9
I-BEST and non-I-BEST students. These colleges include 
a mix of students in their I-BEST programs for a variety 
of reasons. Several indicated that mixing students in the 
classroom provides opportunities for stronger students 
to support weaker students and that such mixing better 
integrates I-BEST students into the college environment. 
Some colleges admit non-I-BEST students into the courses 
out of necessity. Programs that have difficulty recruiting 
a full cohort of I-BEST students can meet enrollment 
requirements by allowing non-I-BEST students into the 
courses. Only I-BEST students generate the richer FTE 
funding, however.
3.2  Fields of Study and Employment 
Preparation
I-BEST programs are designed to prepare low-income 
students for further education and jobs in high-demand, 
high-wage industries.  As shown in Table 1, health care, 
manufacturing, education, and business are the most 
common fields of study for I-BEST programs, accounting 
for 88 percent of the I-BEST programs. 
In addition to targeting fields of study with plentiful 
employment opportunities, I-BEST programs prepare 
students for jobs with high wages. In fact, I-BEST program 
applications must include information on potential 
wages for completers based on state labor market 
data and information from local employers, as shown in 
Table 2. The median potential hourly wage across the 
programs is $14.25, with a minimum median wage of 
$8.51 (in child care
8
) and a maximum median wage of 
$27.31 (in electronics manufacturing). Programs with 
the lowest median wages include child care, home care, 
and education. Those with the highest median wages 
include information technology; nursing; and heating, 
ventilating, and air conditioning. Findings on actual wages 
earned by I-BEST students are presented in a companion 
quantitative analysis (Zeidenberg et al., 2010). 
3.3 Program Duration
Figure 1 shows that the majority of I-BEST programs 
(79 percent) are three quarters or less in length, and more 
than half (54 percent) are two quarters or less.
9
Some 
program staff believed that shorter I-BEST programs are 
Table 1 
I-BEST Programs by Field of Study
Field of Study
Number of 
Programs
Percentage 
of Programs
Health Care
44
32%
Nursing/Nursing Assistant
18
Medical Assisting
6
Medical Technology/Technician
5
Other Health Occupation
15
Manufacturing, Construction,  
Repair and Transportation
32
23%
Education
24
18%
Business
20
15%
Secretarial Services 
10
Administration and Management
5
Other Business
5
STEM
10
7%
Computer and Information Systems
5
Engineering and Engineering Technology
3
Other STEM
2
Protective Services – Corrections
3
2%
Foreign Languages – Interpreter
2
1%
Communications – Print
1
1%
Consumer Services
1
1%
Total
137
100%
Source: I-BEST program applications submitted to the SBCTC.
Note: N = 137.
Table 2
Potential Wages for I-BEST Completers
Field of Study
Median Hourly Wage, 
in Dollars
Language Translation
20.00
Protective Services
17.46
STEM
17.13
Manufacturing, Construction, Repair 
and Transportation
16.30
Consumer Services
13.22
Health Care
13.20
Communications 
13.00
Business
12.37
Education
9.62
Source: I-BEST program applications submitted to the SBCTC.
Note: Program applications were submitted over several years.  
Median wages were identified at the time of submission.
8  The SBCTC requires all I-BEST program proposals to provide labor market data showing evidence of jobs for I-BEST completers at a minimum of $13 
per hour. Child care is an exception to this requirement because of the state interest in this occupation.
9
The Washington State community and technical colleges operate on a quarter system.
Pdf to powerpoint conversion - control Library platform:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf to powerpoint conversion - control Library platform:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
10
better suited to the target student populations because 
students eager to earn a credential for additional job 
opportunities may want to complete a program quickly. 
Also, longer programs can initially seem overwhelming. A 
program administrator at a college with both longer and 
shorter I-BEST programs argued, “One year for people 
who have not taken college-level classes and have not 
paid full tuition before is too long. It is a lot more realistic 
to expect more retention and better outcomes with one 
quarter to two quarters.”
Table 3 shows the number of students who enrolled in 
each type of program during the 2006-07 and 2007-08 
academic years.
4. I-BEST Students
4.1 Characteristics
To better understand the characteristics of I-BEST 
students, we distinguished them from two mutually 
exclusive comparison groups taken from the more 
general population of basic skills students. Table 4 shows 
characteristics of three groups of basic skills students 
in the 2006-07 and 2007-08 academic years: (1) I-BEST 
students, (2) non-I-BEST workforce students, and (3) 
non-I-BEST non-workforce students.
10
In 2006-07 and 
2007-08, there were 2,025 I-BEST students across the 
34 colleges. Over the same time period, there were 
7,933 basic skills students who did not enroll in I-BEST 
but took at least one professional-technical course on 
their own, referred to as non-I-BEST workforce students. 
This group of students is most comparable to I-BEST 
students because enrolling in a professional-technical 
course indicates a desire to pursue occupational training. 
The third group, referred to as non-I-BEST non-workforce 
students, consisted of basic skills students who did not 
enroll in I-BEST or take a professional-technical course. 
There were 79,104 students in this group.
Some noteworthy similarities and differences emerge 
when comparing I-BEST students with the two larger 
groups of basic skills students. As shown in Table 4, 
I-BEST and non-I-BEST workforce students were much 
more likely to have come from ABE/GED courses (as 
opposed to ESL) than the larger population of non-
I-BEST non-workforce students. This is interesting 
because, as illustrated in Figure 2, the majority (86 
percent) of I-BEST programs were designed for both 
ABE/GED and ESL student populations while only 
a few programs were designed specifically for ESL 
students (12 percent) and even fewer specifically for 
ABE/GED students (2 percent). One possible reason for 
the low percentage of ESL students in I-BEST programs 
is ESL students’ self-perception that they lack the 
English language proficiency needed to succeed in the 
professional-technical courses. 
I-BEST students were, on average, more likely than other 
basic skills students to be older, female, and to have a 
GED or high school diploma. Table 5 shows the means for 
the earliest CASAS assessment scores of the three groups 
of basic skills students. I-BEST students had CASAS 
scores that were slightly higher but similar to non-I-BEST 
workforce students (slightly higher on math and reading, 
with a more notable difference on listening). Both these 
groups scored higher than the larger population of non-
I-BEST non-workforce students (particularly on reading 
and listening). These differences may be a result of the 
requirements for different I-BEST programs, which, in 
Figure 1
I-BEST Program Length
Source: I-BEST program applications submitted by colleges to the SBCTC.
Note: N = 127. Ten programs were missing data.
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
Less than 
1 quarter
Length of
Program
Number of Programs
1 quarter 2 quarters 3 quarters 4 quarters More than
4 quarters
10
The term “workforce students” is used here to refer to professional-technical education students. “Non-I-BEST workforce students” are basic skills 
students who took at least one professional-technical course on their own (i.e., not through I-BEST) during the study period.
control Library platform:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
area. Then just wait until the conversion from Powerpoint to PDF is complete and download the file. The perfect conversion tool.
www.rasteredge.com
control Library platform:C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
And detailed C# demo codes for these conversions are offered below. C# Demo Codes for PowerPoint Conversions. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
www.rasteredge.com
11
some cases, required students to score in a higher sub-
range of scores on the CASAS than non-I-BEST students 
(see section 4.2 below for additional information on 
I-BEST program eligibility requirements).
Program staff and instructors noted that many I-BEST 
students have had poor experiences with (or long 
absences from) previous education endeavors and 
that they are self-motivated but lack self-confidence. 
Respondents identified several characteristics of 
students who tend to do well in I-BEST programs. 
They were described as being mature and motivated, 
having few personal and life problems, having 
experience in the job market, and being clearly aware 
of the demands of the I-BEST program and feeling 
able to meet them — qualities much like those of 
successful students generally.
Table 3
I-BEST Student Enrollments by Program Concentration, Grouped by Field of Study
Field of Study
Number of Students, by Year
Total Number  
of Students,
2006-08
Percentage  
of Students,
2006-08
2006-07
2007-08
Health Care
25.5%
Nursing/Nursing Assistant
83
248
331
Medical Assisting
95
144
239
Medical Technology/Technician
6
10
16
Dental Technology/Technician
1
0
1
Other Health
34
65
99
Manufacturing, Construction, Repair, and 
Transportation
143
252
395
14.7%
Education
61
181
242
9.0%
Business
8.5%
Administration and Management
35
68
103
Secretarial Services
20
65
85
Other Business
14
28
42
Protective Services – Corrections
49
52
101
3.8%
STEM
2.1%
Computer and Information Systems
8
34
42
Engineering and Engineering Technology
0
14
14
Mathematics and Science
0
Other STEM
1
1
2
Communications
5
5
10
0.4%
Foreign Languages – Interpreter
2
6
8
0.3%
Consumer Services
0.1%
Cosmetology
0
0
0
Other Consumer Services
0
2
2
Other Fields of Study
69
137
206
7.7%
No Instructional Program Classification Given
275
474
749
27.9%
Total
901
1,786
2,687
100‮0%
Source: Program enrollment data from SBCTC.
control Library platform:.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
XDoc.PDF SDK for .NET. RasterEdge XDoc.PDF for .NET is a professional .NET PDF solution that provides complete and advanced PDF document processing features.
www.rasteredge.com
control Library platform:VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
Conversion of MS Office to PDF. This guide give a series of demo code directly for converting MicroSoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint document to PDF file
www.rasteredge.com
12
4.2 Program Eligibility Requirements
The SBCTC’s only eligibility requirement for I-BEST is 
that students must score below 256 (the same cut score 
for placement into adult basic education) on the CASAS 
assessment, leaving other eligibility decisions to be made 
at the local level in order to best ensure students’
success. Additional eligibility requirements imposed 
by colleges can make recruitment more complex, by 
further delineating CASAS score ranges, instituting other 
measures of academic preparedness, and mandating 
background checks.
Table 4
Characteristics of Basic Skills Students, 2006-07 and 2007-08
Student Characteristics
I-BEST
Non-I-BEST  
Workforce
Non-I-BEST 
Non-Workforce
Number of Students in Program
2,025
7,933
79,104
Program Classification
I-BEST Student
100%
0.0%
0.0%
ABE/GED Student
77.0%
79.4%
45.6%
ESL Student
23.1%
20.7%
54.4%
Non-IB Workforce Student
0.0%
100.0%
0.0%
Social Characteristics
Mean Age
32.1
27.7
30.7
Female
66.3%
62.3%
54.3%
Hispanic
18.8%
16.4%
36.2%
Black, Non-Hispanic
9.8%
11.0%
7.4%
Asian/Pacific Islander
10.1%
8.6%
12.2%
Single w/ Dependent
21.4%
21.0%
13.2%
Married w/ Dependent
23.8%
15.0%
23.8%
Disabled 
7.2%
7.7%
3.6%
Current Schooling Characteristics
Intent is Vocational
a
75.1%
51.5%
19.7%
Intent is Academic
7.5%
9.6%
7.2%
Enrolled Full Time
66.8%
57.8%
28.3%
Previous Schooling 
Mean College Credits
7.6
4.1
0.5
Mean Vocational Credits
4.0
2.5
0.3
GED
12.2%
9.8%
4.1%
High School Graduate
29.6%
19.2%
15.0%
Some College
10.3%
6.8%
4.0%
Certificate
3.9%
2.5%
1.5%
Associate Degree
2.4%
1.8%
1.4%
Bachelor's Degree
3.5%
2.4%
3.5%
Running Start (dual enrollment) student
1.9%
2.4%
0.3%
Source: Program enrollment data from SBCTC.
a Vocational and academic intent indicates the type of college program that the student intends to pursue. If vocational, the student would pursue workforce training; if 
academic, the student would pursue a program that leads to a degree and/or transfer to a four-year institution. Students do not always follow their stated intent, and students’ 
intent can change over time, sometimes in response to their educational experience (see Bailey, Jenkins, & Leinbach, 2006).
control Library platform:C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
C#.NET PDF - PDF Conversion & Rendering SDK for C#.NET. A best C# PDF converter control for adobe PDF document conversion in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.rasteredge.com
control Library platform:C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document. Provide Free Demo Code for PDF Conversion from Microsoft PowerPoint in C# Program.
www.rasteredge.com
13
In fact, some I-BEST programs require potential 
participants to complete a program application covering 
information about a student’s career goals, ability to 
attend classes, and willingness to pay tuition or apply 
for financial aid. Thus, a college’s I-BEST eligibility 
requirements often influence program enrollments.
Eligibility requirements have evolved over time as the 
colleges better identified the skill levels that students 
need to be successful in I-BEST. A common change at 
many of the colleges was to raise the minimum score 
requirement on the CASAS assessment to increase the 
skill level of students enrolling in I-BEST programs. In 
these cases, colleges outlined a sub-range of CASAS 
scores representing higher skill levels that students must 
meet to qualify for I-BEST. 
Some colleges reported that faculty feedback resulted in 
changes to eligibility requirements. At one college, I-BEST 
instructors found that large numbers of their students were 
unable to successfully complete the sequence of I-BEST 
courses, so they worked with program staff to develop 
proficiency levels with specific minimum cut scores to 
ensure that students entering the programs are adequately 
prepared to succeed in the I-BEST program and transition 
to the next level of education and training. Students who 
do not meet the minimum test score requirements are 
either referred to additional basic skills coursework or 
placed into a pre-I-BEST program to refresh their skills. 
The text box on p. 14 (Pre-I-BEST Programs) describes 
college support for student transitions. Also at this college, 
I-BEST faculty and staff recognized that students were 
having difficulty completing their GED tests after they 
enrolled in I-BEST. The college thus decided to institute 
an additional eligibility requirement, that students must 
complete at least three of the five GED tests before they 
can enroll in I-BEST.
4.3 Recruitment and Screening
A major recruitment source for I-BEST programs is each 
college’s own basic skills courses. On-campus recruitment 
strategies include structured in-class presentations by 
I-BEST staff, basic skills instructors’ talking about the 
program with their students, I-BEST informational sessions 
for interested students, flyers and brochures, referrals from 
counselors and advisors, and word-of-mouth. I-BEST 
program staff reported that there are several advantages 
to recruiting from basic skills classes on campus. 
Recruiters are able to target classes at the appropriate 
skill levels and work with instructors who help to identify 
students who could benefit from I-BEST. Respondents 
also reported that students currently enrolled in regular 
basic skills courses might be more receptive to the 
concept of I-BEST than potential participants from outside 
Figure 2
Student Population Focus of I-BEST Programs
Source: I-BEST program applications submitted to the SBCTC.
Note: N = 133. Four programs were missing data.
ESL 12%
ABE/GED 2%
ABE/GED and ESL 86%
Table 5
Means of Earliest CASAS Scores: Basic Skills Population, 2006-07 and 2007-08
Test
I-BEST
Non-I-BEST Workforce
Non-I-BEST  
Non-Workforce
N
Median Score
N
Median Score
N
Median Score
2,025
7,933
79,104
CASAS Math
1,450
227
3,399
225
24,360
222
CASAS Reading
1,782
237
3,986
235
57,143
218
CASAS Listening
432
219
926
213
29,910
205
Source: Program enrollment data from SBCTC.
Note: When tests were taken multiple times by students, the scores used here were the earliest on each test.
control Library platform:C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Tiff
In addition to Word and Excel, Office PowerPoint is also supported by our SDK. Please click to see detailed C# programming demo for PPT to PDF conversion.
www.rasteredge.com
control Library platform:VB.NET PowerPoint: Complete PowerPoint Document Conversion in VB.
resolution, bit depth, scaling, etc. Implement Conversion from PowerPoint to PDF in VB.NET, Converting PowerPoint document to PDF
www.rasteredge.com
14
the college because they are already somewhat familiar 
with the college campus and faculty and, by having taken 
the initiative to enroll in classes, have already revealed a 
desire to further their education.
Partnerships with outside organizations — such as 
community-based organizations, local businesses, 
and One-Stop Career Centers — provide another 
recruitment source. Program administrators effectively 
recruit students through professional and personal 
contacts in the industries associated with I-BEST 
programs (targeting employees in lower skill jobs); they 
frequently mentioned attending meetings and forums 
in the community to “spread the word” about I-BEST. 
Recruiting from community-based organizations also 
allows colleges to reach target populations that are 
particularly underserved or disadvantaged. For example, 
one college reported working with a local rescue mission 
to transition adult basic education students from the 
mission to the college’s I-BEST programs. Another 
college promotes I-BEST at an annual Latino career fair.
Seven of the colleges identify potential participants for at 
least one of their programs by using a different approach. 
Rather than reaching out to students in the basic skills 
population on campus and in the community, the 
programs assess students who are already enrolled in the 
professional-technical courses to determine which of them 
are in need of basic skills instruction. When program staff 
determine that enough students qualify for I-BEST (based 
on their CASAS scores), an I-BEST section is added and 
a basic skills instructor is placed in it. Both I-BEST and 
non-I-BEST students (whether or not they need basic 
skills instruction based on test scores) in these programs 
receive the integrated instruction.
Colleges indicated that it is necessary to invest significant 
resources in recruitment to reach and inform their target 
populations. Even with a variety of strategies in place, 
different programs within each college often experience 
varying degrees of success in recruiting enough students 
to make the programs feasible. Some of the colleges 
have I-BEST programs “on the books” that either have 
never been offered or have been offered only sporadically 
because of difficulty in recruiting enough students.
Even so, because of the demands of I-BEST programs, 
more than a third of the colleges have implemented 
a selection or screening process as part of I-BEST 
student intake. I-BEST staff at many of these colleges 
realized that some students were not gaining a 
good understanding of the program requirements 
and were often surprised by the academic rigor and 
time commitment involved. Students did not always 
understand the importance of attendance, turning in 
assignments on time, and being able to commit to the 
entire length of the program, all of which contributed 
to lower retention. The screening process has helped 
potential program participants understand expectations 
and has also helped program staff determine candidate 
readiness. Screening varies across the programs in 
terms of the degree of structure and formality that are 
Helping students make the transition from ABE and ESL 
classes to college-level coursework takes considerable 
planning and support from college personnel. Moreover, 
not all students who are interested in enrolling in I-BEST 
meet the program eligibility requirements. One strategy 
for preparing students for this transition is placing them 
into a pre-I-BEST program. Six of the Washington State 
colleges have implemented such programs, which are 
designed to prepare students for I-BEST by providing 
focused academic support and student services support 
prior to the start of the I-BEST sequence of classes. 
The academic support may include refresher courses 
or labs for basic math, reading, and writing skills, 
and instruction in basic computer skills. The support 
services include assistance with applying for financial 
aid, registering for classes, and developing academic 
plans. An advantage of this strategy is that the 
services that these students need are centralized, 
more structured, and offered prior to enrollment in 
college-level courses. Pre-I-BEST programs are 
effectively a one-stop resource for the various steps 
involved in the transition to college-level coursework.
Pre-I-BEST Programs
control Library platform:C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET
PowerPoint to PDF Conversion Overview. RasterEdge XDoc.PowerPoint empowers your C#.NET application with advanced PowerPoint to PDF conversion functionality.
www.rasteredge.com
control Library platform:C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
CSV Document Conversion. RasterEdge Windows Viewer SDK provides how to convert TIFF: Convert to PDF. Convert to Various Images. PDF Document Conversion.
www.rasteredge.com
15
involved; screening may include interest or commitment 
checklists, educational interviews, skills assessments, 
visits to I-BEST classes, previewing of curricula and 
textbooks, enrollment in pre-I-BEST programs, and 
student contracts. In some sense, many of the regular 
intake activities, such as attending I-BEST meetings 
and completing financial aid forms, are also screens to 
identify serious, motivated students.
4.4. Financial Aid
One of the most critical aspects of recruiting students 
and maintaining I-BEST programs is helping students 
attain financial aid. In Washington State’s two-year 
colleges, there are several potential aid sources, but the 
complicated process of demonstrating eligibility for them 
can be a deterrent for both the students and colleges.
Because basic skills courses are offered for only a very 
modest fee ($25 per term), basic skills students making 
the transition to college-level courses are faced with 
the adjustment of having to pay tuition for the college-
level portion of I-BEST programs. Since many I-BEST 
students are part of low-income families, the tuition for 
college-level classes can be a prohibitive expense. An 
I-BEST program coordinator stated, “Students who do 
not qualify for financial aid have a very hard time paying 
for tuition. Sometimes we have to drop them before they 
even begin or within the first ten days. About half of the 
students who are interested do not qualify for financial 
aid. This is the major barrier.”
In 2006-07 and 2007-08, a substantial number of I-BEST 
students received a Pell Grant,
11
a State Need Grant, 
or an Opportunity Grant, and, as shown in Figure 3, a 
larger percentage of I-BEST students than non-I-BEST 
workforce students and non-I-BEST non-workforce 
students received some type of financial aid. Of these 
types of aid, the Opportunity Grant was most frequently 
mentioned by respondents as being linked to I-BEST 
programs. While 30 percent of I-BEST students received 
this grant, only about two percent of non-I-BEST 
workforce students and less than one percent of 
non-I-BEST non-workforce students did so (this last 
group of students probably received very little aid 
because they did not take any college-level courses and 
therefore were not eligible for aid).
Figure 4 shows that a higher percentage of I-BEST 
students enrolled full time when compared with both  
Figure 3
Percentage of Basic Skills Students  
Receiving Any Financial Aid, 
2006–07 and 2007–08
80
90
100
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
I-BEST
Non-I-BEST Workforce Non-I-BEST Non-Workforce
Source: Program enrollment data from SBCTC.
Note: “Any financial aid” includes federal, state, and local financial aid.
Figure 4
Percentage of Basic Skills Students  
Enrolled Full Time, 
2006–07 and 2007–08
80
90
100
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
I-BEST
Non-I-BEST Workforce Non-I-BEST Non-Workforce
Source: Program enrollment data from SBCTC.
11  The Federal Pell Grant program provides need-based grants to low-income students. For more information on Pell Grants, see http://www2.ed.gov/
programs/fpg/index.html.
16
non-I BEST workforce students and non-I BEST non-
workforce students, which may be related to the higher 
percentage of I BEST students who received financial aid.
The Opportunity Grant program is particularly important 
because it is designed specifically for students in 
approved career pathway programs in Washington 
State, and all I-BEST sequences are grant-eligible (see 
accompanying box for more information on Opportunity 
Grants). Each college in the state has a designated 
Opportunity Grant coordinator
12
who manages the 
program and provides additional support services 
to students. Students in  I-BEST programs who can 
document financial need qualify for the Opportunity 
Grant, which covers tuition and mandatory fees and 
offers up to $1,000 per academic year for books and 
supplies. All 34 Washington State community and 
technical colleges use Opportunity Grant funding for 
their I-BEST programs, and many colleges view the 
I-BEST strategy and the grant as going hand-in-hand. 
As one administrator remarked, “When you take the 
I-BEST program and combine it with the Opportunity 
Grant program, that provides more financial aid, plus 
a student services person who can support those 
students — you really have a fully comprehensive 
approach to student success.”
Opportunity Grants are also a key resource for I-BEST 
programs because students can be approved for funding 
more quickly than with many other aid options. One 
administrator stated that his college could approve 
a student for an Opportunity Grant in less than 24 
hours, possibly because eligibility requirements for 
receiving a grant for an initial quarter of funding are 
minimal: Students must make a formal application 
to the Opportunity Grant program (each college has 
the authority to create the application, within certain 
guidelines), be a Washington resident, and enroll in an 
Opportunity Grant-eligible program (of which I-BEST is 
one). In order to continue to receive Opportunity Grant 
funding in subsequent quarters, students are required 
to document financial need by submitting a Free 
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Another 
important feature of this grant program is that students 
who are ineligible for other types of aid (for example, 
students who do not pass ability-to-benefit tests
13
) might 
still be eligible for Opportunity Grant funding.
During the period of this study, many students (22 
percent) in I-BEST programs received State Need Grants. 
The State Need Grant program serves the state’s lowest 
income students. Table 6 shows that a high percentage 
of I-BEST students (58 percent) were in the lowest 
quintiles of socioeconomic status. Also, a significant 
number (37 percent) of I-BEST students participated in 
In 2007, the Washington State Legislature 
appropriated $11.5 million per year to the SBCTC 
for the Opportunity Grant program to support 
low-income adults participating in training for 
high-wage, high-demand careers. The goal of the 
program is to help low-income adults increase 
their job skills and receive a credential by providing 
participants with funds to cover tuition and fees 
for up to 45 credits of coursework. Student 
support services are also provided, which may 
include tutoring, career advising, child care, and 
transportation. All 34 community and technical 
colleges in Washington offer educational programs 
that are approved for Opportunity Grants. Approval 
from the SBCTC is given to programs that meet the 
following four criteria (which closely align with the 
I-BEST model).
(1)  Evidence of local labor market demand.
(2)  Part of an educational and career pathway.
(3)  High wage job opportunities for program  
 graduates.
(4)  Active community partnerships.
In 2008, the program served almost 5,000 full- and 
part-time students.
Source: SBCTC website: http://www.sbctc.edu/college/s_opportunitygrants.aspx
Opportunity Grants
12  Colleges whose students receive Opportunity Grants receive funding through the program to provide case management and support services for 
grant recipients. 
13   Postsecondary students who have not earned a high school diploma or GED must pass a federally approved ability-to-benefit test to qualify for 
federal financial aid.
17
WorkFirst (Washington State’s welfare reform program 
funded through the federal TANF block grant), which, like 
the Opportunity Grant program, provides services and 
resources for participants.
Opportunity Grants, State Need Grants, and other forms 
of aid do not appear to completely solve the problem 
of I-BEST students’ difficulty in affording tuition. Some 
students do not qualify for Opportunity Grants or other 
types of aid (one reason specifically mentioned for 
students’ ineligibility was having a family income just 
above the qualifying level). A dean at one college stated, 
“[These students] just couldn’t get any funding. Every 
hoop we took them through, we couldn’t find funding for 
them to take the professional-technical classes. So we 
were building up a list of students who wanted to be in 
the I-BEST program but didn’t qualify for funding.” This 
funding lapse required colleges to find other sources 
of money for students. One college, for example, was 
able to use grant money from the local Workforce 
Development Council to pay for tuition for students who 
did not qualify for financial aid, but the approach solved 
the financial aid issue for only one cohort of students, 
leaving administrators wondering how they would meet 
this challenge in the future.
In addition to the issue of individual student ineligibility 
for financial aid, some colleges have encountered 
barriers to providing federal financial aid for groups of 
students in low-credit I-BEST programs. To be eligible 
for federal aid under Title IV of the Higher Education 
Act, certificate programs must consist of at least 28 
credits. As shown in Figure 1 (p. 10), a number of I-BEST 
programs are one quarter term in length or less and 
therefore –– on their own –– consist of less than the 
required 28 credits. However, because every I-BEST 
program is part of a longer educational pathway (and 
the pathways do meet the requirements of Title IV), 
the I-BEST portion also does meet the requirements. 
Confusion about program length at some campuses 
may have led uninformed staff (particularly financial aid 
officers) to determine, mistakenly, that students in I-BEST 
programs did not meet the minimum number of credits 
required for federal aid. This problem highlights the 
need for consistent communication across departments, 
particularly as I-BEST programs are being developed. 
Because some I-BEST programs impose additional 
eligibility requirements, and because many I-BEST 
students need financial aid in order to pay tuition, it is 
not surprising that recruitment for I-BEST was often 
mentioned as a challenge, one that requires significant 
resources from the college. When I-BEST programs are 
not reaching adequate enrollments, it becomes more 
difficult for administrators to justify support for them, 
given limited budgets and resources.
5.  I-BEST Instruction and 
Student Support Services
Instruction and student support services are the 
foundation of the I-BEST model. As discussed 
previously, I-BEST is designed to contextualize the 
teaching of basic skills to allow adults with basic skills 
deficiencies to succeed in college-level technical 
courses and to enter a coherent program of study 
leading to college credentials and employment. Because 
many I-BEST students have not been successful 
in education previously and because they are often 
unfamiliar with the culture and demands of college-level 
study, they may need special supports to help them 
Table 6
Socioeconomic Status and WorkFirst Participation
Basic Skills Students, 2006-07 and 2007-08
I-BEST
Non-I-BEST  
Workforce
Non-I-BEST  
Non-Workforce
Percentage of students in bottom two quintiles  
of socioeconomic status
a
58%
55%
57%
Percentage of students who participated  
in WorkFirst (WA TANF)
37%
38%
20%
a These figures are based on the quintile of the average socioeconomic status of the Census block group in which each student’s residence was located.  
For details, see Crosta, Leinbach, Jenkins, Prince, and Whitakker (2006) and SBCTC (2006). 
18
succeed. In this section, we discuss the integrated 
instructional model and the support services that are 
integral to the successful implementation  
of I-BEST.
5.1 Instruction
I-BEST programs follow an instructional model that pairs 
a basic skills instructor with a professional-technical 
instructor in the classroom to provide instruction in both 
the professional-technical content area and basic skills. 
The SBCTC requires that I-BEST courses have both 
instructors in class together for at least 50 percent of 
the instructional time in order to qualify for the enhanced 
FTE funding. 
Overall, the colleges were very positive about the 
I-BEST instructional model when it was implemented 
successfully. Factors influencing the degree of success 
of the model — including faculty selection and training, 
instructor characteristics, co-planning and team teaching  
strategies, and professional development — are 
discussed below.
Faculty selection and training. Of central importance 
to the I-BEST instructional model, according to many 
program administrators, is the selection and training of 
faculty. The primary consideration for selection at many 
colleges is the instructor’s willingness and ability to work 
with a co-instructor. In addition, program administrators 
at five of the colleges look for basic skills instructors 
with some background, content knowledge, or interest 
in the professional-technical field in which they may 
be co-teaching. For the professional-technical faculty, 
administrators seek instructors who are interested in 
receiving additional support for their students and are 
open to the team-teaching model. There are often fewer 
instructors to select from on the professional-technical 
side, however, especially in smaller departments with 
only one or two full-time instructors, so in some cases 
selection necessarily becomes a matter of who is 
available and willing to participate.
There was a strong consensus among those we 
interviewed that pairing instructors who could work well 
together is crucial to the success of I-BEST. Instructors 
indicated that it could take several quarters for teaching 
teams to develop into cohesive, comfortable units. In 
fact, we were told of instances in which colleges were 
forced to put programs on hold or discontinue them 
altogether because instructors were not able to work 
together. Team teaching requires an extensive, time-
consuming process of selecting instructors, training 
them, and developing the co-teaching relationship. Thus, 
finding replacements to accommodate faculty turnover 
can be difficult. When an instructor leaves the program, 
the process of finding a new instructor who is the “right 
fit” for the program starts over again, and the teaching 
team must again go through the process of becoming 
comfortable with each other.
The following qualities of successful I-BEST instructors 
were frequently mentioned by those we interviewed: 
flexibility, good communication skills, a willingness 
to embrace new ways of approaching instruction, 
experience with learning communities or other team 
teaching strategies, confidence and willingness to give 
up some control in the classroom, strong organizational 
skills, enthusiasm for the model, and sensitivity to 
the needs of students with basic skills deficiencies 
and other barriers to success in college. Flexibility, 
in particular, was emphasized by respondents as an 
essential quality of successful instructors.
The amount of training provided for I-BEST instructors 
varies across the colleges. Some colleges direct new 
I-BEST instructors to sit in on existing I-BEST courses to 
learn about the team-teaching model from experienced 
faculty. The SBCTC offers training sessions for I-BEST 
faculty, and instructors who have attended them reported 
that they were very beneficial for understanding the 
I-BEST model and developing strategies for team 
teaching. Highline Community College has created an 
I-BEST instructional resources Web site that includes a 
series of integrated teaching training modules (developed 
at Skagit Valley College) covering team-teaching 
strategies. The modules are also used by other colleges 
as a training tool, and several colleges have modified 
them or created their own for internal college use. Also, 
informal training opportunities and on-the-job training are 
common. Nevertheless, program administrators at some 
of the colleges reported that faculty training is an area 
that could be improved upon, but improvement efforts 
have thus far been mostly cursory due to budget and 
time constraints.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested