asp.net core pdf editor : Export pdf into powerpoint application Library utility azure asp.net windows visual studio How%20to%20Use%20Word10-part1394

Creating a Template – The Basics (Part I)
expressed in “How to change the default settings for Word documents.” In particular, it is not a good 
idea to add a header or footer to the Normal template because this will affect the layout of labels.
For this reason it is usually a good idea to leave the Normal template alone (a lot of your settings, such as 
shortcut key assignments and—in previous versions—custom toolbars, will be stored there anyway, so 
that they are available to all templates) and make a custom template for each specific task you routinely do.
How to create a template
There are two basic ways to create a template:
1.  You can start from scratch, selecting New… from the File or Office Button menu and checking the 
radio button for Template instead of Document in the dialog box when you create a new file. 
The above is the author’s personal New dialog, which includes many custom tabs and templates. 
The Installed Templates have been copied to dedicated folders and then uninstalled  
(so as to reduce the number of tabs they require).
l
You can base your template on any existing template, including the Normal template (represented 
in the New dialog by “Blank Document”). If you base a new template on Blank Document (which 
you will find in My templates… in Word 2007), it will not actually be based on the Normal template 
but rather on the default settings (that is, the out-of-the-box Normal template rather than the current 
version with any modifications you may have made).
l
When you save the file, it will automatically be saved as a template, using the filename you assign. 
The default save location will be Word’s Templates folder (or a subfolder you choose). In Word 
2003 or earlier, the file format will be .dot. In Word 2007, the default template format is .dotx, but 
you can also choose .dot (if you want the template to be usable in earlier versions) or .dotm (if it 
contains macros).
2.  You can create a template from a new or existing document. Whenever you have a document that has 
formatting you want to repeat in another document, you can Save As and under “Save as type” 
choose a template format. 
l
In Word 2003 and earlier, the only choice is “Document Template (*.dot).” In Word 2007, you have 
a choice of .dot, .dotx, and .dotm, as described above.
l
In Word 2003 and earlier, the save location will be automatic (as with Method 1). In Word 2007, 
however, the file location is not automatically selected for you. You can save the template 
anywhere, but if you want it to appear in the New Documents dialog, you must save it in the 
Templates folder (accessed via the Trusted Templates link in the Places Bar of the Save dialog)
When you use the first method and base your new template on an existing one (other than Normal), the 
new template will inherit all the macros, custom toolbars or menus, toolbar or menu customizations, 
shortcut key assignments, and AutoText entries or Building Blocks that are stored in that template. Since 
these customizations are not stored in documents based on the template, a template created using the 
second method will not include them. A template created by either method will, however, contain the styles 
and layout of the parent template (though you may choose to modify them).
Note: Unless you have explicitly saved macros, custom toolbars or menus, toolbar or menu 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/Customization/CreateATemplatePart1.htm (3 of 5)10/16/09 5:38 PM
Export pdf into powerpoint - application Library utility:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Export pdf into powerpoint - application Library utility:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Creating a Template – The Basics (Part I)
customizations, shortcut key assignments, AutoText entries, or Building Blocks in a specific document 
template, they will be stored in the global template, Normal.dot or Normal.dotm. This means that they are 
available to all documents, regardless of what document template is attached, so they are not saved in a 
template based on the Normal template.
Another advantage to using the first method in Word 2007 (as noted above) is that Word defaults to the 
Templates folder when you save the template. If you use the second method, you must manually navigate 
to the Templates folder (or other save location).
Using your new template
The next time you choose File | New…  or Office Button | New, you will see the template you have saved. 
In Word 2007, it will be in the Recent Used Templates pane, at least to begin with; you can access it at 
any time from the New dialog that opens when you click on My templates… Double-click on your template 
and you will create a new document that incorporates the page setup, styles, and other formatting you 
have set, along with any boilerplate text you have left in the template.
In the New/Templates dialog, you will see a number of tabs. Except for General, which represents the root 
Templates folder, the labels on the tabs reflect the names of subfolders in the Templates folder. You can 
create additional subfolders of your own, and they will be added as new tabs (in Word 2000 and above, 
you will not see the tabs unless the folders actually contain templates). You can also move files from one 
folder to another, and they will be moved from one tab to another accordingly.
In Word 2000 and above, the installed templates (those that ship with Word) are saved in a different 
location from Normal.dot and user-created templates; you must create new subfolders (tabs) in the folder 
that is assigned for user templates. If you want to add your own templates to one of the tabs that contain 
installed templates, you must create a new subfolder the name of which is exactly the same as the label 
on the dialog tab. For more on this and other template issues, see “Frequently asked questions about 
the location of Word 2002 templates” (this Word 2002 article has links to versions for Word 2000 and 
Word 2003; the Word 2003 article actually covers Word 2007 as well).
Eventually you may get tired of having to go through a menu to access your custom templates, especially 
in Word 2002/2003, where this command opens the New Document task pane. When this happens, you 
can add a button to the Standard toolbar (Word 2003 and earlier) or QAT (Word 2007) to provide direct 
access to your templates:
l
Word 97 and 2000: Open Tools | Customize and select the Commands tab. In the File category, 
select the New…  command and drag it to the Standard toolbar. This button will run the FileNew 
command, which opens the New dialog, as contrasted with the existing New button, which runs the 
FileNewDefault command, which creates a new document based on Normal.dot. Since the button 
icons are identical, you may want to use the button image editor to modify one of them (right-click 
on the button and choose Edit Button Image), or, if you will be using your own templates most of 
the time, you may just want to drag the New button off the toolbar (you can still use Ctrl+N to 
create a new Blank Document).
l
Word 2002 and 2003: The process is similar to that for Word 97 and 2000 except that the New…  
command opens the New Document task pane. You must therefore select the All Commands 
category and locate the FileNewDialog command. Because this command  has no button image, 
when you drag it to a toolbar, it will have a text label: Other…  If you want to use the button image 
from the New button, right-click on it and choose Copy Button Image, then right-click on the 
Other… button and choose first Default Style…, then Paste Button Image. Again, you may want to 
edit this image or remove the New button.
l
Word 2007: In Office Button | Word Options | Customize, there are several “New” buttons you 
can add to the QAT, and they are somewhat confusingly labeled. If you select All Commands in 
the Customize dialog, you will see all four of them: New, New…, New Blank Document, and New 
Document or Template. “New” and “New Blank Document” both run the FileNewDefault command, 
creating a new Blank Document (based on Normal.dotm). “New…” opens the New Document 
dialog you get if you use Office Button | New. And “New Document or Template” takes you directly 
to the classic New dialog (accessed via My templates…  in the New Document dialog) that 
displays both the installed templates and your custom templates in the classic tabbed New dialog.
Templates and styles in Word are your strongest allies in making creation of customized documents easy 
and straightforward. Note that when you add AutoText or Building Blocks or create customized toolbars or 
macros or keyboard shortcuts, you can choose whether to store them in the Normal template or in the 
template on which a given document is based. This allows you to have certain tools restricted to a given 
template, without cluttering up documents for which they are not suitable. The more you explore Word's 
capabilities, the more you will learn to do.
For more about the creation and use of styles in templates, see John McGhie's article Creating a 
Template (Part II).
Note: I am indebted to Office MVP Beth Melton for technical editing and many useful suggestions that 
improved the flow of this article. The many flaws that remain are entirely my own fault (and due to my 
ignoring her advice).
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/Customization/CreateATemplatePart1.htm (4 of 5)10/16/09 5:38 PM
application Library utility:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
By integrating XDoc.PDF SDK into your C#.NET project, Microsoft Office like Word, Excel, and PowerPoint can be converted to PDF document.
www.rasteredge.com
application Library utility:C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value. value, The char wil be added into PDF page, 0
www.rasteredge.com
Creating a Template – The Basics (Part I)
Send all feedback to word@mvps.org  
Top  - Ctrl+Home
Previous - Alt+left arrow
Page Updated: 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/Customization/CreateATemplatePart1.htm (5 of 5)10/16/09 5:38 PM
application Library utility:VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: PDF Export. You may directly copy and paste it into your vb.net testing project. Conversion of PDF to Jpeg. Conversion of MS Office to PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
application Library utility:C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Able to export PDF document to HTML file. It's easy to be integrated into your C# program and convert PDF to .txt file with original PDF layout.
www.rasteredge.com
Creating a Template (Part II)
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ Site
Home 
Site Map 
Word:mac 
FAQ 
Tutorials 
Downloads 
Find Help 
Suggestions 
Links 
About Us 
Search
Creating a Template (Part II)
Article contributed by John McGhie
Word version of this article downloadable here 
This article can be downloaded as a Word document plus its template. If you save them to the same directory as 
each other, the document will retain its link to the template. The downloadable zip file is 75k.
As well as being more printer-friendly than the web version, the document and template also allow you to see the 
principles preached in this article being put into practice. 
See also Creating a Template – The Basics (Part I)
Using Templates
A template is a repository for things you want to use frequently and for complex things that you want to do only once. In 
normal use, this means Layouts, Styles, Tool Bars, AutoText Entries and Macros.
This article tells you how to create a template to produce a software manual.  That's because:
l
That is what I do for a living so I will know what I am talking about (sort of…);
l
Such a template contains all the things you will need to produce any other kind of document;
l
I happen to have one lying around here that I can give you to download;
l
It's the template I used to produce this document, so you can download an example as well.
Mine is set up for metric A4 paper. If you change the paper size, you will have to change everything (and I mean 
“everything”) else as well. Sorry about that.
I am going to give all dimensions in metric units (except font sizes!). You may want to change your settings to metric now. 
That way you can use the dimensions I specify. At the end, you can change back to Imperial if you wish, and Word will 
convert everything into that measure for you. To do this got to Tools>Options>General and set “Measurement Units” to 
Centimetres.
Technical writers love to specify commands and dialog boxes very precisely; and even show you a screen shot of the dialog 
box. I can't do that here because I am writing to cover nine versions of Word. This was actually written on a beta version of 
Word 2004. If you work with me, you will find everything I mention in Word 6, Word 95, Word 97, Word 98, Word 2000, Word 
X, Word XP (Word 2002), Word 2003 and Word 2004. You may have to look for some things: things move around in the user 
interface from version to version.
I guess we should recognise that according to Microsoft's research, “normal” users do not use or even know about 
templates. When Word comes out of the box, it is set up to cater for users who do not understand word processing.
Word is set up to enable the simplest fastest way to produce a document if you have no idea of what you want or what you 
are doing. If you were in that state, you wouldn't be reading this. So this article assumes you are in a workplace, where you 
adhere to a Style Guide and a Formatting Specification. A Template is the repository that stores all the specifications and 
choices that implement your Style Guide and Formatting Specification.
It's also the place where you put all the things you use that are fiddly to create or required to conform exactly to specification.
Always change formatting with Format>Style. I may sometimes forget to say so, in which case please remember it for me! 
There is only one time in this whole exercise that you can apply direct formatting. Anywhere else, it's a total waste of time: 
remember: for most users, the only thing they can ever access in a template is the styles. If the settings are not in the styles, 
they're pointless.
By the end of this exercise, you will realise that Word's default settings are all designed for the knee-cap-level user, and that 
we have to spend a lot of time undoing them. {Begin Political Rant} I hereby give you permission to think unkindly of the 
Product Marketing Department, which took the world's finest word processor and ruined it in order to reinforce the 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/Customization/CreateATemplatePart2.htm (1 of 2)10/16/09 5:38 PM
application Library utility:C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Merge several images into PDF. Insert images into PDF form field.
www.rasteredge.com
application Library utility:VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add file. Insert images into PDF form field in VB.NET. An
www.rasteredge.com
Creating a Template (Part II)
misconceptions of people who should not be left unsupervised with a pencil!!! {end political rant}. 
Creating a Template
So: start Word, allow the default blank document to load, and choose File>Save As. Change the “Save as Type” box to 
“Document Template (.dot)”.
This is where Microsoft gives new users their first hint that they're getting in too deep. As soon as you change the Type to 
Template, you are dumped into your User Templates folder (although you can then change the path if you want to). There 
are good reasons for this. The first is that Word needs to know where this thing is so it can offer it to you when you need it; 
the second is that in this location word can take extra care that macro viruses do not try to add anything nasty to it.
At the moment, the document is still a copy of your Normal.dot template. Give it a file name and save it. Make the file name 
long and descriptive. It doesn't matter that it is long: you will never have to type it. You will do yourself a favour if you follow 
some kind of naming convention. I suggest “<Company Name> A4 Manual.dot” Adding your company name is really nice 
when you come to deal with a lot of templates. Specifying the paper size is goodness too: you are likely to end up with a 
series of templates for different paper sizes: it's nice to keep them together. You do not have to type the “.dot” bit: Word will 
add it for you.
So far, it appears that nothing has changed: you still appear to be looking at a copy of your Normal.dot (and you are). Behind 
the scenes, Word has made some critically important changes: the file now has a different internal structure, and it has 
gained extra objects to store things that documents cannot (or should not) contain.
Table of contents
File Properties/Printer
Paper size
Styles
Other things
Send all feedback to word@mvps.org  
Top  - Ctrl+Home
Previous - Alt+left arrow
Page Updated: 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/Customization/CreateATemplatePart2.htm (2 of 2)10/16/09 5:38 PM
application Library utility:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Divide PDF File into Two Using C#. This is an C# example of splitting a PDF to two new PDF files. Split PDF Document into Multiple PDF Files in C#.
www.rasteredge.com
application Library utility:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
from the ability to inserting a new PDF page into existing PDF or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Bmp, Jpeg
www.rasteredge.com
How can I recover a corrupt document or template - and why did it become corrupt?
l
Up to Word Application Errors
l
Errors affecting entire 
application 
m
Problems opening Word
m
Re-registering Word
m
Resetting menus and toolbars
m
Insufficient memory errors
m
Why is my “Blank 
Document” not blank?
m
My drop-down menus crawl 
down very slowly
m
Files opened for editing are 
read-only
m
Delete (or Backspace) 
doesn't work
m
Some of the tabs in Tools | 
Options look strange
m
Equation Editor error 
messages
m
Mail merge unavailable after 
using the Find Record feature
m
Word insists on asking “Open 
as read-only?”
m
Switching view hides the 
currently selected heading
m
Frequently encountered 
problems with fonts
m
Word shows only one or two 
fonts in its font list
m
Forcing the Task Pane visible
How can I recover a corrupt document 
or template – and why did it become 
corrupt?
Article contributed by 
Dave Rado and 
John McGhie
The advice in this article applies to all versions of Word, 
including those for the Macintosh.
Why do documents corrupt?
If you use any of the following features, your documents are likely 
to corrupt: Master Documents, Nested Tables, Versions, Fast 
Saves, Document Map, and saving to a floppy. For more on 
these, see: 
Tips and “Gotchas”.
In addition, saving when resources are low can cause corruptions. 
If you notice Word start to slow down noticeably it's always best to 
quit and restart Word immediately; to close any other applications 
that are open; and to clear the clipboard, by selecting any 
character and copying it.
Other signs that you are low on resources: fonts suddenly not 
displaying properly; the wrong application icons appearing on 
your Desktop or in Windows Explorer (e.g. Word's icon appearing 
where Excel's should be). If you get these symptoms, restart 
Windows immediately.
A corrupt printer driver can corrupt memory; and if you then save, 
this can corrupt the document. Symptoms: Word often crashes 
when printing (cure: reinstall the driver).
A corrupt template will corrupt any new documents based on it. A 
corrupt Normal.dot template is especially bad -- it spreads its evil 
almost like a virus to almost every new document you create.
If you create list numbering using the Format + Bullets and 
Numbering dialog, this is likely to lead to a corruption arising 
eventually, especially if you also have the “Automatically update 
document styles” checkbox ticked on the Tools + Templates 
and Addins dialog (less of a problem with Heading numbering 
than other types).
Word HomeWord:mac Word General TroubleshootTutorialsAbout 
UsContact
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/AppErrors/CorruptDoc.htm (1 of 5)10/16/09 5:39 PM
How can I recover a corrupt document or template - and why did it become corrupt?
m
Table borders won’t print
l
Individual document errors 
m
“Page X of Y” displays or 
prints as “Page 1 of 1
m
Formatting applied to one 
paragraph affects the entire 
document
m
Whenever I open a 
document all my formatting 
is gone
m
Text at the top of the page is 
unaccountably indented
m
GoBack (Shift+F5) doesn't 
work in some newly-opened 
documents
m
Mirror margins don't work in 
a multisection document 
m
Recovering a corrupt 
document or template
m
Recovering a Master 
Document
m
Word is always making 
changes I don't expect
m
Graphics have turned into 
red X's
m
Graphics keep reverting to 
their original size
m
Captions don't update and 
don't appear in Table of 
Figures
m
Graphics don't appear or 
won't print
m
Positioning floating objects
A bad sector on your hard disk can corrupt a document saved to 
that sector. Make sure you run Scandisk regularly. Running 
Defrag regularly will also help reduce the chances of running low 
on resources. Encourage users to save to the network. Make 
regular backups.
Where are corruptions stored?
Corruptions are usually, but not always, stored in Section Breaks. 
The final 
paragraph mark in a document contains a hidden 
Section Break, so in a single-section document, corruptions tend 
to be stored in the final paragraph mark.
Corruptions can also be stored in any paragraph mark in a 
document; or in an end-of-cell or end-of-row marker within a table; 
or in a bookmark. (Corrupt bookmarks are very rare in Word 97 
and above, unless you have been using EndNote).
If you find that certain commands such as Edit>Find don't work 
within a certain table, that table is probably corrupt.
If you find text mysteriously disappearing and reappearing as you 
page down past a particular paragraph, that paragraph's 
paragraph mark is likely to be corrupt (see the section on fixing 
corrupt templates).
How can I fix a corrupt document?
If you have been using Master documents, see 
How to recover a 
Master Document.
If all new documents based on a certain template are showing 
symptoms of corruption, the template they are based on is almost 
certainly corrupt.
Otherwise:
If using Word 2000 or Above:
Select File + Save As Web page, quit Word, reopen the htm file 
and save it back in Word format – that usually (but not always) 
gets rid of corruptions. The HTML/XML format forces Word to 
completely re-create the internal structure of the document, either 
fixing or discarding the corrupt bits when it does.  Best of all, in 
the case of Word 2000 and above, almost all of the formatting and 
page layout is preserved.
Please note: to preserve your formatting, you must select the 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/AppErrors/CorruptDoc.htm (2 of 5)10/16/09 5:39 PM
How can I recover a corrupt document or template - and why did it become corrupt?
m
Floating objects in tables are 
wrongly aligned vertically
m
Linked floating graphics 
don't show up in Edit Links
m
Layout changes on a 
different computer
m
{ =SUM(ABOVE) } answer 
was obviously incorrect
m
Spelling and Grammar is 
greyed out
m
Mail merge field names have 
an underscore appended to 
them
l
Macros/VBA/VB errors 
m
“Invalid Page Fault” when 
running a macro
m
“Microsoft Forms: Could not 
load an object”
m
“Undefined Variable” – Mid, 
Left, Right not working
m
Problem running a UserForm 
from an Autoexec macro
m
Word 2000 can't be made 
visible, and/or doesn't 
trigger a Close Event
m
When users starts Word they 
activate a previously created 
instance
m
Paragraph borders lost when 
printing from a VBA macro
m
Toolbars not showing when 
automating Word
m
All other UserForm controls 
plain Save As "Web Page" option, not the Save As Web Page 
(Filtered).  If you use the Filtered option, you remove from the 
document all the formatting that an HTML browser cannot 
interpret: for example, page numbers and headers and footers!
If that doesn't fix it, the fixes described below apply.
If using Word 97 or above:
1.  If you have isolated the corruption to a particular table, 
either:
m
Paste the table into Excel; delete the Word table; paste 
the Excel table back into Word, select the new table 
(Alt+Double-click), press Ctrl+Spacebar to remove 
the manual formatting, and reformat the table, or:
m
Select Table + Convert Table to Text, select the text 
that results, and select Table + Convert Text to 
Table. This has the advantage that you lose much less 
formatting than using the Excel method, but the 
disadvantage that if a corruption is stored in a 
paragraph mark within the table, it will remain.
2.  If the table contains horizontally merged cells, it's best to 
recreate a few rows at a time – for instance, if using method 
(b), then after converting the table to text, select contiguous 
rows that have equal numbers of columns, convert them to 
a table, and keep doing this until you have converted all the 
text to individual tables (which will automatically merge 
themselves into a single table).
3.  If you have isolated the corruption to a particular paragraph, 
select the text in the paragraph, but be careful not to select 
the paragraph marker (the paragraph marker is a property 
container, and that's where the corruption is stored). Paste 
into a new document. Delete the corrupt paragraph. Paste 
back from the new document to the old one.
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/AppErrors/CorruptDoc.htm (3 of 5)10/16/09 5:39 PM
How can I recover a corrupt document or template - and why did it become corrupt?
disabled after displaying a 
message box
4.  You can try saving as RTF, closing Word, reopening the 
RTF file and saving back as a Word document. 
Unfortunately, Word's RTF format is similar enough to 
Word's native format to preserve most corruptions.
5.  If that doesn't work, delete any Section Breaks using 
Find 
and Replace, then Select All (Ctrl+A), de-select the final 
paragraph mark (Shift + Left arrow ), copy, and paste into a 
new document. Then close the corrupt document and save 
the new one, overwriting the old one (in that order). Finally, 
log out or restart your operating system  before doing 
anything more (because document corruptions can corrupt 
memory).
6.  If even that doesn't work, try saving in Word 2 format if you 
have this option (the Word 2 converter is no longer offered, 
but if you have upgraded from a previous version, you will 
still have it). Unfortunately, you will lose an awful lot of 
formatting if you do this, though.
7.  If even that doesn't work, select File + Open, set the “Files 
of type” list box to “Recover Text from Any File”, and 
open the corrupt document. Delete the gobbledygook at the 
end. You'll lose all of your formatting leaving only the text.
Note that the “Recover Text from Any File” setting is “sticky”. In 
Word versions prior to 2002, you must immediately select File + 
Open again, change the  “ Files of type” setting back to “Word 
Document” and open another document, while you remember.  If 
you forget, every file you open will have no formatting, and if you 
save it in this condition, it's gone forever.  See 
Whenever I open a 
document using File Open all my formatting is gone, and there is 
garbage at the end).
How can I fix a corrupt template?
The best strategy is to keep a backup, macro-free version of all 
your templates. Then if a template become corrupt, you can copy 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/AppErrors/CorruptDoc.htm (4 of 5)10/16/09 5:39 PM
How can I recover a corrupt document or template - and why did it become corrupt?
any macros over to a copy of the backup template using the 
Organizer and you're back in business.
If you haven't done that, though, and if your template contains any 
macros, you could try running the 
VBA Code Cleaner.
If that doesn't fix it, recreate the template from scratch. If you want 
to copy the content from the corrupt template to the new one, 
follow the same steps as for fixing a corrupt document. It may be 
worth creating the new template based on a “virgin ” copy of 
Normal.dot, just in case Normal.dot is also corrupt. With Word 
closed, rename your existing Normal.dot file and restart Word; a 
new copy of Normal.dot will automatically be created.
One more thing; under Tools + Options + Save, turn on the 
checkbox which says “Prompt to save Normal template”, if it 
isn't switched on already (unfortunately, it is switched off by 
default). The only time you should ever save Normal.dot is when 
you have knowingly made a change to it that you want to save. 
Then you should save it by holding the Shift key down and 
selecting File + Save All. And be sure never to save Normal.dot 
when resources are low (see: 
Why do documents corrupt?).
Allowing Word to save Normal.dot whether you've consciously 
made changes to it or not, is OK in versions of Word later than 
Word 97/98.
Terms of Use
Disclaimer
Privacy Statement
Contact 
Site MapPage Last Updated: Mar 08, 2008
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/AppErrors/CorruptDoc.htm (5 of 5)10/16/09 5:39 PM
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested