asp.net core pdf editor : Convert pdf document to powerpoint software control cloud windows azure .net class How%20to%20Use%20Word12-part1397

How to add pop-up lists to any Word document, so you can click your way through changes in seconds
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ Site
Home 
Site Map 
Word:mac 
FAQ 
Tutorials 
Downloads 
Find Help 
Suggestions 
Links 
About Us 
Search
How to add pop-up lists to any Word 
document, so you can click your way 
through changes in seconds
Or how to use the AutoTextList field
Article contributed by Bill Coan 
Background
Do you re-use some of your documents over and over again, making slight changes just 
before you print, fax, or email it each time? Do you, for example, send the same basic letter to 
each new customer, but edit the letter each time so that it refers to the specific product 
purchased by that customer?
Starting with Word 97, there's an easy way to add a pop-up list of choices to any Word 
document. This new feature lets you point at a word or phrase and simply right-click the 
mouse to switch to some other word or phrase.
For years Word has been able to do something similar with drop-down form fields, but many 
users chafe at the limitations imposed by form fields. For example, form fields require that 
documents be protected for forms, which means you have to sacrifice spellchecking, drawing 
tools, and text formatting. That's quite a penalty to pay, just so you can choose an item from a 
list!
In Word 97 and above, you can sidestep this penalty by relying on a new feature called the 
AutoTextList field. Before I show you how easy it is to use this new field, I need to provide 
some background about AutoText entries and paragraph styles, for users who haven't 
explored these items.
Important! If you're already familiar with AutoText entries and paragraph styles, or if you're 
not interested in “looking under the hood,” feel free to skip over these background items and 
jump right into the procedure that follows.
Background Item #1 
AutoText entries are snippets of text and/or graphics that can be added to your document by 
choosing the desired entry from the AutoText toolbar. (To display this toolbar, right-click any 
other toolbar and choose AutoText.)
Background Item #2 
Word's default global template, normal.dot, ships with numerous AutoText entries but you can 
create additional entries and store them in normal.dot or in any other template desired.
Background Item #3 
Paragraph styles are collections of paragraph properties that can be applied to a paragraph 
by clicking in that paragraph and then choosing the desired style from the dropdown list of 
styles on the Formatting toolbar. You can create new paragraph styles and store them in 
normal.dot or in any other template or document desired.
Background Item #4 (the kahuna) 
What few users realize is that Word organizes its AutoText entries by paragraph style. For 
example, if you click in a paragraph that has been styled as “Product Name,” Word's 
AutoText toolbar will automatically display only those AutoText entries that have been 
designated as Product Names (assuming there are any). The AutoTextList field has this same 
ability, except that it pops up the list of Product Names when you point at the field in your 
document and click the right mouse button.
OK, the procedure
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/TblsFldsFms/AutoTextList.htm (1 of 3)10/16/09 5:40 PM
Convert pdf document to powerpoint - control SDK platform:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf document to powerpoint - control SDK platform:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
How to add pop-up lists to any Word document, so you can click your way through changes in seconds
Ready to create your first pop-up list? Don't be intimidated by the number of steps. Each step 
involves just one or two mouse clicks and all 13 can be completed in less than five minutes. 
Besides, you only have to do this procedure once for each list and then you can use each list 
over and over again as needed.
Before you begin, you may want to print out this procedure to guide you along the way.
Create a pop-up list of products
1. On the Standard toolbar, click the tool to display paragraph marks if not already displayed. 
2. Position the cursor in an empty paragraph.
3. From the dropdown list of styles on the Formatting toolbar, choose the Normal style if not 
already chosen.
4. Type your list of products, pressing <Enter> after each product name.
5. With your mouse, select the entire list of products.
6. Click in the Styles box on the Formatting toolbar, type ProductStyle and press <Enter>
to create the new style: 
(Alternatively you can go to Format | Style | New, but that's more long-winded).
7. Highlight each individual product name (being very careful not to highlight the paragraph 
mark after the name) and press Alt+F3 and hit OK.
8. Delete the list of products and again choose the Normal paragraph style if not already 
chosen.
9. Press Ctrl+F9 to insert a pair of field braces. { }
10. Type the following expression between the field braces exactly as shown:
{ AutoTextList "product" \s "ProductStyle" \t "Right-click to select product" }
11. With the cursor still between the braces, press F9 to update the field (If this fails to hide 
the field code, press Alt+F9 to hide the code.)
12. With your mouse, select the new field, being careful not to select the paragraph mark (¶) 
that follows the field.
13. Press Alt+F3 and hit OK
Insert a product list in your document
1. Click where you want the list to appear.
2. Start typing “product”; if Word offers to complete the typing for you, press Enter or Tab to 
accept the autocompletion. If Word doesn't offer to complete the typing for you, select 
“product” and press F3.
Pop up the product list
1. Point at “product” and click the Right mouse button.
2. Choose the desired product. 
How it works
The secret to the AutoTextList field is in the field code, repeated here for ease of reference:
{ AutoTextList "product" \s "ProductStyle" \t "Right-click to select product" }
Here's what each element of the code means:
AutoTextList
This is the field type. This particular type of field creates a pop-up list.
"product"
This is the field's default value. After the field is created, this value 
will be replaced when you right-click the field and select a different 
value.
\s "ProductStyle"
This tells the field that you want the pop-up list to display only those 
AutoText entries that were formatted with the ProductStyle.
\t "Right-click to 
select product"
This tells the field to display a specific tooltip when the mouse pauses 
over the field.
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/TblsFldsFms/AutoTextList.htm (2 of 3)10/16/09 5:40 PM
control SDK platform:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
try to make it as easy as possible to convert your PPTX C#.NET project, Microsoft Office like Word, Excel, and PowerPoint can be converted to PDF document.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:RasterEdge XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET - SDK for PowerPoint Document
Convert. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Convert PowerPoint to Png, Gif, Bitmap Convert PowerPoint to ODP/ ODP to PowerPoint. Document & Page Process.
www.rasteredge.com
How to add pop-up lists to any Word document, so you can click your way through changes in seconds
Additional tips for advanced users
If you rely on different templates for different types of documents, make sure you're editing 
a template when you complete the procedure described above. At Step 7 and against Step 
13, instead of pressing Alt+F3, choose Insert |AutoText | AutoText.... and then set the 
LookIn list to your specific template and click Add.
Don't delete the paragraph style created in Step 6. If you do, your AutoTextList field will 
display all of your AutoText entries, not just the ones of the designated style.
In Step 7, if you include the paragraph mark that follows the product name, the resulting 
AutoText entry will be inserted into your document with a paragraph mark and the entry will 
be formatted with the Style created in Step 6. For most users, this is not desirable, but if 
this is what you want, by all means go ahead and include the paragraph mark.
To make it easier to see the lists embedded in a document, set Field Codes to be shaded 
Always. To do this, choose Tools|Options|View|FieldCodes|Always.
To navigate from field to field with the keyboard press F11. To navigate backward from 
field to field, press Shift+F11.
To popup the shortcut menu when the cursor is on an AutoTextList field, press Shift+F10.
If you don't like the "Create Autotext..." command that appears at the bottom of the popup 
menu, Choose Tools | Customize | Toolbars | Shortcut Menus | Text | AutoTextListField 
and drag the command from the menu to delete it, then click OK.
Send all feedback to word@mvps.org  
Top  - Ctrl+Home
Previous - Alt+left arrow
Page Updated: 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/TblsFldsFms/AutoTextList.htm (3 of 3)10/16/09 5:40 PM
control SDK platform:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Embed zoom setting (fit page, fit width). Free library for .NET framework. Why do we need to convert PDF document to HTML webpage using VB.NET programming code?
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
How to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to HTML5 Files in C#.NET Class. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
www.rasteredge.com
Creating a macro with no programming experience using the recorder
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ Site
Home 
Site Map 
Word:mac 
FAQ 
Tutorials 
Downloads 
Find Help 
Suggestions 
Links 
About Us 
Search
Creating a macro with no programming 
experience using the recorder
Article contributed by Bill Coan 
Word's macro recorder can help you acquaint yourself with macros and with Office 97's vba 
programming language. 
Let's assume that you create several documents from scratch on a daily basis. After 
composing the text, you press Ctrl+Home to position the cursor at the start of the document. 
Then you click the Center tool on the Formatting toolbar to center the first paragraph of your 
document. Eventually, it occurs to you that you should be able to record a macro for these last 
actions. That is, a macro that will automatically position the cursor at the start of the document 
and center the first paragraph. 
Technically, this scenario may call for a solution involving paragraph styles. But for now let's 
create a macro solution and let's use the macro recorder to create it. 
Proceed as follows:  
1. Choose Macro|Record New Macro on the Tools menu (or simply double-click  
the REC button in the Status bar.) 
2. Enter a macro name (sorry, no spaces or punctuation allowed). 
3. Click the Assign Macro To Keyboard button. 
4. Press Ctrl+F8, then click Assign and click Close. Word will display the Stop Recording 
toolbar, which lets you know that Word is recording your actions and will continue 
recording them until you click the Stop Recording button on this toolbar. (Don't click it 
yet!) 
5. Press Ctrl+Home to position your cursor at the start of your document. 
6. Click the Center tool on the Formatting toolbar. 
7. Click the Stop Recording tool on the Stop Recording toolbar. 
8. Open some other document. 
9. Position the cursor in the middle of the document (doesn't matter where). 
10. Press Ctrl+F8. 
11. Smile with satisfaction as Word moves the cursor to the start of the  
document and centers the first paragraph. 
So far, so good. Now to see what the macro looks like under the hood:  
1. Choose Macro|/Macros on the Tools menu. 
2. Select the macro that you just created. 
3. Click Edit. 
Word will open up the vba editor and display something like the following macro: 
Sub MyFirstRecordedMacro()  
'  
' MyFirstRecordedMacro Macro  
' Macro recorded 10/31/98 by Elgin  
'  
Selection.HomeKey Unit:=wdStory  
Selection.ParagraphFormat.Alignment = wdAlignParagraphCenter  
End Sub 
4. To learn more about the code, position the cursor somewhere in Selection.HomeKey and 
press F1 to view a related help topic. 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/MacrosVBA/UsingRecorder.htm (1 of 2)10/16/09 5:40 PM
control SDK platform:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Convert PDF document to DOC and DOCX formats in Visual Basic .NET project. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Convert PDF to Word Document in VB.NET Demo Code.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
NET. How to Use C#.NET XDoc.PDF Component to Convert PDF Document to Various Document and Image Forms in Visual C# .NET Application.
www.rasteredge.com
Creating a macro with no programming experience using the recorder
5. Close the help window and repeat Step 4 with the cursor in other locations. 
6. On the vba editor File menu, choose Close and Return to Microsoft Word. 
If you have the patience to try these steps, you'll be well on your way. The rest is just details. 
There are lots of them but you can always search the vba help system and return to the 
newsgroups for additional information.
Send all feedback to word@mvps.org  
Top  - Ctrl+Home
Previous - Alt+left arrow
Page Updated: 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/MacrosVBA/UsingRecorder.htm (2 of 2)10/16/09 5:40 PM
control SDK platform:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Convert Word to PDF; Convert Excel to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to PDF; Convert Image to PDF; Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to TIFF Using VB in VB.NET. Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF in Visual Basic Class.
www.rasteredge.com
Running a macro automatically when Word starts or quits
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ Site
Home 
Site Map 
Word:mac 
FAQ 
Tutorials 
Downloads 
Find Help 
Suggestions 
Links 
About Us 
Search
Running a macro automatically when Word 
starts or quits
Article contributed by Dave Rado 
To run a macro when Word starts  
In a Global template, if you write a macro called AutoExec, it will automatically run when you 
launch Word. 
To run a macro when Word quits  
In a Global template, if you write a macro called AutoExit, it will automatically run when you 
quit Word. 
See also the article: Writing application event procedures
Send all feedback to word@mvps.org  
Top  - Ctrl+Home
Previous - Alt+left arrow
Page Updated: 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/MacrosVBA/ApplicationEvents.htm10/16/09 5:41 PM
control SDK platform:C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET
C# Demo: Convert PowerPoint to PDF Document. Add references: RasterEdge.Imaging. Basic.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.Office.Inner.Common.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Drawing.dll
www.rasteredge.com
Running a macro automatically when a document is created, opened or closed
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ Site
Home 
Site Map 
Word:mac 
FAQ 
Tutorials 
Downloads 
Find Help 
Suggestions 
Links 
About Us 
Search
Running a macro automatically when a 
document is created, opened or closed
Article contributed by Dave Rado 
Using Document events 
Open your template, press Alt+F11, and in  the Project window of the VBA environment, 
double-click on  “Microsoft Word Objects”, then on “ThisDocument”. On the toolbar you'll see 
two list boxes. If you pull down the one on the left, and change it from “(General)” to 
“Document”, a procedure called Document_New() will be created. If you then pull down the 
list box on the right, you'll see three events to choose from: Close, New and Open. You can 
select Close or Open from the list to insert a Document_Close() or Document_Open() 
procedure (or you can forget about the list boxes and just type, once you know the syntax). 
Document_New() procedure will run when a document based on that template is created; a 
Document_Open() procedure will run whenever a document based on that template is 
opened; and Document_Close() will run a document based on that template is closed. 
Note that these procedures cannot be made global – they will only be fired when documents 
based on the  template are created or opened or closed. 
Using Auto macros 
Another way of achieving the same objective is to create a Module (Insert + Module), and 
write a macro called AutoNew(), AutoOpen(), or AutoClose(). If stored in any template other 
than Normal.dot, these will behave in the same way as Document events; i.e. they will be fired 
when documents attached to the template are created, opened or closed. 
However, if stored in Normal.dot, they will act globally – in other words, they will be fired when 
any document is created, opened, or closed. This is in contrast with a Document_Open 
procedure stored in Normal.dot, which will only execute when documents based on Normal.
dot are opened. 
Unfortunately, AutoNew, AutoOpen and AutoClose macros stored in an Addin (a .dot file 
stored in Word's Startup directory) will not behave globally. In fact there is no point in storing 
AutoNew, AutoOpen or AutoClose macros in an Addin, because you would (or should) never 
base a document on an Addin. 
Using Application Events 
If you want a macro to be fired whenever any document is opened, regardless of which 
template the document is attached to, the simplest way, as discussed above is to write an 
AutoOpen macro and store it in Normal.dot. However there are problems associated with 
storing macros in Normal.dot, so if you want to avoid that route, the answer is to use 
Application Events. Application Events stored in global Addins do behave globally. And rather 
confusingly, some application events relate to documents. 
In Word 97, you can use the DocumentChange event of the Application object to simulate 
global Auto macros; and in Word 2000, you can use the DocumentOpen, NewDocument and 
DocumentBeforeClose events of the application object. Storing these in an Addin works just 
like storing Auto macros in Normal.dot (i.e. they're global).
See the article: How to create global event procedures similar to AutoOpen, AutoNew 
and AutoClose, without using Normal.dot for more details.
Send all feedback to word@mvps.org  
Top  - Ctrl+Home
Previous - Alt+left arrow
Page Updated: 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/MacrosVBA/DocumentEvents.htm10/16/09 5:41 PM
Getting To Grips With VBA Basics In 15 Minutes
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ Site
Home 
Site Map 
Word:mac 
FAQ 
Tutorials 
Downloads 
Find Help 
Suggestions 
Links 
About Us 
Search
Getting to grips with VBA basics in 15 
minutes
Article contributed by Bill Coan 
I can't turn you into a VBA expert but I can suggest a way to explore VBA that you may find 
helpful. Below, I've listed 22 steps that can be completed in approximately 15 minutes, 
assuming someone is kind enough to read them to you as you sit at your keyboard. If you 
have to read them by yourself and turn your attention alternately to the keyboard and back to 
the steps, then you may need a half hour or longer to complete the steps. Either way, the 
steps should give you a feel for what it's like to program in Word. 
Before starting, launch Word, then press Alt+F11 to launch the VBA editor, and then 
maximize the VBA editor window. 
Ready? Let's start: 
1. In the VBA editor, choose Options on the Tools menu and make sure the following 
checkboxes are checked:  
Auto List Members  
Auto Quick Info 
2. Press F7 to view a code window, if not already displayed.  
Then type “Sub Test” and hit the enter key. The VBA editor will create a subroutine for 
you that looks as follows:
Notice that the cursor is already flashing inside the subroutine, ready for you to type a 
command  
3. Click in the code window and type the following, making special note of the dot at the end 
of the expression: 
ActiveDocument. 
4. If you want to work on the active document (and who doesn't) then you have to start this 
way. (Think Jesus: No one gets to the father except through me!) When you type the "." 
at the end of the expression a list will pop up. This list is the most amazing guide you can 
imagine. Each item on the list is either a method or a property of the ActiveDocument or 
else it's an object unto itself that belongs to the ActiveDocument. For now let's deal with 
methods. Toward the end of this message we'll deal with properties. At the very end of 
the message, we'll deal with other objects besides the currently active document. 
A method is something you can DO to the ActiveDocument, like print it out. The way to 
think is this: “I'm trying to do something to the active document as a whole, namely, print 
it. If I'm patient and scroll through this list, I'll almost certainly find a method that will do 
this for me.” When you first think this way, the word “method” will stick in your throat like 
a fishbone. Later it will feel more like burnt toast and later still it will feel like candy when 
you were young. Indeed, in this case, if you're patient, you will scroll far enough to 
encounter a method called PrintOut. Eureka! You know it's a method (as opposed to a 
property) because it has an icon next to it that looks like a green brick flying through the 
air and at this stage the whole concept of method makes you feel like throwing a brick.  
Nice mnemonic, eh? 
Let's give it a try. Since you've scrolled down and selected PrintOut, you can press Tab 
to accept it or you can double-click it right there in the list. Either way, your statement 
now looks as follows 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/MacrosVBA/VBABasicsIn15Mins.htm (1 of 4)10/16/09 5:41 PM
Getting To Grips With VBA Basics In 15 Minutes
5. So far so good. Most people easily get this far. But now what? 
6. One possibility is that you're done. After all, you've specified an object (the active 
document) and you've selected something that you want to do to it (print it out). Indeed, if 
you're willing to let Word print out the document in whatever way it chooses, then you are 
done. 
7. Another possibility is that you want to control how the print job will be carried out. In this 
case, you must provide some “arguments” (another fishbone, at first). Not to worry. To 
enter one or more arguments, all you do is type a space after the method and let the 
editor help you enter them. Arguments are equivalent to the choices you make in the 
Print dialog box. So go ahead, type a space after PrintOut, so your screen looks like this 
(the pipe character “|” represents your flashing insertion point after you've typed a 
space): 
8. But wait! When you type the space, the VBA editor suddenly gets very helpful again, 
showing you something like the following: 
9. Aha! Aha! These are the arguments for the PrintOut method. Most of them are 
immediately recognizable if you've ever paid attention to the Print dialog box. If you're 
wondering about one or more of them, simply press F1 and you'll call up a help topic that 
tells you all about each one of them. 
10. Now that you can see all the arguments, you can enter values for as many  
of them as you desire. 
One way to do this is to type the name of the argument and then a value,  
using “:=” to connect them and a comma to separate one argument/value from  
the next, like so: 
ActiveDocument.PrintOut Background:=False, Copies:= 2 
Another, boneheaded (in my opinion) way to do this is to enter values for ALL of the 
arguments, in which case you don't have to type the names of the arguments but you do 
have to account for ALL of them, as follows:  
ActiveDocument.PrintOut False, , , , , , 2, , , , , , , 
11. Let's go with the named-argument approach:  
ActiveDocument.PrintOut Background:=False, Copies:= 2 
12. That wasn't so painful, was it? Now press F5 to run the subroutine. Or return to Word and 
choose Tools|Macro|Macros...|Test|Run . (Pressing F5 is easier!) 
A quick review before we plunge on to properties. You think: “I'm trying to do something 
to the active document as a whole, namely, print it. So I start by typing 
“ActiveDocument.” and a list pops up. I scroll through the list and select the PrintOut 
method. Then I type a space and enter some arguments. In this case, I want background 
printing off and I want two copies, so I type the names of those arguments and values for 
each of them. I connect each argument name to its value by using “:=” because I'm part 
of the cognoscenti.”  
Take a big breather here because now it's time to explore properties instead of 
methods . . . 
13. Let's go back to our original assumption, namely, that you want to work on the active 
document as a whole. In this case, though, let's assume you want to change one of the 
properties of the document, rather than hit it with a brick. 
14. Once again, click in a code window and type the following, making special note of the dot 
at the end of the expression:  
ActiveDocument. 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/MacrosVBA/VBABasicsIn15Mins.htm (2 of 4)10/16/09 5:41 PM
Getting To Grips With VBA Basics In 15 Minutes
15. Remember, if you want to work on the active document (and who doesn't) then you have 
to start this way. (No one gets to the father except through me!) When you type the “.” at 
the end of the expression a list will pop up. This list is the most amazing guide you can 
imagine. Each item on the list is either a method or a property of the ActiveDocument or 
else it's an object unto itself that belongs to the ActiveDocument. For now let's deal with 
properties. 
A property is a single characteristic. One of the properties of a document is its password. 
The way to think is this: “I'm trying to change a property of the active document as a 
whole, namely, its password. If I'm patient and scroll through this list, I'll almost certainly 
find a password property.” Indeed, in this case, if you're patient, you will scroll far enough 
to encounter a property called Password. Eureka! You know it's a property (as opposed 
to a method) because it has an icon next to it that looks like a finger pointing at a piece of 
information. Pretty useless mnemonic, eh? 
Let's give it a try. Since you've scrolled down and selected Password, you  
can press Tab to accept it or you can double-click it right there in the  
list. Either way, your statement now looks as follows: 
ActiveDocument.Password 
16. So far so good. Many people easily get this far. But now what? 
17. In this case, the next step is to specify a value for the property. To do this, all you do is 
type a space and an equals sign after the name of the property, so your screen looks like 
this (the pipe character “|” represents your flashing insertion point after you've typed a 
space): 
ActiveDocument.Password = | 
18. Since the VBA editor has no idea what value you want to use for a password, it can't offer 
any suggestions. Instead, you simply have to come up with an idea on your own and type 
it in, perhaps as follows: 
ActiveDocument.Password = "billcoan"  
That's it! That's it! Now press F5 to run the subroutine. Or return to Word and choose 
Tools|Macro|Macros...|Test|Run. (Pressing F5 is easier!) 
When this statement runs, it will assign “billcoan” to be the password for the currently 
active document. You might wonder how you were supposed to know that the password 
had to be enclosed in quotation marks. Well, experience ought to be worth something, 
oughtn't it? In any case, if you had any question, all you would have had to do is position 
the cursor anywhere in the name of the property (“Password”) and press F1. This would 
display a help topic that tells you that a password requires a string, which is to say, a 
bunch of characters inside some quotation marks. 
Take a big breather here because now it's time to explore objects other than the 
currently active document . . . 
Let's face it, the currently active document, as a whole, can hold our attention for only so 
long. After all, you can carry out only so many methods on it (printout, save, saveas, etc., 
etc.) and you can change only so many of its properties (password, grammar checked, 
spelling checked, etc., etc.). 
But what about working on a particular part of a document, such as the first paragraph all 
by itself, or on a collection of parts, such as all the paragraphs? Here lies opportunity! 
After all, documents aren't just objects unto themselves; they're composed of hundreds of 
other, smaller objects. And you can work on each of those objects individually or as parts 
of collections. 
Let's dig deeper and find out how. 
19. The good news is that you can “reach” any part of a document that you want to work on 
by starting out as though you were going to work on the document itself. In other words, 
you can start as you almost always start. That is, once again click in a code window and 
type the following, making special note of the dot at the end of the expression: 
ActiveDocument. 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/MacrosVBA/VBABasicsIn15Mins.htm (3 of 4)10/16/09 5:41 PM
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested