NB: Phrases with @ sign can no longer be selected for use in the ICSCs
1
Compiler's Guide - Updated August 2010 
TABLE OF CONTENTS
10000000: HISTORY................................................................................................................2 
11000000: IDENTIFICATION.................................................................................................2 
12000000  PHYSICAL  PROPERTIES....................................................................................5 
13000000   I M P O R T A N T   D A T A................................................................................14 
13100000  PHYSICAL STATE; APPEARANCE:.............................................................14 
13200000  PHYSICAL DANGERS:...................................................................................20 
13300000  CHEMICAL DANGERS:..................................................................................22 
13400000  OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE LIMITS (OELs):..........................................37 
13500000  ROUTES OF EXPOSURE:...............................................................................46 
13600000  INHALATION RISK:.......................................................................................49 
13700000  EFFECTS OF SHORT-TERM EXPOSURE:...................................................54 
13800000  EFFECTS OF LONG-TERM OR REPEATED EXPOSURE:.........................64 
13900000  ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICITY:........................................................................72 
14000000  FIRE:......................................................................................................................75 
15000000 EXPLOSION:.........................................................................................................85 
16000000 EXPOSURE............................................................................................................89 
17100000 Inhalation............................................................................................................92 
18100000  Skin....................................................................................................................97 
19100000  Eyes..................................................................................................................103 
20100000  Ingestion...........................................................................................................107 
21000000 SPILLAGE DISPOSAL........................................................................................111 
22000000 STORAGE............................................................................................................125 
23000000 PACKAGING & LABELLING...........................................................................130 
24000000  N O T E S.............................................................................................................137 
27000000  REFERENCES....................................................................................................147 
APPENDICES.......................................................................................................................149 
Calculation of the saturated vapour pressure of organic liquids........................................150 
Calculation of the density of vapours as a means of estimating their pattern of dispersion
............................................................................................................................................152 
Minimum ignition energy..................................................................................................154 
Calculation of the pH of medium strong or weak acids and bases....................................156 
Relative Inhalation Risk index (RIR index).......................................................................158 
Odour Safety Factor (O.S.F.).............................................................................................160 
Abbreviations.....................................................................................................................163 
Revisions to the Compiler’s Guide approved in April 2010..............................................165 
Revisions to the Compiler’s Guide approved in April 2009..............................................171 
Revisions to the Compiler’s Guide approved in November 2008.....................................176 
Revisions to the Compiler’s Guide approved in April 2008..............................................181 
Revisions to the Compiler’s Guide approved in November 2007.....................................182 
How to change pdf to ppt on - C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
change pdf to powerpoint; convert pdf file to ppt online
How to change pdf to ppt on - VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
converting pdf to powerpoint slides; conversion of pdf into ppt
NB: Phrases with @ sign can no longer be selected for use in the ICSCs
2
10000000: HISTORY
10010000  Authors:   [] 
Expl. Name of Participating Institute with primary responsibility for completion of this ICSC.  
Ind. If an update, also indicate the Participating Institute of previous versions. Add also to the section 
'History'. 
10030000  Second Reviewer: 
Expl. Name of Participating Institute that reviewed draft ICSC.  
Ind. If an update, also indicate the Participating Institute of previous versions. Add also to the section 
'History'. 
10040000  Date of Review by Scientific Editor: 
Expl. Date of review by the Scientific Editor in the ICSC project. 
Ind. Date to be added by the Scientific Editor to the section 'History'. 
10050000  Date of Peer-Review: 
Ind. Add also to the section 'History'. 
11000000: IDENTIFICATION
11000000  CHEMICAL NAME 
Expl. For the MAIN NAME (use CAPITAL letters) priority is given to the name used by the 
manufacturing industry. If no common name is used, then the IUPAC name (International Union of 
Pure and Applied Chemistry) comes first. This is the official chemical name according to the rules of 
the IUPAC. In addition to the main name and the IUPAC name, other important synonyms are given. 
The MAIN NAME is completed with an indication of the trade form of the substance to which the 
Card applies. Main names and synonyms are indexed. 
11101000  [name] 
Expl. For the MAIN NAME (use CAPITAL letters) priority is given to the name used by the 
manufacturing industry. If no common name is used, then the IUPAC name (International Union of 
Pure and Applied Chemistry) comes first. This is the official chemical name according to the rules of 
the IUPAC. In addition to the main name and the IUPAC name, other important synonyms are given. 
The MAIN NAME is completed with an indication of the trade form of the substance to which the 
Card applies. Main names and synonyms are indexed. 
If the chemical name is very long and the chemical is mainly known by its trade name then  the trade 
name be used instead.  
Ind. Use roman digits between parentheses in this name to state the valency if necessary, e.g., 
IRON(III) OXIDE. The following prefixes are considered to form part of the name: bis, cyclo, iso 
Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Creating a PDF from PPTX/PPT has never been so easy! Web Security. Your PDF and PPTX/PPT files will be deleted from our servers an hour after the conversion.
convert pdf file to powerpoint online; how to convert pdf to powerpoint slides
How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word
Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word.
how to change pdf to powerpoint on; create powerpoint from pdf
NB: Phrases with @ sign can no longer be selected for use in the ICSCs
3
and the numerals mono, di, tri, tetra, penta, etc. In the MAIN NAME they should be written in 
CAPITALS. The following prefixes should be considered as additions and should NOT be printed in 
CAPITALS in the MAIN NAME: ortho- (o-), meta- (m-), para- (p-), alpha- (α-), beta- (ß-), gamma- 
(γ-), etc.; primary (prim-), secondary (sec-), tertiary (tert-); cis-, trans-; dextro- (d-), laevo- (l-); 
normal (n-), N- (link to the nitrogen atom). 
11102000  [syn1] 
Ind. IUPAC name if different from 11101. Trivial names may be used without the stating the valency, 
e.g., copper sulfate for CuSO
4
.5H2O 
11103000  [syn2] 
Expl. In addition to the MAIN NAME, and the IUPAC name, EINECS (European Inventory of 
Existing Chemical Substances) name is given here. Main names and synonyms are indexed. 
Ind. Trivial names may be used without stating the valency, e.g., copper sulfate for CuSO
4
.5H
2
O. 
11104000  [syn3] 
Expl. In addition to the MAIN NAME, other important synonyms are given here and 11105. Main 
names and synonyms are indexed. 
Ind. Trivial names may be used without stating the valency, e.g., copper sulfate for CuSO
4
.5H
2
O. 
11105000  [syn4] 
Expl. In addition to the MAIN NAME, other important synonyms are given here and 11105. Main 
names and synonyms are indexed. 
Ind. Trivial names may be used without stating the valency, e.g., copper sulfate for CuSO
4
.5H
2
O. 
11301000  (cylinder) 
Ind. Applies if the substance is held in a cylinder suitable to keep gases or liquefied gases above 
atmospheric pressure. 
(13603)    (13103/05/07)    (22101/03)    22301    (22309)    (22313) 
11303000  (liquefied) 
Ind. Applies if the substance is a liquefied gas stored under atmospheric pressure, e.g., in a Dewar 
vessel. Cryogenics will have this description. This phrase does not apply to  gases which are (partly) 
liquefied as a result of being kept under pressure in a cylinder; use 11301 instead. 
(13603)   13109  19205 
11305000  (liquefied, cooled) 
Ind. Applies if the substance is an unstable gas (partly) liquefied under pressure and stored under 
continuous cooling to avoid decomposition. (Applies only to a few gases). 
(13603)    22303 
11307000  (powder) 
Ind. Should normally be used only for metal powders. 
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document
PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document.
convert pdf to ppt; chart from pdf to powerpoint
How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF
Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF
how to convert pdf slides to powerpoint presentation; pdf to powerpoint slide
NB: Phrases with @ sign can no longer be selected for use in the ICSCs
4
11501000  [formula] 
Ind. Complete with the formula of the substance. For an organic substance use a linear formula, 
showing the structure of the substance as far as this can be informative to a person with basic 
chemical knowledge. In other cases, the elemental formula should be used. 
11503000  Atomic mass: [] 
Expl. The relative atomic mass is stated here. The relative atomic mass of a substance is the mass of 1 
atom of that substance divided by 1/12 of the mass of 1 atom of carbon. 
Ind. Round off to the nearest 0.1. 
11505000  Molecular mass: [] 
Expl. The relative molecular mass is stated here. The relative molecular mass of a substance is the 
sum of the relative atomic masses of the elements which together form a molecule of that substance. 
Ind. Round off to the nearest 0.1. 
11505010  variable 
11701000  CAS #      [#####-##-#] 
Expl. Unique Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) registry numbers are used for identification as 
substances often have a number of synonyms. 
11703000  RTECS #    [AA#######] 
Expl. The number of the substance as given in the Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances 
published by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)  in USA. Important 
for looking up toxicological data of the substance, many of the synonyms can also be found in this 
Registry. 
11901000  ICSC #     [####] 
Expl. The number of the International Chemical Safety Card (ICSC) is recorded. 
11911000  UN #       [####] 
Expl. The United Nations has numbered a great many substances to facilitate identification, 
especially during transport. The UN Hazard Class, the UN Subsidiary Risks, and the UN Pack Group 
are entered in the field reserved for them in the section Identification. The use of UN number for 
classes or groups of chemicals (n.o.s: not otherwise specified) must be discussed by the Peer Review 
group. 
11921000  EC Annex 1 Index  #       [###-###-##-#] 
Expl. Annex I of Directive 67/548/EEC contains a list of harmonised classifications and labellings for 
substances or groups of substances that are legally binding within the EU. The EC number has 
replaced the EINECS / ELINCS / NLP number designation. 
Entries (i.e. substance/substances indicated by the same Index number) in Annex I are listed 
according to the atomic number of the most characteristic element of the substances' properties.  The 
VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
If you want to change the order of current processing control add-on can do PPT creating, loading powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
convert pdf to ppt online without email; changing pdf to powerpoint
C# TIFF: Learn to Convert MS Word, Excel, and PPT to TIFF Image
C# TIFF - Conversion from Word, Excel, PPT to TIFF. Learn How to Change MS Word, Excel, and PowerPoint to TIFF Image File in C#. Overview
how to convert pdf to powerpoint on; pdf page to powerpoint
NB: Phrases with @ sign can no longer be selected for use in the ICSCs
5
Index number for each substance is in the form of a digit sequence of the type ABC-RST-VW-Y, 
where: 
- ABC is either the atomic number of the most characteristic chemical element (preceded by one 
or two zeros to make up the sequence) or the usual class number for organic substances (cf. 
Appendix I), 
- RST is the consecutive number of the substance in the series ABC, 
- VW denotes the form in which the substance is produced or placed on the market, and 
- Y is the check-digit calculated in accordance with the ISBN (International Standard Book 
Number) method. 
Ind. Complete with the Index number of European Community. Apply according to the official 
interpretation of the EC criteria as described in 'Legislation on Dangerous Substances, Classification 
and Labelling in the European Communities', DIRECTIVE 67/548/EEC and as amended in 
Adaptation to Technical Progress, published by the Office for Official Publications EC, Luxembourg. 
11923000  EC/EINECS #  [###-###-#] 
Expl.  This is the reference number used in the European Inventory of Existing Commercial Chemical 
Substances between 1 January 1971 and 18 September 1981. It has been replaced by the EC number.  
The EINECS number is a seven-digit system, separated into 3 groups by hyphens of the type XXX-
XXX-X, which starts by: 
- 2 or 3 (2XX-XXX-X or 3XX-XXX-X) for chemical substances belonging to EINECS (Existing 
Chemicals), 
- 4 (4XX-XXX-X) for chemical substances belonging to ELINCS (New Chemicals), 
- 5 (5XX-XXX-X) for chemical substances belonging to NLP (No-Longer Polymers). 
Ind. Complete with the European Inventory of Existing Commercial Chemical Substances number. 
12000000  PHYSICAL  PROPERTIES
12101000  Boiling point:                       []°C 
Expl. Indicates the boiling point or range of the anhydrous substance at normal atmospheric pressure 
(101.3 kPa). 
Ind. Round off to the nearest degree Celsius, use one decimal. If a different pressure is stated, use 
12102. 
12102000  Boiling point at []kPa:           []°C 
Expl. Indicates the boiling point or range of the anhydrous substance at an atmospheric pressure 
different from the normal (101.3 kPa), which is preferred. 
Ind. Applies if there is a special reason to mention the boiling point at a pressure other than normal 
atmospheric pressure (101.3 kPa). Round off to the nearest degree Celsius, use one decimal. 
12103000 Boiling point  [] 
12104000  Sublimation point:                 []°C 
VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
VB.NET PowerPoint - Render PPT to PDF in VB.NET. What VB.NET demo code can I use for fast PPT (.pptx) to PDF conversion in .NET class application?
change pdf to powerpoint online; drag and drop pdf into powerpoint
VB.NET PowerPoint: Read & Scan Barcode Image from PPT Slide
VB.NET PPT PDF-417 barcode scanning SDK to detect PDF-417 barcode image from PowerPoint slide. VB.NET APIs to detect and decode
add pdf to powerpoint slide; convert pdf slides to powerpoint online
NB: Phrases with @ sign can no longer be selected for use in the ICSCs
6
Expl. A substance sublimes if on heating it passes directly from the solid to the vapour phase without 
melting. 
Ind. If the pressure at the triple point is >101.3 kPa. Round off to the nearest degree Celsius. 
12105000  Sublimation [] 
12106000  Decomposes 
Expl. Although the phrase “Boiling point (decomposes)” is used in many physico-chemical 
databases, it is more accurate to describe this as the decomposition temperature. The boiling point of 
a substance is a special temperature with an equilibrium between liquid and gaseous state. If the 
substance decomposes at this temperature no equilibrium state is possible because the substance 
changes in a chemical reaction. 
12107000  @Decomposes below boiling point at []°C 
Ind. If decomposition temperature is unknown, complete with 'see Notes'. Round off to the nearest 
degree Celsius. 
Phrase disallowed in April 2007 in favour of 12106 and 12111 
12108000  @Decomposes below boiling point [] 
Ind. (24111) 
Phrase disallowed in April 2007 in favour of 12106 and 12111 
12110000  @Boiling point (decomposes):    []°C 
Expl. If the substance decomposes during boiling at normal atmospheric pressure. 
Ind. Round off to the nearest degree Celsius. 
Phrase disallowed in April 2007 in favour of 12106 and 12111 
12111000  Decomposes at [] °C 
Expl. Although the phrase “Boiling point (decomposes)” is used in many physico-chemical 
databases, it is more accurate to describe this as the decomposition temperature. The boiling point of 
a substance is a special temperature with an equilibrium between liquid and gaseous state. If the 
substance decomposes at this temperature no equilibrium state is possible because the substance 
changes in a chemical reaction. 
12111500  [See Notes] 
12113000  Melting point:                       []°C 
Expl. Indicates the melting point (or range) of the substance at normal atmospheric pressure (101.3 
kPa). If there is a significant difference between the melting point and the freezing point, the range is 
given. In case of hydrated substances (i.e., those with crystal water), the apparent melting point is 
given; this is then mentioned in NOTES (e.g., 24101). 
NB: Phrases with @ sign can no longer be selected for use in the ICSCs
7
Ind. Round off to the nearest degree Celsius, use one decimal. 
(24113/24115) 
12114000 Melting point [] 
12116000  Decomposes 
Expl. Although the phrase “Melting point (decomposes)” is used in many physico-chemical 
databases, it is more accurate to describe this as the decomposition temperature. The melting point of 
a substance is a special temperatures with an equilibrium between solid and liquid state. If the 
substance decomposes at this temperature no equilibrium state is possible because the substance 
changes in a chemical reaction. 
12117000  @Decomposes below melting point at []°C 
(Ind. If decomposition temperature is unknown, complete with 'see Notes'; combine with 24111. 
Round off to nearest degree Celsius, use one decimal.) 
Phrase disallowed in April 2007 in favour of 12116 and 12121.
12118000  @Decomposes below melting point:    [] 
Phrase disallowed in April 2007 in favour of 12116 and 12121 
12120000  @Melting point (decomposes):     []°C 
(Expl. If the substance decomposes during melting at normal atmospheric pressure. 
Ind. Round off to nearest degree Celsius.) 
Phrase disallowed in April 2007 in favour of 12116 and 12121 
12121000  Decomposes at [] °C 
Expl. Although the phrase “Melting point (decomposes)” is used in many physico-chemical 
databases, it is more accurate to describe this as the decomposition temperature. The melting point of 
a substance is a special temperature with an equilibrium between solid and liquid state. If the 
substance decomposes at this temperature no equilibrium state is possible because the substance 
changes in a chemical reaction. 
12121500  [See Notes] 
12129000  Critical Temperature (NOT on card): []°C 
Ind. Use only in case of gases or liquids with a boiling point < 30°C. Round off to nearest degree 
Celsius. 
12301000  Relative density (water = 1):    [] 
NB: Phrases with @ sign can no longer be selected for use in the ICSCs
8
Expl. Indicates whether the substance floats or sinks on water. For gases condensed to the liquid 
phase the density of the liquid phase is given. The density mentioned (specific gravity) applies to 
normal ambient temperatures; other values, if relevant, are given in NOTES. Compressed gases (so-
called permanent gases) do not have a liquid phase, so no value is mentioned. In case of a gas 
liquefied by cooling, the density of the liquid at atmospheric pressure is given in NOTES. 
Ind. Round off the value to the nearest 0.1; for values between 0.8 and 1.1, to the nearest 0.01. If 
possible, use values applying to temperatures between 15 and 25°C. Gases in cylinders: 
- if the critical temperature >= 15°C: mention the relative density to water of the liquid phase at 15 to 
25°C. 
- if the critical temperature lies between -10 and 15°C: complete with 'see Notes' and mention in 
NOTES the density in kg/l at the critical temperature and mention this temperature (use a free 
phrase). 
- if the critical temperature < -10°C: skip phrase. 
Gases in a Dewar vessel (liquefied by cooling): 
- complete with 'see Notes'. Mention in NOTES (i.e., 24119) the density in kg/l at the atmospheric 
boiling point. 
(24119) 
12302000  Density:                              [] 
Expl. Relative density (12301) is typical for liquids. In source documents is often recorded the actual 
density in g/cm
3
. Density is used for many liquids and for most solids. 
Ind. Use this phrase in preference to 12301 if data are available. Round off the value to the nearest 
0.1; for values between 0.8 and 1.1, to the nearest 0.01. If possible, use values applying to 
temperatures between 15 and 25°C. 
12302010  g/cm
3
12302020  g/l 
12302030  kg/m
3
12304000  Solubility in water, g/100 ml at []°C: [] 
Expl. The solubility is given preferably in g/100 ml water at 20°C. Give both the value for the 
solubility and the qualitative description based on the values below. If the solubility is not accurately 
known then just give the qualitative description.   
'very poor'      (< 1 g/l)  
i.e. <0.1g/100 mL 
'poor'             (1 - 10 g/l)  
i.e. 0.1 - 1 g/100 mL 
'moderate'      (10 - 100 g/l) 
i.e. 1 - 10 g/100 mL 
'good'            (100 - 1000 g/l)  
i.e. 10 - 100 g/100 mL 
'very good'     (> 1000 g/l)  
i.e. >100 g/100 mL 
If the substance reacts spontaneously with water this is indicated by the term 'reaction'. A liquid 
which forms one liquid phase, when mixed with water in any proportion, is indicated with 'miscible'. 
For gases, the solubility under a pressure of 1 atmosphere (101.3 kPa) is given. 
12307000  Solubility in water, g/100 ml:     [] 
Expl. The solubility is given preferably in g/100 ml water at 20°C (see 12304). Give both the value 
for the solubility and the qualitative description based on the values below. If the solubility is not 
accurately known then just give the qualitative description.   
'very poor'      (< 1 g/l)  
i.e. <0.1g/100 mL 
'poor'             (1 - 10 g/l)  
i.e. 0.1 - 1 g/100 mL 
'moderate'      (10 - 100 g/l) 
i.e. 1 - 10 g/100 mL 
NB: Phrases with @ sign can no longer be selected for use in the ICSCs
9
'good'            (100 - 1000 g/l)  
i.e. 10 - 100 g/100 mL 
'very good'     (> 1000 g/l)  
i.e. >100 g/100 mL 
If the substance reacts spontaneously with water this is indicated by the term 'reaction'.  A liquid 
which forms one liquid phase, when mixed with water in any proportion, is indicated with 'miscible'. 
For gases, the solubility under a pressure of 1 atmosphere (101.3 kPa) is given. 
Ind. Use this phrase if a value without a temperature is known. 
12310000  Solubility in water:                  [] 
Expl. The solubility is given preferably in g/100 ml water at 20°C (see 12304). Give both the value 
for the solubility and the qualitative description based on the values below. If the solubility is not 
accurately known then just give the qualitative description.   
'very poor'      (< 1 g/l)  
i.e. <0.1g/100 mL 
'poor'             (1 - 10 g/l)  
i.e. 0.1 - 1 g/100 mL 
'moderate'      (10 - 100 g/l) 
i.e. 1 - 10 g/100 mL 
'good'            (100 - 1000 g/l)  
i.e. 10 - 100 g/100 mL 
'very good'     (> 1000 g/l)  
i.e. >100 g/100 mL 
If the substance reacts spontaneously with water this is indicated by the term 'reaction'.  A liquid 
which forms one liquid phase, when mixed with water in any proportion, is indicated with 'miscible'. 
For gases, the solubility under a pressure of 1 atmosphere (101.3 kPa) is given. 
Ind. If the solubility is not accurately known complete this phrase with an adjective (poor, moderate, 
good,...). If possible, add to the adjective the applicable range between parentheses, using the 
following scale: 
'very poor'      (< 1 g/l)  
i.e. <0.1g/100 mL 
'poor'             (1 - 10 g/l)  
i.e. 0.1 - 1 g/100 mL 
'moderate'      (10 - 100 g/l) 
i.e. 1 - 10 g/100 mL 
'good'            (100 - 1000 g/l)  
i.e. 10 - 100 g/100 mL 
'very good'     (> 1000 g/l)  
i.e. >100 g/100 mL 
This phrase can also be completed with 'reaction', but this is not to be used if the reaction with water 
has an (estimated) half-life >1 hour. In those cases the solubility is given in g/l while further 
indications are given with 13383/89. 
(13383)    (13389)    (13383120)    (13389290) 
12313000  Solubility in water, ml/100 ml at []°C: [] 
Expl. The solubility is given preferably in g/100 ml water at 20°C (see 12304). Give both the value 
for the solubility and the qualitative description based on the values below. If the solubility is not 
accurately known then just give the qualitative description.   
'very poor'      (< 1 g/l)  
i.e. <0.1g/100 mL 
'poor'             (1 - 10 g/l)  
i.e. 0.1 - 1 g/100 mL 
'moderate'      (10 - 100 g/l) 
i.e. 1 - 10 g/100 mL 
'good'            (100 - 1000 g/l)  
i.e. 10 - 100 g/100 mL 
'very good'     (> 1000 g/l)  
i.e. >100 g/100 mL 
If the substance reacts spontaneously with water this is indicated by the term 'reaction'. A liquid 
which, when mixed with water in any proportion, forms one liquid phase is indicated with 'miscible'. 
For gases, the solubility under a pressure of 1 atmosphere (101.3 kPa) is given. 
Ind. Use this phrase for gases. 
12501000  Vapour pressure, kPa at []°C:      [] 
Expl. The vapour pressure of gases in cylinders liquefied under pressure is given in kPa mentioning 
the corresponding temperature. (Note: 100 kPa = 1 bar). The saturated vapour pressure of solids and 
liquids is given in Pa or in kPa, preferably at a temperature of 20°C. (Note: 1 kPa = 1000 Pa = 10 
NB: Phrases with @ sign can no longer be selected for use in the ICSCs
10
mbar). If a calculated value is given this is indicated with 'ab.' (i.e., about). The vapour pressures at 
20°C of substances boiling at temperatures >= 350°C are negligible and should NOT be mentioned. 
Ind. Skip for gases with a critical temperature <-10°C and for substances with a boiling point 
>=350°C and an OEL >= 0.1 ppm. (For the OEL, see 13400). Use this phrase for a vapour pressure 
>= 0.1 kPa. Rounding off: 
>= 100 kPa   : to the nearest unit; 
1-100 kPa     : to 1 significant digit after the decimal point; 
>= 0.1-1 kPa : to 2 significant digits after the decimal point; 
1-100 Pa       : to the nearest unit; 
< 1 Pa           : to the nearest significant digit after the decimal point. 
If no value can be found, a calculated value is used; see Appendix 1.  
Rounding off calculated values: 
>= 5 kPa        : to the nearest unit; 
2-5 kPa          : to the nearest 0.5 kPa; 
0.1-2 kPa       : to the nearest 0.01 kPa; 
10-100 Pa      : to the nearest 10 Pa; 
< 10 Pa          : state as < 10 Pa. 
12504000  Vapour pressure, Pa at []°C:       [] 
Expl. The vapour pressure of gases in cylinders liquefied under pressure is given in kPa mentioning 
the corresponding temperature. (Note: 100 kPa = 1 bar). The saturated vapour pressure of solids and 
liquids is given in Pa or in kPa, preferably at a temperature of 20°C. (Note: 1 kPa = 1000 Pa = 10 
mbar). If a calculated value is given this is indicated with 'ab.' (i.e., about). The vapour pressures at 
20°C of substances boiling at temperatures >=350°C are negligible and should NOT be mentioned. 
Ind. Use 12501 for a vapour pressure >= 0.1 kPa. 
Rounding off: 
>= 100 kPa   : to the nearest unit; 
1-100 kPa     : to 1 significant digit after the decimal point; 
>= 0.1-1 kPa : to 2 significant digits after the decimal point; 
1-100 Pa       : to the nearest unit; 
< 1 Pa           : to the nearest significant digit after the decimal point. 
IF no value can be found, a calculated value is used; see Appendix 1. 
Rounding off calculated values: 
>= 5 kPa       : to the nearest unit; 
2-5 kPa         : to the nearest 0.5 kPa; 
0.1-2 kPa      : to the nearest 0.01 kPa; 
10-100 Pa     : to the nearest 10 Pa; 
< 10 Pa         : state as < 10 Pa. 
12504010  negligible 
12507000 Relative vapour density (air = 1): [] 
Expl. This value indicates how many times a gas (or vapour) is heavier than air at the same 
temperature. For vapours from liquids and solids this value applies only for the vapour from the 
boiling liquid, therefore not for normal ambient temperatures. 
Ind. Skip if the boiling point >=350°C. Round to 0.01 for values between 0.9 and 1.1; round other 
values to 0.1. 
Calculation (see Appendix 2): 
d = -- 
29 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested