asp.net core pdf editor : How to convert pdf slides to powerpoint presentation SDK software service wpf windows web page dnn Good-practice-guide0-part143

Good practice in the design 
and presentation of consumer 
survey evidence in merger 
inquiries 
March 2011  
OFT1230 
CC2com1 
How to convert pdf slides to powerpoint presentation - SDK software service:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
How to convert pdf slides to powerpoint presentation - SDK software service:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
© Crown copyright 2011 
You may reuse this information (not including logos) free of charge in any 
format or medium, under the terms of the Open Government Licence. To view 
this licence, visit www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/ or 
write to the Information Policy Team, The National Archives, Kew, Richmond, 
Surrey TW9 4DU, or email: psi@nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk 
Any enquiries regarding this publication should be sent to: 
Marketing, Office of Fair Trading, Fleetbank House, 2-6 Salisbury Square, 
London EC4Y 8JX, or email: marketing@oft.gsi.gov.uk 
This publication is also available from our web-sites at: 
www.competition-commission.org.uk and www.oft.gov.uk  
SDK software service:VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
clip art or screenshot to PowerPoint document slide large amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software service:VB.NET PowerPoint: Use PowerPoint SDK to Create, Load and Save PPT
Please refer to following API to create and define a new blank PowerPoint document with a user-defined presentation slides count.
www.rasteredge.com
CONTENTS 
Section 
Page 
1
Introduction 
4
The good practice principles 
5
The detailed illustrations and examples 
6
Applicability and status of the Guide 
7
2
Good practice principles 
9
Transparency of objectives 
9
Representativeness of sample 
10
Soundness of method 
11
Full disclosure of results 
12
Summary of principles 
12
3
Detailed illustrations and examples 
13
Research objectives and hypotheses for testing 
13
Population description and sampling 
14
Characteristics of research agencies and contractors 19
Research resources and documentation 
19
Designing consumer survey introductions 
20
Designing and ordering consumer survey questions  23
Asking hypothetical questions 
28
Hypothetical questions about price increases 
29
Hypothetical questions about diversion options 
31
Conducting fieldwork 
34
Respondent privacy and data protection 
36
Data processing, analysis and reporting 
38
4
Conclusion 
39 
SDK software service:VB.NET PowerPoint: Merge and Split PowerPoint Document(s) with PPT
of the split PPT document will contain slides/pages 1-4 code in VB.NET to finish PowerPoint document splitting If you want to see more PDF processing functions
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software service:VB.NET PowerPoint: Add Image to PowerPoint Document Slide/Page
insert or delete any certain PowerPoint slide without methods to reorder current PPT slides in both powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
www.rasteredge.com
1
INTRODUCTION 
1.1
During our investigations into mergers, the Office of Fair Trading (OFT) 
and the Competition Commission (CC) both receive submissions of 
evidence derived from surveys of consumers that have been 
commissioned for the specific purpose of helping to understand aspects 
of a merger. These surveys are usually commissioned by management 
consultancies or economic consultancies and conducted by market 
research agencies. All of these groups are the intended audiences for 
this document. 
1.2
Amongst other things, consumer survey evidence may be used for 
market definition or for the assessment of the closeness of competition 
between firms. We welcome this type of evidence and believe that the 
use of statistically-robust consumer survey research can help us reach 
informed decisions. 
1.3
For brevity, this document 'Good practice in the design and presentation 
of consumer survey evidence in merger inquiries' is referred to herein as 
'the Guide' and the CC and OFT jointly as 'the Authorities'. 
1.4
The Guide has two substantive sections: 
first, the Guide sets out principles to assess quantitative consumer 
survey research in Section 2 
second, Section 3 contains some illustrations and examples of 
research techniques. Section 3 will not be used as a basis for 
assessing the evidential weight of a particular piece of consumer 
survey research evidence. 
OFT1230/CC2com1    |    4
SDK software service:VB.NET PowerPoint: How to Convert PowerPoint Document to TIFF in
by Microsoft and it is composed of individual slides. formats, such as JPEG, GIF and PDF, by using below is designed by our programmers to convert PPT document
www.rasteredge.com
The good practice principles 
1.5
The Guide sets out, in Section 2, our general views on good practice 
principles in designing and reporting consumer survey research for 
merger inquiries. We use the term 'consumer' here to describe a person 
who buys a product or service for their own use.
1
1.6
These views are guidelines, not rules. We recognise that circumstances 
vary and that judgment and skill will be required in applying consumer 
survey research methods to a particular case. Time and resource 
constraints will also sometimes mean that the consumer survey research 
possible under particular circumstances cannot comply fully with all of 
the principles set out here. 
1.7
The Guide will, therefore, not have met its objective if it is seen as a 
minimum standard that consumer survey evidence must meet to be 
admissible, or if it discourages merging parties from submitting consumer 
survey evidence that does not comply with the Guide. For brevity, each 
principle is introduced here with a phrase such as 'a consumer survey 
should …'. This should be read as short-hand for 'In the absence of 
clearly argued reasons to the contrary and where time and resources 
allow, a consumer survey should …'. 
1.8
In general, however, submissions that follow the good practice principles 
set out in this Guide, or argue clearly and convincingly why a different 
approach has been taken, are more likely to be given evidential weight. 
1
In some mergers, the customers of the merging parties may be buying on behalf of others; this 
introduces complexities into the research design process that are not considered here. The good 
practice principles would apply also to a situation in which an organisation was buying for its 
own use. 
OFT1230/CC2com1    |    5
1.9
Relevant consumer survey research that has been conducted for the 
purpose of informing business strategy in advance of a merger being 
considered may also have evidential value. It might, indeed, be given 
higher weight than that designed in the light of a proposed merger. 
However, evidence that does not conform to general principles of good 
consumer survey research practice will tend to be given less weight than 
that which does. 
1.10
Furthermore, the focus of the Guide on merger investigations does not 
preclude the principles set out here being relevant in other types of 
investigation, though the degree to which they apply will be a matter of 
judgment for the Authorities. 
1.11
The principles set out in Section 2 will be used in assessing quantitative 
consumer survey research that has been designed for the specific 
purpose of providing evidence in a merger inquiry. 
The detailed illustrations and examples 
1.12
This Guide also offers, in Section 3, illustrations and examples that have 
been drawn from recent experience in competition investigations and are 
intended to assist parties in designing consumer survey research that 
meets the good practice principles. 
1.13
These illustrations are selective and included by way of example. The 
omission of a particular consumer survey research technique from the 
Guide does not imply that results derived using it would not be given 
evidential weight in appropriate circumstances. We encourage parties 
and their advisors to use the most appropriate research techniques to 
generate robust evidence in a given merger situation, irrespective of 
whether evidence from those techniques appears to have been influential 
in previous cases or not. 
OFT1230/CC2com1    |    6
1.14
The detailed information in Section 3 is offered as a concise technical 
resource for parties, and will not be used as a basis for assessing the 
evidential weight of consumer survey research evidence.
2
Applicability and status of the Guide 
1.15
Whilst the Guide has been designed to help interested parties in a merger 
inquiry submit evidence to the Authorities, we will endeavour, where 
possible, to follow the good practice principles in merger inquiries 
ourselves. 
1.16
We aim to be open and transparent in our work. We will consider 
requests from parties in merger inquiries for the disclosure of the 
information underlying our analyses, including requests for the disclosure 
of information derived from consumer survey research. However these 
requests may be subject to important legal and practical constraints on 
our ability to disclose such information. These constraints include the 
Enterprise Act 2002, the Data Protection Act 1998 and the statutory 
timetable for each merger inquiry. 
1.17
Furthermore, once a merger inquiry has started, we will seek to be 
available to engage with parties at key stages in the consumer survey 
research process, wherever this is reasonable and practicable. This will 
allow technical issues that are germane to each particular merger 
situation to be appropriately addressed. The timing of such engagements 
will depend upon the progress of each merger inquiry. Engagement by 
the Authorities would not preclude developing views on the evidential 
weight of a piece of consumer survey research on either side, nor be an 
alternative to rigorous testing and piloting of planned consumer survey 
research approaches by the parties. 
2
Note that the principles of Section 2 might still apply in the assessment of consumer survey 
research that uses methods that are not explicitly mentioned in Section 3. 
OFT1230/CC2com1    |    7
1.18
This Guide is a technical resource to assist parties in presenting effective 
consumer survey research evidence. It is without prejudice to the advice 
and information provided under the Enterprise Act 2002 in the joint 
Merger Assessment Guidelines.
3
3
Merger Assessment Guidelines, September 2010, OFT1254 and CC2 (revised). 
OFT1230/CC2com1    |    8
2
GOOD PRACTICE PRINCIPLES 
2.1
Effective consumer survey research should respect general principles of: 
transparency of objectives 
representativeness of sample 
soundness of method 
full disclosure of results 
Transparency of objectives 
2.2
Sound statistical research requires that the specific hypotheses to be 
tested or the measures to be estimated should be set down before any 
data is collected. This prior statement of objectives need not be formal. 
It allows an objective assessment to be made of whether the consumer 
survey data collected provides evidence for each hypothesis or not, and 
to what degree. 
2.3
Consumer survey research that follows a transparent prior design 
process is more likely to be convincing than that which derives from 
asking a variety of questions about an issue and then searching 
retrospectively through the resulting data for statistically significant 
patterns (though such patterns may still be informative). 
2.4
Reporting consumer survey research transparently should include 
providing a full description of the objectives and the methods used. A 
report should contain sufficient detail to demonstrate that good 
consumer survey research practice was followed at each stage. Where 
questions arise about the conduct of the research that cannot be 
answered from the documentation, direct access to relevant professional 
staff from the agency that conducted the research will be regarded as 
offering the greatest transparency. 
OFT1230/CC2com1    |    9
Representativeness of sample 
2.5
Consumer survey research involves defining a population of interest and 
then consulting a sample from this population. This is done so that 
measures relating to the whole population may be estimated and the 
sampling uncertainty in the estimates may be quantified. The sample 
consulted should be representative of the population, either by incidence 
or value as appropriate for the hypotheses being tested. 
2.6
Consumer survey evidence may have value in any merger situation. It is 
likely to be particularly useful where the potential competition concern 
relates to a large population, and where the views of only a few 
members of that population may not be representative of the population 
at large. 
2.7
If the behaviours and attitudes of interest in the population are expected 
to vary systematically with certain characteristics, then the sample 
selected should have broadly the same composition by these 
characteristics as does the population. This may be ensured by setting 
interview quotas, or demonstrated by comparing incidences between 
sample and population and showing that they match within expected 
sampling error. 
2.8
Reliable consumer survey evidence should therefore: 
set out clearly the population of interest 
draw upon existing research evidence to demonstrate the 
characteristics of consumers with regard to which a sample should 
be representative 
document how the sample matches the population with regard to 
these characteristics. 
OFT1230/CC2com1    |    10
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested