Your 
Blood Pressure
Lowering
Guide to
U.S. DEPARTMENTOFHEALTHANDHUMANSERVICES
National Institutes of Health
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
And paste pdf into powerpoint - Library application class:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
And paste pdf into powerpoint - Library application class:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Your 
Guide
to Lowering
Blood Pressure
2
What Are High Blood Pressure and Prehypertension?
Blood pressure is the force of blood against the walls of arteries. Blood pressure rises 
and falls throughout the day. When blood pressure stays elevated over time, it’s called
high blood pressure.
The medical term for high blood pressure is hypertension.High blood pressure is danger-
ous because it makes the heart work too hard and contributes to atherosclerosis (hardening
of the arteries). It increases the risk of heart disease (see box 1) and stroke, which are the
first- and third-leading causes of death among Americans. High blood pressure also can
result in other conditions, such as congestive heart failure, kidney disease, and blindness.
A blood pressure level of 140/90 mmHg or higher is considered high. About two-thirds
of people over age 65 have high blood pressure. If your blood pressure is between 
120/80 mmHg and 139/89 mmHg, then you have prehypertension.This means that you
don’t have high blood pressure now but are likely to develop it in the future unless you
adopt the healthy lifestyle changes described in this brochure. (See box 2.)
People who do not have high blood pressure at age 55 face a 90 percent chance of 
developing it during their lifetimes. So high blood pressure is a condition that most 
people will have at some point in their lives.
Both numbers in a blood pressure test are important, but for people who are age 50 
or older, systolic pressure gives the most accurate diagnosis of high blood pressure.
Systolic pressure is the top number in a blood pressure reading. It is high if it is 
140 mmHg or above. 
Risk Factors for Heart Disease
Risk factors are conditions or behaviors that increase your chances of developing a disease. When you have
more than one risk factor for heart disease, your risk of developing heart disease greatly multiplies. So if
you have high blood pressure, you need to take action. Fortunately, you can control most heart disease 
risk factors.
Risk factors you can control:
Risk factors beyond your control:
High blood pressure
Age (55 or older for men; 65 or older for  women)
Abnormal cholesterol
Family history of early heart disease (having a father or  
Tobacco use
brother diagnosed with heart disease before age 55 or 
Diabetes
having a mother or sister diagnosed  before age 65)
Overweight
Physical inactivity
box 1
Library application class:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Ability to copy selected PDF pages and paste into another PDF file. Copy three pages from test1.pdf and paste into test2.pdf.
www.rasteredge.com
Library application class:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Ability to copy PDF pages and paste into another PDF file. Support ' Copy three pages from test1.pdf and paste into test2.pdf. Dim
www.rasteredge.com
How Can You Prevent or Control High Blood Pressure?
If you have high blood pressure, you and your health care provider need to work together as
a team to reduce it. The two of you need to agree on your blood pressure goal. Together, you
should come up with a plan and timetable for reaching your goal.
Blood pressure is usually measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg) and is recorded as
two numbers—systolic pressure (as the heart beats) “over” diastolic pressure (as the heart
relaxes between beats)—for example, 130/80 mmHg. Ask your doctor to write down for
you your blood pressure numbers and your blood pressure goal level.
Monitoring your blood pressure at home between visits to your doctor can be helpful.
You also may want to bring a family member with you when you visit your doctor.
Having a family member who knows that you have high blood pressure and who under-
stands what you need to do to lower your blood pressure often makes it easier to make
the changes that will help you reach your goal.
The steps listed in this brochure will help lower your blood pressure. If you have normal
blood pressure or prehypertension, following these steps will help prevent you from
developing high blood pressure. If you have high blood pressure, following these steps
will help you control your blood pressure.
This brochure is designed to help you adopt a healthier lifestyle and remember to take
prescribed blood pressure-lowering drugs. Following the steps described will help you
prevent and control high blood pressure. While you read them, think to yourself . . .
“I Can Do It!”
3
Blood Pressure Levels for Adults
Systolic
Diastolic
Category
(mmHg)
(mmHg)
Result
Good for you!
Your blood pressure could
be a problem. Make
changes in what you eat
and drink, be physically
active, and lose extra
weight. If you also have
diabetes, see your doctor.
You have high blood pres-
sure. Ask your doctor or
nurse how to control it.
box 2
Normal
Prehypertension
Hypertension
less than 120             and
120–139                        or
140 or higher             or
less than 80
80–89
90 or higher
*
For adults ages 18 and older who are not on medicine for high blood pressure and do not have a short-term serious illness. Source: The Seventh 
Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure; NIH Publication No. 03-5230,
National High Blood Pressure Education Program, May 2003. 
If systolic and diastolic pressures fall into different categories, overall status is the higher category.
Millimeters of mercury.
Hypertension can
almost alwaysbe 
prevented, so these
steps are very important
even if you do not have
high blood pressure.
• Maintain a healthy 
weight.
• Be physically 
active. 
• Follow a healthy 
eating plan. 
• Eat foods with 
less sodium (salt).
• Drink alcohol only 
in moderation.
• Take prescribed 
drugs as directed.
*
Library application class:C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value. value, The char wil be added into PDF page, 0
www.rasteredge.com
Library application class:VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add file. Insert images into PDF form field in VB.NET. An
www.rasteredge.com
Being overweight or obese increases your risk of developing high blood pressure. In fact,
your blood pressure rises as your body weight increases. Losing even 10 pounds can
lower your blood pressure—and losing weight has the biggest effect on those who are
overweight and already have hypertension.
Overweight and obesity are also risk factors for heart disease. And being overweight or
obese increases your chances of developing high blood cholesterol and diabetes—two
more risk factors for heart disease.
Two key measures are used to determine if someone is overweight or obese. These are
body mass index, or BMI, and waist circumference.
BMI is a measure of your weight relative to your height. It gives an approximation of
total body fat—and that’s what increases the risk of diseases that are related to being
overweight.
But BMI alone does not determine risk. For example, in someone who is very muscular
or who has swelling from fluid retention (called edema), BMI may overestimate body fat.
BMI may underestimate body fat in older persons or those losing muscle.
That’s why waist measurement is often checked as well. Another reason is that too much
body fat in the stomach area also increases disease risk. A waist measurement of more
than 35 inches in women and more than 40 inches in men is considered high.
Check the chart in box 3 for your approximate BMI value. Check box 4 to see if you are
at a normal weight, overweight, or obese. Overweight is defined as a BMI of 25 to 29.9;
obesity is defined as a BMI equal to or greater than 30.
If you fall in the obese range according to the guidelines in box 4, you are at increased
risk for heart disease and need to lose weight. You also should lose weight if you are
overweight and have two or more heart disease risk factors. (See box 1.) If you fall in the
normal weight range or are overweight but do not need to lose pounds, you still should
be careful not to gain weight.
4
Finding YOURTarget Weight
Lower Your
Blood Pressure
by Aiming for a
Healthy Weight
Library application class:VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF file into two or multiple files in ASP.NET webpage online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files in .NET WinForms.
www.rasteredge.com
Library application class:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
www.rasteredge.com
If you need to lose weight, it’s important to do so slowly. Lose no more than 
1
/
2
pound 
to 2 pounds a week. Begin with a goal of losing 10 percent of your current weight. This 
is the healthiest way to lose weight and offers the best chance of long-term success.
There’s no magic formula for weight loss. You have to eat fewer calories than you use up
in daily activities. Just how many calories you burn daily depends on factors such as your
body size and how physically active you are. (See box 5.)
One pound equals 3,500 calories. So, to lose 1 pound a week, you need to eat 500 
calories a day less or burn 500 calories a day more than you usually do. It’s best to 
work out some combination of both eating less and being more physically active.
5
Body Mass Index
Here is a chart for men and women that gives BMI for various heights and weights.
*
To use the chart, find your height
in the left-hand column labeled Height. Move across to your body weight. The number at the top of the column is the
BMI for your height and weight.
box 3
100
107
115
122
130
138
146
154
163
172
105
112
120
128
136
144
153
162
171
180
110
118
126
134
142
151
160
169
179
189
115
123
131
140
148
158
167
177
186
197
119
128
136
145
155
164
174
184
194
205
124
133
142
151
161
171
181
191
202
213
129
138
147
157
167
177
188
199
210
221
134
143
153
163
173
184
195
206
218
230
138
148
158
169
179
190
202
213
225
238
143
153
164
174
186
197
209
221
233
246
148
158
169
180
192
203
216
228
241
254
4
10
′′
5
0
′′
5
2
′′
5
4
′′
5
6
′′
5
8
′′
5
10
′′
6
0
′′
6
2
′′
6
4
′′
BMI 
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Height 
(feet and 
inches) 
Body Weight (pounds) 
*
Weight is measured with underwear but no shoes.
Library application class:C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Merge several images into PDF. Insert images into PDF form field.
www.rasteredge.com
Library application class:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Divide PDF File into Two Using C#. This is an C# example of splitting a PDF to two new PDF files. Split PDF Document into Multiple PDF Files in C#.
www.rasteredge.com
6
What Does Your BMI Mean?
Category
BMI
Result
Good for you!
Try not to gain weight.
Do not gain any weight, especially if your waist
measurement is high. You need to lose weight if 
you have two or more risk factors for heart disease. 
(See box 1.)
You need to lose weight. Lose weight slowly—
about 
1
/
2
pound to 2 pounds a week. See your 
doctor or a registered dietitian if you need help. 
box 4
Normal weight
Overweight
Obese
18.5–24.9
25–29.9
30 or greater
Source: Clinical Guidelines on the Identification, Evaluation, and Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults: The Evidence Report;NIH
Publication No. 98-4083, National Heart, Lung, and BloodInstitute, in cooperation with the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and
Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, June 1998.
And remember to be aware of serving sizes. It’s not only what you eat that adds calories,
but also how much. 
As you lose weight, be sure to follow a healthy eating plan that includes a variety of
foods. A good plan to follow is the one given in box 6. Some tips to make the plan lower
in calories appear in box 8.
7
Being physically active is one of the most important things you can do to prevent or 
control high blood pressure. It also helps to reduce your risk of heart disease.
It doesn’t take a lot of effort to become physically active. All you need is 30 minutes 
of moderate-level physical activity on most days of the week. Examples of such activities
are brisk walking, bicycling, raking leaves, and gardening. For more examples, see box 5.
You can even divide the 30 minutes into shorter periods of at least 10 minutes each. 
For instance: Use stairs instead of an elevator, get off a bus one or two stops early, or
park your car at the far end of the lot at work. If you already engage in 30 minutes of
moderate-level physical activity a day, you can get added benefits by doing more. Engage
in a moderate-level activity for a longer period each day or engage in a more vigorous 
activity.
Most people don’t need to see a doctor before they start a moderate-level physical 
activity. You should check first with your doctor if you have heart trouble or have had 
a heart attack, if you’re over age 50 and are not used to moderate-level physical activity,
if you have a family history of heart disease at an early age, or if you have any other 
serious health problem.
Examples of Moderate-Level Physical Activities
Common Chores
Sporting Activities 
Playing volleyball for 45–60 minutes
Playing touch football for 45 minutes
Walking 2 miles in 30 minutes (1 mile in 15 minutes)
Shooting baskets for 30 minutes
Bicycling 5 miles in 30 minutes
Dancing fast (social) for 30 minutes
Performing water aerobics for 30 minutes
Swimming laps for 20 minutes
Playing basketball for 15–20 minutes
Jumping rope for 15 minutes 
Running 1 
1
/
2
miles in 15 minutes (1 mile in 
10 minutes) 
box 5
Washing and waxing a car for 45–60 minutes 
Washing windows or floors for 45–60 
minutes 
Gardening for 30–45 minutes
Wheeling self in wheelchair for 30–40 
minutes
Pushing a stroller 1 1/
2
miles in 30 minutes
Raking leaves for 30 minutes
Shoveling snow for 15 minutes
Stair walking for 15 minutes
Lower Your 
Blood Pressure
by 
Being Active
What you eat affects your chances of getting high blood pressure. A healthy eating plan
can both reduce the risk of developing high blood pressure and lower a blood pressure
that is already too high.
For an overall eating plan, consider DASH, which stands for “Dietary Approaches to
Stop Hypertension.” You can reduce your blood pressure by eating foods that are low in
saturated fat, total fat, and cholesterol, and high in fruits, vegetables, and lowfat dairy
foods. The DASH eating plan includes whole grains, poultry, fish, and nuts, and has low
amounts of fats, red meats, sweets, and sugared beverages. It is also high in potassium,
calcium, and magnesium, as well as protein and fiber. Eating foods lower in salt and 
sodium also can reduce blood pressure.
Box 6 gives the servings and food groups for the DASH eating plan. The number of 
servings that is right for you may vary, depending on your caloric need.
The DASH eating plan has more daily servings of fruits, vegetables, and grains than 
you may be used to eating. Those foods are high in fiber, and eating more of them may
temporarily cause bloating and diarrhea. To get used to the DASH eating plan, gradually
increase your servings of fruits, vegetables, and grains. Box 7 offers some tips on how to
adopt the DASH eating plan.
A good way to change to the DASH eating plan is to keep a diary of your current eating
habits. Write down what you eat, how much, when, and why. Note whether you snack
on high-fat foods while watching television or if you skip breakfast and eat a big lunch.
Do this for several days. You’ll be able to see where you can start making changes.
If you’re trying to lose weight, you should choose an eating plan that is lower in calories.
You can still use the DASH eating plan, but follow it at a lower calorie level. (See box 8.)
Again, a food diary can be helpful. It can tell you if there are certain times that you eat but
aren’t really hungry or when you can substitute low-calorie foods for high-calorie foods.
8
Lower Your
Blood Pressure
by
Eating Right
9
The DASH Eating Plan
box 6
Grains and grain
products
Vegetables
Fruits
Lowfat or fat free
dairy foods
Lean meats, 
poultry, and fish
Nuts, seeds, and 
dry beans
Fats and oils
Sweets
7–8
4–5
4–5
2–3
2 or fewer
4–5 per week
2–3
5 per week
1 slice bread
1 cup ready-to-eat cereal*
1/
2
cup cooked rice, pasta, or cereal
1 cup raw leafy vegetable
1/
2
cup cooked vegetable
6 ounces vegetable juice
1 medium fruit
1/
4
cup dried fruit
1/
2
cup fresh, frozen, or canned fruit
6 ounces fruit juice
8 ounces milk
1 cup yogurt
1/
2
ounces cheese
3 ounces cooked lean meat, 
skinless poultry, or fish
1/
3
cup or 1 1/
2
ounces nuts
1 tablespoon or 1/
2
ounce seeds
1/
2
cup cooked dry beans
1 teaspoon soft margarine
1 tablespoon lowfat mayonnaise
2 tablespoons light salad dressing
1 teaspoon vegetable oil
1 tablespoon sugar
1 tablespoon jelly or jam
1/
2
ounce jelly beans
8 ounces lemonade
*
Serving sizes vary between 1/
2
cup and 1 1/
4
cups. Check the product’s nutrition label.
Fat content changes serving counts for fats and oils: For example, 1 tablespoon of regular salad dressing equals 1 serving, 1 tablespoon 
of lowfat salad dressing equals 
1
/
2
serving, and 1 tablespoon of fat free salad dressing equals 0 servings.
The DASH eating plan shown below is based on 2,000 calories a day. The number of daily servings in a
food group may vary from those listed, depending upon your caloric needs.
Daily Servings 
Food Group
(except as noted)
Serving Sizes
10
Tips on Switching to the DASH Eating Plan
Change gradually. Add a vegetable or fruit serving at lunch and dinner.
Use only half the butter or margarine you do now.
If you have trouble digesting dairy products, try lactase enzyme pills or drops—they’re available 
at drugstores and groceries. Or buy lactose-free milk or milk with lactase enzyme added to it.
Get added nutrients such as the B vitamins by choosing whole grain foods, including whole 
wheat bread or whole grain cereals.
Spread out the servings. Have two servings of fruits and/or vegetables at each meal, or add 
fruits as snacks.
Treat meat as one part of the meal, instead of the focus. Try casseroles, pasta, and stir-fry dishes.
Have two or more meatless meals a week.
Use fruits or lowfat foods as desserts and snacks.
box 7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested