Making your mail merge "intelligent" by using IF fields
4. Inserting different text, depending on various mail merge field 
conditions, in a document such as an offer letter or contract
The same principle can be taken to fairly high levels of sophistication. For example, 
consider that you have a recruitment spreadsheet in which one of the columns flags when 
an offer letter needs to be sent. You can use Mail Merge Query Options to create a 
mailshot to all those people to whom an offer letter needs to be sent. All sorts of details in 
the offer letter will, of course, vary, depending on information in the Excel spreadsheet.
Here is a relatively simple example that you can extrapolate from to create a 
sophisticated offer letter template.
We are now pleased to confirm our offer for the position of { MERGEFIELD JobTitle }  { IF 
{ MERGEFIELD StartDate } = "" ". Please advise us of your earliest start date" ", with effect from 
}{ MERGEFIELD StartDate }.
Which will end up either reading something like this:
We are now pleased to confirm our offer for the position of General Dogsbody. 
Please advise us of your earliest start date.
... or something like this:
We are now pleased to confirm our offer for the position of General Dogsbody, with 
effect from 1 January 2001.
5. Inserting files at certain points in a document,  depending on various 
conditions
You can combine IF fields MERGE fields and INCLUDETEXT fields into a single nested 
field to insert one of two (or more) files, depending on a flag you set in your Data Source, 
as follows:
{ IF { MERGEFIELD ReportType } = "PDD" { INCLUDETEXT I:\\Boilerplates\\PDD1.doc } 
{ INCLUDETEXT I:\\Boilerplates\\Std1.doc } }
To insert part, but not all, of a file, you can mark with a bookmark the section of the file 
which you want to insert, then use a field like:
{ IF { MERGEFIELD ReportType } = "PDD" { INCLUDETEXT I:\\Boilerplates\\PDD1.doc 
MyBookmarkName } { INCLUDETEXT I:\\Boilerplates\\Std1.doc AnotherBookmarkName} }
6. Using (or not using) the MergeFormat switch
To quote from Help, the MERGEFORMAT  switch applies “the formatting of the previous 
result to the new result. For example, if you select the name displayed by the field:
{ AUTHOR \* MERGEFORMAT }
and apply bold formatting, Word retains the bold formatting when the field is updated 
when the author name changes.”
This may or may not the effect you want. If it is , just add the switch at the end of all 
relevant fields, e.g.: 
{ IF { MERGEFIELD Gender } = "Male" "Him" "Her" \* MERGEFORMAT } 
By default, this switch is added automatically if you insert your fields using the Insert
+Field menu. If you don't want it, you can de-select the “Preserve formatting during 
updates” checkbox; or you can display field codes (Alt+F9) and delete the switch 
manually. 
Send all feedback to word@mvps.org  
Top  - Ctrl+Home
Previous - Alt+left arrow
Page Updated: 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/MailMerge/MMergeIfFields.htm (3 of 3)10/16/09 5:37 PM
Converter pdf to powerpoint - software control dll:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Converter pdf to powerpoint - software control dll:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Turning Word into a pseudo-database by using Mail Merge Query Options
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ Site
Home 
Site Map 
Word:mac 
FAQ 
Tutorials 
Downloads 
Find Help 
Suggestions 
Links 
About Us 
Search
Turning Word into a pseudo-database by 
using Mail Merge Query Options
Article contributed by Dave Rado
1. How to access Mail Merge Query Options
2. Re-sending a mailshot letter to just one person
3. Re-sending a mailshot letter to several people (but not to the entire Data Source)
4. Using Query Options to manage multiple different mail merges with a single Data Source
5. Using Query Options to select who to email, who to fax and who to send a letter to
6. Sending a letter to everyone whose birthday falls within the next 7 days
7. Sending a letter to ask for information that is missing from a spreadsheet
8. Using mail merge and Query Options to create a “reader-friendly” front-end for an Excel spreadsheet 
(to return to top, press Ctrl+Home)
1. How to access Mail Merge Query Options
“Mail Merge Query Options” is one of the most powerful features of Word's Mail Merge 
facility.
Purists might argue that the power it gives ordinary users isn't necessary because they 
should use Access queries for this sort of thing and link the merge to the query. But in my 
experience, many people who are very comfortable working with Word and Excel find 
Access (or any full-fledged database application) very difficult to work with, and can get 
the job done far more quickly and easily using a combination of Word and Excel. At the 
end of the day, getting the job done is what matters. The vast majority of the world's 
databases (in terms of number of databases, rather than  in terms of amount of data) are 
stored in Excel spreadsheets.
You can access Mail Merge Query Options by clicking on the “Merge” button on the Mail 
Merge toolbar, and then on the “Query Options” button; or by selecting Tools + Mail 
Merge + Query Options. However, I find the feature so useful that I have added it to my 
Mail Merge toolbar.
One fact that is perhaps not immediately obvious is that when you create a query, the 
query is saved with the mail merge Main Document. This is very powerful, because it 
means you can, for example, have a number of different standard mail merge letters and 
labels all linked to the same Mail Merge Data Source, each with a different set of  query 
options stored with them.
For example, a staff database (which could be an Excel Data Source) could contain a 
whole series of flags:
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/MailMerge/MMergeQueryOptions.htm (1 of 5)10/16/09 5:37 PM
software control dll:C#: How to Use SDK to Convert Document and Image Using XDoc.
You may use our converter SDK to easily convert PDF, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Tiff, and Dicom files to raster images like Jpeg, Png, Bmp and Gif.
www.rasteredge.com
software control dll:C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document
Microsoft PowerPoint to PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.Converter ›› C# Converter: PowerPoint to PDF. You maybe interested: PDF in C#,
www.rasteredge.com
Turning Word into a pseudo-database by using Mail Merge Query Options
1. A column flagging when each person's birthday is getting close, so that a standard 
“happy birthday” mailshot can use that in its query; and another column flagging 
whether or not the letter's already been sent (so they don't get mailed twice)
2.
A column showing their employee status, another showing their Line Manager, and if 
their employee status is “Contractor”, a column showing their contract expiry date. A 
standard letter could be saved with a query on these columns in order to mailshot 
their line managers when the Contract is about to expire
... and so on.
Here are a few examples of how you can make your mail merges more powerful using 
Query Options, starting with some very simple examples and getting more complex (and 
powerful) as we go on.
2. Re-sending a mailshot letter to just one person
If somebody didn't receive your letter, the simplest way to re-send just their letter is to do 
a query on their first and last name as shown below.
3. Re-sending a mailshot letter to several people (but not to the entire 
Data Source)
Create a field (a column if you are using a Word or Excel Data Source) called 
“SendAgain”. Put a “Y” in that column against the rows you want the letter to be re-sent 
to. Save, switch back to Word, close the document and open it again to refresh it, and set 
up the Query Options dialog as follows:
Or, for example, if you want to send a follow-up letter to people who haven't yet replied to 
the first mailshot, you could have a mail merge field called “Replied”. When a reply 
comes in, put a Y against the relevant record in the “Replied” column. When it comes to 
time to chase up the stragglers, you can just set up the Query Options to Replied/Not 
Equal to/Y, to send the follow-up letter to those who haven't yet replied.
4. Using Query Options to manage multiple different mail merges with a 
single Data Source
Take the following scenario:
“We have a large mailing list that we use to post invitations (our community and 
education department), and send information to various individuals and charity 
organisations. We have different groups (one for xmas, invitations, etc); and one 
person can belong to many groups. At the moment they have to update a lot of 
duplicates because a person exists in many groups. I would like have one master 
list with addresses and some kind of a code or index. I would like to stay away 
from databases.”
This is easy. In your Data Source (your “master list”), create a column for each “group”; i.
e. a column called “XmasLetter”, etc. To put someone into a particular group, simply put 
a “Y” in that column against that person's row. Then set up all your standard letters with 
the appropriate Query Options saved with the letter.
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/MailMerge/MMergeQueryOptions.htm (2 of 5)10/16/09 5:37 PM
software control dll:XDoc.Converter for .NET, Support Documents and Images Conversion
file converter SDK supports various commonly used document and image file formats, including Microsoft Office (2003 and 2007) Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, Tiff
www.rasteredge.com
software control dll:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Online Powerpoint to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue
www.rasteredge.com
Turning Word into a pseudo-database by using Mail Merge Query Options
So for the standard Christmas letter, for example, the Query Options dialog should read 
XmasLetter/ Equal to/Y.
When you save the letter, the Query Options are saved as well, so from then on you can 
just open the appropriate standard letter whenever you need to do a mailshot, click on the 
“Merge” button, and you're done.
5. Using Query Options to select who to email, who to fax and who to 
send a letter to
You could have three Word documents attached to the same Data Source, each saved 
with different Query Options:
The email would have its Query Options set to EmailAddress/Is not blank.
The fax would have its Query Options set to EmailAddress/Is blank and FaxNo/Is 
not blank.
The letter would have its Query Options set to EmailAddress/Is blank and FaxNo/Is 
blank.
6. Sending a letter to everyone whose birthday falls within the next 7 
days
Assuming you have an Excel spreadsheet containing names, addresses and dates of 
birth:
1.
Create a column called “Birthday”. Use a formula such as the following to calculate 
the person's birthday from their date of birth:
=(DAY(C2)&"/"&MONTH(C2)&"/"&YEAR(TODAY()))
In the US you would swap the day and month round:
=(MONTH(C2)&"/"&DAY(C2)&"/"&"/"&YEAR(TODAY()))
The above formula assumes that the current row is Row 2, and that the date of birth 
is in Column C. It takes the day and month from their date of birth, shoves the 
current year at the end, and displays the result. Having created the formula in one 
cell, you can drag it down to Autofill the remainder of the column.
2. Create another column called “BirthdayFlag”. Use a formula such as the following to 
calculate whether their birthday falls within the next 7 days:
=IF(TODAY()>DATEVALUE(D2),"Whoops, too late!",IF(TODAY()+7>=DATEVALUE
(D2),"Send now",""))
If their birthday has already passed, it will display “Whoops, too late!”. Otherwise, if 
their birthday falls within the next 7 days, it will display “Send now”, and if it's more 
than 7 days until their birthday, it won't display anything.
You could refine it further by adding a column called “LetterSent”, and putting a Y in 
that column when you've sent the letter.
3. In Word create a standard “birthday letter”, and in the Query Options dialog, set the 
BirthdayFlag/Equal to/Y; and LetterSent/Is blank.
Create a second “happy belated birthday” standard letter with BirthdayFlag/Equal 
to/Whoops, too late!; and LetterSent/Is blank.
Open both letters once a week, merge, and you're done – again, you only ever need 
to set the query options once.
The principle illustrated by this example can be used for all sorts of useful mail merges – 
for instance, for sending reminders to managers who have contractors working for them, 
when the contract period is about to expire. 
7. Sending a letter to ask for information that is missing from a 
spreadsheet
Consider the following scenario:
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/MailMerge/MMergeQueryOptions.htm (3 of 5)10/16/09 5:37 PM
software control dll:RasterEdge XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET - SDK for PowerPoint Document
Able to view and edit PowerPoint rapidly. Convert. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Convert PowerPoint to HTML5. Convert PowerPoint to Tiff. Convert PowerPoint to Jpeg
www.rasteredge.com
software control dll:C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit
View PDF in WPF; C#.NET: View Word in WPF; C#.NET: View Excel in WPF; C#.NET: View PowerPoint in WPF; C#.NET: View Tiff in WPF. XDoc.Converter for C#; XDoc.PDF
www.rasteredge.com
Turning Word into a pseudo-database by using Mail Merge Query Options
“I have a large Excel database with some missing information. I would like to 
create a form letter that asks the recipient for the missing information.
What I'd like to do is write a letter that says, “For the patient X, we are missing 
the following information: Date of birth, Diagnostic, Dossier Number. For the 
patient Y, we are missing  ... ” etc., where Date of birth, Diagnostic, Dossier 
Number are all the names of columns in the Excel document.”
For this you would need to use IF fields  in the form letter, with the construction “If the 
Date of Birth field is blank, display the text “Date of birth”, otherwise display nothing.”
Trying to have several such fields on a single line, separated by commas, would require 
tortuous logic in order to get the IF fields to suppress all unnecessary commas, so it's 
easiest to use a bulleted list for this sort of thing:
For the patient X, we are missing the following information:
{ IF { MERGEFIELD DateOfBirth } = "" "Date of birth" "" }
{ IF { MERGEFIELD Diagnostic } = "" "Diagnostic" "" }
Note that, blank paragraphs which contain mail merge fields nested within an IF field are 
not suppressed when you merge. You can get round this problem by merging to a new 
document rather than directly to the printer, and then doing a Find and Replace replacing 
^p^p with ^p, to remove all blank paragraphs from the merged document.
Finally, use Query Options to strip out records for which no information is missing. You 
could do this by setting the relevant fields in the Query Options dialog to “Is not blank”. 
However, this only works with up to 5 fields (a limitation of the dialog). To get round this 
limitation, you can add a column in the spreadsheet called “IsBlank” containing a formula 
of the type:
=OR(ISBLANK(A2),ISBLANK(B2),ISBLANK(C2),ISBLANK(D2))
This formula will display “True” if any of the cells A2, B2, C2 or D2 are blank, and will 
display “False” if none of them are blank. You can then simply set up the Query Options 
dialog to merge with all records for which the “IsBlank” field is equal to True.
8. Using mail merge and Query Options to create a “reader-friendly” 
front-end for an Excel spreadsheet
Take the following scenario:
“We are having a recruitment drive. We have advertised in various media and 
have also contacted various agencies.  We are recording all the details of any job 
applications we receive in an Excel spreadsheet, together with interview dates 
etc.; but the spreadsheet has more than 30 columns, and trying to make head or 
tail of the information does our eyes in. What we need is a sort of database that 
allows me to see all the information about a particular candidate laid out nicely, 
so it's easy to read; and which lets me look at for example, only the candidates 
who have an interview tomorrow. I want it to be easy to look at this information 
both on screen and in a print-out. I'd rather not use Access”
This is very simple to set up using a mail merge. Design a mail merge form in Word (not 
with form fields, but laid out like a form), with the 30+ mail merge fields laid out logically 
on the page, making sure they all fit on a page, and attached to the Excel spreadsheet.
Save multiple copies of the form, one for each report you need.
For instance, one could be called “InterviewsTomorrow.Doc”, and it would have a query 
saved with it which filtered just those records in which the interview date is tomorrow's 
date. To do this, you could add a column in the Excel spreadsheet called 
“InterviewTomorrow” containing a formula such as:
=IF(TODAY()+1=D2, "Y", "")
.. where column D contained the interview date. This would display “Y” if the interview 
date was tomorrow, and display nothing otherwise. Then you could set the Query Options 
to filter those records for which the field “InterviewTomorrow” is equal to Y.
As part of the query you can also store how you want the information to be sorted
so each query could be sorted differently (for the “InterviewTomorrow” query you might 
want to sort by interviewer, and then by interview time, for example). In the Query 
Options dialog, click on the “Sort Records” tab.
Once you've saved all the different versions of the form, each with its own unique query, 
you can simply open the documents whenever you like, to view or print the information, 
nicely laid out, and filtered and sorted appropriately.
To see the records on screen, don't do a merge. Instead, click on the ViewMergedData 
button on the mail merge toolbar to see the data on screen without merging; and use the 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/MailMerge/MMergeQueryOptions.htm (4 of 5)10/16/09 5:37 PM
software control dll:C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET
RasterEdge Visual C# .NET PowerPoint to PDF converter library control (XDoc.PowerPoint) is a mature and effective PowerPoint document converting utility.
www.rasteredge.com
software control dll:VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
editing if they integrate this VB.NET PDF converter control with for converting MicroSoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint document to PDF file in VB
www.rasteredge.com
Turning Word into a pseudo-database by using Mail Merge Query Options
Next Record and Previous Record buttons to skip through the records:
This is much quicker and more convenient than doing a full merge, and gives you similar 
functionality to a conventional database application.
If you want to print the report, click on the Merge button and select “Merge to printer”.
Send all feedback to word@mvps.org  
Top  - Ctrl+Home
Previous - Alt+left arrow
Page Updated: 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/MailMerge/MMergeQueryOptions.htm (5 of 5)10/16/09 5:37 PM
Using MacroButton fields
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ Site
Home 
Site Map 
Word:mac 
FAQ 
Tutorials 
Downloads 
Find Help 
Suggestions 
Links 
About Us 
Search
Using MacroButton fields
Article contributed by Graham MayorJonathan West and Hak-lok Ng 
The macrobutton field can be used as a text marker within a template, or, as the name 
implies, it can be used to run a macro.
Using MacroButton fields as a text marker
You can use a MacroButton field that doesn't actually run a macro but simply displays a 
prompt and allows the user to click on the prompt and type. To do this, insert a field like:
{ MACROBUTTON NoMacro [Click here and type name] }
Change “Click here and type name” to whatever text you require. Press F9 to update the 
field, which will also display the display text instead of the field code: 
See Microsoft's fax templates (which are supplied with Word) for examples of this. Also see:
How to create a template that makes it easy for users to “fill in the blanks”, without 
doing any programming.
Using {MacroButton} fields to run a macro
For this, use a field like this:
{ MACROBUTTON MyMacroName [Double-click here to run macro] }
See: Run a macro when a user double-clicks a button in the document for more details of 
how to create the field.
Macro button fields can make it very easy to set up fairly sophisticated templates with very 
little programming effort. For example, see:
Using {Macrobutton} fields to insert information from the Outlook Address Book into 
documents such as letters.
But they can be useful for all sorts of things – for some more examples, see:
Using hyperlinks in protected forms 
Enable a user to double-click text in a document to change its value 
Organizing your macros 
Also see the checkboxes in the Microsoft Fax templates which are supplied with Word, where 
the macros associated with the fields insert AutoText entries, one AutoText entry being a 
MacroButton field containing a checked checkbox symbol, the other being a MacroButton field 
containing an unchecked one. If you copy those fields, and the macros and AutoText entries 
associated with them (using the Organiser) into your own templates, you can use them 
unmodified.  
“Passing arguments” to MacroButton fields
Macros assigned to MacroButton fields cannot take arguments. In fact if you want to be 
semantic, macros cannot take arguments, ever, because a macro is defined as a public 
subroutine that takes no arguments, which is why subroutines that do take arguments are not 
shown in the list when you select Tools + Macro + Macros.
However, depending on your situation, you can get round this in a number of ways, the best 
two (depending on the circumstances) being.
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/TblsFldsFms/UsingMacroButton.htm (1 of 2)10/16/09 5:37 PM
Using MacroButton fields
1. Your macro can read the value from a Custom Document Property, or a Document 
Variable.
2. You can insert a Private field within your MacroButton field. The first thing your macro 
should do is look for the code of the Private field (which by definition will be the second 
field of the Selection) and read the value that you want to pass
This method is especially good if you have more than one MacroButton field in a single 
document which you want to call the same macro, but with the macro operating on a 
different variable in each case.
For example, you could create a nested field as follows:
{ { Private Hello world }Macrobutton TestMacro [Double-click to run macro]}
... which would display: 
... and the macro could look like this:
Sub TestMacro() 
Dim MyString As String 
'Ignore first 9 characters of the private field - 
the word 'Private', and the spaces 
MyString = Mid$(Selection.Fields(2).Code, 9) 
MsgBox MyString 
End Sub
3. Instead of a Private field, you could use an Addin field within your MacroButton field. An 
Addin field is very similar to a Private field but even more private - see Using Addin 
Fields.
Note that the order matters; the following works as one would wish it to:
Macrobutton TestMacro [Double-click to run macro]{ Addin }}
... but the following makes the MacroButton field's display text invisible:
{ { Addin }Macrobutton TestMacro [Double-click to run macro]}
The macro could look like this:
Sub TestMacro() 
Dim MyString As String 
MyString = Selection.Fields(2).Data 
MsgBox MyString 
End Sub
Send all feedback to word@mvps.org  
Top  - Ctrl+Home
Previous - Alt+left arrow
Page Updated: 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/TblsFldsFms/UsingMacroButton.htm (2 of 2)10/16/09 5:37 PM
Creating a Template – The Basics (Part I)
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ Site
Home 
Site Map 
Word:mac 
FAQ 
Tutorials 
Downloads 
Find Help 
Suggestions 
Links 
About Us 
Search
Creating a Template – The Basics (Part I)
Article contributed by Suzanne S. Barnhill
You can actually get some help in template creation from Word's online Help if you look under “templates, 
creating.” (In Word 2007, look at the “How to create a template” portion of the Help topic “Creating 
Microsoft Office Word 2007 templates.”) But first you need to understand what a template is, what it is 
not, and when you need to create one. Then we’ll look at the basics of how to create a template.
What is a template?
In the most general sense, a template  is a pattern or model on which something else is based. It might be 
a shape that you trace around or an outline of suggested content. In Word, however, the word template  
has a specific technical sense; it is a particular kind of file, with a different file extension from a document (.
dot, .dotx, or .dotm instead of .doc or .docx).
Templates in Word are generally stored in a different location from documents, and you will rarely open 
one directly after creating it. Instead, you will use it as the basis for creating new documents.
Word comes with a number of built-in templates, but you may be unaware of them if you have never visited 
the dialog where they live. What you get when you press Ctrl+N to create a new document in any version 
is a Blank Document based on the default template, which is called Normal (Normal.dotm in Word 2007, 
Normal.dot in previous versions), but Word also offers templates expressly designed for specific types of 
documents: letters, reports, fax cover sheets, and the like. These are accessed as follows:
l
Word 2000 and earlier: Select New…  on the File menu. This opens the New dialog (see figure 
below).
l
Word 2002 and 2003: Select New…  on the File menu. This opens the New Document task pane, 
where you can either select a recently used template or click on “General Templates” (Word 2002) 
or “On my computer…” (Word 2003) to open the Templates dialog (which is just the New dialog 
with a different name).
l
Word 2007: Click the Office Button and select New. This opens the New Document dialog, which 
initially displays “Blank and recent” templates—that is, the Blank Document and any other 
templates you have used recently. The Recently Used Templates pane will be empty until you 
have used other templates, which you can find under Installed Templates  (the ones that ship with 
Word) or My templates… (the ones you have created).
Many, many more templates are available for download from the Office Template Gallery, which can be 
accessed directly from Word 2002 and above:
l
Word 2002: In the New Document task pane, click  “Templates on Microsoft.com.”
l
Word 2003: In the New Document task pane, click on “Templates on Office Online.” 
l
Word 2007: In the New Document dialog, click on Microsoft Office Online.
What a template is not
Although many of the templates you can download from Microsoft Office Online contain sample content, a 
template is not really about content but about structure and layout. A template is designed to provide 
specific page layout (page size and orientation, margins, number of columns, and so on), and styles for the 
types of paragraphs most likely to be used in the given type of document. It may also contain tools to 
facilitate using the included styles and other features. These tools include Building Blocks or AutoText 
entries, macros, keyboard shortcuts, and (in Word 2003 and earlier) custom menus and toolbars.
Some templates do contain boilerplate content: a template for a letter, for example, will perhaps have a 
letterhead on the first page, page numbering, and perhaps an automatic date field. In addition to custom 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/Customization/CreateATemplatePart1.htm (1 of 5)10/16/09 5:38 PM
Creating a Template – The Basics (Part I)
styles for the parts of a letter (Inside Address, Reference Line, Salutation, Body Text, Complimentary 
Close, Signature, Copy List, and so on), it may have dummy paragraphs or text entry fields indicating 
where these parts go.
In general, however, the content of a document is up to the writer. Users often ask for “templates” for very 
specific content, such as a letter protesting an unfair dismissal or a letter to customers of a business 
thanking them for their patronage. You may actually find such samples among those available in the 
Template Gallery at Microsoft Office Online. Viewed from a layout perspective, however, such letters are 
just letters. They can be created using a generic letter template or from scratch, assuming the writer knows 
how to write a letter. What the user is really looking for is a model or sample document that would provide 
suggested wording for such a letter. That is not what a “template” is in Word.
On the other hand, users’ needs are sometimes are more related to layout: “a Request for Proposal 
template to hire a building designer for a residence” or “a restaurant evaluation sheet template” or “a flyer 
template for an AA – Al-Anon Event.” In such cases, finding a readymade template is unlikely, though it 
may be possible to find a generic template that can be adapted. In the last analysis, however, the user is 
still looking for a model or sample rather than a template—just something to copy or build on; even a 
sample document would suffice.
When to create a template
There are several ways to create a new document in Word:
l
Click New on the Standard toolbar (Word 2003 and earlier) or select Blank Document in the New 
Document dialog in Word 2007. Alternatively, press Ctrl+N. This will create a new Blank 
Document based on the Normal template, which contains all the styles available in Word. You can 
modify these styles as desired, and you can change the layout of the document in any way you 
wish.
Note: By default the Quick Access Toolbar (QAT) in Word 2007 does not have a New button that 
automatically creates a new document based on the Normal template. To add the New button, click the 
arrow (More button) at the end of the QAT and then click New.
l
Open an existing document as the basis for a new one. The natural tendency of most users of word 
processing applications is to create a document and use it as a model for future documents. That 
is, you format a letter the way you want all (or most) of your letters to look, save it, and then, when 
you want to write a letter, open this document and save it under another name as the starting point 
for your letter. While this technique is a practical approach in some instances, there is always a risk 
that you will forget to use Save As and will instead overwrite your original document.
l
Create a new document using an existing document as a quasi-template. This is a way to reuse a 
document without risk because a document created this way is unnamed; the first time you click the 
Save button or press Ctrl+S, you will get the Save As dialog, which requires you to name the 
document and choose a place to save it.
l
Word 2002 and 2003: In the New Document task pane, choose New | From existing 
document… Browse for the document in the New from Existing Document dialog and click on 
Create New.
l
Word 2007: New from existing…  is one of the options in the New Document dialog. Browse for 
the document in the New from Existing Document dialog and click on Create New.
l
You can actually accomplish the same thing in any version of Word by right-clicking on a document 
file in the Open dialog or Windows Explorer/My Computer and choosing New.
l
Create a new document based on a different template, either one of those that ship with Word 
(Installed Templates ) or one you have created, by selecting it in the New, Templates, or New 
Document dialog.
The whole point of a Word template is to create a format that can be used over and over again. 
Accordingly, it is unnecessary and a waste of time to create a template for a single-use document. 
Creating a template for letters makes sense; creating a template for a letter protesting one’s unfair 
dismissal does not. A template for flyers for AA – Al-Anon events may make sense if the events are 
frequent and the flyers should be consistent in design; if the event is a one-off, a document will suffice.
So, before you set out to create a template, you should ask yourself whether it is something you would use 
repeatedly. Often this realization comes after you’ve recreated the same document format numerous 
times, changing margins, modifying styles, changing fonts. It occurs to you that you could save time in the 
creation of such documents if you didn’t have to make all these changes. That’s when you need a template.
In addition, there are advantages to true templates that cannot be achieved with documents used as 
templates. Although it is now possible to save macros, a customized QAT (toolbars and  menus in earlier 
versions), and keyboard shortcuts in documents, Building Blocks (AutoText entries in earlier versions) 
must still be saved in templates. And the New/Templates/New Document dialog actually makes it easier 
to access templates than to search for documents.
If you create a specific kind of document (such as letters) almost exclusively, your first impulse may be to 
just make the necessary changes to the Normal template, so that you get a document formatted the way 
you want when you click the New button. This can be a solution up to a point, but please note the caveats 
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/Customization/CreateATemplatePart1.htm (2 of 5)10/16/09 5:38 PM
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested