11
How To Lose Weight on the DASH Eating Plan
The DASH eating plan was not designed to promote weight loss. But it is rich in low-calorie foods
such as fruits and vegetables. You can make it lower in calories by replacing high-calorie foods
with more fruits and vegetables—and that also will make it easier for you to reach your DASH 
eating plan goals. Here are some examples:
To increase fruits:
Eat a medium apple instead of four shortbread cookies. You’ll save 80 calories.
Eat 
1
/
cup of dried apricots instead of a 2-ounce bag of pork rinds. You’ll save 230 calories.
To increase vegetables:
Have a hamburger that’s 3 ounces instead of 6 ounces. Add a 
1
/
2
cup serving of carrots and 
1
/
2
cup serving of spinach. You’ll save more than 200 calories.
Instead of 5 ounces of chicken, have a stir fry with 2 ounces of chicken and 1 
1
/
cups of raw 
vegetables. Use a small amount of vegetable oil. You’ll save 50 calories.
To increase lowfat or fat free dairy products:
Have a 1/
cup serving of lowfat frozen yogurt instead of a 1 1/
2
-ounce milk chocolate bar. You’ll 
save about 110 calories.
And don’t forget these calorie-saving tips:
Use lowfat or fat free condiments, such as fat free salad dressings.
Eat smaller portions—cut back gradually.
Choose lowfat or fat free dairy products to reduce total fat intake.
Use food labels to compare fat content in packaged foods. Items marked lowfat or fat free are 
not always lower in calories than their regular versions. See box 11 on how to read and compare 
food labels.
Limit foods with lots of added sugar, such as pies, flavored yogurts, candy bars, ice cream, 
sherbet, regular soft drinks, and fruit drinks.
Eat fruits canned in their own juice.
Snack on fruit, vegetable sticks, unbuttered and unsalted popcorn, or bread sticks.
Drink water or club soda.
box 8
Pdf to ppt converter online for large - software SDK project:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf to ppt converter online for large - software SDK project:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Use More Spices and Less Salt
An important part of healthy eating is choosing foods that are low in salt (sodium 
chloride) and other forms of sodium. Using less sodium is key to keeping blood pressure
at a healthy level. 
Most Americans use more salt and sodium than they need. Some people, such as African
Americans and the elderly, are especially sensitive to salt and sodium and should be 
particularly careful about how much they consume.
Most Americans should consume no more than 2.4 grams (2,400 milligrams) of sodium 
a day. That equals 6 grams (about 1 teaspoon) of table salt a day. For someone with high
blood pressure, the doctor may advise less. The 6 grams includes allsalt and sodium 
consumed, including that used in cooking and at the table.
Before trying salt substitutes, you should check with your doctor, especially if you have
high blood pressure. These contain potassium chloride and may be harmful for those
with certain medical conditions.
Box 9 offers some tips on how to choose and prepare foods that are low in salt and sodium. 
12
Tips To Reduce Salt and Sodium
Buy fresh, plain frozen, or canned “with no salt added” vegetables.
Use fresh poultry, fish, and lean meat, rather than canned or processed types.
Use herbs, spices, and salt-free seasoning blends in cooking and at the table.
Cook rice, pasta, and hot cereal without salt. Cut back on instant or flavored rice, 
pasta, and cereal mixes, which usually have added salt.
Choose “convenience” foods that are low in sodium. Cut back on frozen dinners, 
pizza, packaged mixes, canned soups or broths, and salad dressings—these 
often have a lot of sodium.
Rinse canned foods, such as tuna, to remove some sodium.
When available, buy low- or reduced-sodium or no-salt-added versions of 
foods—see box 11 for guidance on how to use food labels.
Choose ready-to-eat breakfast cereals that are low in sodium.
box 9
Spice It Up
and
Use Less Sodium
software SDK project:VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
Thus, we still offer the precise online guide for a large amount of robust PPT slides/pages provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK project:C# TIFF: TIFF Editor SDK to Read & Manipulate TIFF File Using C#.
Handle large size of Tiff in partition, reducing the resource 2. Word/Excel/PPT/PDF/ Jpeg to Tiff conversion. Refer to this online tutorial page, you will see:
www.rasteredge.com
Experiment with these and other herbs and spices. To start, use small amounts to find out
if you like them.
Shopping for Foods That Will Help You Lower Your Blood Pressure
By paying close attention to food labels when you shop, you can consume less sodium.
Sodium is found naturally in many foods. But processed foods account for most of the
salt and sodium that Americans consume. Processed foods that are high in salt include
regular canned vegetables and soups, frozen dinners, lunchmeats, instant and ready-to-eat
cereals, and salty chips and other snacks.
Use food labels to help you choose products that are low in sodium. Box 11 shows you
how to read and compare food labels.
As you read food labels, you may be surprised that
many foods contain sodium, including baking soda, 
soy sauce, monosodium glutamate (MSG), seasoned
salts, and some antacids.
13
Tips for Using Herbs and Spices
Herbs and Spices
Use in
Basil
Soups and salads, vegetables, fish, and meats
Cinnamon
Salads, vegetables, breads, and snacks
Chili Powder
Soups, salads, vegetables, and fish
Cloves
Soups, salads, and vegetables
Dill Weed and Dill Seed
Fish, soups, salads, and vegetables
Ginger
Soups, salads, vegetables, and meats
Marjoram
Soups, salads, vegetables, beef, fish, and chicken
Nutmeg
Vegetables, meats, and snacks
Oregano
Soups, salads, vegetables, meats, and snacks
Parsley
Salads, vegetables, fish, and meats
Rosemary
Salads, vegetables, fish, and meats
Sage
Soups, salads, vegetables, meats, and chicken
Thyme
Salads, vegetables, fish, and chicken
box 10
With herbs, spices, garlic, and onions, you can make your food spicy without salt and
sodium. There’s no reason why eating less sodium should make your food any less 
delicious! See box 10 for some great ideas on using spices.
software SDK project:VB.NET Excel: Render and Convert Excel File to TIFF Image by Using
If you need the most comprehensive overview on VB.NET Excel converter add-on, please go If you want to view or edit PDF, Word, Excel or PPT document, you
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK project:C# Imaging - Decode Identcode in C#.NET
Own advanced Identcode barcode reading functionality for C# PDF,Word, Excel & PPT editing projects. decode is located at one corner of a large-size image
www.rasteredge.com
14
Easy on the Alcohol
Drinking too much alcohol can raise blood pressure. It also can harm the liver, brain, and heart. 
Alcoholic drinks also contain calories, which matters if you are trying to lose weight.
If you drink alcoholic beverages, drink only a moderate amount—one drink a day for women, 
two drinks a day for men.
What counts as a drink?
12 ounces of beer (regular or light, 150 calories),
5 ounces of wine (100 calories), or
1
/
2
ounces of 80-proof whiskey (100 calories).
Compare Labels
Food labels can help you choose items lower in sodium, as well as calories, saturated fat, total fat, and cholesterol.  The label
tells you:
box 11
Amount per serving
Nutrient amounts are provided for
one serving. If you eat more or less
than a serving, add or subtract
amounts. For example, if you eat 
1 cup of peas, you need to double
the nutrient amounts on the label.
Number of servings
There may be more than one 
serving in the package, so be sure
to check serving size.
Nutrients
You’ll find the milligrams of sodium
in one serving. 
Percent daily value
Percent daily value helps you com-
pare products and tells you if the
food is high or low in sodium.
Choose products with the lowest
percent daily value for sodium. 
FROZEN PEAS
Nutrition Facts 
Serving Size: 
1
/
2
cup
Servings Per Container: about 3 
Amount Per Serving 
Calories: 60 
Calories from Fat:  0 
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0g 
0%
Saturated Fat 0g 
0%
Cholesterol 0mg 
0%
Sodium 125mg
5%
Total Carbohydrate 11g
4%
Dietary Fiber 6g
22%
Sugars 5g 
Protein 5g
Vitamin A 15%  • Vitamin C  30% 
Calcium     0%  • Iron 
6% 
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 
2,000 calorie diet. 
CANNED PEAS
Nutrition Facts 
Serving Size: 
1
/
2
cup
Servings Per Container: about 3 
Amount Per Serving 
Calories: 60 
Calories from Fat:  0 
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0g 
0%
Saturated Fat 0g 
0%
Cholesterol 0mg 
0%
Sodium 380mg
16%
Total Carbohydrate 12g
4%
Dietary Fiber 3g
14%
Sugars 4g 
Protein 4g 
Vitamin A 6%  • Vitamin C  10% 
Calcium     2%  • Iron 
8% 
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 
2,000 calorie diet
Which product is lower in sodium?
Answer:  The frozen peas. The canned peas have three times more sodium than the frozen peas.
?
software SDK project:C# Imaging - Scan 1D POSTNET in C#.NET
C#.NET PDF document SDK. Seamlessly integrated with C#.NET MS Word, Excel and PPT documents SDK. Quickly scan POSTENT barcode from images in high-quality. Large
www.rasteredge.com
If you have high blood pressure, the lifestyle habits noted above may not lower your
blood pressure enough. If they don’t, you’ll need to take drugs.
Even if you need drugs, you still must make the lifestyle changes. Doing so will help your
drugs work better and may reduce how much of them you need.
There are many drugs available to lower blood pressure. They work in various ways.
Many people need to take two or more drugs to bring their blood pressure down to a
healthy level.
See box 12 for a rundown on the main types of drugs and how they work.
15
Blood Pressure Drugs
Drug Category
How They Work
These are sometimes called “water pills” because they work in
the kidney and flush excess water and sodium from the body
through urine. 
These reduce nerve impulses to the heart and blood vessels.
This makes the heart beat less often and with less force. Blood
pressure drops, and the heart works less hard.
These prevent the formation of a hormone called angiotensin II,
which normally causes blood vessels to narrow. The blood 
vessels relax, and pressure goes down.
These shield blood vessels from angiotensin II. As a result, the
blood vessels open wider, and pressure goes down.
These keep calcium from entering the muscle cells of the heart
and blood vessels. Blood vessels relax, and pressure goes down.
These reduce nerve impulses to blood vessels, allowing blood
to pass more easily. 
These work the same way as alpha-blockers but also slow the
heartbeat, as beta-blockers do. 
These relax blood vessels by controlling nerve impulses.
These directly open blood vessels by relaxing the muscle in the
vessel walls.
box 12
Diuretics
Beta-blockers
Angiotensin converting
enzyme inhibitors
Angiotensin antagonists
Calcium channel blockers 
Alpha-blockers
Alpha-beta-blockers
Nervous system inhibitors
Vasodilators
Manage Your
Blood Pressure Drugs
When you start on a drug, work with your doctor to get the right drug and dose level 
for you. If you have side effects, tell your doctor so the drugs can be adjusted. If you’re
worried about cost, tell your doctor or pharmacist—there may be a less expensive drug
or a generic form that you can use instead.
It’s important that you take your drugs as prescribed. That can prevent a heart attack,
stroke, and congestive heart failure, which is a serious condition in which the heart 
cannot pump as much blood as the body needs.
It’s easy to forget to take medicines. But just like putting your socks on in the morning
and brushing your teeth, taking your medicine can become part of your daily routine. 
See box 13 for some tips that will help you remember to take your blood pressure drugs.
You can be taking drugs and still not have your blood pressure under control.
Everyone—and older Americans in particular—must be careful to keep his or her blood 
pressure below 140/90 mmHg. If your blood pressure is higher than that, talk with your
doctor about adjusting your drugs or making lifestyle changes to bring your blood 
pressure down.
Some over-the-counter drugs, such as arthritis and pain drugs, and dietary supplements,
such as ephedra, ma haung, and bitter orange, can raise your blood pressure. Be sure to
tell your doctor about any nonprescription drugs that you’re taking and ask whether they
may make it harder for you to bring your blood pressure under control.
16
Tips To Help You Remember To Take Your Blood Pressure Drugs
Put a favorite picture of yourself or a loved one on the refrigerator with a note that says, “Remember To 
Take Your High Blood Pressure Drugs.”
Keep your high blood pressure drugs on the nightstand next to your side of the bed.
Take your high blood pressure drugs right after you brush your teeth, and keep them with your 
toothbrush as a reminder.
Put “sticky” notes in visible places to remind yourself to take your high blood pressure drugs. You can 
put notes on the refrigerator, on the bathroom mirror, or on the front door.
Set up a buddy system with a friend who also is on daily medication and arrange to call each other every
day with a reminder to “take your blood pressure drugs.”
Ask your child or grandchild to call you every day with a quick reminder. It’s a great way to stay in touch, 
and little ones love to help the grown-ups.
Place your drugs in a weekly pillbox, available at most pharmacies.
If you have a personal computer, program a start-up reminder to take your high blood pressure drugs, or
sign up with a free service that will send you a reminder e-mail every day.
Remember to refill your prescription. Each time you pick up a refill, make a note on your calendar to 
order and pick up the next refill 1 week before the medication is due to run out.
box 13
18
• What is my blood pressure reading in numbers?
• What is my goal blood pressure?
• Is my blood pressure under adequate control?
• Is my systolic pressure too high (over 140)?
• What would be a healthy weight for me?
• Is there a diet to help me lose weight (if I need to) and 
lower my blood pressure?
• Is there a recommended healthy eating plan I should 
follow to help lower my blood pressure (if I don’t need 
to lose weight)?
• Is it safe for me to start doing regular physical activity?
• What is the name of my blood pressure medication? 
Is that the brand name or the generic name?
• What are the possible side effects of my medication? 
(Be sure the doctor knows about any allergies you have 
and any other medications you are taking, including 
over-the-counter drugs, vitamins, and dietary 
supplements.)
• What time of day should I take my blood pressure 
medicine?
• Should I take it with food?
• Are there any foods, beverages, or dietary supplements 
I should avoid when taking this medicine?
• What should I do if I forget to take my blood pressure 
medicine at the recommended time? Should I take it as 
soon as I remember or should I wait until the next 
dosage is due?
Questions To
Ask Your Doctor
If You Have
High Blood Pressure
People who ordered this guide also liked
Facts About the DASH Eating Plan; NIH Publication 
No. 03-4082
This guide provides details on an eating plan low in total
fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol, and rich in fruits, 
vegetables, and lowfat dairy products. 
Your Guide to 
Lowering Blood Pressure
A patient guide, containing: 
• Clear explanations of high blood pressure and 
prehypertension
• Step-by-step guidance on how to prevent or control 
high blood pressure
•  An Action Item page that you can cut out and place 
where you can see it daily to help you remember that you 
can manage your blood pressure
For More Information
The NHLBI Health Information Center is a service of the
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the
National Institutes of Health. The NHLBI Health Information
Center provides information to health professionals, patients,
and the public about the treatment, diagnosis, and prevention of
heart, lung, and blood diseases. For more information, contact:
NHLBI Health Information Center 
P.O. Box 30105
Bethesda, MD 20824-0105
Phone: 301-592-8573
TTY: 240-629-3255
Fax: 301-592-8563
Web site: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov
Copies of this and other publications are available in bulk at
discounted rates.
Please call us for details at 301-592-8573.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
National Institutes of Health
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
National High Blood Pressure Education Program
NIH Publication No. 03-5232
May 2003
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested