrants to export 
markets.
38
Restructuring and Aggregate Productivity Growth 
3.43  So how does this export market restructuring impact on aggregate productivity 
growth?  Before  addressing  this  issue,  we  consider  the  interaction  of  firms, 
industries and aggregate productivity growth.  
3.44  A rapidly growing body of research has sought to provide micro evidence on the 
role  of  resource  reallocation  for  productivity  growth.
39
Some  of  the 
representatives studies include Baily et al. (1992),  Bartelsman and Dhrymes 
(1998), Olley and Pakes (1996), Haltiwanger (1997) and Foster et al. (2001) for 
the US; and Disney et. al. (2003) and Harris 92004) for the UK. These are 
mostly  based  on some form  of decomposition of  an index of  industry-level 
productivity. For instance, Olley and Pakes (1996) examined the dynamics of 
productivity  in  the  US  telecommunications  equipment  industry  over  three 
decades,  and  show  that  since  1975  most  of  the  productivity  growth  in  the 
industry had arisen from a reallocation of resources, particularly the high exit 
probabilities for plants in the low end of the productivity distribution. 
3.45  However, none of these studies include the aggregate productivity enhancing 
effects of internationalisation. More recent studies for the US, UK, Canada and 
Sweden have sought to overcome this omission, and we now turn to examine 
each of these in turn. 
38
In addition, the negative impact of exit on firm efficiency is also captured in Bernard and Wagner 
(1997) and Clerides et. al. (1998). 
39
See Bartelsman and Doms (2000) for a survey of the literature in this regard. Note, resource 
reallocation can comprise intra-firm reallocations (no firms become more efficient), inter-firm 
reallocations (as less efficient firms loose market share), and the impact of new firm entry and exit 
(with a presumption that new firms are more productive than those that exit). 
application software tool:C# TIFF: Learn to Convert MS Word, Excel, and PPT to TIFF Image
PPTXDocument doc = new PPTXDocument(@"demo.pptx"); if (null == doc) throw new Exception("Fail to load PowerPoint Document"); // Convert PPT to Tiff.
www.rasteredge.com
application software tool:VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
VB.NET PowerPoint processing control add-on can do PPT creating, loading We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
57
The United States 
3.46  Motivated  by  the  empirical  evidence  of  the  effect  of  trade  on  productivity 
Melitz  (2003)  developed  a  theoretical  model  that  allows  for  heterogeneous 
firms,  to  analyse  trade,  intra-industry  reallocations  and  aggregate  industry 
productivity  effects.  In  a general  equilibrium setting, the model  shows how 
trade liberalisation  induces only the more  productive  firms to participate in 
export markets whilst simultaneously forcing the least productive ones out of 
the market. Here the additional sales gained by more efficient firms, and exit of 
the  least efficient ones,  jointly contribute to a  reallocation of market  shares 
towards  the  more  productive  firms  and  this  eventually  leads  to  aggregate 
productivity gains. Thus profits are also equally reallocated towards more the 
productive firms. This model highlights an important transmission channel for 
understanding the interaction of firms and industry performance, incorporating 
the two most frequently cited views of what determines the export status of a 
firm viz. the existence of sunk entry costs as well as firm-level heterogeneity.  
Above all, it is crucial to treat establishments differently in the sense that the 
impact of trade is distributed differently across firms with different levels of 
productivity. That is, the trade-induced reallocation effect among heterogeneous 
firms generates changes in a country’s aggregate productivity that cannot be 
explained by a model based on representative firms (as in most conventional 
trade models).  
3.47  A more recent development in the theoretical modelling of trade can be found in 
Bernard et. al. (2005b). In a similar fashion, they show how the interactions of 
firms,  industries  and  countries  can  affect  the  way  economies  respond  to 
globalisation,  again  within  a  general  equilibrium  setting  incorporating 
monopolistic  competition  and  heterogeneous  firms.  However  they  take  a 
different approach in that they concentrate on  comparative advantage. Their 
model generates a number of novel predictions about the impact of falling trade 
costs on job turnover, aggregate productivity and the welfare gains obtained 
through  a  reallocation  of  resources.  First  of  all,  intra-  and  inter-industry 
reallocations of resources brought about by trade liberalisation improve average 
industry  productivity  and  sectoral  firm  output,  but  relatively  more  so  in 
industries with a comparative advantage than in industries with comparative 
application software tool:VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
VB.NET PowerPoint - Render PPT to PDF in VB.NET. How to Convert PowerPoint Slide to PDF Using VB.NET Code in .NET. Visual C#. VB.NET. Home > .NET Imaging SDK >
www.rasteredge.com
application software tool:VB.NET PowerPoint: Read & Scan Barcode Image from PPT Slide
VB.NET PPT PDF-417 barcode scanning SDK to detect PDF-417 barcode image from PowerPoint slide. VB.NET APIs to detect and decode
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
58
disadvantages industries. Secondly, these trade-induced reallocations also lead 
to considerable job turnover in all industries, with ultimately net job creation in 
comparative  advantage  industries  and  net  job  destruction  in  comparative 
disadvantaged ones. Thirdly, the creative destruction of firms taking place in all 
sectors in the steady state, but this is more highly concentrated in comparative 
advantage  industries  vis-à-vis  comparative  disadvantage  ones.  Lastly,  the 
productivity  gains  from  creative  destruction,  which  is  associated  with 
heterogeneous  firms,  magnify  ex ante comparative advantages  and therefore 
constitute a new channel for welfare gains, as trade costs fall. 
3.48  This model distinguishes itself from that developed in Melitz (2003) principally 
in  that  it  allows  for  different  results  across  industries  and  countries  with 
comparative  advantages.  For  instance,  the  importance  of  firm  self-selection 
varies with the complex interactions of country and industry characteristics; and 
the strength of gross job flows and the extent of steady-state creative destruction 
all differ across industries and countries.  
3.49  Lastly, Bernard and Jensen (2004b) provide an empirical study of trade-induced 
aggregate productivity growth, utilising micro data for US manufacturing. It is 
shown that foreign exposure does indeed foster productivity growth for firms, 
industries  and  manufacturing  as  a  whole.  In  particular,  increased  export 
opportunities are associated with both intra- and inter- industry reallocations 
(from less efficient plants to more efficient ones), accounting for 40% of TFP 
growth in the manufacturing  sector, half of  which is explained by  an intra-
industry reallocation of economic activity. Thus, the higher productivity levels 
as well as the faster growth rates found in exporters (in terms of employment 
and output) offer an additional reallocative channel for explaining aggregate 
productivity growth.
40
The United Kingdom 
3.50  Emerging evidence on industrial restructuring has shown that UK productivity 
growth  is  increasingly  due  to  a  market  selection  process,  in  which  more 
productive  entrants  replace  less  productive  establishment  whilst  high 
40
A limitation of this study was that market entry and exit was not considered; all plants in the dataset 
existed throughout the period of study. Thus, there is no comparison of the relative importance of 
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
59
productivity incumbents gain market shares (Oulton, 2000; Disney et. al., 2003; 
Harris and Robinson, 2001). In particular, the study by Disney et. al. suggest 
that between 1980 and 1992, 50% of labour productivity growth and 80-90% 
TFP  growth could  be  explained  by what  they  termed  external  restructuring 
effects  (i.e.  the  impact  of  market  entry  and  exit  as  well  as  inter-firm 
reallocations in market shares). Using comparable data and a similar approach, 
Harris (2004) reports that over the 1990-98 period, the growth in manufacturing 
TFP did not benefit from incumbents improving or through a reallocation of 
market shares from ‘worse’ to ‘better’ plants; rather TFP benefited mostly from 
the ‘churning’ of plants whereby plants with higher TFP entered and those with 
below average TFP were more likely to exit.  
3.51  Given the importance of industry restructuring effects on productivity growth in 
the UK, Criscuolo et. al. (2004) extend Disney et. al.’s (2003) analysis to cover 
the 1990s (i.e. for 1980-2000 period), for UK manufacturing. Unfortunately, it 
is not possible to assess the contribution of exporters for the UK, in terms of 
restructuring effects due to lack of data. The innovative feature of this study is 
their  attempt  to  explain  entry/exit  restructuring  effects  in  terms  of  the 
contribution  of  globalisation  (and  ICT),  and  thus  how  the  latter  impact  on 
aggregate productivity growth. They found that the reallocations of resources 
(through entry and exit) affected aggregate productivity to an increasingly large 
extent – roughly 25% of productivity growth could be accounted for by this net 
entry effect in 1980-85 and this  amount went up  to  around  40%  of  labour 
productivity growth in 1995-2000. They then went on to show that globalisation 
(as measured by sectoral import penetration and the use of ICT) was important 
in determining the share of net entry in explaining labour productivity growth in 
UK  manufacturing.  However,  the  results  suffered  from  a  high  level  of 
aggregation and co-linearity problems, precluding any precise estimates of what 
proportion  of  aggregate  productivity  growth  was  due  to  import  penetration 
effects. 
Other Countries 
‘creative destruction’, and most importantly how internationalisation interacted with market entry and 
exit. 
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
60
3.52  Finally,  a  limited  amount  of  micro  evidence  of  trade-induced  productivity 
growth, is available for some other countries. For instance, Baldwin and Gu 
(2003) found exporters accounted for almost 75% of  productivity growth in 
Canadian  manufacturing  during  the  1990s  (even  with  less  than  50% 
employment), 28% of which was accounted for by export market entry (both 
existing and new  entrants).  Moreover,  Falvey et al.  (2004)  also  found  that 
exporting had a sizeable effect on industry productivity growth using Swedish 
manufacturing data, in terms of increasing market shares for higher productivity 
exporters.     
Conclusions 
3.53  In this chapter, we address the issues associated with the export-productivity 
nexus from a firm perspective. The relationship between international trade and 
business performance is central to our understanding of firm-level adjustment of 
globalisation and also provides important implications  for policy making. In 
particular, we have focused on the causal link between export and productivity 
at plant level, i.e. whether productivity leads firms to participate in international 
markets, or whether exporting further boosts productivity, or both?  
3.54  We  have  reviewed  two  related  hypotheses and  evidence  in  the  literature to 
address this causality issue. With respect to the self-selection hypothesis, the 
empirical  findings  mostly  suggest  that  exporters  are  indeed  significantly 
different  from  non-exporters,  e.g.  bigger,  more  productive,  more  capital-
incentive, etc. Nevertheless, it is the learning-by-exporting hypothesis that still 
remains controversial arising from various empirical studies.  
3.55  In  terms  of  the  pronounced  differences  in  empirical  findings  regarding  the 
existence of the ‘learning-by-exporting’ hypothesis, some possible factors that 
may account for this are as follows:  
This effect is likely to differ in terms of its importance across countries 
(i.e. it is dependent on the size of the domestic economy vis-à-vis the 
size  of  overseas  markets  and/or  the  overall  exposure  of  domestic 
markets to foreign trade). Hence, a positive effect is found for Canada 
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
61
while none is found for the US (and the evidence for the UK suggests 
there is a small effect that quickly disappears);  
There  are  sample-selection  econometric  issues  that  impact  on  our 
ability to measure  (without bias)  any ‘learning-by-exporting’ effect, 
which are linked to the fact that exporters do seem to ‘self-select’ into 
exporting (i.e. they are not a random sample of the population of all 
firms). 
There  is  some  evidence  that  any  ‘learning-by-exporting’  effect  is 
relatively small and probably confined to only having an influence in 
the short-run, disappearing over the medium to longer term. 
3.56  Irrespective  of whether  firms  self-select  into export  markets and/or  become 
more productive post-entry, there is a need to consider the potential impact of 
internationalisation on aggregate productivity growth. We find that despite the 
fact that this is a new area of research, there is already a considerable consensus 
(based  on  limited  empirical  evidence)  that  dynamic  restructuring  of  the 
economy  results  in  larger  market  shares for  the  most efficient (and  usually 
larger) firms that export, and this has a sizeable impact on boosting aggregate 
productivity.  Clearly,  more  evidence  is  needed  covering  a  wider  range  of 
countries  (including  the  UK)  on  how  important  such  restructuring,  due  to 
increased internationalisation, really is. We also need more information on how 
import  penetration  (and  inward  FDI)  impacts  on  competitiveness  at  the 
firm/plant  level,  since  the  evidence  on  spillovers  from  FDI  is  generally 
inconclusive, while  evidence on  the impact of import  penetration  is  largely 
absent.  
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
62
Appendix 
Sample Selectivity Associated With Learning Effects 
A3.1 A particular issue when testing learning-by-exporting hypothesis has been that 
of sample selectivity (or matching).
41
Here we describe the econometrics of the 
selectivity problem in more detail.  
A3.2 A number of studies attempt to make comparisons between a ‘treatment’ group 
(e.g.  those  plants  that  participate  in  export  markets)  and  the  rest  of  the 
population when it’s known or suspected that the treatment group are not a 
random  sample  drawn  from  the  population  of  all  plants.  To  illustrate  the 
problem,  the  standard  evaluation  problem  in  the  literature  will  be  briefly 
presented (cf. Heckman, 2000, and Heckman and Navarro-Lozano, 2004). The 
key  issue  is  measuring  without  bias  the  outcome Y
i
for  plants  in  terms  of 
whether they exported D
or not. That is: 
( 3.1)
0]
1] [
[
A
EY D
EY D
i
i
i
i
=
= −
To measure the impact using equation (A3.1), we only have the following 
information: 
( 3.2)
0]
1] [
[
0
1
A
EY D
EY D
i
i
i
i
=
= −
that is, the difference between what exporters (D
=1) experience in terms of 
outcome (
1
i
) and what non-exporters (D
= 0) experience (
0
i
). What is not 
observed  is  the  outcome  for  exporters  had  they  not  exported 
(i.e.
1]
[
0
=
i
i
EY D
). The latter counterfactual can be used to expand (A3.2) to 
give the following: 
( 3.3)
0]}
[
1]
1] { { [
[
0
0
0
1
A
EY D
EY D
Y D
EY
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
=
= −
= +
41
See Moffitt (2004).  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested