©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
83
necessary  –  such  as  ‘born  global’  firms  –  to  those  who  have  little  or  no 
international activity and a sceptical attitude to its benefits, and fear of the risks 
involved).
59
They  then  cross-classified  those  7  sub-groups  by  exporting 
experience  and  the  likely  level  of  support  needed  (labelled  as  ‘level  of 
consultant involvement required’ in Figure 4.2).  
Table 4.2: Classification of Knowledge-based sector on the basis of observed 
motivations for exporting  
Segment Label  
Characteristics 
TINA 
There is no alternative (to internationalisation). 
Characterised by the belief that the domestic market is 
simply too small for a viable business and hence 
international trading is essential rather than simply 
desirable.  
Gung Ho 
Characterised by a belief that international markets are 
attractive and that barriers to internationalisation are 
relatively trivial.  
Networker 
Characterised by involvement in a global value chain in 
which trading is between other (international) companies 
in the value chain. 
Incubator 
Characterised by early life cycle, pre-production, stage. 
Heavily R&D focused and seeking commercialisation 
via sales and marketing partners.  
Aspirant Responder 
Characterised by accidental or coincidental international 
activity in response to customer enquiries but also by a 
positive attitude to the benefits of internationalisation  
Passive Responder 
Characterised by accidental or coincidental international 
activity in response to customer enquiries but also by a 
negative attitude to the benefits of internationalisation 
and a fear of the difficulties associated with it.  
Reluctant Virgin 
Characterised by little or no international activity, a 
sceptical attitude to its benefits and a deeply help fear of 
its risks.  
Source: Pragmedic (2003) 
4.28  The  authors  of  the  study  argue  that  the  current  support  offered  by  UKTI 
straddles the needs of the segments and does not meet the needs of any segment 
with great specificity (cf. Figure 4.2); government offers a moderate amount of 
59
Note, the sub-groups identified in Table 4.2 could not be linked in any straight-forward way to 
standard descriptors like size, industry sector (or even the level of export activity). This suggests that 
Convert pdf file to powerpoint - software application project:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf file to powerpoint - software application project:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
84
support which is too little for some and too much for others, as well as being 
perceived as aimed mostly at inexperienced exporters and biased towards low 
technology products
60
Figure 4.2: Motivator based segmentation in the knowledge-based sectors 
Source: Pragmedic (2003) 
4.29  Thus, a more focused approach is called for based on the needs of the 7 sub-
groups identified in Table 4.2, but recognising that since it might not be feasible 
to have such a purely segmented approach, a three mega-segments approach 
might be more practical. They put (see Table 4.2) the Gung-ho, TINA (there is 
no alternative), and networking sub-groups  into  a ‘confident’  meta-segment; 
aspiration  responders  and  incubators  go  into  an  ‘aspirants’  sub-group;  and 
passive  responders  and  reluctant  virgins  comprise  a  ‘reluctants’  sub-group. 
Figure 4.3 summarises the policy response that is recommended for each meta-
segment. 
government provision of support designed around such simple descriptors would result in sub-optimal 
support packages as they would not recognise the role of motivation explicitly. 
EXPORTING 
EXPERIENCE
High
Low
LEVEL OF  
CONSULTANT 
INVOLVEMENT 
REQUIRED 
High
Low 
Networkers 
Passive responders
Aspirational 
responders 
Reluctant 
virgins 
Incubators
Money 
only
Money 
& data 
only 
Some support/ 
encouragement 
Significant 
process 
support
Outsourcing 
of export 
problems 
None
Gung-ho 
TINA
TPUK  
Perceived 
Position 
software application project:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag-and-drop your pptx or ppt file into the drop area.
www.rasteredge.com
software application project:VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Convert smooth lines to curves. Detect and merge image fragments. Flatten visible layers. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
85
Table 4.3: Proposed meta-segment approach to promoting internationalisation 
Meta-Segment 
Confidents 
Aspirants 
Reluctants 
Proposition 
summary 
Internationalisation Support 
Menu – “You know what 
you want, we’ve got it” 
Internationalisation Support 
Partnership – “We have the 
solution to your aspirations” 
Internationalisation 
Awareness Programme – 
“Internationalisation 
without fear” 
Communication 
Known clients: ‘Customer 
Relationship Management,. 
Narrowcast, problem 
specific direct 
communications to advertise 
availability of specific 
services & business 
opportunities. Many 
communications initiated by 
client.  
Unknown clients: make 
aware of offering to counter 
perception that TP is for 
novices & time-consuming 
Key issue is identifying 
aspirants.  
Broadcast: techniques can 
include networking 
seminars designed to attract 
aspirants, and awards, such 
as an award for a product 
with international potential 
Narrowcast: salesperson + 
support. 
Needs to take account of 
limited resources available. 
 Broadcast media, e.g. 
PR in specialist 
journals: “a survey by 
TP has said…” to 
generate interest 
 Educational resources: 
seminars, white papers 
Package 
Present all services 
(including Selection and  
Management of Overseas 
Partners) as a ‘buffet’ for 
client to dip into as required 
Passport to Export, plus: 
 Improved selling to 
address control issues 
 Not assuming non-
exporters – many are 
aspirant responders 
 Rewording of collateral 
Package up services as an 
easy guide to exporting to 
encourage successful 
fulfilment of accidental 
orders. 
Channel 
Largely self-help using Web 
and telephone (inc. 
Gateway/country desks) – 
ideally single ‘contact 
centre’ appearance to client. 
ITA brokering of services 
General business adviser to 
screen, then specialist. 
For buffet services: as 
Confidents. 
Largely remote: 
 Web: self-help guide, 
frequently asked 
questions, online 
diagnostics etc 
 Telephone: for access 
to buffet 
 Shading to general 
business advisers 
Involvement 
Much of relationship is 
remote, transactional; some 
personal brokering 
High, personal. 
Graduated general to 
specialist to cross-brokering 
Mostly remote, low 
involvement 
Source: Pragmedic (2003) 
Government response to firm adjustment to globalisation   
4.30  Hoekman and Javorcik (2004) argued that governments have a twofold role in 
facilitating business internationalisation: (i) to intervene in areas where there are 
market failures; and (ii) to ensure that firms face the ‘right’ incentives to adjust 
60
Note, the UKTI web-site (see http://www.invest.uktradeinvest.gov.uk
) clearly distinguishes 
information into the following export sub-groups:  support for new investors, support for current 
investors, and global partnerships  
software application project:VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint data to PDF form. Merge PDF with byte array, fields. Merge PDF without size limitation. Append one PDF file to the end
www.rasteredge.com
software application project:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Application. Best and professional adobe PDF file splitting SDK for Visual Studio .NET. outputOps); Divide PDF File into Two Using C#.
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
86
to globalisation.
61
The authors argue that governments often fail in the latter role 
e.g.    through  pursuing  inappropriate  macroeconomic  policies  (such  as 
overvaluation  of  the  exchange  rate  following  trade  liberalisation,  and  trade 
policies that attempt to mitigate against the short-run impacts of liberalisation 
but  which  create  perverse  incentives  not  to  adjust),  or  inappropriate 
microeconomic  policies  (hindering  firm  entry  and  exit,  operating  inflexible 
labour markets, and other policies that slow down adjustment to liberalisation). 
In summary, they point to the need for credibility of the overall policy stance 
(i.e.  that  firms  believe  in  the  permanency  of  the  government  response  to 
liberalisation) since it impacts significantly on the incentives of firms to incur 
the costs of adjustment. 
4.31  In terms of the effects of globalisation on indigenous firms, they highlight the 
importance of the following effects: 
(a)  Competition effects
Due to increased imports and inward FDI, there is increased competition in 
domestic markets. It is argued that since a significant body of evidence 
points to ‘churning’ (entry and exit) as a significant source of productivity 
enhancement,  with  such  churning  related  to  import  penetration  (cf. 
Criscuolo, C. et al, 2004, for the UK; and Bernard and Jensen, 2004b, for 
the US), then trade liberalization needs to be complimented by measures 
that facilitate/allow the reallocation of factors of production from low to 
higher productivity firms.  This includes promoting entry, removing exit 
barriers, and promoting innovation (R&D) to ensure firms have adequate 
levels of absorptive capacity. This also includes the need for policies that 
ensure that labour-market flexibility is complimentary and facilitates such 
churning, since economies with sluggish labour markets gain least from 
globalisation as trade barriers are removed. 
(b)  Technology transfer
Trade liberalisation results in access to new technologies, thus potentially 
upgrading  indigenous  firms.  However,  this  also  requires  absorptive 
capacity  to  adapt  such  new  technology, and  such  capacity is related to 
human capital endowments and investment in R&D (see chapter 2). FDI 
61
They acknowledge that in practice intervention by governments may be driven by a combination of 
ensuring there are incentives to adjust and addressing market failure. 
software application project:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
PDFPage page = (PDFPage)doc.GetPage(0); // Convert the first PDF page to a JPEG file. page.ConvertToImage(ImageType.JPEG, Program.RootPath + "\\Output.jpg");
www.rasteredge.com
software application project:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
PDF from PowerPoint; C#: Create PDF from Tiff; C#: Convert PDF to Word; C#: Convert PDF to Tiff; C#: Convert PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# File: Compress
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
87
can also bring about transfers through demonstration effects and a range of 
other  potential  spillover  impacts  (Harris  and  Robinson,  2004,  Table  1, 
provide a typology of such spillovers and evidence on whether they are 
positive or not in the UK; others – such as Gorg and Greeaway, 2004 – also 
provide similar evidence). Hoekman and Javorcik (op. cit.) argue that all 
this suggests that a ‘one size fits all’ approach to policy in this area is 
inappropriate. 
(c)  Access to new markets
Globalisation also creates new opportunities for domestic firms to make 
improvements that are necessary to sell in export markets. If firms that do 
not export have unfavourable characteristics (such as low capabilities and 
absorptive capacity), and such characteristics are a pre-requisite for entry 
into export markets, then Hoekman and Javorcik (op. cit.) argue that policy 
intervention to encourage such firms to export may be a waste of resources. 
However,  if  the  choice  not  to  export  is  due  to  imperfect  information 
associated with the uncertainty about the (sunk) costs and profitability of 
entry, then there is a case for intervention to overcome such market failure.   
4.32  This leads onto the issue that was raised in Chapter 3 as to whether there is a 
‘learning-by-exporting’ effect or not. If there is no post-entry improvement in 
productivity  (but  rather  entry  requires  firms  in  advance  to  have  those 
characteristics that lead to higher productivity, thus self-selecting into export 
markets),  then  it  suggests  that  government  promotional  policies  to  increase 
business  internationalisation  may  be  largely  ineffective  (thus  involving 
deadweight and  possibly  displacement effects).
62
This is not to suggest  that 
there is no room for policy; but rather the emphasis needs to be on promoting a 
competitive  business  environment  rather  than  targeting  support  on  market 
failures.
63
This comprises both the macroeconomic environment (see par. 4.28 
above, but also covering macroeconomic stability, helping to maintain fair and 
open  international  markets,  providing  a  conducive  legal  and  regulatory 
framework for business, minimising burdens on trade through bureaucracy, and 
62
There is little econometric evidence to show whether combating market failure has a significant 
effect on firm entry into international markets; what there is (e.g. Bernard and Jensen, 2004) provides 
little evidence that government promotional activities are effective. 
63
In an ideal world with unlimited resources, government might do both. Moreover, in many situations, 
both areas are covered simultaneously.  
software application project:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; This professional .NET solution that is designed to convert PDF file to HTML web page using VB.NET code efficiently.
www.rasteredge.com
software application project:C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Merge Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint data to PDF form. Append one PDF file to the end of another and save to a single PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
88
ensuring  overall  that  business  conditions  are  favourable  to  growth)  and 
industrial policy. That is, there is a more general need for policies that help 
firms to acquire those characteristics that lead to higher productivity, and thus 
have the ability to overcome sunk entry costs in international markets.  
4.33  Therefore,  policies  that  enhance  the  absorptive  capacity  and  dynamic 
capabilities  of  firms  would  appear  to  be  the  key  requirement  for  boosting 
participation rates in export markets.
64
This then benefits aggregate productivity 
through a reallocation of resources (i.e. market shares) to higher productivity 
exporters,  and the  forcing out of the industry/economy  of the least efficient 
firms (as various models, most notably that analysed by Melitz, 2003, show). 
Moreover, it is not particularly crucial that there be any ‘learning-by-exporting’ 
effect; as Melitz (op. cit., p. 1719) points out “… trade-induced reallocations 
towards  more  efficient  firms  explain  why  trade  may  generate  aggregate 
productivity gains without necessarily improving the productive efficiency of 
individual  firms” (emphasis added to original). He also points out that “of 
course… policies that hinder the reallocation process or otherwise interfere with 
the flexibility of the factor markets may delay or even prevent a country from 
reaping the full benefits from trade” (p. 1719).  
Conclusions   
4.34 
T
his  chapter  has  considered  the  ‘market  failure’  arguments  for  government 
intervention with regard to business internationalisation, primarily to encourage 
firms  to  enter  such  markets  (rather  than  subsidising  export  revenues). 
Undoubtedly  there are certain features of international markets (such as the 
relatively high cost of information, leading to higher risk and uncertainty and 
important sunk entry/exit costs) that provide a rationale for government to act 
(not least because it has an advantage in providing information).  
4.35  However, because of the differing needs of (potential) exporters, government 
assistance needs to be flexible, reflecting the heterogeneous  nature of firms. 
Criticisms that policy is not sufficiently geared to ‘born-global’ firms, and not 
64
Note, UKTI policy is not to increase exports/internationalisation per se, or to increase the number of 
exporters/internationalising firms, but rather focuses on the market failure argument so allowing more 
firms to overcome barriers to entry associated with ‘failures’. In that sense the policy doe seem to be 
about promoting internationalisation. 
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
89
sufficiently  flexible  to  cover  different  sub-groups  of  firms  with  different 
motivations  for  exporting, were presented. To a large extent  the changes in 
policy advocated as a result of these criticisms reflect differing resources that 
are available to different firms.  
4.36  When the rationale for policy is expanded to include the need to ensure that 
firms face the ‘right’ incentives to adjust to globalisation, and not just to cover 
‘market failure’ arguments, this enforces the need for policies that help firms to 
acquire those characteristics (i.e., absorptive capacity and dynamic capabilities) 
that lead to higher productivity, and thus the ability to overcome sunk entry 
costs in international markets. This then benefits aggregate productivity through 
a reallocation of resources to higher productivity exporters. 
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
90
[this page is blank] 
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
91
5.  Major Conclusions  
5.1  Our approach in this literature review has been to cover three substantive areas, 
namely: 
ɷ
International entrepreneurship (Chapter 2);  
ɷ
Firm-level adjustment to globalisation (Chapter 3); and 
ɷ
The role of government in business internationalisation (Chapter 4). 
5.2  The  first  chapter  considered  the  wider  literature  on  international 
entrepreneurship  (much of it from the business and  management area). This 
dealt with the internationalisation process itself, in terms of why certain firms 
become international (and when – e.g. ‘born-global’ companies), the different 
options  available  (e.g.  exporting  vis-à-vis  FDI),  and  the  different  processes 
available (e.g. the traditional evolutionary model – known as the Uppsala Model 
– whereby firms evolve from supplying domestic to export markets, and then to 
become multinational; to more recent literature on firms, including SME’s, that 
are ‘born’ international). We also covered the recent economics literature that 
emphasises  micro  (i.e.  firm  and  plant)  -level  explanations  to  consider  such 
issues as which firms export (introducing explanations linked to the importance 
of sunk costs and the heterogeneity of plants) 
5.3  Generally,  we  found  that  whether  the  traditional,  incremental  model  of 
internationalisation is considered, or transaction cost models (emphasising the 
role of sunk  costs), or monopolistic advantage models, a strong overlapping 
feature  is  the  role  and  importance  of  firm  specific  assets  (complimentary 
resources  and  capabilities  and  thus  absorptive  capacity)  and  knowledge 
accumulation.  This  was  also  true  of  the  literature  covering  more  recent 
phenomenon  of  ‘born-global’  or  ‘born-again  global’  firms,  that  often 
internationalise  very  early  (and  which  are  dependent  on  knowledge-based 
technology).  
5.4  Of  course,  the  literature  pointed  to  other  factors  that  determine 
internationalisation, such as sector (e.g. whether high-tech or not); the size of 
the firm; the presence or otherwise of networks/agglomerations; the importance 
of international experience among the owner/managers; and even ‘luck’ etc. But 
a  recurring  emphasis  throughout  all  the  extant  literature  was  the  core  and 
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
92
essential role of (tacit) knowledge generation and acquisition, both within the 
firm and from its external environment.  
5.5  The  more  recent  economic  models  of  internationalisation  that  have  been 
reviewed focused on  the  importance of  sunk costs  and heterogeneity  across 
firms (i.e. differences in productivity). To overcome entry costs, firms need an 
adequate knowledge-base and complimentary assets/resources (especially R&D 
and human capital assets that lead to greater absorptive capacity); and of course 
productivity differences rely on firms having differing knowledge and resource-
bases associated with differences in rates of innovation and other aspects of 
total factor productivity. Thus again, the importance of firm specific assets and 
knowledge  accumulation  are  at  the  forefront  of  explaining  the 
internationalisation process. 
5.6  However, despite this leading role for knowledge accumulation and factors such 
as absorptive capacity, we found relatively little evidence on how organisations 
learn (and what is most important for success in this area), and how exactly 
absorptive capacity can be measured (and its relative importance in determining 
productivity and entry into foreign markets). Thus, there is still much work that 
needs to be undertaken to enhance the extant literature and thus ‘flesh-out’ some 
of the concepts and arguments presented in Chapter 2. 
5.7  The  second  major  area  covered  in  Chapter  3  was  firm-level  adjustment  to 
globalisation.  The  relationship  between  international  trade  and  productivity 
growth is at the heart of our understanding of economic adjustment to trade 
liberalisation, and we focused in this review on the impact at the micro (i.e. firm 
and plant) –level. A major issue was whether firms/plants that internationalise 
are more productive than non-exporting firms. The evidence on this was fairly 
unanimous that they are, but then the issue becomes one of whether this is a 
requirement  of  internationalisation  and/or  whether  firms  become  more 
productive  when  they  enter  export  markets  as  a  result  of  a  ‘learning-by-
exporting’ effect. If firms have to have certain characteristics in advance that 
result in higher productivity, to allow them to overcome the sunk costs of entry, 
then ‘self-selection’ is likely to dominate.  
5.8  In our view, the jury is still out on whether there is a ‘learning-by-exporting’ 
effect at the firm/plant level. This seems to be because: 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested