asp.net core pdf editor : Convert pdf into ppt control software system web page html winforms console How%20to%20Use%20Word2-part1404

Typographical Tips from Microsoft Publisher
Set pull quotes off from the rest of the text with 
ample white space and a border above or below 
the frame. An appealing way to call attention to a 
pull quote is to enclose it in giant quotation marks, 
as shown in Figure 7 above. If you do this, be 
sure to hang the quotation marks outside the even 
margin of the quote. You can find giant quotation 
marks in some symbol fonts, or you can increase 
the point size of quotation marks in the font used 
for the pull quote; it may be necessary to use 
Format | Font | Character Spacing to lower the 
quotation marks if the latter method is used.
Sidebars 
A sidebar contains information that 
isn't vital to understanding the main 
text, but that adds interest or 
additional information. Sidebar text 
can be the same font and size as 
body text or the same font (in a larger 
size) as the captions. Put the sidebar 
within a page or two of the related 
text. Set the sidebar off from the rest 
of the text by boxing the frame or 
shading it, or both.
Using text styles for  fast and consistent formatting
Text styles are formatting descriptions that you can use to quickly apply text formatting on a 
paragraph-by-paragraph basis. Text styles contain all the formatting information that you need: 
font and font size, indents, line spacing, tabs, and special formatting such as numbered lists or 
character spacing. By using text styles, you can make even complex formatting easy by just 
choosing the style name. And by using text styles for specific purposes – a heading style for 
headings, a list style for lists, and a body style for body text – you can maintain a consistent 
design throughout your story, your entire publication, and even multiple publications.
Text styles can come from a variety of sources. Some text styles are created by Publisher, 
such as the Continued-On Text style, which Publisher uses when a “Continued on page…” 
notice is automatically included in your text frame. [Word also uses some styles automatically; 
among these are Header, Footer, Caption, Footnote Reference, and Footnote Text.] You can 
create other text styles in your word processor as you write your text, and those styles will be 
included in Publisher when you import the file. You can also define your own styles in 
Publisher, import text styles from other publications, or use text styles that have been saved in 
a template. [All of these are true in Word as well, and there are even more good reasons for 
using styles in Word.]
See also: 
Creating a Template – The Basics (Part II) 
Understanding Styles.
Send all feedback to word@mvps.org  
Top  - Ctrl+Home
Previous - Alt+left arrow
Page Updated: 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/Formatting/TypographyTips.htm (8 of 8)10/16/09 5:32 PM
Convert pdf into ppt - SDK software API:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf into ppt - SDK software API:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Some of the most useful Word shortcuts
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ Site
Home 
Site Map 
Word:mac 
FAQ 
Tutorials 
Downloads 
Find Help 
Suggestions 
Links 
About Us 
Search
Printer-friendly version: 
Some of the most useful Word shortcuts
Or how to save yourself hours by giving your mouse a rest!
Article contributed by Dave Rado
General keyboard time-savers 
Styles 
Moving around and selecting things 
(to return to top, press Ctrl+Home)
This list doesn't attempt to be comprehensive, but is a list of the shortcuts which save me the 
most time.
You can also get a complete list of keyboard shortcuts by selecting Tools + Macro + Macros, 
where it says “Macros in”, select “Word Commands”, select the command called 
“ListCommands” and press “Run”. Or you might find the following more useful: Word 
commands, and their descriptions, default shortcuts and menu assignments
General keyboard time-savers
1.
If you look at the menus, you will see many of Word's keyboard shortcuts displayed 
next to the command – for instance, Ctrl+C next to Edit + Copy, Ctrl+V next to Edit + 
Paste, Ctrl+F next to Edit + Find, etc. Learning and using these shortcuts will save you 
many hours, allowing you to spend more time with your family! (And many of them work 
in all Windows applications).
One menu shortcut which is not displayed but which I find very useful is Ctrl+F2 for Print 
Preview.
One which is displayed but which is so useful and so often missed that it's worth 
mentioning specifically is Ctrl+Z to Undo. Keep pressing Ctrl+Z to Undo as far back as 
you want – if you go too far, press Ctrl+Y to redo.
2. To access the menus with the keyboard press Alt plus the underlined letter on the main 
menu. Then type the underlined letter in the drop-down menu. E.g. type Alt+ V, P to go 
into Page Layout View, or Alt+ V, O to go into Outline View. If you have the mouse in 
your hand it's quicker to use the mouse (and then the toolbars come into their own), but 
when touch-typing, accessing the menus with the keyboard saves a lot of time.
3. To apply or remove Bold, Italic or Underline press Ctrl+BCtrl+I, or Ctrl+U. Use Ctrl+L 
to left-justify text, Ctrl+E to centre it, Ctrl+J to justify it, and Ctrl+R to right-justify it.
4. To return to your last edit point, press Shift+F5. For instance, if you have copied and 
want to return to where you were in order to paste. Press Shift+F5 again to go to up to 
the last three edit points, or a fourth time to return to where you started.
Also use this when you first open a document, to go straight back to where you were last 
editing it.
5. To change the case of any text, select the text and press Shift+F3. Very useful, for 
instance, if you have accidentally LEFT YOUR CAPS LOCK ON!
Keep pressing Shift+F3 to toggle between ALL CAPS (or “UPPERCASE”), no caps (or 
“lowercase”), and First Letter In Caps (which Word misleadingly refers to as “Title Case” 
– a true example of Title Case would be “First Letter in Caps”, but to achieve this level of 
intelligence you need a macro).
You get more options if you use the Format + Change Case dialog, though. 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/General/Shortcuts.htm (1 of 5)10/16/09 5:33 PM
SDK software API:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag-and-drop your pptx or ppt file into the drop area.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software API:How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word
How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word. PDF, MS-Excel, MS-PPT to Word Conversion Overview. By integrating XDoc.Word SDK into your C#.NET project, PDF, MS
www.rasteredge.com
Some of the most useful Word shortcuts
6. You can repeat most commands and actions by pressing F4. This is much more useful 
than you might think.
For example, apply borders to a table. Go to your next table, select it, and press F4 to 
apply the same borders. (Or do the same with rows within a table).
Convert a picture from Floating to Inline, then use F4 to do the same with all other 
pictures.
Apply a Style somewhere, then use F4 to apply the same Style to all other paragraphs in 
the document which need that Style applied.
Select one table row, right-click, Insert Rows. Select the new row and F4. Select the two 
new rows and F4. Select the four new rows and F4 – and so on.
In Word 97, you can use F4 in combination with the Table + Cell Height and Width dialog 
to make each column in one table exactly the same width as the equivalent column in 
another table – a trick I use constantly. In Word 2000 and higher, the Table Properties 
dialog doesn't support F4, a serious retrograde step; but fortunately you can fix this. See: 
How to sidestep the problems of the Word 2000 (and higher) Table Properties 
dialog for details.
Before you start, make sure you can see both tables (split the window if necessary). Then 
select a cell in one table, select Table + Cell Height and Width, choose the “Column” 
Tab and press OK; select a column in the other table and press F4. The width you 
“captured” from the first table will now be applied to the other one. (You can even use 
this trick if the two tables are in separate documents.)
You can use the same principle to left or centre-align multiple tables, apply table indents, 
etc. Apply the formatting you want to one table, using the Cell Height and Width dialog (or 
if it is already applied, simply display the dialog and press OK), and just click in the other 
tables you want to apply the formatting to and press F4.
I also use F4 for applying bold to the first couple of words in each item in a bulleted list 
(easier on the fingers than Ctrl+B); for merging cells in several different rows; for making 
the Page Setup identical in two different sections of a document (see Working with 
sections), or in two different documents – the list of time-saving uses for it goes on and 
on! 
7. You can repeat the last Find or Goto by pressing Shift+F4 
8. You can cycle through all open Word documents by pressing Ctrl+F6 (or you can 
cycle backwards by pressing Ctrl+Shift+F6.
In Word 2000 you can also use Alt+Tab, which cycles through all open applications. 
Word 2000 uses SDI (Single Document Interface) which makes each Word document 
behave as if it were a separate instance of Word, although it isn't.
9. This one is more esoteric, but very useful if you customise commands a lot, and several 
people have emailed me with this tip.
If you have a numeric keypad, press Alt+Ctrl+Num+ (hold down Alt and Ctrl and press 
the + key on the numeric keyboard). If you don't have a numeric keypad, assign a 
shortcut key of your own to the Word command 
ToolsCustomizeKeyboardShortcut. Either way, when you press the shortcut, the 
mouse cursor will change into a 4-headed squiggle: 
Now if you press another shortcut key combination, the “Customize Keyboard” dialog will 
display and show you which command or macro is currently assigned to that shortcut. (for 
instance, if you press Ctrl+F4 while the squiggly cursor is visible, the dialog will display 
the DocClose command).
Alternatively, if you invoke the squiggly cursor and then select any menu item, the 
“Customize Keyboard” dialog will display and show you which command or macro that 
menu button is assigned to. Unfortunately, this doesn't work for toolbar buttons, but you 
can temporarily Ctrl+Drag  a toolbar button onto a menu (select Tools + Customize first), 
and then use the squiggly cursor to find out what command or macro the button is 
assigned to.
And unfortunately, it works less reliably with custom menu buttons than it does with built-
in ones – according to squiggly cursor, several custom buttons that I've assigned to 
macros are actually assigned to the ToolsMacro command!!! That's a bug.
Styles
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/General/Shortcuts.htm (2 of 5)10/16/09 5:33 PM
SDK software API:How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF
How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF. MS Office to PDF Conversion Overview. By integrating XDoc.PDF SDK into your C#.NET project, Microsoft Office
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software API:C# TIFF: Learn to Convert MS Word, Excel, and PPT to TIFF Image
C# TIFF - Conversion from Word, Excel, PPT to TIFF. In order to convert Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint to quiet easy to integrate this SDK into your C#
www.rasteredge.com
Some of the most useful Word shortcuts
1. To remove manual formatting: Press Ctrl+Spacebar to remove character formatting. 
Press Ctrl+Q to remove paragraph formatting. These shortcuts return the formatting to 
the default for the Style in use. To return the selection to the “Normal” style, press Ctrl
+Shift+N.
If you've been emailed a document by another company and need to get it into your 
“Corporate style”, and if it contains a lot of manual formatting (as they usually do), print it, 
and then press Ctrl+A (Select All), Ctrl+Spacebar and Ctrl+Q. If the document uses 
styles, but the styles are in a mess (as they will be if the author had the default 
Autoformat as you Type” settings on), press Ctrl+Shift+N as well. Then apply styles. 
Doing this can save you hours per document, literally. 
2. Avoid formatting text manually as much as possible – use Styles instead.
But where you need to format manually, you can use Ctrl+Shift+C to copy formatting 
and Ctrl+Shift+V to paste it. Having copied formatting, you can use Ctrl+Shift+V as 
often as you like – even across multiple documents – without having to copy again until 
you close Word.
If a paragraph marker is selected when you copy, this will copy and paste the paragraph 
formatting; otherwise it will just copy and paste the character formatting.
You can also use Ctrl+Shift+C and Ctrl+Shift+V to copy & paste such things as drawing 
object lines and fills – in both Word and PowerPoint.
The Paintbrush 
on the Toolbar does more or less the same thing, (although it's much 
harder to use, and you have to double-click on it if you want to apply the same formatting 
multiple times); and in Excel and Visio, where unfortunately Ctrl+Shift+C and Ctrl+Shift+V 
don't work, the Paintbrush can be a huge time-saver for things like reapplying cell 
properties and shape fills. 
3. To create Headings, hold the Alt+Shift keys down, and while keeping them held down, 
press the Left or Right arrow on the keyboard – Left arrow to create a main Heading, or 
promote an existing one, Right arrow to create a subheading or demote an existing one. 
No need to select anything first, just click in the paragraph which you want to apply the 
formatting to.
This one is very useful in any View but especially in Outline View, as it allows you to 
promote and demote a large number of Headings at once.
Alternatively, you can press Ctrl+Alt+1 to create a Heading 1, Ctrl+Alt+2 to create a 
Heading 2, etc. But unfortunately, in Europe, Ctrl+Alt+4 has been hijacked for the Euro 
symbol. 
Personally I much prefer the Alt+Shift method anyway; easier on the fingers, only one 
shortcut to remember; and you don't need to think about which Heading Level you want 
to apply, you only have to think about whether you want the heading to be the same level 
as the previous one (Left arrow), a higher level (Left arrow twice) or a sub-heading of it 
(right-arrow). When going through a long document applying headings, this shortcut 
saves me hours!
Alt+Shift+Left or Right arrow can also be used to promote and demote outline 
numbered or bulleted lists – not just Headings.
If the Headings don't look the way you want them to, don't format them manually! 
Redefine the Styles instead (Format + Style + Modify).
Incidentally, some people also like using Alt+Shift+Up and Down arrows to change the 
order of their Headings in Outline View, so give that a try. Personally, I prefer using drag 
and drop.
4.
Never! use manual page breaks – they're a maintenance nightmare. Instead, on the 
Format + Paragraph + “Line and Page Breaks” tab:
a) Select “Keep with next” to keep paragraphs together. For example, on the top few 
rows of a table or the top few paragraphs of a bulleted list, or an inline picture which 
needs to stay with its caption – although in the latter case it would be better to build 
this into your Picture style definition.
b) Select “Keep Lines together” to prevent a paragraph from ever being split over two 
pages (but see also “Widow/Orphan Control”, covered below).
c) Select “Page break before” to force a page break where needed – again, build that 
into your style definitions where possible, e.g. for the Heading 1 style in a long 
document, and for the style you use for your Table of Contents title.
“Widow/Orphan control” prevents one line of a paragraph being “orphaned” at the top or 
bottom of a page – but this is built in to your style definitions by default anyway.
And a last point while on the subject of styles, make sure that under Format + Style + Modify, 
the “Automatically Screw Up Update” setting is turned off. Unfortunately, it is turned on by 
default for the List Bullet and TOC styles. Turn them off!
Moving around and selecting things
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/General/Shortcuts.htm (3 of 5)10/16/09 5:33 PM
SDK software API:VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
directly encode converted image source into PDF document file converted image source to PDF format, RasterEdge VB other encoding APIs to convert rendered image
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software API:VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
to split one PPT (.pptx) document file into smaller sub control add-on can do PPT creating, loading powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
Some of the most useful Word shortcuts
1. To move around a document
a) Use Ctrl+Left or Right arrows to move one word; use Home and End to move to 
the start or end of a line; Ctrl+Home or Ctrl+End to move to the beginning or end 
of a document, Ctrl+Up or Down Arrow to move one paragraph, and the Up or 
Down arrows to move one line. And of course, PgUp and PgDn to move one 
screen, but you knew that one!
b) Press F5 and in the left-hand pane of the Goto dialog, select “Section” to go 
to the next section, “Table” to go to the next table, etc. Or you can use the 
browse button near the bottom of the scroll bar, pictured on the right 
(although I never do!). The browse object changes when you use Find/
Replace or select a different object in the Go To dialog, which I find 
infuriating (see the 1c for more on this). 
c) By default, Ctrl+PgDn is assigned to the BrowseNext command, and Ctrl+PgUp 
is assigned to BrowsePrevious. If the last thing you used Goto for was to go to a 
table, they will go to the next or previous table.
Some people like this, because it allows them to go backwards as well as 
forwards, whereas Shift+F4 only goes forwards (although you can also use Shift
+F5 to go back). But personally, I find it infuriating, because 90% of the time I just 
want to go to the next or previous page, not to a table, thank you. So I've 
assigned the GoToNextPage command to Ctrl+PgDn and the GoToPreviousPage 
command to Ctrl+PgUp (which you can do using Tools + Customize+ Keyboard). 
I'd be lost without these ones (as would most of my users!).
2. To select text:
a) Hold the Shift key down and use the key combinations covered in 1a. For example, 
to select everything from the insertion point to the end of the document in order to 
delete it, press Ctrl+Shift+End – much quicker than any other way! Similarly, Shift
+Up or Down Arrow selects one line, Shift+PgUp and PgDn selects one screen, 
and so on.
And if you've selected too much, just keep the Shift key down while you use the 
same keys covered in 1a to de-select what you don't want.
This works just as well when selecting cells in Excel, incidentally, and is probably 
even more of a timesaver in Excel than it is in Word.
b) Another good way of selecting text is to click where you want the selection to start, 
use the scrollbars (or wheelie if you have one on your mouse) to scroll until you can 
see where you want your selection to end, and with the Shift key held down, click 
again.
As with 2a, you can de-select if you've selected too much by keeping the Shift key 
held down and clicking again.
c)
A third method, which I never use but some people swear by, is to either double-click 
on the status bar where it says “EXT”, or press F8. This puts you into Extended 
Selection mode, which means you can use the same shortcuts as in 2a but without 
having to hold the Shift key down.
While in Extended Selection mode, you can also press Enter to select to the end of 
the paragraph; or press period (.) to select to the end of the sentence. Keep 
pressing Enter or period to select more paragraphs or sentences. (I got this one 
from Beth Melton).
And again you can de-select if you've selected too much, but this time without 
needing to keep the Shift key held down.
Pressing F8 twice selects a word, three times a sentence, four times a paragraph 
and five times the entire document.
To get out of Extended Selection mode, press Esc or double-click on the status bar 
again.
d) Double-click on a word to select it, triple-click to select the paragraph. Ctrl+Click 
to select a sentence.
Or click once in the left margin (which MS refers to as the “Selection Bar” in Help) 
to select one line, double-click to select a paragraph and triple-click to select the 
document (although I usually use Ctrl+A to select the document).
e) To select a block of text (for instance, to quickly remove manually typed bullets), 
either hold the Alt key down while you drag; or press Ctrl+Shift+F8 and then move 
the arrow keys on the keyboard.
The latter method works much better than the former if selecting large blocks 
spanning multiple pages (I picked this one up from the newsgroups).
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/General/Shortcuts.htm (4 of 5)10/16/09 5:33 PM
SDK software API:C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document
NET Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; ConvertResult. FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software API:VB.NET PowerPoint: Read & Scan Barcode Image from PPT Slide
VB.NET PPT PDF-417 barcode scanning SDK to detect PDF-417 barcode Allow VB.NET developers to output PPT ISSN barcode scanning result into data string.
www.rasteredge.com
Some of the most useful Word shortcuts
f)
The following tip was supplied by Klaus Linke: sometimes you may have selected 
some text by moving down the document, and you may suddenly realise that you 
want the selection to begin further up the document (or the other way round); and 
Word won't let you do this without deselecting and starting again!
You can get around this problem by assigning the following macro to a keyboard 
shortcut. Press your shortcut to change the selection direction (so that for example, if 
you can't currently extend the start of the selection upwards, you will be able to do so 
after pressing the shortcut); then press the same shortcut again to reverse the 
direction back to how it was:
Sub ChangeSelectionDirection() 
Selection.StartIsActive = Not (Selection.StartIsActive) 
End Sub 
3. To move and select within a table:
a) Alt+Mouse Click selects a column. Alt+Double-click selects the table.
b)
Alt+PgDn goes to the bottom of a column, Alt+PgUp to the top. Press Shift as well, 
to select to the top or bottom of the column.
c) To select a row, click in the left margin of the document; drag down or up to select 
multiple rows.
d) To change the order of your rows, you can use the Alt+Shift+Up and Down arrows 
(no need to select anything). Or you can drag and drop.
4. To move paragraphs of text without resorting to cut and paste, you can use drag 
and drop. If you are moving paragraphs to a position that is off-screen, split the window 
first (Window + Split).
Alternatively, if you are in Page/Print View or Normal View, and your cursor is not in a 
table, you can move the current paragraph(s) up or down the document using the Alt
+Shift+Up and Down arrows. Whereas in Outline View, this moves Headings and all 
their subsidiary text, in Page/Print View or Normal View it just moves the current 
paragraphs (but in a table it moves the current rows instead).
5. To edit text while you're in Print Preview, click on the page to zoom in, then click on 
the Magnifier button
on the Print Preview toolbar to switch into edit mode. Click on the 
Magnifier again when you want to quit edit mode and zoom back out.
Word of warning: Be careful not to type unless you are in Edit mode! Word lets you do 
this, and because there's no visible insertion point, you will have no idea where the text 
you type is going to be inserted! This is a bug.
Oh, and one last thing – don't forget about your right mouse button !
Send all feedback to word@mvps.org  
Top  - Ctrl+Home
Previous - Alt+left arrow
Page Updated: 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/General/Shortcuts.htm (5 of 5)10/16/09 5:33 PM
Word commands, and their descriptions, default shortcuts and menu assignments
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ Site
Home 
Site Map 
Word:mac 
FAQ 
Tutorials 
Downloads 
Find Help 
Suggestions 
Links 
About Us 
Search
Word for Windows commands, and their 
descriptions, default shortcuts and menu 
assignments 
Article contributed by Dave Rado
Word has a built-in command ListCommands, which produces a table of all the Word 
commands with their current key and menu assignments. However, it does not list the 
commands using their actual names; nor does it include descriptions of what the commands 
actually do.
Various sites on the web list the default shortcuts, but again, most don't list the commands 
using their correct names; most don't list those commands which are not assigned to a 
shortcut by default – but which you might well want to assign to one, or to assign to a menu; 
or which you might want to intercept using a macro; and some don't list full descriptions of 
what the commands do.
WordCommands.zip (50k) extracts to an Excel file, 
WordCommands.xls, which contains a list of all interceptable Word 
commands (Word 97 and above), using their correct English names; 
and with various filters applied to the spreadsheet so that you can 
easily switch between viewing all commands; or only those assigned 
to a shortcut by default; or only those assigned to either a shortcut 
or a menu by default (select View + Custom Views, then select a 
view from the list).
If you don't have access to Excel, WordCmndsPDF.zip (136k) 
contains 3 PDF files, one for each of the Custom Views.
Each command is listed with a description of what it does; in many cases a much fuller 
description than that which Word itself displays when you scroll through the commands (by 
selecting Tools + Macros + Macros, and selecting “Word commands” under “Macros in”).
The hyperlinks at the top right of the sheet are to help you with navigation.
If you just want to know about the most useful shortcuts, and why they are so useful, see 
Some of the most useful Word shortcuts
If you want to assign some of the unassigned commands to a menu or shortcut, see: 
How to assign a Word command or macro to a hot-key 
How to assign a Word command or macro to a toolbar or menu
If you want to create a macro to intercept one of the commands, see: 
Intercepting events like Save and Print
Send all feedback to word@mvps.org  
Top  - Ctrl+Home
Previous - Alt+left arrow
Page Updated: 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/General/CommandsList.htm10/16/09 5:33 PM
How can I insert special characters, such as dingbats and accented letters, in my document?
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ Site
Home 
Site Map 
Word:mac 
FAQ 
Tutorials 
Downloads 
Find Help 
Suggestions 
Links 
About Us 
Search
How can I insert special characters, such as 
dingbats and accented letters, in my 
document?
Article contributed by Suzanne S. Barnhill
Many Word users don't realize how easy it is to insert special characters. There are at least 
four ways to do it: through the Symbol dialog, using shortcut keys, automatically with 
AutoCorrect, or by direct keypad entry
The Symbol dialog
If you choose Symbol… on the Insert menu, you will bring up the Symbol dialog, shown 
below. (If you have a slow system and/or one with many fonts installed, you may find that this 
dialog takes an appreciable time to appear the first time you use it in a Word session, but after 
that it should pop up instantly.) 
In the font list in the Symbol dialog, "(normal text)" means the font you are currently using. For 
more information about the other fonts listed, see Fonts in the Symbol dialog (below). 
To insert a character, double-click on it, press Enter, or click the Insert button. The dialog 
stays open so that you can insert more than one character, and you can “step out” of the 
dialog to move the insertion point before choosing another character and inserting it. 
Shortcut keys 
Word has also made it very easy for you to insert many of these characters without recourse 
to the dialog - in particular special characters such as ® and international characters such as 
é. It does this through built-in shortcut keys. When you select a character in the dialog to 
which a shortcut key has been assigned (either by Word or by you, the user), it is displayed at 
the bottom of the dialog. The characters to which Word has assigned shortcut keys are 
broadly categorized as either “special characters” or “international characters.” Memorize the 
shortcuts for the characters you use often, use the dialog for the rest.
Special characters 
Note that the Symbol dialog has two tabs: “Symbols” and “Special characters.” The latter 
both lists the shortcut key (if any) for each of a variety of characters and lets you insert it 
directly (by selecting it and double-clicking or pressing Insert). The list is as follows: 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/General/InsertSpecChars.htm (1 of 8)10/16/09 5:33 PM
How can I insert special characters, such as dingbats and accented letters, in my document?
In the above list, note the following:
In the shortcut keys for the em and en dashes, “Num -” means the minus sign on the 
numeric keypad, as opposed to the hyphen on the top row of the keyboard (that is the key 
used in the shortcuts for the nonbreaking and optional hyphens). If you are using a laptop 
computer that doesn't have a numeric keypad or for some other reason don't have easy 
access to the numeric keypad, you might want to assign different keyboard shortcuts to 
these symbols.
In the shortcut keys for the various quotation marks, ` (accent grave) is the key at the top 
left of your keyboard (it also has the tilde ~ on it); ' and " are the apostrophe and shifted 
apostrophe (quote). These keyboard shortcuts use what is called a “setup key.” The 
comma in the shortcut shows that you press, say, Ctrl+` and release. The status bar will 
display the combination you have pressed. You then press the remaining character. (As 
you will see, this technique is widely used in producing international characters.).
Other useful shortcuts that are not included in this list are Ctrl+@, Spacebar to produce 
the degree symbol (°) and Ctrl+/, c to produce the cent sign (¢).
On the Symbols tab, under “(normal text)”, there are a number of fractions, which you can 
assign to shortcut keys if you don't want to use the Autoformat method of inserting 
fractions.
You may wonder why some of these shortcuts are needed. For example, if you have “smart 
quotes” enabled on the AutoFormat As You Type tab of Tools | AutoCorrect, you will get 
these characters automatically. But sometimes Word guesses wrong and gives you ” when 
you want “; and Word always gets it wrong when you need  two opening quotes in a row. In 
such cases, it is convenient to be able to force Word to give you what you want. 
Note that there are no assigned shortcut keys for some of the characters. You can assign 
your own shortcuts if you like; for example, I have Alt+Ctrl+M and Alt+Ctrl+N assigned to the 
em and en spaces. To assign a shortcut, just select the desired symbol and press the 
Shortcut Key… button. The Customize Keyboard dialog opens with the insertion point in the 
“Press new shortcut key” box. Just enter the key combination you want to use and press 
Assign. If you want this shortcut to be available in all your documents, press Close. If you are 
using a template other than Normal.dot and want the shortcut key available only in documents 
based on that template, select it in the “Save changes in” list before closing the dialog.
You can use this same technique to assign a new shortcut to a character (even if Word 
already has a built-in one). The one you assign will take precedence over the built-in one. If 
you later decide you don't need this shortcut, select it in the “Current keys” list in the 
Customize Keyboard dialog and press Remove. Word will then revert to the built-in shortcut.
International characters 
Word also provides built-in shortcuts for many of the accented and other special characters 
needed to type foreign words. If you are using a language other than English exclusively or 
primarily, there are more efficient ways to type (for more information on this, see Word's Help 
under “characters, international”), but for the occasional foreign (or domesticated) word that 
needs an accent, these shortcuts are very handy. Word provides a complete list of these 
shortcuts in the Help article “Type international characters” (reached via “international 
characters, type international characters” or “characters, special, type international 
characters”). The list is as follows:
To produce
Press
à, è, ì, ò, ù 
À, È, Ì, Ò, Ù
Ctrl+` (accent grave), the letter
á, é, í, ó, ú, ý 
Á, É, Í, Ó, Ú, Ý
Ctrl+' (apostrophe), the letter
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/General/InsertSpecChars.htm (2 of 8)10/16/09 5:33 PM
How can I insert special characters, such as dingbats and accented letters, in my document?
â, ê, î, ô, û 
Â, Ê, Î, Ô, Û
Ctrl+Shift+^ (caret), the letter
ã, ñ, õ 
Ã, Ñ, Õ
Ctrl+Shift+~ (tilde), the letter
Ctrl+Shift+: (colon), the letter
å, Å 
Ctrl+Shift+@, a or A
æ
Æ
Ctrl+Shift+&, a or A
Ctrl+Shift+&, o or O
ç, Ç 
Ctrl+, (comma), c or C
ð, Ð 
Ctrl+' (apostrophe), d or D
ð, Ð 
Ctrl+' (apostrophe), d or D
ø, Ø 
Ctrl+/, o or O
¿ 
Alt+Ctrl+Shift+?
¡ 
Alt+Ctrl+Shift+!
ß 
Ctrl+Shift+&, s
Note that in the above shortcuts, unlike many of the others, you get a different symbol 
depending on whether the combining letter is capital or lowercase. 
AutoFormat and AutoCorrect
Many symbols are or can be entered in Word automatically through the action of AutoFormat 
and AutoCorrect.
AutoFormat 
We have already mentioned the “Replace as you type” option to replace “straight quotes” 
with “smart quotes.” Other options are to replace “Fractions with fraction characters” and 
“Symbol characters with symbols.” The example given for the latter is replacement of -- (two 
hyphens) with a dash. Note that this works only when the two hyphens are not preceded or 
followed by a space. If you include spaces, they may sometimes be converted to an en dash. 
On the other hand, a hyphen is not converted to an en dash (even in many places where it 
would be appropriate) unless it is preceded and followed by spaces (and the spaces remain 
around the en dash), so keyboard shortcuts may still be needed for ultimate control. And 
remember that whenever Word converts anything you type into something you don't want, you 
can reverse just the AutoCorrect or AutoFormat with Undo (Ctrl+Z).
AutoCorrect 
Many special characters are defined as AutoCorrect entries. Since these all sort to the top of 
the AutoCorrect list, it is easy to review them. They are also summed up in this list, found in 
Word's Help under the topic “Create arrows, faces, and other symbols automatically” 
(“symbols, creating automatically”): 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/General/InsertSpecChars.htm (3 of 8)10/16/09 5:33 PM
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested