NB: Phrases with @ sign can no longer be selected for use in the ICSCs
61
'Respiratory failure' is the inability of the cardiac and pulmonary systems to maintain an adequate 
exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the lungs.  When this expression is chosen include one of 
the following in phrase 13751: heart, cardiovascular system, lungs or blood. 'Respiratory depression' 
is caused by the depression of the central nervous system, in which the respiration is slow or feeble 
failing to provide full ventilation and perfusion of the lung. When this expression is chosen include 
the following in phrase 13751: central nervous system. 
13753010  asphyxia 
13753020  cardiac disorders 
13753030  convulsions 
13753040  cyanosis 
13753050  impaired functions 
13753060  insomnia 
13753070  irritability 
13753080  kidney impairment 
13753090  lesions of blood cells 
13753095  destruction of blood cells 
13753100  liver impairment 
13753110  respiratory failure 
13753120  tissue lesions 
13753130  shock 
13753140  jaundice 
13753150 respiratory depression 
13754000  the formation of methaemoglobin. 
Expl. The blood contains a substance called haemoglobin which is important in the transport of 
oxygen from the lungs to all parts of the human body. Some substances can - when absorbed - alter 
haemoglobin into a form called methaemoglobin which cannot transport oxygen. Too much 
methaemoglobin in the blood will mean that the internal organs become starved of oxygen. 
Ind. Apply for chemicals which can cause significant methaemoglobinaemia on short-term exposure. 
Chemicals that can generate methaemoglobin in vivo include nitrite and some aminophenols, N-
hydroxyarylamines, aromatic amines, and arylnitro compounds. Combine with 13751 with 'blood' 
selected in the window of subphrases.   
13781-82    (17108-09-13-14-19-25-31-37)   17309    (18103)    (18118-19-23)    20143     
(20106-07-19-25-27)    (24417)    24425 
13755000  [] 
13756000  Cholinesterase inhibition[]. 
How to convert pdf into powerpoint slides - C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
convert pdf to powerpoint slide; pdf to ppt converter online for large
How to convert pdf into powerpoint slides - VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
converting pdf to powerpoint online; pdf to ppt converter online
NB: Phrases with @ sign can no longer be selected for use in the ICSCs
62
Expl. Much of the nervous system depends on a chemical neurotransmitter called acetylcholine, the 
action of which is controlled by an enzyme acetylcholinesterase. Some substances, such as 
organophosphorous and carbamate pesticides, can inhibit the activity of this enzyme. This results in 
accumulation of the active neurotransmitter and hyperactivity of the nerve pathways. Symptoms of 
acute poisoning can include irritability, tremors, convulsions, and possibly death, usually as a result 
of respiratory failure.  
Ind. Apply for chemicals (carbamate or organophosphorous esters) which can cause significant 
cholinesterase inhibition. Combine with 13751 with 'nervous system'. 
13751-53-73  13781-82  (16211)  17110-42-27-31-19-14-37-29   (18103-20-23)   20110-03-17-37-43 
24417-25 
13761000  Exposure []could cause lowering of consciousness. 
Expl. This phrase is used when exposure at realistic levels may lead to a lowering of consciousness. 
Ind. Judgement must be made as to whether the effect could occur at realistic exposure levels. 
a) Substances with an OEL (not a ceiling value): 
Can be completed with 'above the OEL' if the effect is possible after a short exposure time at realistic 
levels, e.g., less then 5-10 times the OEL. If the effect mentioned would only be expected at very high 
levels (>10 x OEL), this phrase can be used and completed with 'far above the OEL'. 
b) Substances with a ceiling OEL value: 
Must be completed with 'above OEL'. 
c) Substances without an OEL: 
One of these phrases can be used, completed if possible after the word 'exposure' with the mention of 
conditions that produce the stated effect, e.g., 'at low level' or 'at high level'.  
The application of this phrase to substances for which there is no OEL requires 'Peer-Review'. 
13763000  Exposure []could cause []. 
Expl. This phrase indicates certain effects which may be caused by exposure to the substance. 
Ind. May be completed with 'trembling', 'convulsions', 'excitement', 'muscle weakness', etc. 
a) Substances with an OEL (not ceiling value): 
Can be completed with 'above the OEL' if the effect is possible after a short exposure time at realistic 
levels, e.g., less then 5-10 times the OEL. If the effect mentioned would only be expected at very high 
levels (>10 x OEL), this phrase can be used and completed with 'far above the OEL'. 
b) Substances with a ceiling OEL value: 
Must be completed with 'above OEL'. 
c) Substances without an OEL: One of these phrases can be used, completed if possible after the word 
'exposure' with the mention of conditions that produce the stated effect, e.g., 'at low level or 'at high 
level'. The application of this phrase to substances for which there is no OEL requires 'Peer-Review'. 
13771000  Exposure []may result in unconsciousness. 
Expl. This phrase is used when exposure at realistic levels may lead to unconsciousness. 
Ind. Judgement must be made as to whether the effect could occur at realistic exposure levels. 
a) Substances with an OEL (not a ceiling value): 
Can be completed with 'above the OEL' if the effect is possible after a short exposure time at realistic 
levels, e.g., less then 5-10 times the OEL. If the effect mentioned would only be expected at very high 
levels (>10 x OEL), this phrase can be used and completed with 'far above the OEL'. 
b) Substances with a ceiling OEL value: 
Must be completed with 'above OEL'. 
c) Substances without an OEL: 
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
control, developers are able to split a PowerPoint into two or more It enables you to move out useless PowerPoint document pages C# Codes to Sort Slides Order.
pdf to powerpoint converter online; how to convert pdf into powerpoint slides
VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
split one PPT (.pptx) document file into smaller sub library SDK, this VB.NET PowerPoint processing control & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
convert pdf to ppt online; how to convert pdf to ppt for
NB: Phrases with @ sign can no longer be selected for use in the ICSCs
63
One of these phrases can be used, completed if possible after the word 'exposure' with the mention of 
conditions that produce the stated effect, e.g., 'at low level' or 'at high level'.  
The application of this phrase to substances for which there is no OEL requires 'Peer-Review'. 
13773000  Exposure []may result in death. 
Expl. This phrase is used when exposure at realistic levels may lead to death. 
Ind. Judgement must be made as to whether the effect could occur at realistic exposure levels. 
a) Substances with an OEL (not a ceiling value): 
Can be completed with 'above the OEL' if the effect is possible after a short exposure time at realistic 
levels, e.g., less then 5-10 times the OEL. If the effect mentioned would only be expected at very high 
levels (>10 x OEL), this phrase can be used and completed with 'far above the OEL'. 
b) Substances with a ceiling OEL value: 
Must be completed with 'above OEL'. 
c) Substances without an OEL: 
One of these phrases can be used, completed if possible after the word 'exposure' with the mention of 
conditions that produce the stated effect, e.g., 'at low level' or 'at high level'.  
The application of this phrase to substances for which there is no OEL requires 'Peer-Review'. 
13775000  Exposure []may result in []. 
Expl. This phrase indicates certain effects which may be caused by exposure to the substance. 
Ind. a) Substances with an OEL value (not a ceiling value): 
Can be completed with 'above the OEL' if the effect is possible after a short exposure time at realistic 
levels, e.g., less then 5-10 times the OEL. If the effect mentioned would only be expected at very high 
levels (>10 x OEL), this phrase can be used and completed with 'far above the OEL'. 
b) Substances with a ceiling OEL value: 
Must be completed with 'above OEL'. 
c) Substances without an OEL: 
One of these phrases can be used, completed if possible after the word 'exposure' with the mention of 
conditions that produce the stated effect, e.g., 'at low level' or 'at high level'.  
The application of this phrase to substances for which there is no OEL requires 'Peer-Review'. 
13775010  at high levels 
13775030  cardiac dysrhythmia 
13775040  death 
13775050  lowering of consciousness 
13775060  unconsciousness 
13775070  above the OEL 
13775080  far 
13781000  The effects may be delayed[]. 
Expl. The effects of exposure to some substances do not become manifest until some time (possibly 
hours) after the exposure. 
Ind. Can be completed with '(see Notes)' if additional information given in NOTES (e.g., 24101). 
VB.NET PowerPoint: Merge and Split PowerPoint Document(s) with PPT
sample code in VB.NET to finish PowerPoint document splitting &ltsummary> ''' Split a document into 2 sub Note: If you want to see more PDF processing functions
add pdf to powerpoint; change pdf to powerpoint online
VB.NET PowerPoint: Extract & Collect PPT Slide(s) Using VB Sample
you want to combine these extracted slides into a new please read this VB.NET PowerPoint slide processing & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
how to change pdf to powerpoint; how to convert pdf to ppt
NB: Phrases with @ sign can no longer be selected for use in the ICSCs
64
13782000  Medical observation is indicated. 
Expl. With some substances there is a distinct interval between the moment of exposure and the onset 
of the first symptoms. In such cases, observation preferably in a hospital, may be necessary in order 
to have instant medical aid available, should the need arise. 
Ind. This phrase can be used with 13781. 
13783000  See Notes. 
13784000  Health effects of exposure to the substance have not been investigated []. 
Expl. The potential toxicity of some chemicals has not been investigated satisfactorily, because, for 
example, faulty protocols have been used, or results incorrectly interpreted. For some chemicals, little 
is known simply because no research has been carried out. 
Ind. For chemicals for which adequate data could not be found to make a judgment on effects of 
short-term exposure. Close with full stop if no data is available because no research has been done. 
Complete with 'adequately' if evidence shows that the available data were obtained through 
inadequately conducted research. 
13785000  Health effects of exposure to the substance have been investigated extensively but none has been 
found. 
Expl. Some chemicals do not represent a hazard to human health even at high, and improbably high, 
levels of exposure. 
Ind. Applies if the available literature (following a thorough search) indicates that potential toxicity 
has been extensively and reliably investigated and indicates that there is no evidence of likely adverse 
effects. Use 24405 in cases where the chemical has not been investigated adequately. The selection of 
this phrase has to be approved by the Peer Review group. 
13800000  EFFECTS OF LONG-TERM OR REPEATED EXPOSURE: 
Effects listed under Short-Term can be duplicated here, however, to do so is a peer review decision.    
13801000  Repeated or prolonged contact with skin may cause dermatitis[]. 
Expl. Repeated or prolonged exposure to a number of substances may lead to effects on the skin. This 
may take the form of inflammed or reddened skin, known as dermatitis. 
Ind. Applies if positive human experience is available; refer to toxicological handbooks. May be 
completed with further short details; also see 13807. 
13803000  Repeated or prolonged contact may cause skin sensitization[]. 
Expl. A contact sensitizer is a substance that will induce an allergic response following skin contact. 
People with an existing allergy should avoid contact with this substance. 
Ind. Apply if there is evidence in humans that the substance can induce sensitization by skin contact 
in a substantial number of people, or where there are positive results from appropriate animal test. 
Evidence should include: 
Positive data from patch testing, normally obtained in more than one dermatology clinic; 
Epidemiological studies showing allergic contact dermatitis caused by the substance; 
VB.NET PowerPoint: Use PowerPoint SDK to Create, Load and Save PPT
guide for PPT document, we divide this page into three parts in VB.NET to create an empty PowerPoint file with or local file and get the exact PPT slides number;
change pdf to ppt; conversion of pdf to ppt online
VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
Using this VB.NET PowerPoint to PDF converting demo code below, you can easily convert all slides of source PowerPoint document into a multi-page PDF file.
how to change pdf to powerpoint slides; how to change pdf file to powerpoint
NB: Phrases with @ sign can no longer be selected for use in the ICSCs
65
Positive data from appropriate animal tests; 
Positive data from experimental studies in man. 
Well documented episodes of allergic contact dermatitis, normally obtained in more than one 
dermatology clinic. 
Evidence from animal studies is usually more reliable than evidence from human exposure. In cases 
where evidence is available from both sources, and there is a conflict in results, the quality and 
reliability of evidence from both sources must be assessed. Negative human data should not normally 
be used to negate positive results from animal studies. 
In animal studies, when an adjuvant type method for skin sensitization is used, a response at least 
30% of the animals is considered positive. For a non-adjuvant test method a response of at least 15% 
of the animals is considered positive. 
A decision to use this phrase must be considered by the Peer-Review Committee. 
18207    (16207) 
13805000  Repeated or prolonged inhalation exposure may cause asthma[]. 
Expl. A respiratory sensitizer is a substance that will induce hypersensitivity of the airways following 
inhalation of the substance. This may result in rhinitis/conjuntivitis and alveolitis, or asthma. People 
with an existing allergy should avoid contact with this substance. 
Ind.  Apply if there is evidence in humans that the substance can induce specific respiratory 
hypersensitivity, and/or where there are positive results from an appropriate animal test. Evidence 
will normally be based on human evidence and will generally be seen as asthma. Other 
hypersensitivity reactions such as rhinitis/conjunctivitis and alveolitis should also be considered. A 
decision on classification should take into account the size of the population exposed and the extent 
of the exposure. A decision to use this phrase must be considered by the Peer-Review Committee. 
(16207)    24422    24423 
13807000  The liquid defats the skin[]. 
Expl. Many liquids have no direct effect on the skin and will not lead to an allergy, but will defat the 
skin upon prolonged or repeated contact. As a result, the skin may become rough, dry, and red. After 
the skin has been in frequent contact with, or is cleaned with, a defatting liquid, it should be washed 
off with water and soap and then treated with an ointment or cream. 
Ind. Do not use if phrase 13801 has already been used. If both apply, preference should be given to 
13801. 
18105    18201 
13807100  Repeated contact with skin may cause dryness and cracking 
Expl. Some substances have a weak defatting action that will not result in dry skin from short-term 
exposure, but after long-term or repeated exposure may eventually deplete the skin of its natural oils 
resulting in dry, cracked skin (not necessarily dermatitis). 
Ind. Use for substances where this effect has been shown to happen. 
(18201)  
13808000  Inhalation[] may cause asthma-like reactions (RADS). 
13809000  Lungs may be affected by repeated or prolonged exposure[]. 
Expl. The effects on the lungs include chronic bronchitis, lung fibrosis, etc. which only become 
manifest after some time of repeated or prolonged exposure. This phrase is used when the effects are 
only caused if relatively high concentrations of the substance are inhaled. Definition of long-term or 
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
clip art or screenshot to PowerPoint document slide large amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
and paste pdf into powerpoint; pdf to powerpoint slide
VB.NET PowerPoint: Add Image to PowerPoint Document Slide/Page
to add, insert or delete any certain PowerPoint slide without a multi-page PPT document into 2, 4, 6 powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
convert pdf slides to powerpoint; converting pdf to powerpoint
NB: Phrases with @ sign can no longer be selected for use in the ICSCs
66
repeated exposure: more extended exposure than short-term (i.e., more than one working day). In the 
description of effects of short term exposure, the acute (minute to hours) and latent (hours to days) 
effects should be emphasized, whereas in the description of the effects of long-term or repeated 
exposure the chronic and cumulative effects should be mentioned. 
Ind. Applies when there is evidence of effects on the lungs (e.g., chronic bronchitis, lung fibrosis, 
etc.) which only become manifest after some time of repeated or prolonged exposure. 
13809010  to the aerosol 
13809020  to dust particles 
13809030  to fibres 
13809040  to fumes 
13809050  to the gas 
13809060  to the vapour 
13809070  and 
13811000  Lungs may be affected by inhalation of high concentrations[]. 
Expl. The effects on the lungs include chronic bronchitis, lung fibrosis, etc. which only become 
manifest after some time of repeated or prolonged exposure. This phrase is used when the effects are 
only caused if relatively high concentrations of the substance are inhaled. This phrase is used when 
the effects are only caused if relatively high concentrations are inhaled. 
Ind. Applies when effects are only caused on inhalation of high concentration, while 13809 has to be 
used when exposure without intensive contact is sufficient to cause the effects. The phrase has to be 
completed with 'gas', 'vapour', 'fume', 'mist', or 'dust particles'. 
13813000  The substance may have effects on the [] 
Expl. This sentence indicates what organs or systems may be affected and what consequences this 
may have, but with relevance to long-term exposure. 
Ind. Complete with the target organs using terms understandable to the lay person (nervous system, 
liver, blood, etc.) and combine if possible with 13815. Otherwise close 13813 with a full stop. Do not 
duplicate the target organs and effects described under Effects of Short-Term Exposure unless there is 
an important reason to do so. 
13813010  bladder 
13813020  blood 
13813030  bone marrow 
13813040  cardiovascular system 
13813050  central nervous system 
13813060  endocrine system 
13813070  gastrointestinal tract 
C# PowerPoint: C# Guide to Add, Insert and Delete PPT Slide(s)
empty page and insert it into an existing view detailed guide for each PowerPoint slide processing powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
convert pdf file to powerpoint; convert pdf to ppt
C# PowerPoint: C# Codes to Combine & Split PowerPoint Documents
2 sub-documents, if you need to split PowerPoint into 4, 6 &ltsummary> /// Split a document into 2 sub powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
pdf page to powerpoint; convert pdf to powerpoint slides
NB: Phrases with @ sign can no longer be selected for use in the ICSCs
67
13813080  immune system 
13813090  kidneys 
13813100  liver 
13813110  lungs 
13813120  lymphatic system 
13813130  nervous system 
13813140  peripheral nervous system 
13813150  respiratory tract 
13813160  spleen 
13813170  thyroid 
13813180  and 
13813190 when ingested 
13815000  , resulting in [] 
Expl. This phrase combined with 13813 indicates what organs or systems may be affected and what 
consequences this may have, but with relevance to long-term exposure. 
Ind. Use this phrase to indicate the effects only if it adds useful information to 13813 and there are 
good literature references. 
Toxicological information should come from scientific literature preferably concerning man, or from 
animal studies that use guidelines like OECD guidelines or in accordance with generally accepted 
standards of good scientific practice at the time that the test was carried out. 
13815010  anaemia 
13815020  cardiac disorders 
13815030  cyanosis 
13815040  fibrosis 
13815050  impaired functions 
13815060  kidney impairment 
13815070  lesions of blood cells 
13815080  liver impairment 
13815090  respiratory failure 
13815100  tissue lesions 
NB: Phrases with @ sign can no longer be selected for use in the ICSCs
68
13815110  and 
13817000  the formation of methaemoglobin[]. 
Expl. The blood contains a substance called haemoglobin which is important in the transport of 
oxygen from the lungs to all parts of the human body. Some substances can, when absorbed, alter 
haemoglobin into a form called methaemoglobin which cannot transport oxygen. Too much 
methaemoglobin in the blood causes internal organs to become starved of oxygen. This phrase is used 
when methaemoglobineamia is a result of long-term or repeated exposure.  
Ind. Apply for chemicals which can cause methaemoglobinaemia generally only after long-term or 
repeated exposure. Chemicals that create methaemoglobin in vivo include nitrite and some 
aminophenols, N-hydroxylamines, aromatic amines, and arylnitro compounds. Do not use in addition 
to 13754 unless there is an important reason to do so. 
(16207)    17108-09-13-14-19-25-31-37    17309    (18103)    (18118-19-23)    20143     
(20106-07-19-25-27)    24417-25    (20317) 
13818000  Cholinesterase inhibitor[]; cumulative effect is possible: see acute hazards/symptoms. 
Expl. Much of the nervous system depends on a chemical neurotransmitter called acetylcholine, the 
action of which is controlled by an enzyme acetylcholinesterase. Some substances, such as 
organophosphorous and carbamate pesticides, can inhibit the activity of this enzyme. This results in 
an accumulation of the active neurotransmitter and hyperactivity of the nerve pathways. This phrase 
is used when the effect is as a result of long-term or repeated exposure. 
Ind. 17110-14-19-27-31-37-42   (18103-20-23) 20110-03-17-37-43 24417-25 (16211) 
13819000  [] 
13831000  This substance is carcinogenic to humans. 
Expl. A carcinogen is a substance which induces cancer or increases its incidence. Classification of a 
substance as posing a carcinogenic hazard is based on the inherent properties of the substance and 
does not provide information on the level of the human cancer risk which the use of this substance 
may represent. 
This sentence indicates that there is sufficient evidence to support a causal association between the 
exposure to a substance and human cancer, according to criteria published by the International 
Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) or outlined in the Globally Harmonised System (GHS) for 
Human Health and Environmental Effects of Chemical Substances. See Annex 9 and 10. 
A decision to use this phrase must be a conclusion taken by the Peer-Review Committee. 
Ind. Use phrase if it complies with criteria applicable to a placing as IARC Classification  Group 1 
(Carcinogenic to humans) or GHS 1A (Known human carcinogen).   
16207 
13833000  This substance is probably carcinogenic to humans. 
Expl. A carcinogen is a substance which induces cancer or increases its incidence. Classification of a 
substance as posing a carcinogenic hazard is based on the inherent properties of the substance and 
does not provide information on the level of the human cancer risk which the use of this substance 
may represent. 
This sentence indicates that the evidence of a causal association between the exposure to a substance 
and human cancer is not sufficient, but it is strong enough to establish a probability, according to 
criteria published by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) or outlined in the 
NB: Phrases with @ sign can no longer be selected for use in the ICSCs
69
Globally Harmonised System (GHS) for Human Health and Environmental Effects of Chemical 
Substances. 
These data can be supported by mammalian experiments, since substances that have induced 
malignant tumours in well performed experimental studies in animals are also to be presumed to be 
human carcinogens unless there is strong evidence that the mechanism of tumour formation is not 
relevant for humans.  
A decision to use this phrase must be a conclusion taken by the Peer-Review Committee. 
Ind. Use phrase if it complies with criteria applicable to a placing as IARC Classification Group 2A  
(Probably carcinogenic to humans) or GHS Classification 1B (Presumed human carcinogen).  
16207 
13835000  This substance is possibly carcinogenic to humans. 
Expl. A carcinogen is a substance which induces cancer or increases its incidence. Classification of a 
substance as posing a carcinogenic hazard is based on the inherent properties of the substance and 
does not provide information on the level of the human cancer risk which the use of this substance 
may represent.  
Substances that have induced malignant tumours in well performed experimental studies in animals 
are also to be presumed to be human carcinogens unless there is strong evidence that the mechanism 
of tumour formation is not relevant for humans.  
This sentence indicates that the evidence of a causal association between the exposure to a substance 
and human cancer is inadequate (or there are no human studies), but there is strong evidence from 
mammalian experiments for the presumption of a human carcinogenic hazard, according to criteria 
published by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) or outlined in the Globally 
Harmonised System (GHS) for Human Health and Environmental Effects of Chemical Substances.  
A decision to use this phrase must be a conclusion taken by the Peer-Review Committee. 
Ind. Use phrase if it complies with criteria applicable to a placing as IARC Classification Group 2B 
(Possibly carcinogenic to humans) or GHS Classification 2 (Suspected human carcinogen).   
16207 
13837000  Tumours have been detected in experimental animals but may not be relevant to humans. 
Expl. A carcinogen is a substance which induces cancer or increases its incidence. Classification of a 
substance as posing a carcinogenic hazard is based on the inherent properties of the substance and 
does not provide information on the level of the human cancer risk which the use of this substance 
may represent. 
This sentence is used when positive results from mammalian experiments are available in the 
published literature, but the tumours arise by mechanisms for which there is strong evidence that they 
may not occur in humans. Sometimes, an unrealistically high dose may be considered as part of such 
mechanism, e.g., leading to certain types of bladder tumours in rats.  
A decision to use this phrase, or no phrase at all, must be a conclusion taken by the Peer-Review 
Committee. 
Ind. Use this phrase if it complies with IARC Classification 3 (Unclassifiable as to carcinogenicity to 
humans) but differs from EC or other important classification system.  
(16207) 
13839000  Other data on carcinogenicity (NOT on card): [] 
Ind. Mention all other important data on the carcinogenicity, mutagenicity and reproductive toxicity 
of the substance. 
13840000  [] 
NB: Phrases with @ sign can no longer be selected for use in the ICSCs
70
13841000  @May cause heritable genetic damage in humans. 
Expl. The substance may cause mutations in the germ cells (ova or spermatozoa) of humans, which 
could be transmitted to the offspring. This phrase is used when there is clear evidence that the 
substance can cause heritable mutations, or the evidence is strong enough to suggest that the 
substance should be regarded as if it induces heritable mutations in germ cells. 
Ind. The phrase was deleted in Hanover meeting 16.3.2001 
Apply this phrase if there is sufficient evidence to establish a causal association between human 
exposure to the substance and heritable genetic damage, e.g., from human epidemiological studies, or 
when there is sufficient evidence to provide a strong presumption that human exposure to the 
substance may result in the development of heritable genetic damage, generally on the basis of  
1) positive result(s) from in vivo heritable germ cell mutagenicity tests in mammals (e.g., specific 
locus test, heritable translocation, etc.), 
2)  positive result(s) from in vivo somatic cell mutagenicity in mammals in combination with 
evidence that the substance has potential to cause mutations to germ cells. This supporting evidence 
may, for example, be derived from mutagenicity/genotoxic tests in germ cells in vivo, or by 
demonstrating the ability of the substance or its metabolite(s) to interact with the genetic material of 
germ cell, 
3)  positive result(s) from tests showing mutagenic effects in the germ cells of humans, without 
demonstration of transmission to progeny; for example, an increase in the frequency of aneuploidy in 
sperm cells of exposed people. 
A decision to use this phrase must be a conclusion taken by the Peer-Review Committee. 
16207 
13843000  @May cause genetic damage in humans. 
Expl. There is some evidence to suggest that the substance may cause mutations in the germ cells 
(ova or spermatozoa) of humans. 
Ind. The phrase was deleted in Hanover meeting 16.3.2001. 
Apply this phrase if there is positive evidence obtained from experiments in mammals and/or in 
some cases in vitro experiments, obtained from 
1) somatic cell mutagenicity test in vivo, in mammals, 
2) other in vivo somatic cell genotoxicity tests which are to be supported by positive results from in 
vitro mutagenicity assays.  
Chemicals which are positive in vitro mammalian mutagenicity assays, and which also show 
chemical structure activity relationship to known germ cell mutagens should also be considered. 
A decision to use this phrase must be a conclusion taken by the Peer-Review Committee. 
16207 
13845000  May cause heritable genetic damage to human germ cells. 
Expl. Since no chemical has been identified as including such damage, a more definitive phrase (i.e., 
Causes...) is not required. The substance may cause mutations in the germ cells (ova or spermatozoa) 
of humans, which could be transmitted to the offspring. This phrase is used when there is clear 
evidence that the substance can cause heritable mutations, or the evidence is strong enough for 
presumption that the substance should be regarded as if it induces heritable mutations in germ cells. 
Note that evidence restricted to the mutagenic effects in somatic cells, with no germ cell evidence, is 
subsumed by the carcinogenicity phrases (13831-13837). 
Ind. There is either  
a) strong evidence for a causal association between human exposure to the substance and heritable 
genetic damage, or,  
b) sufficient evidence to provide a strong presumption that human exposure to the substance may 
result in development to heritable genetic damage, generally on the basis of appropriate mammalian 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested