17
Heavy-Duty veHicle inspection anD Maintenance prograMs
regarding size distribution, ruehl and coauthors report that the 1998 engine emissions 
display a unimodal distribution with a peak at 100 nanometers (nm), while the 2010 
engine emissions show a bimodal distribution, with a principal peak identical to that 
of 1998 but at a much lower concentration and a second peak around the 20 nm mark. 
interestingly, particles clustering around the second peak (~20 nm) are composed 
mostly of sulfates.
this change in PM levels and composition is problematic with respect to the soot-based 
PM measurement used in conventional i/M programs. currently, these programs for 
hDVs focus on soot readings using the free acceleration smoke (Fas) test or lug-down 
test, but these tests have difficulty correlating PM emissions from smoke measurements. 
these tests and the corresponding smoke opacity measurement technique were 
developed to detect high emitters that have mechanically controlled engines and no 
after-treatment system. as discussed in the previous section, the relationship between 
smoke and PM emissions under these testing conditions is unclear. 
the problem of low correlation between smoke measurement and PM emissions makes 
the smoke detection method an unreliable option for discovering high emitters of PM. 
Brodrick, et al. (2000) point out that a malfunctioning puff limiter (a device to curtail 
excess smoke) results in a thick, black puff of smoke when the vehicle accelerates, 
but that does not affect emissions under any other operating condition. the defect 
would produce very high readings on the smoke opacity meter under an Fas test 
but little impact under a lug-down test. conversely, a dirty air filter or worn-out fuel 
injector could have a large impact on PM emissions but only a small effect on smoke 
opacity measurements during acceleration. thus, smoke opacity meters may be able 
to detect high smoke emissions under some testing conditions, and caused by certain 
malfunctions, but they are poor indicators of high PM emissions in other circumstances 
or in the case of different kinds of malfunctions. 
Moreover, a review of literature on soot measurement techniques by giechaskiel et al. 
(2013) found that opacity measurements are not suitable for post-1998-model engines 
because the emissions are far below the detection limit. these engines, even without 
DPF, show average opacity values around 3 percent or less, which is close to the opacity 
detection limit. Moreover, tests carried out with cracked DPFs showed that the opacity 
meters were not capable of identifying those with damaged filters.
no
X
emissions, on the other hand, have been historically excluded from i/M programs 
because of the higher testing costs entailed, as these can only be measured through lug-
down tests, with more sophisticated measurement equipment. one of the reasons no
X
cannot be tested with reasonable reproducibility using methods that do not incorporate 
loading is that engine-out no
X
is fairly proportional to engine load (Faiz, Weaver, 
and Walsh, 1996). During Fas testing the loading demands are minimal, resulting in 
meaningless no
X
readings. thus, loaded testing on a dynamometer, or any other means 
to simulate load on the engine, is required to use no
X
measurements as indication of 
engine and emission system condition. 
in the early 2000s, california carried out a pilot program to study an i/M testing reform 
for heavy-duty vehicles (arB, 2003). the concept was focused on reducing excess 
no
X
emissions. During this program, 67 hDVs were tested on a repair-grade chassis 
dynamometer. Most vehicles were in the 1990–2001 certification groups, with no
X
limits 
between 4.0 and 6.0  grams per brake horsepower–hour. results showed that 15 percent 
Add pdf to powerpoint - SDK control API:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Add pdf to powerpoint - SDK control API:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
18
ICCT white paper
of the vehicles tested may have exhibited excess no
X
, with the highest emitter group 
demonstrating no
X
emissions greater than 12 g/bhp-hr. Vehicles with no
X
emission rates 
above 10.0 g/hp-hr (about 1.6–2.4 times their certification standard) were considered to 
be failing the i/M test and were required to undergo repairs. During the pilot, 21 vehicles 
were sent for fixes. testing of repaired vehicles subsequently revealed very small no
X
improvements of around 2.1 percent. overall, the pilot results indicated high costs for 
repairs and only minor emissions benefits. the conclusion of the pilot program was 
that the proposed i/M design was not practical for identification of high no
X
emitters. 
california’s air resources Board decided that alternative testing concepts would be 
needed to move forward with a no
X
screening program for heavy-duty vehicles. (lyons, 
2015; st. Denis and lindner, 2005).
SDK control API:C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control API:VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Add Image to PDF Page in VB.NET. Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document Using XDoc.PDF SDK for VB.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
19
Heavy-Duty veHicle inspection anD Maintenance prograMs
3  ProPosed methods And new develoPments
Most current inspection and maintenance (i/M) programs for heavy-duty vehicles 
were created to target high emissions of particulate matter (PM) for vehicles with 
little or no PM emission control technology. those vehicles, mostly pre–euro ii 
standard (in the european union) or ePa 1998 or earlier (in the united states), emit 
PM with a composition that makes soot sensing the right technology for detecting 
malfunctions. newer vehicles with advanced PM and nitrogen oxides (no
X
) emission 
control technologies, such as common rail fuel injection systems, diesel particulate 
filters (DPFs), and selective catalytic reduction (scr) systems, emit pollutants at 
levels that are more difficult to evaluate with the emission measurement techniques 
of legacy i/M programs. 
this section introduces new methods for identifying high emitters via traditional 
i/M programs and also through complementary programs. traditional i/M programs 
can benefit from new developments with regard to particulate matter and gaseous 
emission measurement systems. improved testing protocols and on-board 
diagnostics (oBD) systems are tools that can be incorporated within the framework 
of existing heavy-duty vehicle (hDV) i/M programs. remote sensing and the on-road 
heavy-duty Vehicle emissions Monitoring system (ohMs) are other technical options 
to extend the tests conducted under hDV i/M programs into the realm of real-world 
driving conditions.
new deVelOpMenTS inVOlVinG pM And nO
X
MeASUreMenT 
eQUipMenT FOr i/M TeSTinG
it was previously noted in this report that opacity readings do not correlate well with 
particulate matter measurements and that no
X
measurements are not covered by the 
large majority of i/M programs. a review of recent pilot projects and studies into better 
instruments for particle measurements under very low emission concentrations (typical 
of DPF-equipped vehicles) and for inspection-grade no
X
measurement reveal that there 
are a handful of measurement devices that can be deployed in hDV i/M programs that 
offer a reasonable trade-off between accuracy and cost. 
the conclusions from the test Diesel (teDDie) project, a joint effort by the european 
commission and the international Motor Vehicle inspection committee (cita) to 
improve diesel vehicle emissions measurement, including i/M testing, suggest that 
there are commercially available instruments for i/M testing with the right technical 
characteristics to measure PM at lower levels than can be measured with current 
opacimeters. under this project, laser light scattering photometry (llsP) instruments 
and a diffusion-charging real-time particle counter were evaluated (text Box 1). 
the three llsP instruments tested present good accuracy at very low and very high 
PM emission concentrations. Moreover, excessive PM emissions can be clearly identified 
with llsP instruments, and their correlation with type-approval emission testing is much 
stronger than what current opacimeters offer. the costs of llsP are similar to those 
of opacimeters. the llsP devices are also easy to handle and require about the same 
amount of training as do opacimeters. it should be noted that a change in the type of 
instrument used would require a corresponding shift in emission limits values and units, 
from smoke density (m
-1
) to milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m
3
).
SDK control API:VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control API:C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
www.rasteredge.com
20
ICCT white paper
the results from teDDie on llsP coincide with an investigation carried out by Parsons 
in 2000, on behalf of the national environment Protection council of australia, aimed 
at improving their i/M testing protocols for diesel vehicles (Parsons, 2001). the authors 
concluded that smoke opacity did not correlate well with PM measurement under local 
chassis testing cycles. in contrast, they deemed that llsP, in conjunction with effective 
vehicle preconditioning techniques, can be an accurate, robust, and reliable method of 
measuring particulate mass and has potential as an effective, low-cost i/M tool.
no
X
measurement instruments for i/M programs are not as developed as PM/soot 
sensors. given that there is no significant market for them at the moment, it is not a 
surprise that literature on this topic is scarce. the teDDie project evaluated some of 
the most promising sensors, and its conclusions and recommendations are summarized 
here. according to the observations, non-dispersive ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy 
(nDuV) is the most suitable technology for nitric oxide (no) and nitrogen dioxide 
(no
2
)—the two components of no
X
—measurement during i/M testing. electrochemical 
cells, similar to those used by no
X
sensors in advanced vehicle aftertreatment systems, 
were also evaluated but were found to be inferior to nDuV’s performance because 
of wide-range calibration issues and instability of measurements. the authors of the 
teDDie report concluded that the nDuV instrument performed well during type-
approval testing and that it was technically suitable for i/M testing, although cost was 
perceived as an obstacle to broad adoption (cita, 2011). 
sensors for Pm And no
x
meAsurement
there are a number of instruments in different stages of development for 
measuring PM, black carbon (Bc), and no
X
. a brief overview of the instruments 
most likely to be applied in advanced inspection and maintenance programs 
(since research groups have found them to be simple, portable, and capable 
of raw exhaust gas measurements) is presented in the following paragraphs. 
Further literature on this area can be found at gautam et al. (2000), cita (2011), 
giechaskiel et al. (2013), and giechaskiel, riccobono, and Bonnel (2014). 
particulate matter and black carbon measurement
one of the most common direct reading instruments is the optical sensor 
(giechaskiel et al., 2013). these instruments read the interactions between 
particles and a light source. opacimeters currently used by i/M programs 
measure the amount of light that is blocked by soot particles (mostly Bc). 
some candidate optical-sensor-type instruments for i/M testing measure light 
scattering, while others use a completely different technique that involves 
particle sizing and distribution.
coNTiNued
SDK control API:C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Sticky Note to PDF Page in C#.NET. Able to add notes to PDF using C# source code in Visual Studio .NET framework.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control API:C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit
allowed to load and view PowerPoint without Microsoft Office software installed, create PDF file, Tiff image and HTML file from PowerPoint, add annotations to
www.rasteredge.com
21
Heavy-Duty veHicle inspection anD Maintenance prograMs
laser light scattering photometry (llSp) 
scattering is the deflection of light in various directions by irregularities in an 
aerosol sample. either halogen light or a laser light source is used to illuminate 
the sample gas. a mirror set at a 90-degree angle to the light source captures 
the scattered light through a sensor. the scattered light received by the sensor 
is dependent on the wavelength of the light source and the particle size. llsP 
is suitable for very low particle concentrations, with measurement ranges of 
0.1–200 mg/m
3
, well below the opacimeter range. (cita, 2011). an evaluation 
of this type of instruments for i/M purposes is available at Durbin t. (2010)
diffusion charge sensors (dCS)
Diffusion charge sensors are designed to measure particle size distribution 
by charging, classifying, and counting the particles. the sample drawn 
from the exhaust pipe moves through a confined space where particles are 
electrostatically charged. the particles enter the measurement chamber, 
which consists of a high-voltage positively charged electrode surrounded by 
electrometers. the particles change their trajectory as a result of repulsion 
forces and end up on the electrometers at different locations depending 
of size. this design allows for continuous measurement of particle size 
and number, and the accuracy depends on the quantity of electrometers 
in the chamber. Dcs is the most likely instrument to be deployed for Pn 
measurements as part of the real Driving emissions regulation in europe. a 
detailed discussion on Dcs and Pn measurement can be found at giechaskiel 
et al. (2014).
nO and nO
2
measurement
several technologies are currently used for no
X
measurement in different 
applications. only nondispersive ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy (nDuV) and 
electrochemical cells have been considered previously for i/M programs (gautam 
et al., 2000; cita, 2010). these two and two other methods, chemiluminescence 
and nondispersive infrared absorption spectroscopy (nDir), are presented here 
for the sake of completeness.
nondispersive ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy (ndUV)
nDuVs operate under the principle that a gas absorbs a particular band 
of wavelength in the ultraviolet spectrum, while it will transmit all other 
wavelengths (gautam et al., 2000). special detectors capture the amount of 
absorption of light energy, and, from that, concentration is inferred. nDuV 
sensors are used in portable emission measurement systems (PeMs) for 
on-road measurements, showing good correlation with laboratory-grade 
instruments (cita, 2011). the advantage of nDuV readings is that they do not 
show cross-sensitivity with water vapor and carbon dioxide.
coNTiNued
SDK control API:C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PowerPoint
load and view PowerPoint without Microsoft Office software installed, convert PowerPoint to PDF file, Tiff image and HTML file, as well as add annotations in
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control API:RasterEdge XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET - SDK for PowerPoint Document
Convert. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Extract, copy and paste PowerPoint Pages. Annotation & Thumbnail. Add and burn annotation to PowerPoint.
www.rasteredge.com
22
ICCT white paper
electrochemical cells
these sensors were developed as a result of fuel cell technology and are 
commonly used to detect oxygen concentration. in these instruments, the 
oxidation of no generates a small electrical current, proportional the amount of 
no present (gautam et al., 2000). the technology was used to develop smart 
no
X
sensors in the 1990s by ngK/VDo (a Japanese electronics manufacturer 
in combination with a german equipment supplier). Widely available now, nox 
sensors with this technology are currently used in all euro Vi and ePa 2010 
heavy-duty vehicles for on-board diagnostics (oBD) functions. 
nondispersive infrared absorption spectroscopy (ndir)
nDir instruments operate under the same principle as nDuV (gautam et 
al., 2000). unfortunately, nDir and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy 
show cross-sensitivity to water vapor, which prevents them for being applied 
in typical i/M testing environments (removing the cross-sensitivity implies 
additional system complexities, which, although technically feasible, increase 
costs) (cita, 2011). nDir analyzers are currently used to measure carbon 
monoxide, carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and some hydrocarbons (gautam et 
al., 2000). 
Chemiluminescence detector (Cld)
the chemiluminescence detector is the standard instrument for measuring 
no and no
2
during type-approval tests (cita, 2011). clD measures the 
light emitted when no reacts with ozone (o
3
). During the reaction, about 10 
percent of the no that is converted to no
2
emits photons, which the clD 
instrument picks up as a proxy for no concentration in the sample gas. For 
no
2
measurement, the no
2
in the sample is dissociated from no and then 
added up to the original no (gautam et al., 2000).
AlTernATiVeS FOr iMprOVinG i/M TeSTinG FOr hdVS
Besides enhancements to current i/M testing, which requires better and more 
representative yet short drive cycles, as well as more accurate and inexpensive gas and 
particle analyzers, there are alternatives that can complement or potentially replace 
traditional i/M methods. these encompass oBD, remote sensing, and the ohMs. 
Changes to i/M protocols
a review of the literature shows that changes to the protocols are closely related to 
the new technologies that are emerging for PM measurement and others directly 
incorporated into vehicles (i.e., use of scr and DPF). 
the teDDie report, which as of the writing of this paper was the best source on new 
developments in the field, suggests that detecting high emissions of PM from older 
and newer vehicles can still be accomplished through Fas testing, by adopting better 
instruments (e.g., llsP) and by changing the pass/fail criteria. the adoption of llsP 
would require additional studies for establishing appropriate vehicle-specific emission 
limits (by age or technology group) as well as instrument calibration and certification 
procedures for the use of llsP within hDV i/M programs (cita, 2011). 
23
Heavy-Duty veHicle inspection anD Maintenance prograMs
the teDDie report concluded that the biggest challenge for current Fas testing with 
respect to no
X
emissions is that scr systems are not warm enough during the test, 
resulting in inconclusive readings. that is, the scr system can be operational, yet the 
low exhaust temperature range does not allow it to function as intended.
this implies that today’s Fas testing would not be suitable for no
X
testing in 
regions following the european standards (e.g., india and china). the alternatives for 
overcoming this problem are either to modify the current vehicle pre-conditioning 
protocol for Fas, to switch to loaded chassis testing (lug-down or australia’s Dt-80), 
or to adopt oBD as part of the inspection. 
On‑board diagnostics
oBD systems monitor the performance of engine and after-treatment components, 
including those responsible for controlling emissions.
6
the oBD system is designed 
to help ensure proper operation of the emission control equipment, alerting the 
driver in case of malfunctions, so as to keep vehicular emissions within certain limits 
during daily use. oBD systems are a valuable tool for vehicle owners and technicians 
since they provide important feedback about maintenance needs and potentially 
urgent repairs. oBD assists in the service and repair of vehicles by providing 
a simple, quick, and cost-effective way to identify problems by retrieving vital 
automotive diagnostics data.
oBD was first introduced to heavy-duty vehicles (hDVs) in 2005 in europe for its euro 
iV standard. the phase-in schedule of carB/ePa oBD requirements started with 
hDVs with a gross vehicle weight rating (gVWr) below 14,000 lbs between 2005 and 
2008 in the united states, as a continuation of technologies developed for lDVs. oBD 
requirements were extended to the heavier categories starting in 2010. 
other countries have adopted hDV oBD requirements following the european 
program model. india instituted oBD rules for its Bharat iV emission standards 
starting in 2013; Brazil has adopted oBD regulations similar to euro iV/V since 2012 
for its ProconVe P-7 hD standards; china requires oBD as part of the china iV hDV 
standard (equivalent to euro iV) since July 2013. a summary global overview of oBD 
systems for hDVs can be found in Posada and Bandivadekar (2015). 
adoption of oBD data for i/M programs can complement inspection measurements 
since oBD directly monitors the systems that affect vehicle emissions. oBD systems 
monitoring covers two main categories: threshold monitoring and nonthreshold 
monitoring. threshold monitoring requirements apply to critical emission control 
systems. the malfunction indicator light (Mil) turns on when sensors detect signals 
likely to lead to emission levels above a specified threshold value, known as oBD 
threshold limits (otl).
7
each emission threshold limit value is related to the vehicle 
emission standard, as a multiplier or as an added value in the case of no
X
. it should 
be noted that european oBD regulations set thresholds only for PM and no
X
, while 
the u.s. oBD requires in addition nonmethane hydrocarbons (nMhc) and carbon 
monoxide (co). nonthreshold monitoring involves functional, and electrical monitoring 
 Definition according to the u.s. environmental Protection agency. 
 some oBD sensors perform direct measurements (e.g., oxygen concentrations), but most rely on lookup 
tables or virtual sensing techniques, which are mathematical model predictions of the target parameter 
based on available inputs (e.g., model-driven “no
X
sensors” predict engine-out no
X
concentrations based 
on engine parameters). 
24
ICCT white paper
of 75–100 signals per engine. this includes tracking of engine and certain after-
treatment components for total failure, ability to reach a particular target, response 
rate to reach the predetermined target, circuit continuity, voltage, current, and many 
more characteristics of each separate system involved in reducing emissions. 
a list of heavy-duty vehicle systems monitored by vehicles compliant with euro iV, V, 
and Vi standards and ePa 2010 are presented in table 4-1. this systems monitored 
cover after-treatment systems (DPF, scr), engine systems (e.g., fuel injectors and 
turbochargers), and other relevant systems (electrical systems and sensors). some 
of the systems are monitored against otls, while others are monitored only for 
functionality issues. thanks to the wide coverage of all the systems involved in 
vehicle emission control, oBD can serve as a tool for observing the mechanical and 
maintenance status of in-use vehicles. 
oBD testing is incorporated into i/M programs during vehicle annual inspections. 
During an oBD test, the mechanic taps into the oBD port on the vehicle and retrieves 
any diagnostic trouble code (Dtc) saved by the system to determine the type and 
status of the fault. (in the event of an emission-related component fault, following 
a systematic trouble code evaluation, a Dtc is stored in the memory of the control 
module responsible for that component, and the malfunction indicator light on the 
dashboard will illuminate to alert the driver of the malfunction.) the Dtc can be 
retrieved using a diagnostics logger or oBD Dtc reader (or scanning tool). currently, 
use of oBD as part of i/M programs for hDVs is limited to ontario in canada and 
oregon in the united states. 
25
Heavy-Duty veHicle inspection anD Maintenance prograMs
Table 3‑1. summary of global hDV oBD monitoring requirements. source: Posada and Bandivadekar, 2015
OBd 
requirement
euro iV/V
Stage 1 and 2
euro Vi
US epA 2010
implementation 
years
2005 and 2008
1
2013–16
1
2010–16
diesel threshold 
monitoring and 
OTl ratios2
no
X
and PM
no
X
(3.2
X
–2.6
X
) and PM (2.5
X
)
no
X
(3.0
X
–2.5
X
), PM (5.0
X
), 
nMhc (2.0
X
), co(2.0
X
)
Catalyst—dOC
removal and major failure
conversion efficiency for 
hydrocarbons
nMhc catalyst conversion; DPF 
heating 
lean nO
X
trap 
(lnT) or nO
X
absorber
conversion efficiency; 
reductant delivery if used 
conversion efficiency—no
X
oBD threshold limits (otl) 
monitoring; reductant delivery 
if used; feedback control
SCr system
conversion efficiency; otl for 
no
X
; major failure (removal, 
electrical failure of sensors and 
actuators)
conversion efficiency—
otl for no
X
; reductant 
delivery (quantity, quality, 
consumption rate)
conversion efficiency—otl 
for no
X
monitoring; reductant 
delivery (quantity, quality, 
consumption rate); feedback 
control
SCr urea system
Monitoring of urea quantity, 
quality, and consumption
Monitoring of urea quantity, 
quality, and consumption
Monitoring of urea quantity, 
quality, and consumption
dpF system
conversion efficiency; oBD 
threshold limits (otl)  for PM; 
major failure (removal, electrical 
failure of sensors, clogged filter)
conversion efficiency
otl 
for PM; major failure (removal, 
electrical failure of sensors, 
clogged filter); regeneration
Filtering performance—PM 
and nMhc  otl monitoring; 
pressure differential; 
regeneration (frequency, 
completion); missing substrate; 
active regeneration (fuel 
delivery); feedback control
Combined 
denO
X
+dpF
conversion efficiency and 
thresholds for no
X
and PM; 
major failure
Fuel systems
Monitoring quantity, timing, and 
circuit integrity
Pressure; quantity; timing; 
control
otl monitoring; pressure; 
quantity; timing; control
Air boost 
systems
Mass air flow; boost pressure 
and inlet manifold pressure
otl monitoring; flow rate; 
response; cooler operation; 
control; Vgt-commanded 
geometry
otl monitoring; flow rate; 
response; cooler operation; 
feedback control; Vgt-
commanded geometry
eGr systems
Monitor for failure conducive 
to exceeding thresholds; no 
explicit mention of egr cooling 
systems
otl for no
X
; flow rate; 
response; egr cooler 
performance
otl monitoring; flow rate; 
response; cooler operation; 
feedback control
Variable Valve 
Timing Systems 
— VVT
not explicit
VVt target and response
PM, nMhc, and co otl 
monitoring; VVt target and 
response
engine cooling 
systems
not explicit
thermostat and total failure
thermostat; engine coolant 
temperature; circuit 
malfunction
Sensors and 
actuators
Monitor for electrical 
disconnection — circuit integrity
Proper operation; voltage; 
circuit integrity; monitoring 
capacity
otl monitoring for exhaust gas 
sensors; performance (voltage, 
current); circuit continuity; 
feedback control; monitoring 
capacity
[1]  For europe, type approval dates; first registration dates start one year later.
[2]  oBD monitors for malfunctions that lead to emissions above oBD thresholds for no
X
, PM, hydrocarbons, and co. the ratios 
are presented as multiple of the corresponding standard (e.g., no
X
2.0
X
means 2.0 times the no
X
standard).
26
ICCT white paper
remote sensing devices
another way to identify high-emitting vehicles is through remote sensing devices 
(rsD) technology. remote sensing consists of a light beam directed through the 
exhaust plume of vehicles passing by. the increment in pollutant concentrations 
relative to the background air is measured and expressed as an instantaneous emission 
factor in the unit grams of pollutant per kilogram of carbon dioxide (co
2
) or fuel. 
speed and acceleration are measured as well, thus connecting the emission factor to 
the driving situation or engine load. a camera captures a picture of the license plate 
to allow linking of the emissions data to vehicle registration information, notably, 
to engine family and model year or emission certification. once the vehicle and the 
owner are identified, if repeated readings exceed high-emitter thresholds, the owner is 
notified for i/M testing. remote sensing devices are common tools to screen lDVs, as 
the technique does not interrupt the flow of vehicular traffic. 
remote sensing has been used for a variety of purposes, including gauging the 
characteristics of the fleet overall, setting compliance limits, and identifying high 
emitters. Because of its potential for quick mass sampling it can be an efficient 
method for high-emitter identification. the use of remote sensing in detecting high 
emitters is known as “dirty screening.” “clean screening” can also be employed, 
whereby remote sensing detects clean vehicles and either waives their i/M tests or 
postpones them for an interval. remote sensing has been used for research purposes 
since this type of emission measurement method can gather large amounts of data 
over years of program application (Borken-Kleefeld, 2013). remote sensing is best 
used in conjunction with roadside inspection practices (usaiD, 2004). 
remote sensing technology is not appropriate as a substitute for an i/M program 
on its own, but the techniques described here can complement and improve the 
efficiency of a well-rounded i/M program. remote sensing has the capacity to 
measure most gaseous pollutants and smoke opacity. rsD has been typically 
deployed to measure co
2
, carbon monoxide (co), hydrocarbons (hc) as propane 
equivalents, no, and opacity as a proxy for PM. the latest remote sensing devices 
also measure no
2
, ammonia (nh
3
), and sulfur dioxide (so
2
) (Borken-Kleefeld, 2013). 
in particular the simultaneous measurement of no and no
2
is highly desirable for 
an accurate determination of total no
X
emissions from diesel vehicles with modern 
after-treatment devices.
an exercise exemplifying the potential of remote sensing was carried out on heavy-
duty vehicles in canada by envirotest. researchers tested 6,000 heavy-duty vehicles 
over a period of 55 days. the measurements were taken at highway weigh stations. 
PM was measured with ultraviolet (uV) opacity instruments calibrated to ultrafine 
particle measurements.
8
regarding fleet characterization, the measurements allowed 
researchers to identify three different sets of vehicle emission groups: 
»
the 2007 and older hDVs, with PM and no
X
emissions respectively ten and six 
times higher than newer models, on a grams per kilogram of fuel basis; 
»
the 2008–2010 hDV group, with markedly lower PM emissions, thanks to DPF use, 
and no
X
emissions similar to the 2007-and-older group. it should be noted that the 
 rsD uses uV light (~230 nanometers) to measure opacity because of its far greater sensitivity to fine particle 
matter than the traditional green light (550nm) used in commercial-grade opacimeters. at that wavelength 
the channel is more sensitive to the particles composing most of the particulate mass emitted by today’s 
diesel vehicles.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested