LIL Library Learning Objects
OU Harvard guide to citing
references
Add pdf to powerpoint presentation - software application dll:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Add pdf to powerpoint presentation - software application dll:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Contents
1Introduction
1
1.1 Principles of in-text citations and references
1
1.2 The general structure of a reference
2
2In-text citations
4
3Reference list
7
4Secondary referencing
8
5Books, book chapters and ebooks
9
5.1 Books
9
5.2 Book chapters
9
5.3 Translated books
10
5.4 Modern editions
10
5.5 Sacred texts
11
5.6 Ancient texts
12
5.7 Ebooks online
13
5.8 Ebooks on readers
13
6Journal and newspaper articles
15
6.1 Printed journal articles
15
6.2 Ejournal articles
15
6.3 Printed newspaper articles
17
6.4 Online newspaper articles
18
7OU module materials
20
7.1 Module texts
20
7.2 Copublished module texts
22
7.3 Online module materials
22
7.4 Module readings
24
7.5 Module audiovisual materials
26
7.6 Figures, diagrams and tables
27
7.7 Secondary referencing in module materials
28
7.8 Citing materials from another module
29
7.9 Page numbers
30
7.10 Lectures, seminars and presentations
30
7.11 Student-generated content
31
8Audiovisual materials
33
8.1 TV programmes
33
8.2 Radio programmes
33
8.3 Films
34
8.4 DVDs
34
8.5 Audio CDs
35
8.6 Songs
36
8.7 YouTube item
37
8.8 iTunes or other downloads
38
9Works of art and visual sources
39
software application dll:VB.NET PowerPoint: Use PowerPoint SDK to Create, Load and Save PPT
an empty PowerPoint file with our reliable .NET PPT document add-on; a fully customized blank PowerPoint file by using the smart PowerPoint presentation control
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
index = 1 End If correctOrder.Add(index) Next clip art or screenshot to PowerPoint document slide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
9.1 Works of art
39
9.2 Online images
40
9.3 Exhibition catalogues
41
9.4 Plays and live performances
42
10 Online/electronic materials
44
10.1 Personal or organisational websites
44
10.2 Online documents
44
10.3 Blogs
45
10.4 Wikis
46
10.5 Twitter
47
10.6 Podcasts
47
11 Conference papers
49
12 Reports
50
13 Software
51
13.1 Computer programs
51
13.2 Mobile application
51
14 Personal communications
53
14.1 Emails
53
14.2 Forum messages
53
14.3 Telephone calls
54
14.4 Personal letters
54
14.5 Unpublished interviews
55
14.6 Second Life
55
15 Theses
57
16 Legal and legislative material
58
17 Patents
61
18 Standards
62
19 Maps
63
20 Faculty-specific examples
64
20.1 Health and Social Care
64
software application dll:VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Codes to Create Linear and 2D Barcodes on
Here is a market-leading PowerPoint barcode add-on within VB.NET class, which means it as well as 2d barcodes QR Code, Data Matrix, PDF-417, etc.
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:VB.NET PowerPoint: Merge and Split PowerPoint Document(s) with PPT
For Each doc As [String] In dirs docList.Add(doc) Next code in VB.NET to finish PowerPoint document splitting If you want to see more PDF processing functions
www.rasteredge.com
1Introduction
This guide provides practical advice and examples to help you create
references for information sources using the Open University (OU)
Harvard style. Some OU modules may use other referencing styles. Please
check the details for your module before using this guide.
Note: this guide was revised in October 2014. Some of the
advice has been slightly amended, but it should not differ
significantly from earlier versions. If your module materials ask
you to reference OU module materials in a different way, please
follow your module’s guidance. If you are unsure, contact your
tutor.
If you are unable to find the reference type you need in this guide, you
are advised to find something similar and base your reference on that
example. The main aim is to record the key information about your
source to enable someone else to locate it. See the
Library FAQ
(‘What
if I cannot find the reference type I need in the OU Harvard guide to
citing references?’) for more guidance.
1.1 Principles of in-text citations and
references
When producing an academic assignment you are required to acknowledge
the work of others by citing references in the text and creating a list of
references or bibliography at the end. There are two steps involved:
Step 1: In-text citations
In-text citations enable you to indicate in your work where you have
used ideas or material from other sources. Here are some examples
using the OU Harvard style. If, for example, your source is a book
written by Brown and published in 1999, your in-text references would
follow one of these three formats:
.
Further work (Brown, 1999) supports this claim
.
Further work by Brown (1999) supports this claim
.
‘This theory is supported by recent work’ (Brown, 1999, p. 25).
For further guidance see In-text citations (Section 2) of this guide.
1
1Introduction
software application dll:VB.NET PowerPoint: Add Image to PowerPoint Document Slide/Page
of "AddPage", "InsertPage" and "DeletePage" to add, insert or delete any certain PowerPoint slide without & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
text content from source PDF document file for word processing, presentation and desktop How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references
www.rasteredge.com
Step 2: List full references at the end of your work
Everything you have cited in the text of your work, for example journal
articles, web pages, podcasts, etc., should be listed in alphabetical
order at the end. This is the reference list. Each reference should
include everything you need to identify the item. You need to identify
the source type (e.g. book, journal article) and use the correct
referencing format from this guide to create the reference. If you include
items that are not specifically cited but are relevant to the text or of
potential interest to the reader, then that is a bibliography.
For further guidance see Reference list (Section 3 of this guide).
Op. cit. and ibid.
These terms (from the Latin opere citato, ‘in the work already cited’ and
ibidem, ‘in the same place’) are not used in the OU Harvard system.
1.2 The general structure of a reference
As mentioned in Section 1.1, the main aim in providing accurate and
consistent referencing (apart from meeting academic conventions) is to
enable your readers to look up the exact sources that you have cited in your
piece of work. This means that you need to give accurate information about
the type of item, the name or title of the item, who produced it, the date it
was produced and where you found it. All reference examples in this guide
are based on a combination of some or all of these elements, depending on
the type of item. Knowing this should help you to break down a reference
into its component parts and therefore to create references for any sources
you might use that aren’t covered in this guide.
Broadly speaking, the key pieces of information for a reference in OU
Harvard style tend to be:
Author, A. A. and Other-Author, B. B. (Date) ‘Title of item’, Title of
Overall Work [Item type/information], Publisher information/location from
which accessed.
Author/creator
This is usually the names of the person or people who created the specific
item you are citing.
X443 Information literacy
2
software application dll:C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
In order to run the sample codes, the following steps would be necessary. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PowerPoint.dll.
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
In order to run the sample codes, the following steps would be necessary. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PowerPoint.dll.
www.rasteredge.com
Date
This is the year, and sometimes the month and day, when the cited item was
published or made available. If no date is available, use n.d. If a work is to
be published in the near future, use ‘forthcoming’.
Title/name of item
This is the title of the specific item you have cited.
Title/name of overall work
This is the title of any overall work in which the item you cited appeared,
for example an edited book from which you used a chapter or the journal
from which you used an article.
Item type/information
This is information about the type of item you’ve cited, for example an
ebook, a Twitter post or a DVD. It could also be where information about
the nature of the item is placed, for example that this is a special issue or
special section of a journal.
Publisher information
This is the item publisher’s location and name.
Location from which accessed
This is usually a URL or web address from which the item can be accessed.
These elements are the basic parts from which a reference in Harvard style
is formed. There are various modifications to this, depending on the type of
item. If you can’t find an example reference in this guide for the precise
type of item you have cited, you should find the most similar example and
base your reference on that, bearing in mind the elements outlined above.
3
1Introduction
2In-text citations
In the Harvard system, references in the text (in-text citations) are referred
to by the author’s name and year of publication, for example:
It is stated that … (Bloggs, 2007) or Bloggs (2007) states …
Quotes
If you are directly quoting material (i.e. using the exact form of words used
in the original and putting the text in quote marks), you will also need to
include the page number(s) of the quoted material in your in-text citation,
for example:
Bloggs talks about ‘the importance of preparation’ for interviews (2007,
p. 57).
This is also the case for where you use quoted material from all the types of
text referred to in the rest of this guide, unless page numbers are not
available.
Larger quotes should be displayed in a separate paragraph, for example:
Bloggs (2007, p. 348) is more critical:
Idon’t agree with this at all, the argument is poorly made and does
not hold up to any scrutiny. One begins to wonder if we shall ever
see any sense from this organisation on this subject at any time in
the next one hundred years.
If you do not name the source in the lead-in to the quote, then it must be
given after it:
Other commentators are more critical:
Idon’t agree with this at all, the argument is poorly made and does
not hold up to any scrutiny. One begins to wonder if we shall ever
X443 Information literacy
4
see any sense from this organisation on this subject at any time in
the next one hundred years.
(Bloggs, 2007, p. 348)
Authors with more than one publication
In the reference list or bibliography, items are listed only once in
alphabetical order. In some cases you may refer to more than one
publication by an author for a specific year. To help identify these different
items for your in-text citation and reference list, you should add a letter of
the alphabet to the year of publication, for example:
(Thomson, 2004a), (Thomson, 2004b) and (Thomson, 2004c) where a,
band c refer to the order in which they are cited in your text.
Multiple authors
If a publication has three or more authors the in-text citation should list
only the first author followed by et al. (‘and others’). For example:
(Jones et al., 2006)
but in the reference list or bibliography you would list each author in full as
follows:
Jones, R., Andrew, T. and MacColl, J. (2006) The Institutional
Repository, Oxford, Chandos Publishing.
Citing multiple sources
Where you have several in-text citations together, you should order them in
reverse chronological order, beginning with the most recently published
source, and separate each source with a semicolon (;). If more than one
work is published in the same year, order these texts alphabetically by
author.
(Frobisher, 2012; Barnes et al., 2009; Huy, 2009; Monk and
Bosco, 2001)
5
2In-text citations
Op. cit. and ibid.
These terms (from the Latin opere citato, ‘in the work already cited’ and
ibidem, ‘in the same place’) are not used in the OU Harvard system.
X443 Information literacy
6
3Reference list
References in the reference list or bibliography give, in alphabetical order
by author surname, full details of all the sources you have used in the text.
When a corporate author’s name starts with ‘The’, use the first main word
of the title when alphabetising, e.g. The Open University is listed under ‘O’.
For example:
Reference list example
Bourdieu, P. (1992) The Logic of Practice, Cambridge, Polity Press.
Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment (CABE) (2007)
This Way to Better Streets: 10 Case Studies on Improving Street
Design, London, CABE [Online]. Available at www.cabe.org.uk/default.
aspx?contentitemid=1978 (Accessed 12 February 2009).
Foucault, M. (1991 [1977]) Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the
Prison (trans. A. Sheridan), London, Penguin.
Glaskin, M. (2004) ‘Innovation: the end of the white line’, Sunday
Times, 22 August [Online]. Available at www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/
driving/article472085.ece (Accessed 12 February 2009).
Goffman, E. (1959) The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life, New
York, Anchor Books.
House of Commons (2003) Hansard, 2 July, Column 407 [Online].
Available at www.parliament.the-stationery-office.co.uk/pa/cm200203/
cmhansrd/vo030702/debtext/30702-10.htm (Accessed 12
January 2012).
McNichol, T. (2004) ‘Roads gone wild’, Wired Magazine, vol. 12, no. 12,
December [Online]. Available at www.wired.com/wired/archive/12.12/
traffic.html (Accessed 12 January 2012).
The Open University (2006) Real Functions and Graphs: Workbook 2,
Milton Keynes, The Open University.
Ruppert, E. S. (2006) The Moral Economy of Cities: Shaping Good
Citizens, Toronto, University of Toronto Press.
Shared Space (2005) Shared Space: Room for Everyone, Leeuwarden,
Shared Space [Online]. Available at www.shared-space.org/files/18445/
SharedSpace_Eng.pdf (Accessed 21 February 2009).
Thompson, K. (2003) ‘Fantasy, franchises, and Frodo Baggins: The
Lord of the Rings and modern Hollywood’, The Velvet Light Trap,
vol. 52, no. 3, pp. 45–63.
7
3Reference list
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested