www.theicct.org
AUGUST 2015
whiTe pAper
communications@theicct.org        
Berlin    |    Brusse ls    |    san Francisco    |    Washington
Review of CuRRent PRaCtiCes  
and new develoPments in  
Heavy-duty veHiCle insPeCtion 
and maintenanCe PRogRams
Francisco Posada, Zifei Yang, and rachel Muncrief
Changing pdf to powerpoint - Library SDK class:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Changing pdf to powerpoint - Library SDK class:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
FUndinG
Funding for this work was provided by the climate and clean air coalition to reduce 
short-lived climate Pollutants (ccac) and the rockefeller Brothers Fund.
Acknowledgments
special thanks to Freda Fung for reviewing the segments of this report that cover 
china and hong Kong; thanks to Professor Donald stedman for his comments on the 
overall report and for answering many of our questions on the on-highway emission 
measurement systems and remote sensing; many thanks to Jens Borken-Kleefeld for 
his detailed review and constructive comments on high emitters and remote sensing 
devices. our icct colleagues Fanta Kamakaté and ray Minjares deserve a special 
acknowledgment for their significant contributions shaping this report.
© 2015 international council on clean transportation
1225 i street nW suite 900
Washington Dc 20005 usa
communications@theicct.org  |  www.theicct.org | @theicct
Library SDK class:VB.NET Word: Word Conversion SDK for Changing Word Document into
VB.NET Word - Convert Word to PDF Using VB. How to Convert Word Document to PDF File in VB.NET Application. Visual C#. VB.NET. Home
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK class:C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
Enable batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. Support to overwrite PDF and save rotation changes to original PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
i
executive summAry
the purpose of an inspection and maintenance (i/M) program is to identify high-
emitting vehicles and mitigate their impact on air quality and climate. i/M programs 
require vehicle owners to subject their vehicles regularly to a certified emissions test. 
Vehicles that fail the test, owing either to emissions that exceed the regulatory threshold 
or to emissions control component malfunctions, are required to undergo repairs. high 
emitters are vehicles whose pollutant levels are significantly greater than expected 
based on the vehicle’s type, certified emission standard, and age. high emitters typically 
make up a small percentage of a vehicle fleet but are responsible for an inordinately 
large amount of total emissions. heavy-duty vehicles (hDVs) represent, on average, less 
than 5 percent of the global on-road vehicle population, but 40–60 percent of on-road 
nitrogen oxide (no
X
) and particulate matter (PM) emissions , and around 70-90 percent 
of black carbon emissions comes from these vehicles. Within that 40–60 percent, 
a disproportionate share of the no
X
and PM emissions can be attributed to a small 
fraction of hDVs, the high emitters. 
in this paper, we review the best practices for i/M programs, evaluate existing i/M 
testing methods and protocols and their limitations, examine new and emerging 
techniques for i/M testing, evaluate a range of i/M programs across the globe, and make 
recommendations about how to improve i/M programs in the future.
Best practices for i/M programs have been fairly well established over the years. Five 
overarching best practices were identified as follows: (1) design a comprehensive 
institutional structure for i/M program management (2) base i/M program technical 
design on local impact assessment studies, subject to improvements over time (3) 
promote i/M program compliance and enforcement (4) obtain and manage resources   
(5) build up maintenance capacity in i/M programs. the bulk of this paper addresses the 
technical design of hDV i/M programs.
current i/M programs for hDVs rely on two main testing methods, the free acceleration 
smoke (Fas) test and the lug down smoke test. the free acceleration test is the most 
common and least expensive method and is done by engaging the throttle in the fully 
open position for a few seconds. the lug-down test is a loaded test that requires placing 
the vehicle on a dynamometer to simulate conditions of engine load for the test. Both 
of these tests rely on exhaust measurements using smoke opacity meters, which will 
sense when tailpipe soot levels are above a certain threshold. there are many limitations 
of these testing techniques. First, these tests are typically only used to measure smoke, 
(an indicator of PM emissions), whereas other pollutants such as no
X
are not measured. 
second, these tests are not suitable for newer vehicles with advanced aftertreatment 
systems due to the fact that the tests are not sensitive enough to detect many of the 
potential malfunctions of an advanced emissions control system. 
there are a number of newer measurement technologies and testing methods that 
could be utilized to improve i/M programs. improving the measurement of particles will 
likely involve a shift from conventional opacimeter to advanced technologies that can 
read a wider range of particle sizes and concentrations, such as laser-light-scattering 
photometry (llsP). Measuring no
X
and nitrogen dioxide (no
2
) under i/M programs 
could be done using non-dispersive ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy (nDuV). 
alternatives testing methods that can complement or replace traditional i/M methods 
include the use of on-board diagnostics (oBD), remote sensing, and the on-road heavy-
Library SDK class:VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Merge Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint data to PDF form. together and save as new PDF, without changing the previous two PDF documents at all
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK class:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
PDF. Supports tiff compression selection. Supports for changing image size. Also supports convert PDF files to jpg, jpeg images. C#
www.rasteredge.com
ii
ICCT white paper
duty Vehicle emissions Monitoring system (ohMs). oBD systems , which monitor the 
main functionality of the engine emissions control systems, are available on newer hDVs 
in several countries. adoption of oBD data for i/M programs can complement inspection 
measurements since oBD directly monitors the systems that affect vehicle emissions. 
remote sensing, utilizing roadside emissions measurement setups to measure vehicles’ 
emissions as they drive by, has been used for a variety of purposes, including gauging 
the characteristics of the fleet overall, setting in-use compliance limits, and identifying 
high emitters. remote sensing can be utilized in i/M programs whereby remote sensing 
detects both clean and dirty vehicles and either postpones or accelerates their i/M tests 
accordingly. one of the most promising new methods to detect high emitters is the on-
road heavy-duty Vehicle emissions Monitoring system. the ohMs collects hDV exhaust 
emissions while running the vehicle under a partially enclosed, tunnel-like structure. this 
system has the potential to measure particulate numbers (Pn), particulate mass, and 
black carbon (Bc) emissions, along with gaseous pollutants. the main advantage of 
the ohMs with respect to current Fas is that it can measure no
X
and PM for all types 
of vehicles, whether mechanically or electronically controlled, with or without after-
treatment systems. 
some key conclusions and recommendations from this study are:
1.  only a handful of countries and sub-national governments have implemented 
i/M (and other) programs for controlling hDV high emitters. We recommend 
that all countries adopt some form of i/M program for hDVs based on their 
specific situation.
2.  the current programs were designed based on an older fleet, and although 
some countries are revisiting the pass/fail criteria to take into account newer 
technologies (euro iii, euro iV, ePa 2004, and their equivalents), the adoption of 
new measurement techniques and testing methods (such as ohMs) are needed 
to accommodate the cleanest fleets (euro Vi and ePa 2010) and as well as 
additional pollutants.
3.  refining the criteria used to assess hDV compliance with i/M testing is vital. 
Policy makers can investigate and discover the characteristics and distribution of 
noncompliant vehicles, based on local studies; pass/fail criteria should be based 
on those local studies and tailored by vehicle technology or certification level. 
4.  i/M programs ideally would be combined with complimentary measures. Measures, 
such as remote sensing programs, can help governments concentrate resources 
on monitoring and improving the vehicle types with highest noncompliance ratios 
and therefore increase the pass rate of i/M testing. 
5.  in regions where the emission standards for new hDVs require oBD systems, there 
is the potential for improving the i/M program for those vehicles with the system. 
oBD’s advantage is that it will monitor and report on specific emissions control 
systems to be repaired, which is the main purpose of the i/M program. also, the 
information gathered can be codified and utilized for a wider in-use compliance and 
enforcement program, checking on failure rates and potential warranties and recalls.
Library SDK class:C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to perform PDF file password adding, deleting and changing in Visual Studio .NET project use C# source code in .NET class. Allow
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK class:C# TIFF: Learn to Convert MS Word, Excel, and PPT to TIFF Image
using RasterEdge.Imaging.PowerPoint; This demo code is for rendering and changing PowerPoint (.pptx) document to Tiff image. // Load your PPT (.pptx) document.
www.rasteredge.com
1
Heavy-Duty veHicle inspection anD Maintenance prograMs
tAble of contents
executive Summary ....................................................................................................................i
 Background ...........................................................................................................................2
high emitters and air Quality  ............................................................................................................3
Best Practices for inspection and Maintenance Programs ......................................................6
scope ............................................................................................................................................................9
 review of Current i/M Testing protocols  .......................................................................10
lDV i/M testing .......................................................................................................................................10
hDV Diesel i/M testing .........................................................................................................................12
summary of current inspection and maintenance testing protocols  
for lDVs and hDVs .........................................................................................................................14
limitations of current i/M testing for legacy and clean diesel vehicles ............................15
 proposed Methods and new developments .................................................................. 19
new developments involving PM and no
x
measurement equipment  
for i/M testing ..................................................................................................................................19
alternatives for improving i/M testing for hDVs .......................................................................22
integrating oBD, remote sensing, and ohMs into i/M programs ......................................30
summary of advanced i/M testing methods ...............................................................................32
 international experience ...................................................................................................33
australia .....................................................................................................................................................33
canada .......................................................................................................................................................34
china ...........................................................................................................................................................34
guangdong, china .................................................................................................................................35
europe ........................................................................................................................................................35
hong Kong, special administrative region of china ...............................................................36
california, us ...........................................................................................................................................37
colorado, us ............................................................................................................................................38
summary of regional i/M testing programs for hDVs .............................................................39
 Summary and recommendations: ..................................................................................40
summary of current i/M program status .....................................................................................40
new developments regarding i/M testing methods ...............................................................40
recommendations..................................................................................................................................41
Bibliography .............................................................................................................................43
Library SDK class:VB.NET Image: How to Generate Freehand Annotation Through VB.NET
as PDF, TIFF, PNG, BMP, etc. If this VB.NET annotation library is used, you are able to create freehand line annotation in VB.NET application without changing
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK class:VB.NET Image: Easy to Create Ellipse Annotation with VB.NET
png, gif & bmp; Add ellipse annotation to document files, like PDF & Word to customize ellipse annotation on your document or image by changing its parameters
www.rasteredge.com
2
ICCT white paper
1  bAckground
inspection and maintenance (i/M) programs require vehicle owners or operators to subject 
their vehicles to emissions inspections and to repair them in cases of failure. inspections 
may be either periodic (e.g., once a year as a requirement of registration) or random 
(roadside pullovers). a vehicle fails the test if emissions are found to exceed limits set for 
that particular vehicle type. in some regions, a vehicle also fails if any component of the 
emissions control system is found to be malfunctioning, even if excess emissions are not 
demonstrated. owners or operators of vehicles failing testing are required to take steps 
to repair the vehicle or face penalties. Vehicles that continue to fail inspections even after 
being repaired are prohibited from operating in the jurisdiction where they are registered. 
the purpose of an i/M system is to identify high-emitting vehicles and mitigate 
their impact on air quality. high-emitting vehicles are those whose pollutant levels 
are significantly greater than expected based on the vehicle’s technology, certified 
emission standard, and age. the definition of “high emitter” is not completely settled 
among research groups, but the most common practice is to segregate vehicles into 
classes defined by technology/certification standard/age and to define high-emitter 
cutoff points as a multiple of the respective emission standard (i.e., vehicles with 
emission rates X times above the corresponding certification standard are considered 
high emitters) or by relative position in the emission rate distribution of the fleet (i.e., 
vehicles with emission rates in the X
th
percentile of the population emission distribution 
are considered high emitters). it should be noted that older vehicles within a fleet are 
not necessarily considered high emitters per se. older vehicles can maintain emission 
rates close to the design emission standard through proper and regular maintenance 
practices. an i/M program would therefore not trigger repairs in those well-maintained 
older vehicles. in regions where older vehicles still constitute a large share of the fleet 
and are a large contributor to the local emission inventory, the most common option to 
reduce their emission contributions is to promote vehicle replacement programs, also 
known as scrappage programs.
Vehicles become high emitters for the following reasons:
1.  Negligence
improper or incorrect vehicle maintenance or operation can cause early deterioration 
of engine or emission control components. examples of negligence that could lead to 
increased emissions are not changing the lubricating oil at regular intervals, neglecting 
to replace air and fuel filters, miscalibrated spark timing, unresolved fueling rate issues, 
and injector leaks. refilling the tank with improper fuel can also cause higher emissions 
by damaging the vehicle’s fuel injection systems or emission control equipment. 
one special case of negligence is ignoring the malfunction indication light (Mil) that is a 
feature of the oBD system designed to alert the driver in case of malfunctions that can 
lead to increased emissions. operating a vehicle despite Mil activation potentially leads 
to high emissions. 
incorrect vehicle operation can also lead to elevated emissions. Driving a vehicle that is 
overloaded, above its manufacturer-defined gross vehicle weight rating (gVWr), could 
result in excessive engine and transmission demands, with potential damage to engine 
components and after-treatment systems, thereby causing high emissions.
Library SDK class:VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
creating, loading, merge and splitting PDF pages and Files, adding a page into PDF document, deleting unnecessary page from PDF file and changing the position
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK class:C# Excel - Excel Page Processing Overview
C#.NET programming. Allow for changing the order of pages in an Excel document in .NET applications using C# language. Enable you
www.rasteredge.com
3
Heavy-Duty veHicle inspection anD Maintenance prograMs
2. Tampering
tampering refers to the deliberate modification of a vehicle, engine, or emission control 
device that leads to emissions increases. such tampering is typically the result of the 
owner’s or operator’s attempts to boost vehicle performance, save costs, or improve 
vehicle fuel economy. For example, the reprogramming of the vehicle’s electronic 
control unit (sometimes called reflashing) or removal of a vehicle’s catalytic converter or 
exhaust gas recirculation (egr) system to raise performance can increase emissions and 
may be considered illegal tampering. i/M programs generally aim to identify vehicles 
whose excess emissions are caused by owner/operator negligence or tampering.
3. Manufacturer defects
Vehicles may also become high emitters because of design or manufacture defects. For 
example, a defective component, inadequate quality control on the production line, or 
poor durability of components could all cause a vehicle’s emissions to exceed limit values. 
other types of defects that result in high in-use emissions stem from a disconnect 
between the design conditions used for developing the emission control systems (i.e., 
laboratory engine testing) and the conditions that the vehicles experience during daily 
use. as an example, high in-use no
X
emission during city operation have been reported 
from hDVs fitted with selective catalytic reduction (scr) systems, owing to the lower 
exhaust temperatures experienced under low-speed urban driving conditions (lowell 
and Kamakaté, 2012). 
inspection and maintenance programs are different from in-use compliance and 
enforcement programs, which are primarily aimed at early detection of excess emissions 
caused by manufacturer defects.
1
a large database of i/M test results may be useful 
to compliance regulators as a way of identifying issues if a particular vehicle model 
consistently fails across multiple inspections. in specific cases i/M programs have been 
able to detect manufacturer defects before in-use compliance programs flag the models 
in question. in europe, high in-use no
X
emissions from diesel vehicles have been identified 
with remote sensing programs (chen and Borken-Kleefeld, 2014), and that information 
resulted in proposed changes to the european type-approval regulatory process for 
passenger cars, namely, the prospective adoption of real Driving emissions testing.
hiGh eMiTTerS And Air QUAliTy 
Diesel engines are widely used around the world in commercial and heavy-duty 
applications owing to their higher efficiency, superior torque at low engine speeds, 
reliability, and durability. however, untreated diesel exhaust, which is made up of 
numerous gaseous and solid chemical compounds, is widely recognized to be a public 
health hazard and damaging to the climate. specific emissions of concern include ozone 
precursors, such as nitrogen oxides (no
X
) and volatile organic compounds (Vocs); 
particulate matter (PM) and PM precursors (e.g., no
X
and sulfur oxides—sox); and toxic 
and carcinogenic compounds such as formaldehyde. in addition, black carbon (Bc), the 
light-absorbing carbonaceous fraction of PM, absorbs solar radiation and re-emits it as 
heat, making this short lived climate pollutant (slcP) the second-largest contributor of 
energy to the climate system after carbon dioxide.
 some examples of in-use compliance programs are: in-use conformity, conformity of production testing, 
selective enforcement audits, and in-use verification programs and surveillance testing.
4
ICCT white paper
Known health effects of diesel exhaust include cancer (especially lung cancer), heart 
disease and stroke, asthma, bronchitis, and other respiratory infections and diseases, as 
well as acute effects such as irritation, lung function changes, headaches, nausea, and 
fatigue (e.g., see Kagawa, 2002; sydbom et al., 2001; arB, 1998). Many of the health 
effects caused by diesel exhaust are linked to particle size and composition, including 
the presence of toxic compounds. Diesel emission particles can penetrate into the 
deepest portion of the lungs because of their small size (less than 100 nanometers, or 
0.1 micrometers, in aerodynamic diameter), where they can pass through cell walls and 
be transported via the bloodstream to other organs of the body (gehr, 2010; Prasad 
and Bella, 2010). smaller particles also offer more surface area overall for adsorbing 
toxic organic compounds. these health impacts of diesel exhaust result in significant 
societal losses in the form of premature deaths, forgone productivity, missing work 
days, increased medical spending for hospital admissions and emergency room visits, 
restricted activities, and more.
hDVs, both new and in use, are attractive targets for policymakers hoping to reduce 
PM, Bc, and no
X
emissions and improve local air quality. owing to a combination of 
higher rates of operation (i.e., distance traveled each year) and elevated emission rates 
(grams of pollutant per distance traveled), diesel hDVs are responsible for a high share 
of PM, Bc, and no
X
emissions from motor vehicles in both developed and developing 
countries. in addition, in many nations around the world, hDV emission control programs 
have lagged behind programs for passenger vehicles. table 1-1 summarizes the relative 
contribution of hDVs to highway emission inventories for selected countries and regions 
around the world, not including high emitters. heavy-duty vehicles represent, on 
average, less than 5 percent of the global on-road vehicle population, but 40–60 percent 
of on-road nitrogen oxide and particulate matter emissions, and around 70-90 percent 
of black carbon emissions come from these vehicles. on a national and regional level, 
these values can vary dramatically, as illustrated in table 1-1.
Table 1‑1. examples of hDV shares of total highway vehicle emissions around the world
region
year
hdV 
percentage of 
vehicle fleet
hdV percentage 
of vehicle nO
X
emissions
hdV percentage 
of vehicle pM 
emissions
hdV percentage 
of vehicle BC 
emissions
reference
Australia
2010
19%
67%
59%
81%
icct roadmap
Brazil
2009
3%
46%
45%
Ministry of the 
environment 
(Brazil), 2011
Canada
2010
15%
74%
52%
92%
icct roadmap
California
2008
1% 
48%
44%
arB, 2009
China
2009
4% 
40%
57%
MeP, 2010
europe
2010
11%
68%
47%
68%
icct roadmap
hong Kong (Special
Administrative
region of China)
2011
19%
70%
91%
hKePD, 2013
U.S.
2010
5%
58%
36%
85%
icct roadmap
5
Heavy-Duty veHicle inspection anD Maintenance prograMs
high-emitting heavy-duty vehicles account for an even smaller percentage of the overall 
vehicle fleet but are responsible for an inordinately large share of total emissions. 
according to measurements ofBc emissions performed by george Ban-Weiss  and 
colleagues (2009) on 251 trucks in california, 45 percent of Bc emissions come from 13 
percent of high-emitter trucks.a 2013 study by the texas a&M transportation institute 
(tti) in collaboration with the university of Denver (Du) found that higher-emitting 
vehicles contribute a large percentage of emissions: 6.8 percent of vehicles tested were 
responsible for 19.2 percent of total no
X
emissions measured (tti/Du, 2013). a study 
conducted in canada shows that the impact of high emitters on total PM and no
X
emissions is more pronounced for a cleaner fleet: in the case of vehicles without after-
treatment (pre-2008), the 25 percent of them considered high emitters were responsible 
for 40 percent of total PM and 35 percent of total no
X
emitted by this group; in the case 
of vehicles with after-treatment systems (DPF and selective catalytic reduction, or scr), 
the 20 percent of them considered high emitters were responsible for 56 percent of 
total PM and 52 percent of total no
X
(envirotest canada, 2013). Measurements carried 
out by Xing Wang and others (2011) in Beijing demonstrate that around 50 percent of 
PM and Bc emissions come from high-emitting vehicles.
Modeling estimates for high-emitter contributions relative to total on-road fleet 
emissions estimate that these vehicles are projected to be responsible for more than50 
percent of PM and Bc emissions by 2020. global modeling of PM emissions by vehicle 
model and technology performed by Fang Yan and colleagues (2011) estimates that 
high-emitting vehicleswill become the largest contributors of PM emissions by 2020, 
especially those from asia, africa, and latin america. the 2011 uneP integrated 
assessment of Black carbon andtropospheric ozone identified elimination of high-
emitting on-road and off-road engines as one of two key measures for mitigation of 
internationalemissions of black carbon in the transport sector (shindell et al., 2011). 
these findings suggest that detection of high emitters contributes to air quality and is 
even more effective when implemented in cleaner fleets.
although there is a general consensus on the magnitude of hDV high-emitters’ 
contribution to local and international emission inventories, the benefit flowing from 
i/M programs is rarely explored in the literature, and the data vary greatly as a function 
of local fleet characteristics, testing procedures, and pass/fail criteria. For hDVs, most 
of the data on high-emitter contributions come from a handful of study cases focused 
on the i/M effect on pre- and post-inspection emissions. robert l. Mccormick and 
associates (2003) studied the effect of i/M repairs on 26 vehicles reporting visible 
smoke emissions, 14 of them pre-1991 models, and reported that after the repair the 
average smoke opacity of those vehicles had declined to between 26 and 30 percent 
and PM declined by around 40 percent, while no
X
emissions actually increased by 
15–30 percent. tti and Du estimated (they did not measure directly) that the benefit of 
repairing the group of high-emitting vehicles identified during the study was amounted 
to around 8 percent in no
X
reductions (tti/Du, 2013). 
countries and regions looking into adopting new i/M programs or improving current 
ones could ideally carefully evaluate the potential benefits based on locally run testing 
campaigns and complementary data from remote sensing programs. this would permit 
the tailoring of pass/fail criteria and test procedures to the local fleet composition and 
the relative contribution of various pollutants.
6
ICCT white paper
BeST prACTiCeS FOr inSpeCTiOn And MAinTenAnCe prOGrAMS
inspection and maintenance (i/M) programs are in place in many countries, especially for 
light-duty vehicles, and have been operating for several decades, resulting in a wealth of 
experience from which the best practices presented here have been sifted (usaiD, 2004; 
Wagner and rutherford, 2013; Fung and suen, 2013). Best practices can be organized 
around four common topics: institutional design, technical design (impact assessments, 
test procedures, standards, vehicles), public awareness, and resource management.
1.  design a comprehensive institutional structure for i/M program management
national policymakers should develop the general policy framework, while local ones 
should adapt and strengthen the program to meet area-specific air quality challenges. 
i/M program implementation and especially individual project grant determinations 
ideally should be handled by municipal policymakers, who have a detailed 
understanding of local needs and conditions, including fleet composition and fuel use. 
local policymakers will be better suited to making estimates of the expected emissions 
reduction (useful for maximizing cost-effectiveness) as well as to ensuring that older 
vehicles are retired properly. national policymakers and enforcement officials, through 
the quality assurance system, can play a role in local i/M programs.
there is broad consensus among i/M program reviews in the literature that the 
inspection function ought to be conducted in a specialized facility (usaiD, 2004; 
Fung and suen, 2013). there are two institutional design options: a small number of 
centralized testing hubs or a larger number of more dispersed testing facilities. in 
the case of the more comprehensive facilities in a few locations, the high volume of 
inspections makes it easier to spread the costs over a greater number of clients, while 
allowing for easier oversight of the testing facilities and protocols. a larger number 
of more limited facilities can make access easier for drivers, but oversight becomes 
burdensome, and investments in advanced equipment as well as proper calibration and 
repair of testing equipment can pose a challenge.
another difficult question of institutional design is whether vehicle inspections 
should be performed by government agencies or private outfits. there are pros 
and cons for each option. a report from usaiD (2004) favors private firms over 
government agencies, the reason being that a capital-starved public operation could 
be constrained in trying to provide the range of services offered by a well-funded 
private inspection company. the issues of subpar quality standards and equipment 
and technical competence can be addressed by making sure that funds raised by the 
i/M testing fees are dedicated to personnel training and to proper maintenance and 
upgrading of the testing equipment and facilities. the bottom line is that, independent 
of public or private operation, adequate testing equipment and staff training, with 
close oversight, is required. 
a third option with respect to i/M program design, which has been tried out in the 
united states, is self-testing. the self-certification program allows proprietors of vehicle 
fleets to perform tests in their own maintenance facilities, as long as the testing and 
repairs are certified to the standards of the state in which the facility is based and results 
are reported to the state (arB, 2014). self-certification is advantageous for vehicle fleet 
operators that have their own facilities and certified technicians and inspectors but also 
requires a robust oversight program. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested