How Word differs from WordPerfect
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ Site
Home 
Site Map 
Word:mac 
FAQ 
Tutorials 
Downloads 
Find Help 
Suggestions 
Links 
About Us 
Search
How Word differs from WordPerfect
Article contributed by John McGhie
WordPerfect considers a document to be a “type stream.” If you picture WordPerfect sitting 
on the end of the printer cable, sending characters one-by-one, and every now and again 
inserting a COMMAND to change what the printer is doing, you'll get the idea. For example, 
WP sends the commands for “Arial” font and “bold”. It then expects the printer to print every 
character that way until it tells the printer to do something else.
Word, on the other hand, considers a document to be a “container.” Within this container are 
more containers and, within them, still more. Into each of these containers, Word inserts 
objects. The objects can be bits of text, or bits of pictures, or complete files created by other 
applications.
To make a document in Word, you create containers, fill them, and manipulate their properties 
to decide their position and appearance. For example, you create a container called a 
“paragraph”. Into it you place a string of text like this sentence. Then you apply properties to it 
such as, “Font=Times New Roman,” “Size=12,” “Face=Bold,” “Language=US English,” 
“Space before=12,” “Line height=1,” etc., etc., etc.... The properties of a container affect all 
the objects inside it, including other containers. For example, each character is a container 
that can have a font, size, and colour, but it inherits these properties from the paragraph that 
contains it unless you override the paragraph properties for that character.
Regrettably, long ago, Microsoft decided that this mechanism was far too complicated for us 
to understand, so they hid it from us. If you ever open a Word document in a hexadecimal 
editor and have a look, you will soon discover that they were right. A Word document 
internally is a maze of pointers to the various containers, which appear in the file in a 
sequence unrelated to the order in which they print.
I would make the following suggestions for a long and happy life with Word:
1. Forget reveal codes. They are not useful in Word. If you need them, click the “What's 
This?” button on the Help menu (or press Shift+F1), and then click the text you are 
interested in. That will show you most of the current properties. Also see: Is there life 
after "Reveal Codes"? 
2.
What you see on the screen is what you are going to get. If the text on the screen does 
not appear bold, then it does not have the bold property, regardless of what you feel it 
“should” have :) 
3. As far as humanly possible, avoid direct formatting in Word. Word is designed to run on 
Styles. Learn to use them. It is so much easier to get one style correctly formatted than it 
is to get 174 paragraphs all looking the same. Ignore the format painter: it's a problem 
looking for a place to happen. 
4. Do not accept Word the way it came out of the box. Customise the hell out of it. That's 
why it was designed that way. Start with the toolbars: piss off all the rubbish that comes 
on the standard toolbars and add your favourite styles and tools in their place, so 
everything you need is only one click away. Get into macros as soon as you can: there's 
no point in fiddling around typing things you can simply assign to a mouse-click. 
5. Learn to use a different template for each document type. That way, you can make the 
template automatically set up all your styles, margins, spelling languages, etc., for the 
particular type of document you are making. Avoid basing documents on the “Normal” 
template. You can never control the contents of the Normal template, on your computer 
or on anyone else's. Documents attached to the Normal template will reformat 
themselves each time they are opened or passed to a different machine. 
6. Don't be tempted to customise Word to work like WP. You can do it, but Word will fight 
you every inch of the way if you do, and you will have a very frustrating time of it. 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/General/WordVsWordPerfect.htm (1 of 2)10/16/09 5:36 PM
Convert pdf to powerpoint using - Library software class:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to powerpoint using - Library software class:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
How Word differs from WordPerfect
7. Don't expect to read anything useful about Word in a paper manual. All the information is 
in the Help. Suffer that damned paper-clip and learn to use it: it's the fastest way to find 
anything. That's because there's too much information and it updates too frequently to be 
published on paper. I have found that anyone who has published a paper book about 
Word 97, for example, either hasn't understood it, or has done it at such a trivial level that 
it is not useful. Since I write books for a living, I can tell you that it is just not possible to 
describe Word in less than 1,800 pages, and it's just not possible to economically keep a 
book like that up-to-date. 
8.
Resign yourself to the fact that it will take six months of daily use to really tame the brute, 
but once you have, you won't go back.
See also: 
WordPerfect to Word converters (and why none of them are perfect) 
Is there life after "Reveal Codes"?
Send all feedback to word@mvps.org  
Top  - Ctrl+Home
Previous - Alt+left arrow
Page Updated: 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/General/WordVsWordPerfect.htm (2 of 2)10/16/09 5:36 PM
Library software class:How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint. your application with advanced PowerPoint document manipulating SDK to load, create, edit, convert, extract, and
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic. dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Drawing.dll.
www.rasteredge.com
The draw layer: a metaphysical space
l
Up to Word Drawing & Graphics
l
General Concepts
m
Inline versus floating graphics
m
Inline–Floating hybrid graphics
m
The drawing layer explained
m
Wrapping
m
Manipulating graphics and drawing 
objects
n
Wrapping text around a graphic
n
Working with anchors
n
Unlinking a floating linked graphic
n
Unlinking an inline linked graphic
n
Selecting drawing objects behind 
text
n
Rotating clipart
n
Rotating or flipping text
n
Set paste inline as the default
n
Graphics formats
n
Choosing formats
n
Creating PDF output
n
File associations: restoring
n
“Gotchas”
n
Graphics display as 
red X's 
n
Captions don't update 
or don't appear
n
Graphics don't display 
or don't print
The draw layer: a metaphysical space 
(and how to bring it back down to 
earth)
Article contributed by 
Dave Rado and 
Bill Coan 
Word's draw layer is a metaphysical space where floating 
objects reside. It really isn't a layer, since floating objects can 
be sent behind the text layer or brought out in front of it. 
Either way, they continue to reside in the draw layer.
The relationship between the draw layer and the text layer is 
a bit unusual, to say the least. As noted, the draw layer is 
both behind and in front of the text layer. Any floating object 
can be right-clicked to bring up a menu that includes an 
“Order” command that lets you send the object behind or 
bring it out in front of the surrounding text (as well as behind 
or in front of any other floating objects).
Any objects which you can insert using the Drawing toolbar – 
for instance, Text Boxes – reside in the Drawing layer.
Some things to watch out for with objects 
in the drawing layer
1.   Any text residing in the Drawing layer is immune to many 
of Word's standard features such as Caption numbering, auto 
generated tables of contents, tables of figures etc.
If the above features are critical to your document, it is 
therefore usually better to use Frames rather than Text 
Boxes.  Frames float, like Text Boxes, yet reside in the text 
layer, so are accessible to the above features.
Word HomeWord:mac Word General TroubleshootTutorialsAbout 
UsContact
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/DrwGrphcs/DrawLayer.htm (1 of 4)10/16/09 5:36 PM
Library software class:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
converter library control is a 100% clean .NET document image solution, which is designed to help .NET developers convert PDF to HTML webpage using simple VB
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to TIFF Using VB in VB.NET. using RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Demo Code to Convert PDF to Tiff Using VB.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
The draw layer: a metaphysical space
n
Preventing graphics 
reverting to their 
original size
n
Positioning floating 
graphics relative to 
page
n
Floating objects in 
tables are vertically 
aligned wrongly
n
Linked floating 
graphics don't show 
up in Edit Links
n
Preventing layout 
change on different 
computer
This is particularly an issue when you add a caption to a 
floating graphic.  By default Word puts the caption in a 
textbox, which means it won't update and won't appear in the 
Table of Figures.  To get round this you need to:
a) Convert the floating graphic to an 
inline graphic.  
Select Format + Picture, and if using Word 97, 
click the Position tab and uncheck Float Over Text; 
if using Word 2000~2003 click the Layout tab and 
select Inline with Text.
b)
Delete the textbox, and reinsert the caption in the 
text layer.
c) If you really need the graphic to float, you can then 
select both the inline graphic and the caption 
simultaneously and put them into a frame.
To put them into a frame you need to use the Insert Frame 
command, which has been cunningly hidden on the Forms 
toolbar; you can get at it by right-clicking on any toolbar, selecting 
the Forms Toolbar, and clicking the Insert Frames button: 
You can make the button more easily accessible for when you 
next need it by selecting Tools + Customize, and holding the Ctrl 
key down while you drag the button from the Forms toolbar to the 
Insert menu, where it rightfully belongs. Or see: 
How can I add 
the Insert Frame command to the Insert menu?.
2.   Floating objects (even frames) can be a maintenance 
nightmare in any document that will ever need to be amended or  
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/DrwGrphcs/DrawLayer.htm (2 of 4)10/16/09 5:36 PM
Library software class:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG Using VB.
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
converter library control is a 100% clean .NET document image solution, which is designed to help .NET developers convert PDF to HTML webpage using simple C#
www.rasteredge.com
The draw layer: a metaphysical space
pasted from.  They should certainly be avoided in long 
documents, unless there is no alternative but to use them.  
Strange things tend to happen when you add text which precedes 
a floating object – such as part of it suddenly appearing in the 
footer of one page and the rest appearing in the header of the 
following page!
You can generally simulate text-wrapping quite convincingly by 
putting your (inline) graphic into one cell of a borderless, single-
row, two-cell table; and putting your text in the other cell.
If you need to have call-outs pointing at various parts of a graphic, 
one way of getting around the problem is to do a screen capture 
of the complete drawing, paste it into a graphics package, crop it, 
then paste it back into Word as an inline graphic.  Or another 
workaround is to create the drawing in another application such 
as PowerPoint, and paste it into Word inline.  There are others as 
well, but these two are probably the simplest.
3.   Floating objects use more memory. This can be an particular 
problem when printing. If your pages fail to print in full or print 
fuzzily, converting floating graphics to inline ones, and using 
tables rather than textboxes, generally fixes it.
Using tables rather than textboxes is usually to be preferred in 
any case – for some reason which I've never understood, 
inexperienced Word users tend to create their “tables” by putting 
several textboxes alongside each other! Please don't fall into this 
trap! Tables are far easier to create, maintain, and work far better 
as tables than textboxes do. Only use textboxes when tables 
really can't be used.
See also  
I inserted some graphics in a document, but now I can't see them; 
or there is just an empty box where one should be; or my graphics 
won't print
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/DrwGrphcs/DrawLayer.htm (3 of 4)10/16/09 5:36 PM
Library software class:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Using this PDF to Word converting library control, .NET developers can quickly convert PDF document to Word file using Visual C# code.
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to SVG in C#.NET. C# Programming Language to Render & Convert PDF to SVG Using C#.NET XDoc.PDF Converter Control.
www.rasteredge.com
The draw layer: a metaphysical space
and the following 
Microsoft Knowledge Base articles:
WD97: General Information about Floating Objects 
WD2000: General Information About Floating Objects
Terms of Use
Disclaimer
Privacy Statement
Contact 
Site MapPage Last Updated: Apr 28, 2007
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/DrwGrphcs/DrawLayer.htm (4 of 4)10/16/09 5:36 PM
Cleaning up text pasted from the Web
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ Site
Home 
Site Map 
Word:mac 
FAQ 
Tutorials 
Downloads 
Find Help 
Suggestions 
Links 
About Us 
Search
Cleaning up text pasted from the Web 
Article contributed by Suzanne S. Barnhill and Dave Rado
The ease of copying and pasting text from Web sites and email greatly simplifies many tasks 
in Word, but problems often arise in making the pasted text conform to the style of the 
document into which it is pasted. One of the most common chores is getting rid of excess line 
breaks, which cause the text to wrap short of the right margin. There are several ways to work 
around this problem.
Assessing the problem text
The most efficient method of reformatting short lines of text depends on whether the breaks 
are line breaks or paragraph breaks. So the first line of attack must be to display nonprinting 
characters using the Show/Hide button on the Standard toolbar. (For more on nonprinting 
characters, see What do all those funny marks, like the dots between the words in my 
document, and the square bullets in the left margin, mean?) If each line ends in a pilcrow 
or paragraph mark (¶), then AutoFormat may be all you need. If each line ends in a bent arrow
(signifying a line break), you will need to use a different approach.
Using AutoFormat
No matter what other options you have enabled on the AutoFormat tab of Tools | AutoCorrect, 
when you select a block of text with a paragraph break at the end of each full line, AutoFormat 
will delete all the paragraph breaks but the last.
Unfortunately, text pasted from the Web or email nowadays rarely has lines ending in 
paragraph breaks. But you can force this format by using Paste Special and selecting 
“Unformatted Text” (in Word 2002, if you have “Paste Options” enabled, you can just Paste 
and then select the “Keep Text Only” option). This pastes your selection with paragraph 
breaks instead of line breaks, and AutoFormat will then do the trick.
Using Find and Replace
Sometimes, however, you will not want to paste as unformatted text. In that case, what you 
will most likely get is text with a line break at the end of each line. Provided there is an empty 
line at the end of each paragraph, cleanup is still relatively simple. It takes just two Find and 
Replace operations.
First pass 
1.
Press Ctrl+H to open the Find and Replace dialog.
2. In the “Find what” box, type ^l^l (those are lowercase Ls, representing two line breaks).
3. In the “Replace with” box, type ^p (the code for a paragraph break).
4.
Replace All. You will now have a paragraph break at the end of each true paragraph.
Second pass 
1. In the “Find what” box, type ^l.
2. In the “Replace with” box, type a space.
3. Replace All.
This removes the line breaks and allows text to wrap naturally.
Harder cases 
If there is not an empty line between paragraphs, you will probably have to insert paragraph 
breaks by hand. If the amount of text is not large, you can scroll through and press Enter 
where a paragraph break is needed. Then replace each line break with a space. This will 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/Formatting/CleanWebText.htm (1 of 2)10/16/09 5:36 PM
Cleaning up text pasted from the Web
leave an extra space at either the beginning or the end of each paragraph. You can use Find 
and Replace again to replace <space>^p or ^p<space> (as appropriate) with ^p. (Note that 
“<space>” represents pressing the spacebar, you don't type “<space>”)!
An alternative approach is to Shift+Enter to enter an extra line break at the end of each 
paragraph, then follow the instructions in the section above.
Even when the amount of text is very large, there is no really good alternative to manual 
editing. But if you Paste Special as Unformatted Text and run AutoFormat, you may find that 
Word is almost as clever as you are at finding where a paragraph ends.
Note that the methods described above are suitable only for simple text. If you have copied 
and pasted an entire Web page, with graphics, tables, and frames, much more work will be 
required to format it for use in a Word document.
Other non-printing characters worth replacing 
Often when you paste from the web, and also from some other applications, characters 
come in which display as paragraph marks but don't behave like “proper” paragraph 
breaks should – they behave like manual line breaks!. So you might find that when you 
center a “paragraph”, several other adjacent paragraphs also get centered. To cure this, 
do a Find and Replace; in the “Find what” box type ^013, in the “Replace with” box, type 
^p and click “Replace All”.
When
pasting
from
the
web,
nonbreaking
spaces
often
come
in,
rather
than
ordinary 
spaces. To get rid of them, do a Find and Replace; in the “Find what” box type ^s, in the 
“Replace with” box, insert a <space> character (press the spacebar), and click “Replace 
All”.
If you want to automate any of the above steps you can record them using the macro 
recorder and play them back as needed.
Neat tip
This following tip has appeared in Woody's Office Watch (WOW). When you cut and paste 
text from a Web site, there are often leading spaces at the beginning of each line. A very 
quick way to remove all these spaces is to select the text, center justify the selection and then 
left justify the selection. All the extra spaces will have disappeared.
Send all feedback to word@mvps.org  
Top  - Ctrl+Home
Previous - Alt+left arrow
Page Updated: 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/Formatting/CleanWebText.htm (2 of 2)10/16/09 5:36 PM
How to create a Mail Merge
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ Site
Home 
Site Map 
Word:mac 
FAQ 
Tutorials 
Downloads 
Find Help 
Suggestions 
Links 
About Us 
Search
How to create a mail merge
Article contributed by Beth Melton and Dave Rado
1. Mail merge basics
2. General mail merge FAQ
3. Related articles on this site
4. Helpful mail merge Knowledge Base articles 
(to return to top, press Ctrl+Home)
1. Mail merge basics
This article will step you through the basics of creating a mail merge and contains links to some of 
the more advanced features.
Sometimes the term “mail merge” can be a little misleading. We assume from the title that the intent 
of mail merge is to produce letters for mass mailing purposes. That's not necessarily the case.
Mail merge is for simplifying repetitive documents and tasks. Mail merge can be used for creating 
many documents at once that contain identical formatting, layout, text, graphics, etc., and where 
only certain portions of each document varies. Mail merge is also used for generating mailing labels, 
envelopes, address lists, personalised training handouts, etc. As well as hard copy mailshots, it can 
be used to generate multiple emails and electronic faxes. And it can even be used to create a 
“friendly” front-end to spreadsheet or database information.
Whenever you need to assemble similar data, mail merge is the answer!
Mail merge primarily consists of two files, the Main Document and the Data Source. The Main 
Document contains the information that will remain the same in each record, and the Data Source 
contains all the variable information, in the form of fields . This is the information that will change in 
the Main Document when the merge is completed. Along with the information that remains the 
same, the Main Document also contains merge fields, which are references to the fields in the Data 
Source.
When the Main Document and Data Source are merged, Microsoft Word replaces each merge field 
in the Main Document with the data from the respective field contained in the Data Source. The end 
result is a third document, a combination of the Main Document and Data Source – although you 
can also mail merge directly to the printer; (or fax or email) – you don't need to create a merged 
document on screen; and you can also “preview” the mail merge without actually merging (using 
the ViewMergedData button).
Step
Comments
1. If you have an existing file you want 
to use as the merge document 
open it now.
For WordPerfect users this would be the primary file
2. Start the Mail Merge Helper by 
going to Tools/Mail Merge.
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/MailMerge/CreateAMailMerge.htm (1 of 5)10/16/09 5:36 PM
How to create a Mail Merge
3. Select the type of Main Document 
you wish to create.
You will be asked whether you 
want to use the Active Window or a 
New Document. To use the 
document you opened in Step 1, 
select Active Window
If you select New Document, Word 
will create a blank document based 
on the Normal template. For most 
purposes it is much better to use a 
template specific to the task in 
hand rather than the Normal 
template; so Active Window is 
usually the better choice.
Form Letters – A Section Break is placed between 
records in the completed merge.
Mailing Labels – Records are merged to a table 
representing the label layout. If you use the wizard to 
create your labels, Word will insert a «Next Record» 
field at the start of every table cell except the first one. 
If creating your own customised label template, you 
will need to insert the «Next Record» fields yourself 
(you can use the “Insert Word Field” button to do this).
Catalog – Records are merged continuously; use for 
mailing lists, telephone directories, etc.
Envelopes – Similar to form letters except that an 
envelope paper definition is used. 
4. Click Get Data to select your Data 
Source. There are four methods 
you can use for your Data Source:
a)
Create Data Source
This uses Word as the Data Source; setup your fields 
and type the data for the first time. The data is then 
stored in a Word table, which can easily be transferred 
to an Excel Data Source later if required.
Note that you may find even a Word Data Source 
easier to set up without the wizard once you know 
what you're doing, as it's nothing more than a Word 
table with the items in the Heading Row of the table 
representing the mail merge fields – although you may 
well need to use Normal View to view all the data in 
the table if you don't want the columns to be incredibly 
narrow. Some experienced users prefer to use the 
wizard for this reason.
b) Open Data Source
Lets you browse to and open a WordExcel, Access 
(or any supported database) or text file Data 
Source.
c)
Use Address Book
Use an Outlook or Outlook Express address book 
as the Data Source. (It can also link up to an 
Exchange *.pab and a Schedule+ Contacts list).
d) Header Options
If a Data Source from another program does not 
contain a Heading Row, or if field names in the 
Heading Row of your Data Source do not match the 
merge fields in your Main Document, you can use a 
separate Header Source and specify the field names.
Field names must be listed in the same order as 
the corresponding information in the Data Source.
Field names in the Header Source must match 
any merge fields you've inserted in the Main 
Document. 
However, where possible, build the Heading Row 
into your Mail Merge Data Source rather than having 
a separate Header Source – it simply makes life 
easier.
Note that if your Data Source does contain a Header 
row, and if you nevertheless use a separate Header 
Source, the Header Row within the Data Source will 
be treated as a mail merge record – so be careful.
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/MailMerge/CreateAMailMerge.htm (2 of 5)10/16/09 5:36 PM
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested