asp.net core pdf editor : Change pdf to powerpoint on application control utility html azure .net visual studio Good-Merger-Index-2014-52-part142

Transferee 
Transferor
Type of 
Deal 
Size by income 
transferred
Size by net assets 
transferred
1
breast Cancer now
1) breast Cancer Campaign
2) breakthrough breast 
Cancer
Merger
£28,492,507
£20,151,000
2
addaction
kCa
Takeover
£18,076,000
£2,804,000
3
gLL
north Country Leisure
group 
Structure
£8,925,538
-£123,279
4
abbeycroft Leisure
anglia Community Leisure
Merger
£7,581,426
£4,067
5
Richmond fellowship
aquarius
group 
Structure
£7,261,671
£1,978,905
6
gLL
Carlisle Leisure
group 
Structure
£6,500,000
£11,233
7
east kent Crossroads
Crossroads Care  
West kent
Merger
£3,047,243
£1,931,510
8
gofal
esgyn
Takeover
£2,395,791
£421,951
9
advonet
1) advocacy Support
2) Leeds advocacy
3) advocacy for Mental 
Health & Dementia
Merger
£2,392,099
£622,482
10
St Loye's foundation
Community Care Trust
Takeover
£2,332,024
£227,488
11
mcch
DgSM - Your Choice
group 
Structure
£2,328,169
£1,206,764
12
Redwings Horse Sanctuary
Mountains animal  
Sanctuary
Takeover
£2,032,737
Unknown
13
JW3 Trust
London Jewish Cultural 
Centre
Takeover
£1,923,118
£1,894,096
14
Rehabilitation for addicted 
Prisoners Trust (RaPt)
blue Sky Development  
& Regeneration
Takeover
£1,648,040
£227,739
15
Young enterprise
pfeg
Takeover
£1,419,185
£2,377,598
16
foyer federation
Changemakers
Takeover
£1,150,878
£110,197
17
Parachute Regiment Charity
Parachute Regiment  
afghanistan Trust
Merger
£1,135,062
£3,103,404
18
fitzroy Support
The Leo Trust
Takeover
£1,103,464
£2,033,608
19
nCVO
Charities evaluation 
Services
Takeover
£1,003,380
£617,721
20
nCVO
Mentoring and befriending 
foundation (Mbf)
Takeover
£880,644
£364,445
  ‘Size by income/net Assets transferred’ figures were the most recent available annual income figures for the transferor organisation(s) in 
the deal – for equal mergers, income and asset figures of both/all organisations are combined.
Top 20 Deals Ranking 
9
     CHaRITY anD SOCIaL enTeRPRISe DeaLS           Page 21
Change pdf to powerpoint on - application control utility:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Change pdf to powerpoint on - application control utility:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
A new feature in the Index this year is a look 
at the financial position of charities engaging 
in merger, reviewing their surplus/deficit as a 
percentage of turnover.
More than half of transferor charities are in loss 
(53% of them), compared to 24% of acquiring 
charities making losses. Moreover, not only are 
a substantial majority of acquiring/transferee 
organisations in surplus, but 44% of them 
are growing at rate of more than 3% a year. 
Interestingly, the top deal of the year – the equal 
merger that formed Breast Cancer now - involved 
two loss-making organisations coming together to 
shore up their financial positions.
This analysis appears to confirm that many 
charity mergers are constructed as “rescues”, 
where a smaller charity in financial distress seeks 
merger with a larger, more stable organisation in 
order to safeguard its services from closure. 
We are of the view that this type of deal has 
become more of a feature of the sector in recent 
years due to funding instability.
10
If so, this is not necessarily a positive sign for the 
sector. Mergers are often better when they are 
proactively sought from a position of strength, 
as part of a clear strategy to increase the social 
impact of the charity and enhance outcomes 
for its beneficiaries. Mergers conducted on this 
basis allow the organisations to fully review their 
options and negotiate a better deal for themselves. 
For example, small charities that are specialist 
in a particular service area or well-rooted in a 
community will have a clear value proposition if 
seeking to join a larger organisation or group, and 
will often be in a better position to retain services 
or negotiate for autonomy.
Manually adjusted so that for merger deals both 
organisations are counted as transferors.
Sample size: 85 organisations.
 CHaRITY anD SOCIaL enTeRPRISe DeaLS           Page 22
5.2  FinAnCiAL DRivERS
10   http://blog.cfg.org.uk/index.php/mergers-during-the-recession-why-werent-there-as-many-as-expected/
Transferor
Transferee
Losses 10%+
Losses 0-10%
Surplus 0-3%
Surplus 3-10%
Surplus 10%+
18%
35%
16%
16%
16%
9%
15%
32%
29%
15%
application control utility:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Online Powerpoint to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Then just wait until the conversion from Powerpoint to PDF is complete and download the file.
www.rasteredge.com
application control utility:RasterEdge XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET - SDK for PowerPoint Document
Able to view and edit PowerPoint rapidly. Convert. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Convert PowerPoint to HTML5. Convert PowerPoint to Tiff. Convert PowerPoint to Jpeg
www.rasteredge.com
We present here the income size of organisations 
that engaged in mergers in 2014/5.
While we know from the top 20 ranking that the 
largest few deals represent the majority of the value 
of charity mergers, the smallest charities account 
for most of the actual activity. Small charities 
(those under £1m) made up 45% of merger partners, 
with medium-sized organisations (£1-10m in our 
classification) representing 37%. 
This means that the centre of gravity for 
consolidation activity in the sector has shifted 
downward slightly since 2013/4, with smaller 
charities now replacing medium-sized charities as 
the most likely to be involved in mergers. 
In 2014/5 there was again a few large (£10m+) 
and super large (£50m+) organisations involved 
in mergers, including organisations like GLL, 
Addaction, the Shaw Trust and Centrepoint.
The proportion was fairly consistent with 2013/4 
and reflects the overall ‘pyramid’ shape of the 
not-for-profit sector, which tends to feature many 
small or local organisations and progressively 
smaller numbers of larger organisations. 
Combined with the share of income that the top 
few mergers represents, this continues to tell a 
story of a small number of large transformative 
mergers and a comparatively long tail of small 
local mergers.
CHaRITY anD SOCIaL enTeRPRISe DeaLS           Page 23
5.3  SizE AnD DiSTRibuTion
Sample size: 89 organisations
5
%
application control utility:C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit
to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to PDF; Convert Image to PDF; Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission
www.rasteredge.com
application control utility:How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint. Overview for How to Use XDoc.PowerPoint in C# .NET Programming Project. PowerPoint Conversion.
www.rasteredge.com
Based on the framework described in chapter 
4, straight takeovers where one organisation is 
fully integrated into another represented 62% of 
all the mergers in 2014/5 (up from 43% in 2013/4). 
Takeovers using a subsidiary model represented a 
further 13% and takeovers using a group structure 
7%. Together, takeovers of all types rose to 82% 
(compared to 73% previously). 
Straight takeovers are therefore the most common 
model for merger, due to the fall in the number 
of identifiable cases where the smaller partner 
had retained status as a subsidiary. This may 
have been due to the fact that many smaller 
organisations in financial distress sought a safe 
haven and did not have the negotiating power 
to enforce a subsidiary model. However, some 
small organisations did still retain a level of 
autonomy and identity, whether that was within 
an established group or as a subsidiary.
Equal mergers accounted for 18% of all deals - 
similar to the 23% share in the last Index - while 
there were no clear cases of asset or service swaps 
in 2014/5. As in 2013/4, genuine mergers appear 
to be rare, although mergers represent 4 of the 10 
largest deals.
These findings continue to demonstrate that a 
wide range of structural options are available 
to charities considering merger, even if they 
are small or in distress. Some of the details 
of particular mergers we looked at led to 
significant discussion on our team about how 
best to classify them, which is a reminder that 
charities have the capacity to negotiate deals 
that best serve their particular circumstances 
and priorities – no two mergers are exactly alike. 
Once charities have given thought to what  
those priorities are, the right structure can 
invariably be found.
5.4  TyPES oF DEAL
62%
18%
13%
0%
 CHaRITY anD SOCIaL enTeRPRISe DeaLS           Page 24
Sample size: 45 deals
7%
application control utility:C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PowerPoint
Such as load and view PowerPoint without Microsoft Office software installed, convert PowerPoint to PDF file, Tiff image and HTML file, as well as add
www.rasteredge.com
application control utility:VB.NET PowerPoint: Read, Edit and Process PPTX File
create image on desired PowerPoint slide, merge/split PowerPoint file, change the order of How to convert PowerPoint to PDF, render PowerPoint to SVG
www.rasteredge.com
The development of group structures
We have tracked the development of group structures, which are a relatively new 
innovation in the UK charity and social enterprise sector, but more common among 
housing associations. 
Groups allow a range of services to be brought under one central company, achieving 
scale and cost reductions whilst allowing for the retention of brand, management 
and board at the subsidiary level (albeit with some new members and governance 
controls). Central services are delivered by the group company, which enables 
subsidiaries to focus on front line delivery, where subsidiaries often have interest 
and expertise. In a pure model, the central organisation is like a holding company 
and will not deliver frontline/customer services. There are cases though where group 
companies continue to handle delivery, and we regard these as ‘emerging’ groups.
GLL is notable here for two mergers which it completed using a group structure. 
Likewise, Richmond Fellowship added the Midlands-based substance abuse charity 
Aquarius as a further subsidiary into its group following the takeovers of MyTime  
CIC, Croftlands Trust and County of Northampton Action on Addiction as  
subsidiaries in 2013/4.
In the housing sector, there is a lively debate about the merits of group structures. It 
was only the Accord Housing Group’s takeover of Heatun Housing that we regard as a 
fully established group structure. City South Manchester/Eastlands and Golden Gates 
Housing Trust/Helena Housing are both examples of emerging groups.
In an environment where cash is not changing hands, group structures are an 
attractive way for smaller not-for-profits to accept a takeover. More autonomy is 
retained by the transferring organisation including brand identity and a Board. That 
said the Parent still has ultimate control and all participating organisations do need to 
be aware that governance and reporting lines can be more complex going forward.
Types of Deal
 CHaRITY anD SOCIaL enTeRPRISe DeaLS           Page 25
application control utility:VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password. Remove password from PDF. Set PDF security level. VB: Change and Update PDF Document Password.
www.rasteredge.com
application control utility:C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET
C# PowerPoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET. Online C# Tutorial for Converting PowerPoint to PDF (.pdf) Document. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion Overview.
www.rasteredge.com
We assess here ‘hotspots’ of consolidation. As 
in 2013/4 health and social care was the area 
of greatest activity, with these types of services 
accounting for 43% of those changing hands. This 
was followed by intermediaries - which provide 
various kinds of infrastructure or representation 
for frontline charities - at 16%. 
Intermediary mergers include deals involving both 
national organisations and local CVSs, the latter 
of which are under particular financial strain at 
the moment. NCVO conducted two mergers, one 
of which built on its recent volunteering focus 
(Monitoring and Befriending Service) and the 
other on its general support role for the sector 
(Charities Evaluation Service). We also saw the 
Social Impact Analysts Association and SROI 
Network come together demonstrating the rise of 
impact measurement and social value as themes 
in the sector.
In terms of local CVS organisations, we saw 
mergers in Norfolk, the Vale of Glamorgan 
in Wales and the London borough of Merton. 
Reduced local authority budgets are a key driver 
of these mergers, as CVSs try to adapt and 
find new ways to fund themselves. This is a 
continuation of a trend we saw in 2013/4, when 
there were a further four mergers involving 
local CVS organisations. Over two years this 
means that 20 local CVS organisations have 
merged.
It is worth noting that NCVO chief 
executive Stuart Etherington recently called for 
more infrastructure mergers in an October 2015 
speech, arguing that the level of duplication in the 
800-strong sector is not sustainable with a tougher  
funding environment.
Other areas of high activity included the justice 
sector (including domestic violence, ex-offenders 
and animal welfare in our broad categorisation), 
community organisations such as local hubs 
and clubs, leisure trusts and employment and 
training providers.
In sports and leisure sector, 5 leisure trusts 
completed mergers in the 2014/5 period. In 
the context of a sector containing about 100 
organisations, this is noteworthy. This has 
mainly been due to local authorities scaling back 
funding for formerly council-run local trusts 
and retendering contracts. The press release for 
GLL’s takeover of Carlisle Leisure alluded to these 
financial drivers, stating that “[Carlisle’s] directors 
believe that the economies of scale and savings 
in procurement that merger will bring maximise 
the chances of retaining the Carlisle and Allerdale 
contracts, due for renewal”. As local authorities 
seek to retender contracts for leisure services with 
more stringent terms, then scale and efficiency 
become ever more important for leisure providers.
5.5  SECToR HoTSPoTS
  CHaRITY anD SOCIaL enTeRPRISe DeaLS           Page 26
3%
Employment
6%
Culture
5%
Sport
5%
Faith-based
5%
Community
7%
Justice
10%
Intermediary
16%
Health & Social Care
43%
International
1%
Environment
0%
Education
Sample size: 129 organisations
(some organisations overlapped sectors)
Within the health and social care sector, charities 
delivering residential care (21%) and physical 
health (20%) participated in the most mergers. 
Residential care included a merger between 
federated Crossroads organisations in Kent and 
Age Concern Hampshire taking over a local day 
care centre. Physical health includes the formation 
of Breast Cancer Now, the single largest merger 
in 2014/5, as well as the Stroke Association’s 
takeover of Speakability. More local examples 
include St Loye’s Foundation in Devon making the 
Community Care Trust a subsidiary. 
Mental health and substance abuse were also 
notable areas of merger activity, influenced by 
commissioner-led demands for cross-disciplinary 
provision. Substance abuse charity Addaction 
acquired KCA in order to strengthen its mental 
health services (following on from their 
acquisition of City and Hackney Alcohol Service 
in the 2014 Index), while mental health charity 
Richmond Fellowship continued its growth 
strategy by acquiring substance abuse charity 
Aquarius (making 4 deals in the last two years). 
The desire to scale up and compete for complex, 
bundled health and social services contracts was 
a driver behind these mergers.
A complex merger between four charities covering 
mental health and disabilities was also seen when 
Advocacy Support, Leeds Advocacy and Advocacy 
for Mental Health & Dementia combined and 
merged into a consortia, Advonet. Advonet 
had originally been founded to provide a single 
point of access for service users, who previously 
faced a choice of advocacy organisations with 
complementary specialisms. Advonet also 
runs Leeds Independent Health Complaints 
Advocacy and one of the merging organisations 
owned a company, Articulate Advocacy. This 
is an interesting example of innovation and 
collaboration in the sector and an example of how 
joint efforts between separate organisations can 
provide a stepping stone towards full merger at  
a later stage.
Consolidation trends for health and social care
   CHaRITY anD SOCIaL enTeRPRISe DeaLS           Page 27
Physical Health
20%
Social Care - 
residential
21%
Mental Health
16%
Disabilities
15%
Hospices
5%
Substance abuse
11%
Homeless
8%
Social Care 
-domiciliary
4%
How mergers in the sector are explained, reported and branded is often a point of great sensitivity when 
deals are being negotiated. Charity managers are faced with a difficult balancing act – they must reassure 
staff, funders and beneficiaries as organisations go through substantial change, but they must also be clear 
about what everyone can expect from the new arrangements.
In news announcements of deals, “merger” was the 
most common description (56%), even though the 
number of genuine mergers was far lower at 18% 
of all deals. This was very consistent with what 
we found in the 2013/4 Index (58% were branded 
“mergers”, against 23% of deals) and continues to 
reflect discomfort in the sector with acknowledging 
the prevalence of takeovers. Terms denoting 
takeovers were used in 27% of new releases this 
year, against 62% of actual deals. Further, one deal 
that was effectively a takeover stressed language 
around a “transfer of services”.
Softer language enables smaller organisations 
taking part in deals to feel reassured, but it calls into 
question whether organisations are doing enough to 
ensure that clear expectations are set. In the cases 
where mergers do struggle or fail we are often told it 
is due to false expectations, with staff facing greater 
operational changes than they had anticipated.
Finally, in the case of group structures we find that 
there is a much closer correlation between how 
they are reported and what is actually happening. 
Executives find it easier to speak plainly when 
adopting these models because they do give more 
autonomy to the organisation being taken over.
Charities have a number of different options to brand 
their new merger. As a report by nfp Synergy on 
charity branding noted, “sometimes the dominant 
brand wins out, sometimes a whole new name is 
created, and sometimes the two names are just bolted 
together like a crude piece of welding”.
11
We also track 
a fourth possibility, which is the transferor charity 
retaining its own brand as either a subsidiary or as a 
distinct service within their new parent body. 
Most organisations involved in merger in fact chose 
this last option and agreed that a transferring 
organisation should retain its brand in some form, 
occurring in 51% of cases. This was much the same as 
last year, when the figure was 48%.
Among the other three options, what is immediately 
notable is that there were few, if any, clear examples 
of names simply being amalgamated. In 36% of cases, 
transferor charities were more clearly incorporated 
under the brand of a larger charity, with the resulting 
loss of their former brand. Rebrands with new names 
represented 13% - examples included Breast Cancer 
Now (from the merger of Breast Cancer Campaign 
& Breakthrough Breast Cancer), Support Our Paras 
(formerly Parachute Regiment Charity & Parachute 
Regiment Afghanistan Trust) and Social Value 
International/UK (previously Social Impact Analysts 
Association & the SROI Network).
This points towards merged organisations being clearer 
in their branding this year and taking the opportunity of 
merger to refresh their brand or strengthen an existing 
one.
However, brand and identity were put in context by 
two charities in Surrey, Leatherhead Youth Project 
and Liquid Connection. When they announced their 
intention to come together after several years of close 
collaboration, they explained their decision simply by 
saying that “we began to realise that the young people 
couldn’t tell that we were two different organisations 
as we complemented each other so well”.
12
This is 
a reminder that for beneficiaries, the presence and 
quality of vital services is more important than the 
brands they are delivered under, and this is something 
trustees and managers would do well to keep in mind 
when considering merger.
    CHaRITY anD SOCIaL enTeRPRISe DeaLS           Page 28
5.6  LAnGuAGE AnD bRAnDinG
language
branding
11   http://nfpsynergy.net/free-report/whats-name-key-issues-when-charity-wants-change-their-name
12   http://www.dorkingandleatherheadadvertiser.co.uk/Leatherhead-youth-charities-merge-unify-services/story-26194937-detail/story.html
housing 
Association Deals
 Page 29
6
13  Inside Housing has reported that 89 mergers, amalgamations or transfers of engagements (where a transferring body ceases to exist) 
occurred in the period of 2011-2014. Another 90 occurred between 2007-2011, establishing a benchmark of approx 26 mergers and takeovers 
per year in the sector. However, we have found the figure to be much smaller if internal restructurings are excluded and if we only consider 
deals where there is available financial information in the public domain.
14  http://www.amaresearch.co.uk/Housing_Assoc_14s.html
houSing aSSoCiation dealS
We provide here a report on mergers in the 
Social Housing Sector. 
Our analysis focuses upon 8 deals completed 
between April 30
th
2014 and May 1
st
2015 for 
which there is a reasonable amount of financial 
information available in the public domain. We 
have arrived at this figure starting with a HCA 
list of amalgamations, transfers of engagements 
and mergers which was cross referenced against 
media reports from Inside Housing
13
and then 
adjusted to exclude internal restructurings and 
small deals for which little reliable information 
was available.
We also noted that several organisations 
had announced they were actively working 
towards merger in 2014/5, only for them to call 
off the process in a further announcement. 
This highlights a difference between the 
way that charities and housing providers 
undertake mergers. In the charity sector, public 
announcements are frequently made when 
mergers are very likely to go ahead. In the 
housing sector, the greater scale and complexity 
means that the merger process is accompanied 
by multiple public announcements and news 
stories at various junctures, and it is not 
uncommon to see previously-signalled mergers 
abandoned as due diligence is carried out or 
regulatory judgements are issued. The level of 
rigour in due diligence is significantly higher for 
housing associations.
   HOUSIng aSSOCIaTIOn DeaLS           Page 30
Headlines
We found the 16 organisations involved in these 
8 mergers were turning over collectively £765m 
(compared to £811m for charities), with the 
transferring organisations accounting for £360m 
of this (compared to £110m for charities). It is 
worth noting that as in the charity sector, this 
means total merger activity is very small in the 
context of the HA sector, which contains 1,700 
organisations.
14
These deals involved asset transfers of £1.6 billion, 
based on the most recent information we had 
available. This means that housing sector deals 
involved about 3.5 times as much income changing 
hands than those done in the charity sector and 
were 33 times larger on a net asset basis.
The single largest deal - a merger between 
Jephson and Raglan to form Stonewater - saw 
the organisations bring together £153m of 
income (over 40% of the total in 2014/5), along 
with £933m of assets (57%). Both of these housing 
providers were also categorised as ‘super-large’ 
for stock size (with more than 10,000 units apiece) 
and Stonewater is now reported to manage around 
31,000 homes across England.
Jephson/Raglan was the only merger where full 
integration occurred, with both abandoning their 
previous brands. Four deals were structured as 
takeovers of some variety – either completely, 
or with one becoming the subsidiary of another. 
Three more involved the formation or expansion 
of a group structure.
Three organisations chose the option to rebrand 
under new names (Stonewater, One Manchester 
and Torus), while there were three cases where 
a subsidiary kept their name and two smaller 
housing association brands were lost through an 
outright takeover.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested