GOOD GOVERNANCE IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR 
11 
2. Key Principles of Good Governance in the Public Sector 
2.1.  The function of good governance in the public sector is to ensure that entities act in the public 
interest at all times. 
2.2.  Acting in the public interest requires: 
A. 
Strong commitment to integrity, ethical values, and the rule of law; and
B. 
Openness and comprehensive stakeholder engagement.
2.3.  In addition to the requirements for acting in the public interest, achieving good governance in the 
public sector also requires: 
C. 
Defining outcomes in terms of sustainable economic, social, and environmental benefits; 
D. 
Determining the interventions necessary to optimize the achievement of intended outcomes;
E. 
Developing  the  capacity  of  the  entity,  including  the  capability  of  its  leadership  and  the 
individuals within it;
F. 
Managing  risks and  performance through  robust internal control  and  strong public financial 
management; and
G. 
Implementing good practices in transparency and reporting to deliver effective accountability.
2.4.  Figure 1 illustrates how the various principles for good governance in the public sector relate to 
each other.  
And paste pdf to powerpoint - SDK control API:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
And paste pdf to powerpoint - SDK control API:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
GOOD GOVERNANCE IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR 
12 
Figure 1: Relationships between the Principles of Good Governance in the Public 
Sector 
2.5.  The core principles for good governance in the public sector set out above are high level and bring 
together a number of concepts. The following section provides an explanation of the underlying 
rationale, together with supporting commentary, for the key elements of each principle, and 
supporting sub-principle. Each principle section is followed by examples and questions for entities 
to consider in assessing how they live up to the International Framework as well as in developing 
action plans to make necessary improvements.  
SDK control API:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control API:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Page: Extract, Copy, Paste PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Copy and Paste PDF Page. VB.NET DLLs: Extract, Copy and Paste PDF Page.
www.rasteredge.com
GOOD GOVERNANCE IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR 
13 
3. Guidance on Implementing the Good Governance Principles 
3.1.  In order to deliver good governance in the public sector, both governing bodies and individuals 
working for entities must act in the public interest at all times, consistent with the requirements of 
legislation and government policies, avoiding self-interest and, if necessary, act against a perceived 
organizational interest. Acting in the public interest implies a wider benefit to society, which should 
result in positive outcomes for service users and other stakeholders. In its Policy Position Paper, 
Definition of the Public Interest, IFAC defines the public interest as: 
The  net  benefits derived  for,  and procedural  rigor  employed  on  behalf  of,  all  society  in 
relation to any action, decision or policy.
3.2.  IFAC recognizes that differences in culture and ethical systems should be considered in assessing 
whether or not the public interest is being served, especially where institutions are operating 
interna
tionally. It notes that ³interests of the public´ in the broadest sense are all things valued by 
individuals and by society, including rights and entitlements (such as property rights), access to 
government, economic freedoms, and political power. They also include, for example:  
sound and transparent financial and non-financial information and decision making on the 
part of governments and public sector entities to their constituents;  
sound governance and performance management in public sector entities; and  
efficient use of natural resources in the production of goods and services, thereby enhancing 
the welfare of society by their greater availability and accessibility.  
3.3.  This section considers the underlying rationale for each principle and provides supporting 
commentary on the key elements of each principle, expressed through sub-principles. Each 
principle section is followed by examples and questions for entities to consider when assessing 
how they live up to the International Framework as well as when developing action plans to make 
necessary improvements. The section first considers the two principles on acting in the public 
interest: 
A. 
Strong commitment to integrity, ethical values, and the rule of law; and
B. 
Openness and comprehensive stakeholder engagement.
The  additional  five  principles  required  for  achieving  good  governance  in  the  public  sector  are 
covered later in this section.
A.  Strong commitment to integrity, ethical values, and the rule of law 
The public sector is normally responsible for using a significant proportion of national resources 
raised through taxation to provide services to citizens. Public sector entities are accountable not 
only for how much they spend but also for the ways they use the resources with which they have 
been  entrusted.  In  addition,  they  have  an  overarching  mission  to  serve  the  public  interest  in 
adhering to the requirements of legislation and government policies. This makes it essential that the 
entire entity  can  demonstrate the integrity  of all  its  actions  and has  mechanisms  in place  that 
encourage and enforce a strong commitment to ethical values and legal compliance at all levels. 
A1.  Demonstrating integrity 
SDK control API:VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document in VB.NET Project.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control API:C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document.
www.rasteredge.com
GOOD GOVERNANCE IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR 
14 
The governing body should promote a culture where acting in the public interest at all times is the 
norm. It should do this by taking the lead in establishing and living up to specific values for the 
entity and its staff. These values should be easy to communicate and understand. They should be 
over  and  above  minimum  legal  requirements  and  should  build  on  established  principles  for 
behavior  in public  life,  such  as  objectivity,  selflessness,  and  honesty.
7
These  principles  reflect 
public  expectations  about  the  conduct  and  behavior  of  entities,  groups,  and  individuals  who 
manage public service provision and spend public money. 
The governing body should stand as a role model (often referred to as the ³tone
-
at
-
the
-
top´) by 
keeping these values at the forefront of its own thinking and behavior and use them to guide its 
decision making and other actions. The values can also be used to promote a culture of integrity 
and collaboration  throughout  the  entity  through  a  number of mechanisms. These  include  their 
definition  and  communication  through  codes  of  conduct,  frequent  staff  consultation  and 
communication, exemplary behavior, and performance assessment and reward processes.
A2.  Strong commitment to ethical values  
Ethical values and standards should be embedded throughout an entity and should form the basis 
for all its policies, procedures, and actions, as well as the personal behavior of its governing body 
members and other staff. 
Having  a  code  of  conduct  for  governing  body  members  and  staff  is  a  key  element  of  good 
governance. Developing, reviewing,  and communicating a code  that  illustrates what  the  values 
mean in specific circumstances helps to make visible (a) how the entity operates; (b) how it embeds 
its core values, such as by reflecting values in communications, processes, and behavior; and (c) 
how it relates to its key stakeholders. Codes also help reassure stakeholders about the entity¶s 
integrity and its commitment to ethics. 
Conflicts can arise between the personal interests of individuals involved in making decisions and 
the decisions that the governing body or employees need to make in the public interest. To ensure 
continued integrity and avoid public concern or loss of confidence, governing body members and 
staff should take steps to avoid or deal with any conflicts of interest, whether real or perceived. 
Some entities have a separate ethics policy and code of conduct. In such cases, an entity¶s ethics 
policy  typically  sets  out  values  and  principles  while  a  code  of  conduct  outlines  standards  of 
behavior and practices. 
It can be  difficult to measure objectively  factors affecting an entity¶s  performance in leadership, 
ethics,  and  culture,  or  to  identify  ethical  problems  before  they  manifest  in  organizational 
performance.  However,  it  is  important  that  entities  seek  to  understand  and  maintain  their 
performance  in  these  areas. Useful  evaluative  approaches  to  gauge  performance  include staff 
surveys,  performance  appraisals,  administrative  reviews,  and  leadership  self
-
assessments. 
Stakeholders can also provide important feedback on how an entity is performing in leadership, 
ethics, and culture. This can be solicited formally or be received through comments and complaints. 
Complaints  can  form  a  vital  part  of  feedback  and  should  be  handled  and  resolved  efficiently, 
effectively, and in a timely manner so that lessons learned are used to improve the performance, 
both ethical and general, of the entity and its services. 
7
 The Nolan Principles
The Seven Principles of Public Life, www.learn-to-be-a-leader.com/nolan-principles.html  
SDK control API:C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
C#.NET PDF SDK - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in C#.NET. C# Guide C#.NET Demo Code: Copy and Paste Image in PDF Page in C#.NET. This C#
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control API:VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in VB.NET. using RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; VB.NET: Copy and Paste Image in PDF Page.
www.rasteredge.com
GOOD GOVERNANCE IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR 
15 
Whistleblowing processes should also be established whereby individuals or groups are able to 
draw formal attention to practices that are unethical or violate internal or external policies rules or 
regulations  and  to  ensure  that  valid  concerns  are  promptly  addressed.  These  processes  also 
reassure  individuals  raising  concerns  that  they  will  be  protected  from  any  potential  negative 
repercussions.
A3.  Strong commitment to the rule of law 
Fair legal frameworks, enforced on an impartial basis, as well as an independent judicial system 
assist in building societies where individuals and organizations alike can feel safe. They do this by 
affording  legal  protection  for  rights  and  entitlements,  offering  redress  for  those  harmed,  and 
guarding against corruption. 
Public sector entities at all levels may be involved with creating or interpreting laws; such activities 
demand a high standard of conduct that prevents these roles from being brought into disrepute. 
Adhering to the rule of law also requires effective mechanisms to deal with breaches of legal and 
regulatory provisions.
Public sector  entities  and  the  individuals working  within them  should,  therefore, demonstrate  a 
strong  commitment to  the rule of  law as  well as  compliance with  all relevant laws. Within this 
International Framework, they should also strive to utilize their powers for the full benefit of their 
communities and other stakeholders. The rule of law is also a means by which public sector entities 
and individuals within them can be held to account through compliance with any constraints on 
resources voted by the legislature. 
SDK control API:VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
to: create a new PDF file and load PDF from other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy and paste PDF file page.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control API:C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
to: create a new PDF file and load PDF from other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy and paste PDF file page.
www.rasteredge.com
GOOD GOVERNANCE IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR 
16 
Principle A: Examples
Maintaining standards
Entities can establish and maintain standards through codes of conduct, which should be supported by 
training. Standards can be reinforced through individual performance reviews and promoted through a 
system of rewards and sanctions. Individuals should have a clear understanding of the consequences of 
non
-
compliance with the code.
It is good practice for the chief executive and/or chair of the governing body, or equivalents, to certify 
annually, in an annual report or equivalent document, that they are satisfied regarding the adequacy of 
their entity¶s arrangements for safeguarding high standards.
When  commissioning services,  it  is  good practice for  public  sector  entities  to address ethical  issues 
throughout  the  procurement  process.  Contractors  and  others  should  acknowledge  their  ethical 
responsibilities in relation to delivering public services.
Identifying conflicts of interest
The  key  question  that  must  always  be  addressed  is:  whether  a  member¶s  or  official's  duties  or 
responsibilities to a public entity could be affected by some other interest or duty that the member or 
official may have.
It is  important  to  focus on  the  overlap between the  two  interests—that  is,  whether  the member's or 
official's other interest has something to do with the particular matter that is being considered or carried 
out by the public entity.
It is better to err on the side of openness when deciding whether something should be disclosed. Many 
situations are not clear
-
cut. If a member or official is uncertain about whether or not something constitutes 
a conflict of interest, it is safer and more transparent to disclose the interest anyway. The matter is then 
out in the open, and the expertise of others can be used to judge whether the situation constitutes a 
conflict of interest, and whether the situation is serious enough to warrant any further action.
Disclosure promotes transparency,  and  is  always better  than the member or  official  silently  trying to 
manage the situation by themselves. There might also be a perceived conflict of interest that should be 
avoided, wherever possible.
—Extract taken from Managing Conflicts of Interest: Guidance for Public Entities (Office of the Auditor
-
General, New Zealand). The full document is available at www.oag.govt.nz/2007/conflicts
-
public
-
entities.
Principles for whistleblowing
Whistleblowers can play an essential role in detecting fraud, mismanagement, and corruption. However, 
they may  experience bullying  or dismissal from  their  job. To promote responsible  whistleblowing and 
adequate protection for whistleblowers, Transparency International has developed international principles 
for whistleblower legislation, which many countries and international organizations have used to develop 
their  own  legislation  and  standards.  Transparency  International¶s  principles  are  available  at 
www.transparency.org/files/content/activity/2009_PrinciplesForWhistleblowingLegislation_EN.pdf.
GOOD GOVERNANCE IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR 
17 
Principle A: Evaluation Questions
Have risks associated with poor ethical standards been assessed? 
Has the governing body adopted a formal code of conduct defining the standards of behavior to 
which individual governing body members and all employees of the entity are required to subscribe 
and adhere to?
Is the governing body living up to its code of conduct and, thus, setting the right tone for the entity?
Are there any ways in which the behavior of those in governance roles might undermine the entity¶s 
aims and values?
Has  the  governing  body  established  appropriate  mechanisms  to  ensure  that  members  of  the 
governing body and employees are not influenced by prejudice, bias, or conflicts of interest?
Do ethical issues appear regularly on the agenda for governing body meetings?
Does the chief executive (or equivalent) take personal responsibility for the ethical standards in his 
or her entity?
What are the values that staff are expected to demonstrate in their actions and behavior? Are these 
documented and communicated effectively to all staff?
Does the entity have an anti
-
fraud and corruption policy? Is it working effectively?
Do all employees know what to do if they suspect misconduct, fraud, or corruption?
Further reading
Strengthening Governance: Tackling Corruption, The World Bank Group¶s Updated Strategy and 
Implementation Plan, 2012
B.  Openness and comprehensive stakeholder engagement 
Public sector  entities are  run for the public good, so there is a  need  for  openness  about  their 
activities and clear, trusted channels of communication and consultation to engage effectively with 
individual citizens and service users, as well as institutional stakeholders. 
B1.  Openness 
To demonstrate that they are acting in the public interest at all times and to maintain public trust 
and confidence,  public sector  entities should be  as open as  possible about all  their decisions, 
actions, plans, resource use, forecasts, outputs, and outcomes. Ideally, this commitment should be 
documented through a formal policy on openness of information. 
Governing bodies should provide clear reasoning for their decisions. In both their public records of 
decisions  and  in  explaining  them  to  stakeholders,  they  should  be  explicit  about  the  criteria, 
rationale, and considerations on which decisions are based, and, in due course, about the impact 
and consequences of those decisions. They should restrict the provision of information only when 
the wider public interest clearly demands it. 
Such restrictions may be appropriate only in a limited number of situations. These might include 
situations where communicating certain information might endanger national security or adversely 
affect a country¶s relationships with other countries or international entities. There may  also  be 
situations  involving  business  relationships  with  the  private  sector  where  information  cannot be 
freely communicated as it is held in private ownership. Finally, there may be situations concerning 
GOOD GOVERNANCE IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR 
18 
individual citizens—for example when dealing with clients within the social welfare sector—where 
personal integrity would prevent information from being openly available.
B2.  Engaging individual citizens and service users effectively 
The governing body should ensure that the entity has a clear policy on the types of issues it will 
consult or engage the public and service users on in order to ensure that the services provided (or 
other  interventions)  are  contributing  to  the  achievement  of  intended  outcomes.  It  should  also 
ensure that the entity has processes in place to collect and evaluate the views and experiences of 
people and organizations of all backgrounds. Evaluation processes should enable the interests of 
the more vocal stakeholder groups to be balanced with other stakeholders¶ interests to ensure that 
no one group becomes too dominant. In addition, they should also take into account the interests of 
future generations of tax payers and service users (intergenerational equity).
Representative views from, for example, current service users about the suitability and quality of 
existing services are relevant, as are those of both users and non
-
users about their future needs. 
Such views can be expressed through a variety of mechanisms, such as surveys, websites, and 
direct  feedback  from  regular  meetings  with  clients,  as  well  as  referenda  and  elections  in  a 
democratic system. The policy should explain clearly how the entity will use this input in its decision 
making and how it will feed these decisions back to the public and service users.
B3.  Engaging comprehensively with institutional stakeholders 
Few  public sector entities can achieve their intended outcomes solely through their own efforts. 
Public sector  entities also need to  work  with  institutional  stakeholders  to improve services and 
outcomes, or for accountability reasons. Developing  formal and informal partnerships with other 
entities,  both  in  the  public  sector  and  other  parts of the  economy,  allows  entities  to  use  their 
resources more efficiently and achieve their outcomes more effectively. Relationships with other 
entities are particularly important if they serve the same users or communities or if they provide 
complementary or related services.
As a result, public sector entities often have a complex network of different types of relationships 
with other entities, the range and strength of which vary. Some are lateral relationships between 
partners while some are hierarchical relationships, such as those between legislatures and different 
levels  of  government.  For  many  parts  of  the  public  sector,  other  entities—such  as  central 
government—play  a major role in determining policy and resources. Good governance requires 
clarity of purpose, objectives, and defined outcomes for each of these relationships. In particular, 
effective  engagement  with  other  stakeholder  institutions  is  vital  to  the  development  of  defined 
outcomes if these are to be achieved successfully and sustainably.
Additional considerations when working with other public sector entities include:
clearly allocating accountabilities and responsibilities with governance options, including the 
appointment of a lead entity and/or a governing body composed of representatives from the 
lead agency and other involved entities;
working toward a shared objective or outcome, with consideration given to the best way to 
evaluate the effectiveness of joint activities in achieving goals;
specifying clear funding arrangements and ensuring appropriate systems are in place so that 
expenditures against milestones and deliverables can be properly managed; and
GOOD GOVERNANCE IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR 
19 
carefully  considering  and  monitoring  the  risks  facing  each  entity  as  part  of  joint  work, 
particularly any shared risks.
Principle B: Examples
Budget openness
As part of its commitment to government transparency, the government of Indonesia, in association with 
the International Budget Partnership, launched the Open Budget Index (OBI) 2012 survey results for the 
Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) region in February 2013. The event introduced the OBI 
and  its  methodology  and  explored  why  problems may  be  encountered  in  its  implementation.  These 
included  technical  problems  and  those  associated  with  a  lack  of  awareness  regarding  a  right  to 
information on behalf of citizens as well as political sensitivity. Additional details are available in an Open 
Government Partnership blog at
http://blog.opengovpartnership.org/2013/03/budget-openness-stories-from-asean/. 
Stakeholder engagement at Hong Kong Hospital Authority
The Hong Kong Hospital Authority (HA) offers highly subsidized public healthcare services to the Hong 
Kong Special Administrative Region¶s seven million inhabitants. Like other healthcare providers around 
the world, the HA faces limited funding but virtually unlimited demand for medical services. In setting forth 
future  strategies  and  priorities  to  address  this  key  challenge,  HA  formulates  medium
-
term  Strategic 
Service Plans, which  incorporate not only internal stakeholders¶  input from different levels across the 
organization but also the views and concerns of external parties, such as representatives from patient 
groups  and  other  non
-
government  healthcare  organizations.  Being  able  to  accurately  articulate  the 
financial requirements arising from these emerging challenges is, therefore, strategically important to the 
HA for securing funding from the government to sustain its delivery of quality patient care in the long run.
—Adapted from Integrating Governance for Sustainable Success (IFAC, 2012). For additional information, 
see the HA website (www.ha.org.hk).
Boards and commissions
Creating boards, commissions, or advisory groups is an effective way to encourage citizen, user, and/or 
volunteer involvement  in governing a  public  sector entity. At the local  level, boards and commissions 
increase awareness of a government¶s activity among average citizens; cultivate and educate a pool of 
potential  elected  officials;  provide  needed  feedback  and  reality  checks  for  the  governing  body;  and 
provide some of the more detailed and common aspects of governance that allows the elected governing 
board to focus on the more strategic issues.
Cooperation
Receiving refugees and integrating them into society may involve a range of entities—the coast guard, 
police,  customs,  social  welfare  entities,  municipal  entities  for  housing,  labor  market  authorities,  and 
employment offices, hospitals and schools. If efforts to improve integration fail or are inadequate, it can be 
because each entity tries to optimize its own actions with little or no ambition to cooperate with others in 
this complex chain.
GOOD GOVERNANCE IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR 
20 
Principle B: Evaluation Questions
Does the entity have an explicit commitment to openness and transparency in all activities of the 
entity?
What policy/criteria are applied when deciding to keep information confidential?
How well does the entity explain the reasons for its decisions to those who might be affected by 
them?
What is the entity¶s policy on how it should consult citizens and service users? 
Does  the  policy  explain  clearly  the  types  of  issues  it  will  consult  on  and  how  it  will  use  the 
information received?
How does the entity demonstrate its current and future service users are treated fairly?
How does the entity make judgments about the balance between the interests of the community 
and the interests of individual citizens?
Who are the institutional stakeholders that the entity needs to have good relationships with? 
How does the entity ensure that it is able to develop effective relationships with key institutional 
stakeholders at the most senior level?
Does the entity engage in genuine dialogue with its stakeholders, including the media?
What is the level of trust that individual service users, and institutional stakeholders, have in the 
entity?
How are the outcomes measured against the fulfillment of stakeholders expectations?
Achieving good governance in the public sector 
In addition to the requirements in Principles A and B for acting in the public interest at all times, achieving 
good governance in the public sector also requires:
C. 
Defining outcomes in terms of sustainable economic, social, and environmental benefits.
D. 
Determining the interventions necessary to optimize achievement of intended outcomes.
E. 
Developing  the  capacity  of  the  entity,  including  the  capability  of  its  leadership  and  the 
individuals within it.
F. 
Managing risks and performance through robust internal control and strong public financial 
management.
G. 
Implementing  good  practices  in  transparency  and  reporting  to  deliver  effective 
accountability.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested