Harvard Style Citing & 
Referencing 
Student Guide 
Heriot-Watt University 
Information Services 
Cite Them Right Online is also available for guidance on the Harvard 
style (see IS guides www.hw.ac.uk/is/is-guides.htm ). Cite Them Right 
Online uses a slightly different Harvard style to the Harvard shown on 
the following pages. 
If you have not been instructed otherwise by your teaching staff, either 
version can be used. Whichever version of Harvard you choose, use it 
consistently in the same piece of writing.  
Please note: This guide will not be updated and Cite Them Right Online 
is the more comprehensive resource. 
Please follow any citing and referencing guidance/instructions given by 
your teaching staff e.g. if a specific version of Harvard is required or if 
another completely different style is required.  In these cases, please 
follow the advice/instructions given by your teaching staff. 
And paste pdf into powerpoint - Library SDK class:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
And paste pdf into powerpoint - Library SDK class:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Heriot-Watt University Information Services: Harvard Citing and Referencing Guide 
Version 1.2 last updated 8 September 2015 
 ABOUT HARVARD CITING AND REFERENCING 
1.1
Why provide citations and references? 
5
1.2
When must I provide a citation? 
5
1.3
When do I not need to provide a citation? 
6
1.4
Plagiarism 
7
2
HOW TO CITE AND REFERENCE USING THE HARVARD STYLE 
8
2.1
In-text citations 
8
2.2
Reference Lists 
9
2.3
Reference List or Bibliography? 
10
3
BOOKS 
11
3.1
Books with 1 author 
11
3.2
Books with 2 or 3 authors 
12
3.3
Books with 4 authors 
12
3.4
Chapters in an edited book 
12
3.5
Books with an editor 
13
3.6
Books with no author 
13
3.7
E-books 
13
3.8
Books in translation 
14
4
JOURNAL ARTICLES 
15
4.1
Online Journal Articles 
16
5
CITING & REFERENCING NEWSPAPER ARTICLES 
18
5.1
Online newspapers 
18
5.2
Print newspapers 
18
6
CITING & REFERENCING THESES & DISSERTATIONS 
20
Library SDK class:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Ability to copy selected PDF pages and paste into another PDF file. Copy three pages from test1.pdf and paste into test2.pdf.
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK class:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Ability to copy PDF pages and paste into another PDF file. Support ' Copy three pages from test1.pdf and paste into test2.pdf. Dim
www.rasteredge.com
Heriot-Watt University Information Services: Harvard Citing and Referencing Guide 
Version 1.2 last updated 8 September 2015 
6.1
Theses 
20
7
CITING & REFERENCING THE WEB 
21
7.1
Web document with an author 
21
7.2
Web document with no author 
21
7.3
Web document with a corporate author 
21
7.4
PDF document 
22
7.5
Blog 
22
8
SECONDARY REFERENCING & QUOTING DIRECTLY 
23
8.1
Secondary referencing 
23
8.2
Short quotes 
23
8.3
Long quotes 
24
9
FURTHER SOURCES OF INFORMATION 
25
Library SDK class:C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value. value, The char wil be added into PDF page, 0
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK class:VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add file. Insert images into PDF form field in VB.NET. An
www.rasteredge.com
Heriot-Watt University Information Services: Harvard Citing and Referencing Guide 
Version 1.2 last updated 8 September 2015 
 About Harvard Citing and Referencing  
Citing and referencing is an important part of the writing process.  When writing an assignment, eg a 
paper, essay, project report, dissertation or thesis, whenever you use ideas, quotes or any other material 
from an external source (eg a book, journal, conference paper, newspaper, website etc.), you must show 
the source of that information in both the body of your text (an in-text citation ) and at the end of your 
work (a reference list). 
The Harvard System is one of the most commonly used referencing systems.  
It is one type of “author, 
date” referencing systems (as opposed to a “numeric system”, which use
s numbers for in-text citations). 
There are different versions of the Harvard system, each with slightly different formatting.  Your 
supervisor will specify a referencing style for you to follow, but will not normally say which version of 
Harvard you should choose.  No version is “better” than another –
you should follow one style throughout 
your work.  
Heriot-Watt University Information Services has chosen one version of Harvard for this guide.  This style 
has also been loaded into EndNoteWeb and EndNote Desktop Reference Management Software.  If you 
are using this software to store and format your references, then you should choose 
Harvard 
HWU
to be consistent with this guide.  However, you should note that when using reference 
management software to format your references, you should always check your references for 
consistency before submitting the work. 
For more information and workshops on Harvard Citing and Referencing, and also on using EndNoteWeb 
and EndNote Desktop, see the Further Information section in this guide. 
Library SDK class:VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF file into two or multiple files in ASP.NET webpage online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files in .NET WinForms.
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK class:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
www.rasteredge.com
Heriot-Watt University Information Services: Harvard Citing and Referencing Guide 
Version 1.2 last updated 8 September 2015 
1.1  Why provide citations and references? 
Citing and referencing allows you to acknowledge the work of others and to demonstrate that:  
you have gathered evidence to support your ideas and arguments 
you have used credible, good quality sources  
have read widely and at an appropriate academic level 
allows your tutor to differentiate between your own work and the work of others and to locate the 
sources you have used.  
1.2  When must I provide a citation? 
Whenever you 
use ideas from, refer to, or quote from, another person’s work you 
should acknowledge 
this in your work by citing and referencing.  
You must provide a citation whenever you use ideas, theories, facts, experiments, case studies , adopt 
another person’s
research method , survey or experiment design and whenever you use statistics
tablesdiagrams, drawings etc. from a source.  
You must also provide a citation whenever you:  
Quote directly: this is where you use another pe
rson’s ideas in their own words. 
If you present 
information exactly as it appears in a source, indicate this by using quotation marks. Use p. to indicate  a 
page number, and pp. to indicate a range of pages  
‘Market segmentation is where the larger market is
heterogeneous and can be broken down into smaller 
units’ (Easy and Sorensen
2009, p.133).  
Paraphrase: this is where you present another p
erson’s ideas in your own words. In t
he following 
example an original passage from a book has been changed using my own words. While sentence two 
has been re-written its meaning is the same as the original and so a citation must be provided: 
Original:  
MPs were not paid a salary until 1912. In medieval times constituents sometimes paid their 
members and met some of the expenses of sending an MP to Westminster, but the practice died 
out by the end of the 17th century and thereafter MPs needed personal wealth or a personal 
patron in order to sustain a political career (Rush 2005, pp.114 - 115). 
Paraphrase: 
Library SDK class:C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Merge several images into PDF. Insert images into PDF form field.
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK class:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Divide PDF File into Two Using C#. This is an C# example of splitting a PDF to two new PDF files. Split PDF Document into Multiple PDF Files in C#.
www.rasteredge.com
Heriot-Watt University Information Services: Harvard Citing and Referencing Guide 
Version 1.2 last updated 8 September 2015 
Until the 20th century, when MPs received a salary, personal wealth or the support of a patron 
was essential for a long-term career in politics. Financial support for MPs had on occasion come 
from their constituents in the medieval period but this system had ended by the 17th century 
(Rush 2005, pp.114-115.)  
NOTE: You can provide a page number if you think it will be helpful, but this is not as important as with a 
direct quotation. Check with your supervisor if unsure. The School of Management and Languages, for 
example, only require a page number for direct quotations.  
Summarise: this is where you 
express another person’s ideas in fewer words
 In the following example I 
have taken a passage from a book and shortened it but while the summary has been shortened its 
meaning is the same as the original, requiring a citation.   
Original:  
The proportion of manual workers in the ranks of the parliamentary Labour Party declined from 
1945 to 1979, from approximately 1 in 4 to 
1 in 10….. Of the 412 Labour MP
s elected in 2001, 
12% were drawn from manual backgrounds (Criddle cited in Norton 2005, p.23). 
Summary: 
Since 1945 the proportion of manual workers in the parliamentary Labour Party has fallen from 
25% (approx.) to 12% in 2001 (Criddle cited in Norton 2005, p.23). 
NOTE: You can provide a page number if you think it will be helpful, but this is not as important as with a 
direct quotation. Check with your supervisor if unsure. The School of Management and Languages, for 
example, only require a page number for direct quotations.  
1.3  When do I not need to provide a citation?  
When you express your own ideas, theories, arguments, conclusions  
Where surveys and experiments are designed and carried out by you 
When you develop your own research method  
When conveying very basic common knowledge: i.e. Glasgow is in the west of Scotland  
But common knowledge for you, and those studying within your subject area, may not be common 
knowledge for all.  Also, information that may be viewed as being very basic, such as the statistical 
information in the following example, must also be cited:   
Heriot-Watt University Information Services: Harvard Citing and Referencing Guide 
Version 1.2 last updated 8 September 2015 
Glasgow is in the west of Scotland and has a population of 530,000 (cite source!)  
1.4  Plagiarism 
If you do not cite and reference ideas, quotes or any other material that you have used from a 
source you may be accused of plagiarism. 
Plagiarism is defined as 
presenting someone else’s 
work 
as your own. It’s 
academic theft! To avoid 
plagiarism you should always note accurately and fully the details of all the sources you use. 
The following Heriot- Watt guide aims to help you avoid plagiarism:  
http://www.hw.ac.uk/registry/resources/PlagiarismGuide.pdf  
Heriot-Watt University Information Services: Harvard Citing and Referencing Guide 
Version 1.2 last updated 8 September 2015 
 How to cite and reference using the Harvard Style 
2.1   In-text citations 
These appear in the body of your work. Citations must provide the following information:  
The name of the author(s) or editor(s) of the source being cited  
The publication date (year) of the source being cited 
And the page numbers you have taken material from (when quoting directly from a source). Some 
Heriot-Watt University Schools (such as Management and Languages) do not require page numbers 
here for anything other than a direct quo
te”.  Ask your Supervisor or Tutor what is required.
Example 1 
In the following example I have used data from a source (a book, written by Clegg) and therefore made 
reference to his name in the text of my essay:   
According to Clegg (1985, p.543) the inter-war period was 
“significantly different” to the previous
Example 2 
In this example I have used information from a source but placed information about the author in brackets 
(with date and page number information) at the end of the sentence:   
25% of manufacturing jobs 
were lost in the 1980’s (Jones
1995, pp.64-65).  
You can also use this system at an appropriate point in a sentence. For example: 
Production fell by one fifth in 2009 (Smith 
2010, p.6) and continued to fall….
Clegg is the 
author of the 
source  
1985 is the date 
when the source 
was published  
p.543 is the number of the page 
the information I have used has 
come from  
Jones is the author 
of the source 
1995 is the date 
when the source 
was published  
pp.64-65 are the 
pages I have taken 
information from  
Heriot-Watt University Information Services: Harvard Citing and Referencing Guide 
Version 1.2 last updated 8 September 2015 
2.2 Reference Lists 
Reference Lists appear at the end of your work and should be in alphabetical order by author / 
editor / corporate author, irrespective of the format (book, e-book, journal, website etc.) of the 
source used. (Note, the primary source 
the book title, journal title etc 
is italicized.): 
Aaronson, A. and Biggins, B. (2005a) 'Quantitiative methods', European Journal of Research Methods, 
9(7), 10-13.  
Aaronson, A. and Biggins, B. (2011) A primer in essential methodology, 3rd ed., London, Ontario: Niagra 
University Press.  
Beetham, H. (2007) Retail economics, Abingdon: Routledge.  
Bezemer, D. J. (2010) 'Understanding financial crisis through accounting models', Accounting, 
Organisation and Society, 35(7), 676-688, available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aos.2010.07.002 
[accessed 12 January, 2012].  
Bezemer, D. J. (2010) 'Understanding financial crisis through accounting models', Accounting, 
Organisation and Society, 35(7), 676-688, available: DOI:10.1016/j.aos.2010.07.002 [accessed 
12 January, 2012].  
Bezemer, D. J. (2010) 'Understanding financial crisis through accounting models', Accounting, 
Organisation and Society, 35(7), 676-688, available: http://www.sciencedirect.com [accessed 12 
January, 2001].  
Educause (2006) '7 things you should know about screencasting', [online], available: 
http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ELI7012.pdf [accessed 12 January, 2010].  
Hendry, S. (n.d.) Flora and fauna of Scotland, Glasgow: Collins.  
Macleod.A. (2010) 'Public sector pay freeze', The Times, 21 January, 3.  
Osman Akan, A. (2006) Open channel hydraulics, Butterworth-Heinemann [online], available: 
http://www.dawsonera.com [accessed 12 January 2012].  
Palmer, A., Ketteridge, S. and Marshall, S., eds. (2010) Political landscapes in Europe, Oxford: Oxford 
University Press.  
Sloman, J. and Wirde, A. (2009) Economics, 7th ed., Harlow: Pearson Education.  
Solomon, M., Bamossy, G., Askegaard, S. and Hogg, M. K. (2006) Consumer behaviour: a European 
perspective, 3rd ed., Harlow: Financial Times.  
Tiesdell, S. (2010) 'Glasgow: Renaissance on the Clyde?' in Punter, J., ed. Urban design and the British 
urban renaissance, Abingdon: Routledge, 262-279.  
Understanding SPSS, (2009) London: SPSS Press. 
Heriot-Watt University Information Services: Harvard Citing and Referencing Guide 
10 
Version 1.2 last updated 8 September 2015 
2.3  Reference List or Bibliography? 
reference list is a list of all of the sources you have cited in your work 
bibliography is a list of the sources you have used to help you write your assignment but not cited 
A bibliography would be presented in the same way as your reference list and would be a separate 
list following your reference list.  
Remember to speak with your tutor if you have any doubts about what is expected from your written 
assignments!  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested