•H
A
R
T• 
PUBLISHING 
STYLE GUIDELINES  
Style Guidelines ................................................................................................................. 1 
1.  Preparing a manuscript for publication .................................................................... 4 
1.1  OSCOLA .................................................................................................................. 4 
1.2  Electronic Copy ........................................................................................................ 4 
1.3  Table of Contents ..................................................................................................... 5 
1.4  Style Sheet ................................................................................................................ 5 
2.  General Style Points ..................................................................................................... 5 
2.1  Consistency .............................................................................................................. 5 
2.2  Spelling..................................................................................................................... 5 
2.3  Grammar ................................................................................................................... 6 
2.4  Full stops .................................................................................................................. 6 
2.5  Hyphenation ............................................................................................................. 6 
2.6  Dashes ...................................................................................................................... 6 
2.7  Quotation Marks ....................................................................................................... 7 
2.8  The Use of Capitals .................................................................................................. 7 
2.9  Foreign Words .......................................................................................................... 8 
2.10  Names ..................................................................................................................... 9 
2.10.1  Titles and Postnominals ................................................................................... 9 
2.10.2  Foreign Names ................................................................................................. 9 
2.10.3  Compound Surnames ....................................................................................... 9 
2.10.4  Abbreviations and Acronyms ........................................................................ 10 
2.11  Numbers ............................................................................................................... 10 
2.12  Dates ..................................................................................................................... 11 
3.  Structure and layout .................................................................................................. 11 
Embed pdf into powerpoint - control application platform:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Embed pdf into powerpoint - control application platform:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
HART PUBLISHING STYLE GUIDELINES 
3.1  Headings ................................................................................................................. 11 
3.1.1  Numbering of Headings ................................................................................... 12 
3.2  Paragraphs .............................................................................................................. 12 
3.3  Quotations .............................................................................................................. 12 
3.3.1  Quotation Marks .............................................................................................. 13 
3.3.2  Introductory Punctuation ................................................................................. 13 
3.3.3  Capitalisation at the Start of Quotations .......................................................... 14 
3.3.4  Mistakes in the Original Quotation ................................................................. 14 
3.3.5  Ellipses............................................................................................................. 14 
3.3.6  Change in Emphasis ........................................................................................ 15 
3.3.7  Omission of Citations ...................................................................................... 15 
3.3.8  Editing Quotations ........................................................................................... 15 
3.4  Footnotes ................................................................................................................ 15 
3.4.1  Abbreviations in Footnotes .............................................................................. 16 
3.4.2  Introductory Signals ......................................................................................... 17 
3.4.3  Cross-referencing within Footnotes ................................................................. 18 
3.5  Graphics ................................................................................................................. 18 
3.5.1  Figures, Graphs, Tables ................................................................................... 18 
3.5.2  Photographs and Digital Images ...................................................................... 19 
3.5.3  Copyright Permissions ..................................................................................... 20 
3.5.4  Notes and Source Notes ................................................................................... 20 
4.  Citation of PRIMARY LEGAL Sources .................................................................. 20 
4. 1  Cases...................................................................................................................... 20 
4.1.1  Domestic Cases ................................................................................................ 20 
4.1.2  European Cases ................................................................................................ 21 
4.1.3  European Court of Human Rights ................................................................... 21 
4.1.4  Other International Decisions .......................................................................... 21 
4.1.5  Cross-citation ................................................................................................... 21 
4.1.6  Punctuation of Legal Citations ........................................................................ 22 
4.2  Legislation .............................................................................................................. 22 
5.  CITATION OF Secondary sources .......................................................................... 22 
5.1  Short-title System ................................................................................................... 22 
5.1.1  Books ............................................................................................................... 23 
5.1.2  Chapters in Edited Volumes ............................................................................ 24 
control application platform:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links. also makes PDF document visible and searchable on the Internet by converting PDF document file into HTML webpage.
www.rasteredge.com
control application platform:C# TIFF: How to Embed, Remove, Add and Update TIFF Color Profile
On the whole, our SDK supports the following manipulations. Empower C# programmers to embed, remove, add and update ICCProfile. Support
www.rasteredge.com
HART PUBLISHING STYLE GUIDELINES 
5.1.3  Journal Articles ................................................................................................ 24 
5.1.4  Journal Titles ................................................................................................... 24 
5.1.5  Foreign Language Titles .................................................................................. 25 
5.1.6  Web-based (online) Resources ........................................................................ 25 
5.1.7  Bibliography for Short-title System ................................................................. 26 
5.2  Author–Date Referencing Systems ........................................................................ 27 
5.2.1  Books ............................................................................................................... 27 
5.2.2  Chapters in Edited Volumes ............................................................................ 27 
5.2.3  Journal Articles ................................................................................................ 27 
5.2.4  References for Author–Date System ............................................................... 27 
6.  Edited Collections ...................................................................................................... 28 
6.1  Contributors ............................................................................................................ 29 
6.2  Structure and Style ................................................................................................. 29 
6.3 Copyright ................................................................................................................. 29 
7.  Further Guidance ....................................................................................................... 30 
control application platform:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Turn PDF images to HTML images in VB.NET. Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. Available zoom setting (fit page, fit width).
www.rasteredge.com
control application platform:VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Embed PDF to image converter in viewer. Quick evaluation source codes for VB.NET class. Sometimes, to convert PDF document into BMP, GIF, JPEG and PNG
www.rasteredge.com
HART PUBLISHING STYLE GUIDELINES 
1.  PREPARING A MANUSCRIPT FOR PUBLICATION 
There is no definitive guide to writing and styling law books. Much can be gained from 
consulting the Harvard Law Review Association’s Bluebook: A Uniform System of 
Citation 18th edn (2005), the Chicago Manual of Style 15th edn (Chicago, University of 
Chicago Press 2003), which is the major American style guide, and books such as the 
New Oxford Dictionary for Writers and Editors  (Oxford, Oxford University Press 2005) 
(‘New ODWE’) or Butcher’s Copy-editing: The Cambridge Handbook for Editors, Copy-
editors and Proofreaders by J Butcher, C Drake and M Leach 4th edn (Cambridge, 
Cambridge University Press 2006). The latter contains a very useful short section on best 
practice for preparing law books (14.2) and also contains much invaluable advice on 
many aspects of manuscript writing and editing.  
1.1  OSCOLA 
Hart Publishing style aims to be consistent with OSCOLA (the Oxford Style for the 
Citation of Legal Authorities). This is a comprehensive guide to citation which is 
available from the Oxford University Law Faculty’s website at 
denning.law.ox.ac.uk/published/oscola.shtml. It is a modern style which adopts 
straightforward and easily followed rules for citing all manner of legal materials, 
including secondary sources, and is regularly updated. On general editing matters not 
covered by OSCOLA, Hart Publishing favours Butcher’s Copy-editing as a guide. 
The points listed below are set out either to alert authors to particular features of 
our house style which may be inconsistent with the styles of OSCOLA (these are 
highlighted in the text below) and some of the larger publishers, or to reinforce what we 
view as best practice. Whatever style you decide to adopt, please be consistent in what 
you do, and try to stick to the rules listed in section 2 below. 
When you deliver your manuscript please make sure you include the following:  
1.2  Electronic Copy 
The typescript should always be delivered electronically by e-mail, on a CD-ROM or 
memory stick. 
It is never acceptable to submit PDF files, which, while readable, are not normally 
capable of being edited or manipulated by our typesetters.  
Please remember to let us know the type of software used and the name of the 
files in which the text and notes are stored. Text can be saved in Word documents 
control application platform:C# Raster - Image Save Options in C#.NET
NET Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB a zone bit of whether it's need to embed Color profile
www.rasteredge.com
control application platform:C# TIFF: How to Insert & Burn Picture/Image into TIFF Document
Entire C# Code to Embed and Burn Image to TIFF GetPage(0); // load an PNG logo into REImage REImage powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
www.rasteredge.com
HART PUBLISHING STYLE GUIDELINES 
(.docx), Wordperfect or Rich Text Format (.rtf) formats. Label the files clearly by chapter 
number (1, 2, 3, 4 etc). Each chapter should be saved as a separate file. Figures, imported 
tables and other embedded objects should be saved as separate files. 
PLEASE VIRUS CHECK YOUR MATERIAL BEFORE SENDING IT TO US. 
1.3  Table of Contents 
You must prepare a table of contents, though it is not necessary to include page numbers 
at this stage. For edited collections the chapter number, title and contributor name is 
sufficient. For single-authored books you may include up to the first three levels of 
heading.  
1.4  Style Sheet 
If, for any reason, you have adopted a style which is inconsistent with our house style, or 
if you suspect that you may have done so but are not sure then please prepare a ‘style 
sheet’ noting any peculiarities which you think we ought to be alerted to. 
2.  GENERAL STYLE POINTS 
2.1  Consistency 
A consistent approach to the style of the text and footnotes should be adopted at all times. 
Any departures from Hart Publishing style should also be consistent, and should be 
notified when the manuscript is delivered. 
2.2  Spelling 
English spelling should be used throughout. The ‘ise’ form should be used for words such 
as ‘modernise’, ‘civilise’, ‘organise’, and the ‘-se’ form for ‘analyse’. 
We recommend the use of The Chambers Dictionary, which uses British spelling 
conventions. If you use an Oxford dictionary such as the Shorter Oxford English 
Dictionary (SOED), you must be sure to use the alternative form British spellings. 
control application platform:VB.NET TIFF: Rotate TIFF Page by Using RaterEdge .NET TIFF
formats are: JPEG, PNG, GIF, BMP, PDF, Word (Docx Visual Basic .NET class, and then embed "RasterEdge.Imaging splitting huge target TIFF file into multiple and
www.rasteredge.com
control application platform:VB.NET Image: How to Draw and Cutomize Text Annotation on Image
NET text annotation add-on tutorial can be divided into a few on document files in VB.NET, including PDF, TIFF & license and at last you can embed the required
www.rasteredge.com
HART PUBLISHING STYLE GUIDELINES 
Fowler’s Modern English Usage (see 2.3) provides useful guidance on some 
British spelling practices, eg,  doubling of consonants. Butcher’s Copy-editing deals with 
spelling issues at 6.14. 
‘Per cent’ is preferred in the text, but can be abbreviated to ‘%’ in the footnotes. 
Exceptionally if you are referring to a large amount of statistical data in the text then you 
may use %.  
In the text, references to other chapters should be in the form ‘chapter one’ rather 
than ‘Chapter 1’; in the footnotes this can be ‘ch 1’ etc. 
You should distinguish between ‘judgment’ (the legal decision of a court/judge: 
‘Scott Baker LJ, giving the judgment of the court, said that ... ’ and ‘judgement’ meaning 
opinion. ‘In our judgement this development reveals ...’. 
2.3  Grammar 
Grammar is to be guided by RW Burchfield (ed), Fowler’s Modern English Usage 3rd 
edn rev (Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2004). 
2.4  Full stops 
Full stops are not required for abbreviations, either in text or in footnotes. A full stop 
should appear within parentheses only when it completes a full sentence contained 
therein. Footnote cues should follow full stops. 
2.5  Hyphenation 
A hyphen is used where it is effectively being used to make one word out of the two 
words separated by the hyphen. There are no absolutely hard and fast rules about 
hyphenation, though terms such ‘Solicitor-General’ and ‘Attorney-General’ are 
commonly hyphenated. You should choose the form you prefer, with or without 
hyphenation, and stick to it. Butcher’s Copy-editing contains useful guidance on 
hyphenation 6.12.3. 
2.6  Dashes  
An em-dash is used to mark an interruption in the structure of a sentence. A pair of em-
dashes can be used to enclose a parenthetical remark. Alternatively, an em-dash can be 
used to replace a colon. 
control application platform:VB.NET Image: VB.NET Code to Add Rubber Stamp Annotation to Image
Suitable for VB.NET PDF, Word & TIFF document managing & editing project. VB Can be implemented into both Windows and web VB.NET applications; Support single or
www.rasteredge.com
control application platform:VB.NET Image: Creating Hotspot Annotation for Visual Basic .NET
the configuration environment to integrate RasterEdge Visual Basic .NET into your imaging to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
www.rasteredge.com
HART PUBLISHING STYLE GUIDELINES 
An en-dash is half as wide as an em-dash and is ordinarily equivalent to the word 
‘to’ or ‘and’. For example, Oxford–London railway; the Smith–Jones Bill (two people). 
By contrast Smith-Jones with a hyphen indicates a double-barrelled name of a single 
individual. An en-dash is also sometimes used to suggest tension and carries the sense 
‘versus’, eg,  in terms such as cost–benefit analysis. 
An en-dash is used for number ranges. Care should be taken to maintain the 
distinction between a hyphen in citations such as UCC art §8-303 and en-dashes in  
number ranges 8–31, especially when using SARAs and macros for universal correction. 
2.7  Quotation Marks 
Quotation marks may be used to indicate that a phrase or word is being used with a 
specific meaning. Single quotation marks should be used. There is no need to 
differentiate such usage from quotations. (See Butcher’s Copy-editing  11.1.2.)  
See further at 3.3.1.below regarding quotations. 
2.8  The Use of Capitals 
Other than at the beginning of a sentence or in the titles of works, capitals should only be 
used for proper nouns. Thus, ‘Parliament’ would be used in the following sense ‘when the 
UK Parliament sits...’ but ‘parliament’ would be used as follows ‘the majority of 
parliaments in the Commonwealth’ The following should also be capitalised: 
Act (or Bill) of Parliament 
Attorney-General 
Cabinet 
Commonwealth 
Constitution (but constitutional) 
Crown 
Executive Council 
Governor 
Governor-General 
Her Majesty, the Queen 
his Honour, her Honour, their Honours 
Law Lords 
their Lordships 
Lords Justices 
Member States 
Parliament (but parliamentary) (and the Houses thereof) 
HART PUBLISHING STYLE GUIDELINES 
Political parties (Labour Party) 
Province (eg Nova Scotia) 
Religious denominations 
Prime Minister 
State (eg Queensland) 
Vice-Chancellor 
The following words should not be capitalised: 
common law, and other names of legal classification (eg,  criminal law) 
court (unless naming it— eg,  High Court. Beware, ‘Court’ remains capitalised 
if it is an abbreviated reference to a specific Court: eg, ‘in Avery Jones v IRC 
the Court’ (because here it is referring to the ‘High Court’) 
judiciary 
legislature 
local government 
press 
schedule 
statute 
Where no indication is given above, the author should decide on a consistent usage. If the 
context makes clear, for example, that ‘the directive’ refers to the ‘Working Time 
Directive’ mentioned in the previous sentence, then a capital ‘D’ is not necessary but may 
be preferred by the author. Consistency of practice is what is required, and the copy-editor 
should follow the predominant usage of the author, where no style guidance has been 
provided and the author’s style does not conflict with Hart Publishing style. 
2.9  Foreign Words 
Foreign words and phrases that have not been absorbed into general English usage should 
be italicised and, if necessary, translated in an immediately following parenthesis. But cf 
foreign names 2.10.2 below. For quotations in a foreign language see 3.3 below. 
Butcher’s Copy-editing gives more information at 6.7 and 6.7.1. 
However, foreign words and phrases which have been anglicised are not italicised 
Unfortunately, there is no agreed method of determining whether foreign words or 
phrases have been anglicised. However, as a guide, those appearing in the following list 
may be judged to have passed into everyday usage, and do not require italicisation. 
HART PUBLISHING STYLE GUIDELINES 
amicus curiae;  a priori;  a fortiori;  bona fide;  de facto;  de jure;  ex parte;  ex post; ex 
post facto;  indicia;  in situ,  inter alia;  laissez-faire;  mutatis mutandis, novus actus 
interveniens;  obiter dicta;  per se;  prima facie;  quantum meruit;  quid pro quo;  raison 
d’etre;  ratio decidendi;  stare decisis;  terra nullius;  ultra vires;  vice versa;  vis-a-vis;  viz. 
Accents on foreign words are only retained where it is necessary for pronunciation. 
2.10  Names 
2.10.1  Titles and Postnominals 
Conventional titles such as Mr and Ms, and honorific titles or titles indicating 
qualification, such as Dame, Dr or Professor, may be included in the text before a 
person’s name (although this practice is not required). No full stops should be used where 
an abbreviated form of a title is given.  
No titles, whether conventional or honorific, should be included before an 
author’s name cited in footnotes (including honorific titles such as ‘Sir’, ‘Dame’ and 
peerage titles). 
Postnominals, such as QC or AM, are usually not referred to after the name of 
authors in either text or footnotes, except in footnotes which state the qualification and 
status of the author. 
2.10.2  Foreign Names 
Foreign names of persons, institutions and places, including names of courts, are not 
italicised. Capitalisation follows the practice of the language, eg, Cour de cassation, 
Conseil d’Etat, Bayerisches Staatsministerium der Justiz.  
See also Compound names 2.10.3 below. For titles of books, journals and journal 
articles in foreign langauges see 5.1.5 below. 
2.10.3  Compound Surnames 
Rules governing the capitalisation and the form of citing compound surnames is complex 
and depends to some extent on both the language of the name and nationality of the 
person. Butcher’s Copy-editing 6.11 gives succinct advice on how to form such names. 
If you are faced with inconsistent forms of a compound name cataloguing rules, as 
revealed in online library catalogues, can be helpful in identifying the preferred form. 
HART PUBLISHING STYLE GUIDELINES 
10 
Library of Congress Authority Headings for Names can be found at authorities.loc.gov/> 
and entries marked ‘Authorized Heading’ are the preferred form. The British Library 
catalogue can be found at www.bl.uk/catalogues/listings.html.  
Follow the guidance of these resources for alphabetisation of foreign names in 
Bibliographies and Reference lists. (See also Butcher’s Copy-editing 8.2.1 Foreign 
Personal Names.) 
The usage of these library catalogues may not match the practice of other 
European national libraries, but should be preferred in an English language publication.  
2.10.4  Abbreviations and Acronyms 
It is best to give the full name of an Institution or Official Body in the first instance and 
indicate in parentheses the abbreviation or acronym by which it will be referred to in the 
following text: The Department of Trade and Industry (DTI)  
NB it is not necessary to use quotation marks within the parentheses in such 
instances. 
If the majority of your readers or general usage commonly uses the abbreviation or 
acronym eg, NATO, you should consider whether, on first use, the abbreviation should be 
expanded, ie,  NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization).  
2.11  Numbers 
Numbers under 10 should be written in words. 
Figures should be used: 
(i) for numbers over nine;  
(ii) when the material contains a sequence of stated quantities, numbers, ages, etc 
(example: children in the 7–12 age group);  
(iii) for numbers of sections, clauses, paragraphs etc; and 
(iv) wherever words would appear clumsy. 
References to sequential page numbers should be made as follows. 
When a range of numbers delineating a sequence of pages (or paragraphs) is used, the 
numbers should be elided to the last two digits (12–15; 113–16; 240–45; 400–99; 325–
28). However, when the range between two numbers crosses the boundary between two 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested