Information & Learning Services 
Harvard Citing &  
Referencing Guide  
2013/14 4
th 
Edition  
Reprinted for 2014/15
Changing pdf to powerpoint file - control application utility:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Changing pdf to powerpoint file - control application utility:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
About this Guide 
The Harvard style outlined in this University of Worcester Harvard Referencing Guide is the approved 
format agreed by the Learning, Teaching & Student Experience Committee at the University,  and is 
reviewed  by  the  Committee  annually.  Many  variations  of  Harvard  exist  across  different  academic 
institutions, therefore one was selected and approved, in order to provide a consistent method of Harvard 
referencing for students, as well as a point of reference for academic staff marking student work, across 
any departments using the Harvard style. 
ILS is responsible for providing printed guidance for Harvard referencing. For any new sources which are 
not in the guide, we often refer to Pears & Shields (2013) in order to offer a suggestion in keeping with the 
University’s Harvard format. These examples may be added to future editions of the guide. Academic 
Liaison Librarians are able to support students using the University of Worcester Harvard style. 
For more support: 
Library and subject-specific support: http://libguides.worc.ac.uk 
Email: askalibrarian@worc.ac.uk  
Study Skills from Student Services: http://www.worcester.ac.uk/studyskills/630.htm 
Reference: Pears, R. & Shields, G. (2013) Cite them right: the essential referencing guide. 9
th
edition. 
Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan. 
Contents 
Citing  
2-6 
What does citing look like?   
Paraphrasing & Summarising 
Direct quote 
Two separate publications with the same author(s) and same year 
Citing from chapters written by authors in an edited book 
Secondary referencing 
Word Counts and using an Appendix  
Including visual materials in your work 
Using undated sources in your work  
The Reference List   
Top tips for good referencing  
Quick Guide to common sources (books, articles, webpages) 
How to reference print and online sources with examples 
10-21 
Books, e-books and chapters in edited books 
10 
Translated books, books in other languages, dictionaries, dissertations  11 
Journal articles and newspaper articles 
12-13 
Conference proceedings 
13 
Webpages and reports 
14 
Online video, music and audiovisual sources 
15-16 
Market reports and maps 
16 
Acts of Parliament, Hansard and White/Green Papers 
17 
Images, charts and figures   
18 
Materials from lectures and VLEs and your unpublished work 
19 
Interviews, online presentations and personal communications 
20 
Social media and blogs (weblogs)   
21 
control application utility:C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
Enable batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. Support to overwrite PDF and save rotation changes to original PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
control application utility:VB.NET Word: Word Conversion SDK for Changing Word Document into
VB.NET Word - Convert Word to PDF Using VB. How to Convert Word Document to PDF File in VB.NET Application. Visual C#. VB.NET. Home
www.rasteredge.com
Citing   
In your assignment, when you have used an idea or a quote from a book, journal article or other source you 
must acknowledge this in your text. We refer to this as ‘citing’.   
What does citing look like?  
In your text, a citation will usually follow the format author-year of publication. This normally applies 
whatever the type of source you are citing – book, journal article, website or newspaper. An ‘author’ is the 
person, organisation or department who created, wrote or produced the work. If you use a direct quote, you 
will additionally include a page number, where available. You are strongly advised to look at the way 
authors cite sources in their chapters and articles when reading for your studies, as this will help you to 
understand how citing can enhance your academic writing.  
The table below reflects the most common mistakes made by students when citing sources in their work. 
More examples for paraphrasing, quoting and secondary referencing follow. Please take some time to look 
through them, as they provide answers to questions asked by students at some point during their course.   
Incorrect and correct examples 
Why? 
Haylock, D. (2006) 
Haylock (2006) 
Do  not  include  initials  in  your  citation,  these 
should be included in the full reference at the 
end of your work. 
Haylock and Thangata (2007) define 
differentiation as “ways in which teachers take 
into account in their planning and teaching the 
differences between the pupils in the class”. 
Haylock and Thangata (2007: p.57) define 
differentiation as “ways in which teachers take 
into account in their planning and teaching the 
differences between the pupils in the class”. 
Direct quotes should be cited in the text with a 
page number (if available) for the page where 
the quote appeared. 
If you are paraphrasing (writing someone else’s 
ideas  into  your  own  words,  so  not  directly 
quoting), you should include a citation (author-
date) but do not need to include a page number. 
http://www.autism.org.uk (2010) 
National Autistic Society (2010) 
A website address is not an author. An author is 
a named person or organisation. 
DfE (2011) 
Department for Education (DfE) (2011) 
The first time you use an acronym, it is good 
practice to provide the full name as well. 
The use of rods, blocks and coins can be 
beneficial in teaching place value to children. 
(Haylock 2006) 
The use of rods, blocks and coins can be 
beneficial in teaching place value to children 
(Haylock 2006). 
If the citation is at the end of your sentence, then 
both the author and date go inside the brackets, 
and the full stop comes after the citation, not 
before. 
Smith (2009) (one author) 
Shelton and Brownhill (2010) (two authors) 
Littleford, Halstead and Mulraine (2004) 
(three authors) 
Littleford et al. (2004) 
For three or more authors, include the surname 
of the first author in your citation, then write et al. 
(‘and others’). Remember to list all authors in 
your reference list at the end of your work. 
control application utility:VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Merge Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint data to PDF form. together and save as new PDF, without changing the previous two PDF documents at all
www.rasteredge.com
control application utility:C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to perform PDF file password adding, deleting and changing in Visual Studio .NET project use C# source code in .NET class. Allow
www.rasteredge.com
Paraphrasing & Summarising
What is it? Writing another author's idea or findings in your own words. You may paraphrase a quote or 
short paragraph from a source, making it more meaningful within the context of your work. You may also 
summarise the content of a longer passage of text, such as an article or a report, or write about a seminal 
piece of work, policy or theory in your subject area. 
Why do it? You are demonstrating that you have understood what you have read, and the relevance of 
those ideas to your essay, assignment or research. Paraphrasing and summarising enables you to include 
supporting  or  contrasting  evidence  in  your  work  in  a  more  creative  and  coherent  way.  Therefore 
paraphrasing is an important element of academic writing.  
Examples of paraphrasing and summarising 
Description 
Pears  and  Shields  (2010)  offer  tips  to  help 
students avoid plagiarism, including good time 
management,  the  use  of  quotation  marks for 
direct  quotes,  and  making  full  notes  of  all 
reference details for every source. 
Here, the citation introduces the sentence. Only 
the year is in brackets. 
It is important to choose a research topic which 
you are likely to be interested in for a long period 
of  time,  and  think  through  all  the  potential 
difficulties of researching that topic before you 
commit to it (Bell 2010). 
In this example, the citation is placed at the end 
of the sentence, before the full stop. Both author 
and year appear inside the brackets. 
The literature on academic skills offers a variety 
of  tips  on  reading  effectively,  including: 
underlining to focus your attention on the text, 
questioning  what  is  being  read,  summarising 
chunks  of  reading,  and  categorising  different 
sources to give purpose to what you are reading 
(Northedge  2005;  Creme and  Lea 2008;  Grix 
and Watkins 2010). 
Occasionally,  your  wider  reading  may  reveal 
several  authors  who  share  the  same 
perspectives. You can show this in your writing 
by listing the sources as shown, and separating 
them with a semi-colon.  
Direct quote   
What is it? Using an actual quote from a source to compare with or to illustrate your perspectives, 
discussions, ideas or arguments. Remember to use double quotation marks.   
Why do it? Quoting can be used to show the breadth of your reading. Sometimes the author's own words 
say it best. However, quotes can break the flow of your writing if you use them too often, particularly long 
quotes. Shorter quotes should sit within the sentence you are writing, “like this quote” (Smith 2013: p4). If 
you must use long quotes (more than two lines as a guide), they should be placed in a new paragraph and 
indented using the ‘tab’ key: 
“This is an example of a long quote, which has been placed in a new paragraph and indented. The 
last sentence introduced this quote using a colon (:) and you can place the author-date citation at 
the end, using a right-alignment. On the next page you will see more examples of direct quotes and 
some important tips for citing them correctly.” 
Smith (2013: p.4) 
control application utility:VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
creating, loading, merge and splitting PDF pages and Files, adding a page into PDF document, deleting unnecessary page from PDF file and changing the position
www.rasteredge.com
control application utility:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Supports for changing image size. this .NET PDF to TIFF conversion control, C# developers can render and convert PDF document to TIFF image file with no loss
www.rasteredge.com
Examples of quoting 
Description 
Collecting and reading through assignment 
feedback is a valuable and important part of 
learning. However Race (2007: p.32) suggests 
that regular self-assessment is also crucial, so 
that a student can “identify in good time those 
elements that will be the most valuable and 
important areas to which to devote additional 
time and effort”.    
The citation includes a page number to show 
where the quote can be found in that source. 
The quote itself is a part of the sentence 
structure, which is often much more effective 
than simply ‘dropping in’ the quote without any 
context around it.  
“ ‘Formative feedback’ … can help you develop 
your approach, and fine-tune your efforts 
towards getting that good degree” (Race 2007: 
p.87).   
In this example, the citation is placed at the end 
of the sentence, before the full stop. Author, 
year and page number appear inside the 
brackets. If appropriate, you can use ellipsis 
(three dots ) to indicate that you have omitted 
part of a quote, as shown here. 
Example 1:  
C4EO (2010: Research, para. 3) states: “The 
policy commitment to eradicate child poverty by 
2020 through systemic reform is therefore of 
primary importance for improving young 
children’s life chances”. 
Example 2: 
The Open University (2013: online) argue for 
balance and logic in academic writing: “Don't 
select only those facts or pieces of evidence 
that support your argument and ignore 
competing material”. 
Example 3: 
Sir Ken Robinson, noted for his work on 
creativity in education, acknowledges a 
“struggle” between “forms of education which 
focus on the whole child” and the “tendencies of 
Governments to want to control and test 
education as a public utility” (lwf 2012: online). 
Sources with no page number 
If you quote from a webpage, you are unlikely to 
have a page number which you can use in your 
citation. Other versions of Harvard suggest 
either using the paragraph number and/or the 
section heading (example 1), or simply stating 
‘online’ (example 2). You should choose a 
method and use it consistently. 
Example 3 is from an online video, where 
Robinson delivers the quotes as part of a 
conference speech, which was uploaded to You 
Tube by ‘lwf’ - the ‘author’ - in 2012.  
If your e-reader or Kindle does not provide 
page numbers, then an alternative is to use the 
chapter and paragraph number: 
Matthews (2010: chapter 2, para. 4) explains… 
In your full reference at the end of your work, 
you must put the full web address of the page or 
video, where the quote can be read or heard.   
Two separate publications with the same author(s) and same year   
If you cite a new source, which has the same author and was written in the same year as an earlier citation 
in the same essay, you must use a lower case letter after the date to differentiate between the two.   
In text citation example 
In the reference list 
Good relationships with parents are crucial in 
tackling a child's poor behaviour. Dukes and 
Smith (2009a: p.28) explain how these might be 
nurtured: "Mutual respect, a valuing of diversity 
and effective communication are essential to 
forming good relationships with parents."    
Dukes and Smith (2009b) suggest several 
methods of communicating with parents, such 
as regular meetings, diaries, observations and 
records.   
Dukes, C. & Smith, M. (2009a) Building better 
behaviour in the early years. London, SAGE.   
Dukes, C. & Smith, M. (2009b) Recognising and 
planning for special needs in the early years. 
London, SAGE. 
control application utility:C# TIFF: Learn to Convert MS Word, Excel, and PPT to TIFF Image
Now, you may load an Excel (.xlsx) file and convert it using RasterEdge.Imaging. PowerPoint; demo code is for rendering and changing PowerPoint (.pptx) document
www.rasteredge.com
control application utility:VB.NET Image: How to Generate Freehand Annotation Through VB.NET
relocating, resizing, rotating, deleting, changing color attributes is easy to annotate image file with freehand drawn as an annotation on documents, like PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
Citing from chapters written by authors in an edited book 
Some books may contain chapters written by different authors. These are called edited books. Normally the 
person named on the front cover is the editor (ed. or eds. for more than one), and the contents page will 
have different authors listed under each chapter title. When citing something from an edited book, the 
author(s) who wrote the chapter should be cited, not the editor(s) of the book.   
In text citation example 
In the reference list 
Buckler and Hobbs (2009) advise students that 
the learning process can be very different at 
university.    
Buckler, L. & Hobbs, S. (2009) University life: 
the student perspective. In: Doughty, R. & 
Shaw, D. (eds.) Film: the essential study guide
Abingdon, Routledge, pp. 15-24. 
Secondary referencing 
What is it? When you are reading an article, book or other source, you may find that the author (A) cites the 
work of another person (B). If you want to cite B’s work as well, but you are not able to locate B’s original 
source for yourself, then you will have to cite it second-hand, through A. This is known as secondary 
referencing. 
Your citation will often be written in a way which reflects ‘B as cited by A’, or ‘A cites B’, as shown in the 
examples below. However, before going ahead with secondary referencing, you should first use A’s citation 
and reference list to try to find B’s work for yourself. Summon can be a useful tool for locating sources when 
you have the reference details to hand. 
Why do it? You'll need to do it when you cannot locate the original source. You are advised to read the 
original source if you can, so that you can see the context for yourself without the perspective of a second 
person. However, sometimes this is not possible, particularly in cases where you are discussing well-
established theories and ideas which were published many years ago; the original sources will be very hard 
to acquire. In your reference list, you only include the source you have read (A), not the original source (B).   
In text citation example 
In the reference list 
Vygotsky (1931) cited by Langford (2005: p.48) 
discusses pattern recognition by infants: 
“objects are divided into objects to recognise, to 
grasp, etc., that is they are distinguished 
according to different sensory patterns”. 
Langford, P.E. (2005) Vygotsky’s 
developmental and educational psychology
Hove, Psychology Press.  
Wray (2010) cites Morgan and Saxton’s (1991) 
belief that engagement, experience and 
participation is central to learning.  
Wray, D. (2010) Looking at Learning. In: Arthur, 
J. & Cremin, T. (eds.) Learning to teach in the 
primary school. 2
nd
edition. London, Routledge, 
pp.41-52. 
[This is a reference for a chapter in an edited 
book.] 
Word counts and using an Appendix 
If you are unsure about what is included in an assignment’s word count, or are uncertain about when to use 
an Appendix to include additional information or data in your work, please seek advice from your tutors, as 
each Institute may have their own policies and guidance on word counts and the use of appendices. An 
Appendix is often used to present your own research data, or to include extracts of sources and information 
which needs to be kept anonymous e.g. school and NHS policies (especially if not freely available online), 
children’s work, and information gathered while on placement.  
control application utility:VB.NET Image: Easy to Create Ellipse Annotation with VB.NET
to display extra information on your document image file. ellipse annotation to document files, like PDF & Word your document or image by changing its parameters
www.rasteredge.com
control application utility:C#: How to Edit XDoc.HTML5 Viewer Toolbar Commands
principle also applies equally to changing tabs order exception that four tabs, namely File, Annotation, Signature var _userCmdDemoPdf = new UserCommand("pdf");
www.rasteredge.com
Including visual materials in your work  
Duplication of charts,  diagrams, pictures  and images  should be treated as direct quotes, in that the 
author(s) should be acknowledged and page numbers shown both in your text where the diagram is 
discussed or introduced, and in the caption you write for it. You are also advised to ask your tutors in your 
Institute about whether there is a policy or guidance on reproducing a table of figures/illustrations in your 
work, alongside the reference list.  
Let’s say you’re discussing UK populations and want to include the chart below. This chart would need to 
be given its own caption to show where the chart is from, and be referenced properly in your reference 
list, and cited in your text.  
In text citation example 
In the reference list 
Figure 1 (Office of National Statistics 2013) 
indicates that the population of the UK stands at 
63.8 million….. 
Figure 1: Age structure of United Kingdom for 2013 
(Source: Office for National Statistics 2013) 
Office for National Statistics (2013) Age structure of 
United Kingdom for 2013. [Online] Available from: 
http://www.neighbourhood.statistics.gov.uk/HTMLD
ocs/dvc1/UKPyramid.html [Accessed 17 June 
2013]. 
Using undated sources in your work 
Finding a date of publication, particularly for some online sources, can sometimes be a challenge. For 
example, you may have found a webpage with no indication of when the content was published or last 
updated, or a PDF document with no date information on it. It is very important that you make every effort to 
find a date of publication rather than put (no date) in your reference. This is because the currency (how up 
to date the source is) is often an essential criterion for deciding whether a source is valid, reliable and 
credible enough to cite in your academic work. Other evaluation criteria include authority (who wrote it), 
purpose (who was it written for and why) and relevance (is the content and source relevant to your 
research).  It is your responsibility to evaluate information before including it in your academic work. 
To find the date of a webpage, try looking at the page information in your browser for a ‘created’ or 
‘modified’ date. This is usually found by right-clicking on the webpage and selecting the appropriate option, 
but it isn’t always available. For PDF documents, you can look at the document properties or locate the 
webpage where the PDF can be downloaded from, as this often contains reference information such as 
author and date.  
The Reference List   
This is your list of all the sources which have been cited in the assignment. For every citation in your essay, 
there must be a corresponding reference in the list at the end. An example list is at the bottom of this page. 
Sources are not separated by source type or put into a bulleted list. All sources are listed inclusively, in 
A-Z order by author/editor. Sources are typed in one continuous line, so no need to use the ‘tab’ or 
‘enter’ keys. Do not break up website URLs.  
Each source must be laid out in a particular format that must be followed. Most sources (with the 
exception of Parliamentary and legal documents, and some media sources) will follow a basic format, 
which can then be adapted depending on whether the source is online, in print, or is a chapter or article 
within an edited publication (see below). If you are unsure how to reference a source, then you should 
look for the basic elements of author, date and title, and work from there. Ask yourself: What does my 
reader need to know in order to locate the same source I read?  
Book 
Author (Year) Title. Place of publication, Publisher. 
Webpage 
Author (Year) Title. [Online] Available from: URL [Accessed date]. 
Chapter in an 
edited book 
Author (Year) Title of chapter. In: Editors (eds.) Title of publication. Place, Publisher, 
start page – end page. 
Article in an 
issue of a journal 
Author (Year) Title of article. Title of Journal. Volume number (issue number), start 
page – end page. 
Apart from the first word, all other words in book and article titles begin with lower case letters, except 
for proper nouns such as cities, countries and names. (Note this does not apply to journal titles.)  
bibliography follows the same layout as a reference list, but is used to list all the sources you 
consulted  for  your  work,  but  did  not  cite.  You  should  check  with  tutors  whether  an  additional 
bibliography is acceptable, as many tutors will only want you to include a reference list. 
Reference List  
C4EO (2010) Narrowing the gap in outcomes for young children through effective practice in the early 
years: research. [Online] Available from: 
http://www.c4eo.org.uk/themes/earlyyears/ntg/default.aspx?themeid=1 [Accessed 25 June 2013]. 
Creme, P. & Lea, M.R. (2008) Writing at university: a guide for students. 3
rd
edition. [e-book] Maidenhead, 
Open University Press. Available from: My iLibrary [Accessed 12 April 2011].   
Grix, J. & Watkins, G. (2010) Information skills: finding and using the right resources. Basingstoke, Palgrave 
Macmillan.   
lwf (2012) Sir Ken Robinson – leading a learning revolution. [Online] Available from: 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-XTCSTW24Ss [Accessed 18 June 2013]. 
Open University (2013) Writing in your own words. [Online] Available from: 
http://www2.open.ac.uk/students/skillsforstudy/writing-in-your-own-words.php [Accessed 18 June 2013]. 
Pears, R. & Shields, G. (2013) Cite them right: the essential referencing guide. 9
th
edition. Basingstoke, 
Palgrave Macmillan. 
Reynard, A. (Tuesday 11 March 2008) There are lessons only parents can teach. The Daily Telegraph
[Online] p.20. Available from: Lexis Library. [Accessed 5 April 2012]. 
Vardi, I. (2012) Developing students’ referencing skills: a matter of plagiarism, punishment and morality or 
of learning to write critically? Higher Education Research & Development. [Online] 31 (6), 921-930. 
Available from: Taylor & Francis Online [Accessed 18 June 2013]. 
Top tips for good referencing 
Notetaking: When making notes about your reading, always write down the basic source details: 
author, date, title, page number (especially for quotes), and where needed, website address and/or 
journal title/volume/issue. This saves time later and helps you to avoid accidental plagiarism. 
Colours: Consider using different colours for your notes. For example, you might use black for your 
own ideas, green for quotes and blue for paraphrasing and summarising. 
Time management: Try to create your reference list as you are writing your assignment. Leaving it until 
the last minute makes the task more difficult and time-consuming.  
Consistency is the central principle for referencing. Punctuation and layout as shown in this guide 
should be followed, and there should be consistency in both areas throughout your citations and 
reference list. 
Proof-reading: Check that for every citation in your writing, there is a matching reference in your 
reference list. Author(s) and date must match, or your reader won’t be able to link the citation to its 
reference.  Read your work aloud: does it make sense? Any spelling mistakes? Missing punctuation? 
Do your quotes, paraphrases and citations flow within your writing?  
Finding quotes or sources: Phrase searching in Google (using “double quotation marks”) can help 
you to find quotes when you’ve forgotten where they came from. The library catalogue can provide book 
reference details, and you can see your loan history through your online library account too.  
Unusual sources not in this guide: The University of Worcester’s referencing guidance cannot give 
examples for every type of source that’s out there. Sometimes you need to be creative. Consider using 
a comprehensive guide to referencing to help you devise the best solution, such as Pears and Shields 
(2013) Cite Them Right (9
th
edition). The book has been used to inform some of the guidance in this 
Harvard guide.  
Useful reading: Neville, C. (2010) The complete guide to referencing and avoiding plagiarism. 2
nd
edition. Maidenhead, Open University Press. (Also available as an e-book.) 
Need help?  Academic  Liaison  Librarians  and  your  tutors  can  advise  on  referencing. 
Email: askalibrarian@worc.ac.uk  
Quick Guide to common sources 
For more in-text citation examples, see the previous pages on quoting, paraphrasing, summarising and 
secondary referencing. The example given for each source below is merely indicative of what is possible, 
not prescriptive for that source, to show you what an in-text citation might look like. 
Source Type 
In-text citation example 
Full Reference 
Book 
Yin (2011: p.6) explains that a qualitative 
methodology can enable researchers “to 
conduct  in-depth  studies  about  a  broad 
array  of  topics…in  plain  and  everyday 
terms”. 
Yin, R.K. (2011) Qualitative research from 
start to finish. New York, Guilford Press.  
Chapter in an 
edited book 
Aerobiology has been defined by Cecchi 
(2013: p.2) as “the branch of biology that 
studies organic particles, such as bacteria, 
fungal spores, pollen grains and viruses, 
which  are  passively  transported  by  the 
air”.  
Cecchi, L. (2013) Introduction. In: Sofiev, 
M. & Bergmann, K-C. (eds.) Allergenic 
pollen: a review of the production, release, 
distribution and health impacts. Dordrecht, 
Springer, pp.1-8. 
E-Book 
Boyd  and  McKendry  (2012)  emphasise 
the  importance  of  students  becoming 
independent  learners,  able  to  manage 
their time and be responsible for their own 
learning.  
Boyd, V. & McKendry, S. (2012) Getting 
ready for your nursing degree. [e-book] 
Harlow, Pearson Education. Available 
from: Dawson Era [Accessed 19 June 
2013]. 
Journal article 
accessed online 
Barry  (2006)  suggests  that 
an 
understanding  of  citing  and  referencing, 
alongside  an  awareness  of  types  of 
plagiarism  and  how to avoid  them, can 
help students to become more confident 
critical thinkers and writers. 
Barry, E. (2006) Can paraphrasing 
practice help students define plagiarism? 
College Student Journal. [Online] 40 (2), 
377-384. Available from: Academic 
Search Complete [Accessed 19 June 
2013]. 
Newspaper 
article accessed 
online 
Short courses in study skills and academic 
writing  may  be  valuable  for  preparing 
young  people  for  university-level  study, 
and  can  help  to  raise  aspiration  and 
stimulate  new  learning  (Roberts  and 
Pritchard 2004).    
Roberts, L. & Pritchard, L. (Friday 9 
January 2004) Skills give students a 
spring in their step. The Times 
Educational Supplement. [Online] 
Available from: Lexis Library [Accessed 19 
June 2013]. 
Webpage 
There  are  a  range  of  instruction  words 
which can be used in assignment titles, 
including 
discuss, 
evaluate 
and 
summarise. The Writing Development 
Centre  (2009)  at  Newcastle  University 
provides  a  list  of  common  instruction 
words  and  their  meanings,  which 
demonstrates  how  students  are  often 
expected to do more than just describe 
something. 
Writing Development Centre (2009) 
Understanding instruction words. [Online] 
Available from: http://www.ncl.ac.uk/stud 
ents/wdc/learning/essays/understanding/in
struction.htm [Accessed 19 June 2013]. 
Note that there are many online sources which may have the same layout as a ‘webpage’ reference type: 
Author (Year) Title. [Online] Available from: URL [Accessed date] 
Act of 
Parliament 
The Equality Act 2010 lists a number of 
protected characteristics, including age 
and disability.  
Equality Act 2010. (c.15) London, The 
Stationery Office.   
Acts of Parliament are an exception to the rule that citations and references always start with an author. 
See the section on Acts of Parliament for more information. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested