asp.net core pdf editor : How to convert pdf to powerpoint Library control class asp.net web page winforms ajax How-My-Predictions-Are-Faring0-part1423

How My Predictions Are Faring 
Ray Kurzweil 
October 2010 
How to convert pdf to powerpoint - SDK application project:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
How to convert pdf to powerpoint - SDK application project:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
How My Predictions Are Faring 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
Overview ............................................................................................................................. 1 
Predictions made for 2009 in The Age of Spiritual Machines 
The Computer Itself .............................................................................................. 11 
Education .............................................................................................................. 34 
Disabilities ............................................................................................................ 45 
Communication ..................................................................................................... 50 
Business and Economics ....................................................................................... 68 
Politics & Society ................................................................................................. 84 
The Arts ................................................................................................................ 91 
Warfare ............................................................................................................... 102 
Health & Medicine .............................................................................................. 110 
Philosophy........................................................................................................... 120 
Predictions made in The Age of Intelligent Machines .................................................... 124 
The Singularity is Near 
Predictions for 2010 ............................................................................................ 129 
The Singularity is Near: Graphs ......................................................................... 135 
Library Journal Predictions ............................................................................................ 146 
SDK application project:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Download Free Trial. Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Then just wait until the conversion from Powerpoint to PDF is complete and download the file.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application project:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
C# PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references:
www.rasteredge.com
How My Predictions Are Faring 
Page|1 
OVERVIEW 
How my predictions are faring 
In this essay I review the accuracy of my predictions going back a 
quarter of a century. Included herein is a discussion of my 
predictions from The Age of Intelligent Machines (which I wrote in 
the 1980s), all 147 predictions for 2009 in The Age of Spiritual 
Machines (which I wrote in the 1990s), plus others. Perhaps my 
most important predictions are implicit in my exponential graphs. 
These trajectories have indeed continued on course and I discuss 
these updated graphs below. 
My core thesis, which I call the “law of accelerating returns,” is 
that fundamental measures of information technology follow 
predictable and exponential trajectories, belying the conventional 
wisdom that “you can’t predict the future.” There are still many 
things 
which project, company or technical standard will prevail 
in the marketplace, or when peace will come to the Middle East 
that remain unpredictable, but the underlying price/performance 
and capacity of information is nonetheless remarkably predictable. 
Surprisingly, these trends are unperturbed by conditions such as 
war or peace and prosperity or recession.
The quintessential example of the law of accelerating returns is the perfectly smooth, 
doubly exponential growth of the price/performance of computation, which has held 
steady for 110 years through two world wars, the Cold War, the Great Depression, the 
collapse of the Soviet Union, the re-emergence of China, and other notable events of the 
late nineteenth, twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. 
Some people refer to this phenomeno
n as “Moore’s law,” but that is a misconception. 
Moore’s law (which states that you can place twice as many components on an integrated 
circuit every two years and they run faster because they are smaller) is just one paradigm 
among many. It was the fifth, not the first, paradigm to bring exponential growth to the 
price/performance of computing. 
SDK application project:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Convert PDF to Image; Convert Word to PDF; Convert Excel to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to PDF; Convert Image to PDF; Convert Jpeg to PDF;
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application project:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Convert PDF to HTML. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to HTML in VB.NET Demo Code. Add necessary references:
www.rasteredge.com
How My Predictions Are Faring 
Page|2 
The exponential rise of computation started with the 1890 U.S. census (the first to be 
automated), decades before Gordon Moore was even born. In my 2005 book, The 
Singularity is Near, I provide this graph through 2002, and I update it through 2008, 
below. The smoothly predictable trajectory has continued, even through the recent 
economic downturn. 
Computation is the most important example of the law of accelerating returns (LOAR), 
because of the amount of data we have for it, the ubiquity of computation, and its key 
role in ultimately revolutionizing everything we care about. But it is far from the only 
example. Once a technology becomes an information technology, it becomes subject to 
the LOAR. 
Biomedicine is becoming the most important area of technology and industry to be 
transformed in this way. Progress has historically been based on accidental discoveries, 
so progress has been linear, not exponential. This has still been useful: life expectancy 
has grown from age 23 as of one thousand years ago, to age 37 as of two hundred years 
ago, to close to age 80 today. 
However, medicine and human biology have just undergone a grand transformation to 
become an information technology. We have gathered the software of life: the genome. 
The human genome project itself was perfectly exponential, with the amount of genetic 
data doubling and the cost per base-pair coming down by half each year since the project 
was initiated in 1990. 
(Right) This wafer, developed by BioNanomatrix, 
contains nano-sized channels for analyzing DNA 
molecules. The wafer contains many nanoanalyzer 
chips, each lined with 50,000 channels. (Photo 
courtesy of BioNanomatrix) 
We now have the ability to design biomedical 
interventions on computers and to test them on 
biological simulators, the scale and precision of 
which are also doubling every year. 
Now we can also update this obsolete software: RNA interference can turn genes off and 
new forms of gene therapy can add new genes, not just to a newborn but to a mature 
individual. The spatial resolution of brain scanning and the amount of data on the brain 
we are gathering are also doubling each year. 
There are many other manifestations of this integration of biology and information 
technology, as we move beyond genome sequencing to genome synthesizing. 
More references 
Wired magazine | 
³
DNA Technology Posts Dramatic Speed Increases
´
Xconomy news | 
³
Sequencing DNA for less than $100 in under an hour
´
MIT Technology Review | 
³
The $100 Genome
´
SDK application project:C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET
C# PowerPoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET. C# Demo: Convert PowerPoint to PDF Document. Add references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application project:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Convert PDF to HTML. |. C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to HTML in C#.NET. How to Use C# .NET XDoc.PDF SDK to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage in C# .NET Program.
www.rasteredge.com
How My Predictions Are Faring 
Page|3 
Another information technology that has seen smooth exponential growth is our ability to 
communicate with each other and transmit vast repositories of human knowledge. There 
are many ways to measure this. 
Cooper’s law
, which states that the total bit capacity of 
wireless communications in a given amount of radio spectrum doubles every 30 months, 
has held true since Marconi used the wireless telegraph for Morse code transmissions in 
1897, to today’s 
4G communications 
technologies. According to Cooper’s law, the 
amount of information that can be transmitted over a given amount of radio spectrum has 
been doubling every 2.5 years for more than a century. 
Other examples include the number of nodes on the Internet and the number of bits per 
second transmitted on the Internet, which are both doubling each year. 
More references 
NewScientist magazine | 
³
Exploring the Exploding Internet: growing at a remarkable speed since 
inception
´
PhysOrg | 
³Internet Growth Follows Moore¶s Law 
Too
´
I examine these and many other examples, manifestations, and implications of the law of 
accelerating returns in The Singularity is Near (SIN)
. Below, I’ve updated these graphs, 
demonstrating how these trends have continued unabated in the six years since the graphs 
in SIN were compiled. The reason that I became interested in trying to predict certain 
aspects of technology is that I realized about 30 years ago that the key to being successful 
as an inventor (a profession I adopted when I was five years old) was timing. Most 
inventions and inventors fail, not because they are unable to get their gadgets to work, but 
because their timing is wrong, either introducing their innovation before all of the 
enabling factors are in place, or too late, missing the window of opportunity. 
Being an engineer, I started to gather data on measures of technology in different areas. 
When I began this effort, I did not expect that this study would present a clear picture, but 
I hoped that it would provide some guidance and enable me to make educated guesses. 
My goal was 
and still is 
to time my own technology projects so that they will be 
appropriate for the world that exists when I complete the projects 
which I realized 
would be very different from the world that existed when I started. 
Consider how much the world has changed recently. Just a few years ago, people did not 
use social networks (Facebook, for example, was founded in 2004 and now has over 800 
million active users), wikis, blogs, or tweets. Most people did not use search engines or 
cell phones in the 1990s. Imagine the world without social networks, wikis, blogs, tweets, 
cell phones, and search engines. That sounds like ancient history, but that was not so long 
ago. The world will change even more in the near future. 
SDK application project:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to MS Office Word in VB.NET. VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. Best
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application project:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to TIFF Using VB in VB.NET. Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF in Visual Basic Class.
www.rasteredge.com
How My Predictions Are Faring 
Page|4 
In the course of this investigation, which began three decades ago, I made a startling 
discovery: if a technology is an information technology, the basic measures of 
price/performance and capacity (per unit of time or cost, or other resource) follow 
amazingly precise exponential trajectories. 
These trajectories outrun the specific paradigms they are based on (such as Moore’s law). 
But when one paradigm runs out of steam (for example, when engineers were no longer 
able to reduce the size and cost of vacuum tubes in the 1950s), it creates research 
pressure to create the next paradigm, and so another S-curve of progress begins. 
The exponential portion of that next S-curve for the new paradigm then continues the 
ongoing exponential of the information technology measure. So vacuum-tube-based 
computing in the 1950s gave way to transistors in the 1960s, and then to integrated 
circuits and Moore’s law in the late 1960s, and beyond. Moore’s law, in turn, will give 
way to three-dimensional computing, the early examples of which are already in place. 
(Right) A map of the Internet in 2009. (Image courtesy of the 
Internet Mapping Project, Bell Labs/Lumeta Corp.)  
My law of accelerating returns (LOAR) forms the basis and 
fundamental thesis for my three books on the future of 
technology (The Age of Intelligent MachinesThe Age of 
Spiritual Machines, and The Singularity is Near) and two 
health books co-authored with Terry Grossman, M.D. 
(Fantastic Voyage and TRANSCEND).  
However, the primary application of the LOAR, in terms of my own career, remains the 
timing of my specific technology projects. 
We might wonder, are there fundamental limits to our ability to compute and transmit 
information, regardless of paradigm? The answer is yes, based on our current 
understanding of the physics of computation. There are limits, but they are not very 
limiting. Ultimately we can expand our intelligence trillions fold based on molecular 
computing. By my calculations, we will reach these limits late in this century.  
It is important to point out that not every exponential phenomenon is an example of the 
law of accelerating returns. Some observers misconstrue the LOAR by citing exponential 
trends that are not information-based: for ex
ample, how men’s shavers have gone from 
one blade to two to four, and then asking, where are the eight-blade shavers? Shavers are 
not (yet) an information technology.  
The LOAR does not apply to non-information technologies, but does apply to 
information technologies such as computing, the Internet, the understanding of the 
genome and the brain. The reason information technologies are able to consistently 
transcend the limitations of any particular paradigm is that the resources required to 
compute or remember or transmit a bit of information are vanishingly small. 
How My Predictions Are Faring 
Page|5 
In SIN, I provide a theoretical examination, including a mathematical treatment of why 
the LOAR is so remarkably predictable. Essentially, we always use the latest technology 
to create the next: technologies build on themselves in an exponential manner, and this 
phenomenon is readily measurable if it involves an information technology. More 
broadly speaking, this acceleration and exponential growth applies to any process in 
which patterns of information evolve. So, we see acceleration in the pace of biological 
evolution, and similar (but much faster) acceleration in technological evolution, which is 
itself an outgrowth of biological evolution. 
I now have a public track record of more than a quarter of a century of predictions based 
on the law of accelerating returns, starting with the book The Age of Intelligent Machines 
(AIM), which I wrote in the mid-1980s. 
Examples of accurate predictions from that book include: the emergence in the 1990s of a 
vast, worldwide web of communications tying together people around the world to each 
other and to all human knowledge; a great wave of democratization emerging from this 
decentralized communication network, sweeping away the Soviet Union; the defeat of the 
world chess champion by 1998; and many other timely predictions. I discuss these 
predictions from AIM, below. 
I described the law of accelerating returns, as it is applied to computation, extensively in 
The Age of Spiritual Machines (ASM), a book I wrote in the mid to late 1990s. On pages 
22-24, I provided a century of data showing the doubly exponential progression of the 
price/performance of computation through 1998. I updated this graph through 2002 in 
SIN, and through 2008 in this essay. 
ASM included hundreds of predictions for specific decades (2009, 2019, 2029, and 2099). 
With 2009 now concluded, some observers have commented on my 2009 predictions 
from ASM. Many of these are reasonable reviews. However, a few critics have distorted 
the accuracy of my predictions in a number of ways. The most interesting type of 
misrepresentation is the critics’ selection bias.
As I discuss in detail below, I made 147 predictions for 2009 in ASM, which I wrote in 
the 1990s. Of these, 115 (78 percent) are entirely correct as of the end of 2009, and 
another 12 (8 percent) are “essentially correct” (see below) —
a total of 127 predictions 
(86 percent) are correct or essentially correct. Another 17 (12 percent) are partially 
correct, and 3 (2 percent) are wrong. 
So, it is easy to focus on the few predictions that were incorrect, excluding the majority 
of predictions 
which were accurate 
and craft a biased analysis. This selection bias 
may be combined with a misunderstanding of what the prediction meant in the first place, 
or ignorance of the current situation, resulting in citing an accurate prediction as 
inaccurate. For example, one commentator lists only three accurate predictions and cites 
five that are “false,” l
eaving out almost all of the 127 predictions that are accurate or 
essentially accurate.  
How My Predictions Are Faring 
Page|6 
Of these “false” predictions, a number are, in fact, true. The remaining are only a few 
years away, and I 
consider them “essentially correct,” given that these predictions were 
specified by decades (not years) in ASM. More about this point, below. 
An example of a prediction that was cited as “false” when it is, in fact, true is, “Personal 
computers are available in a wide range of sizes and shapes, and are commonly 
embedded in clothing and jewelry.” When I wrote this prediction 
in the 1990s, portable 
computers were large heavy devices carried under your arm. 
Today, they are indeed embedded in shirt pockets, jacket pockets, and hung from belt 
loops. Colorful iPod nano models are worn on blouses as jewelry pins or on a sleeve 
while running, health monitors are woven into undergarments, computers are built into 
hearing aids, and there are many other examples. The prediction does not say that all 
computers would be small devices integrated in these ways, just that this would be 
“common,” which is indeed the case. And “personal computers” should not be restricted 
to the marketing category we happen to call “personal computers” today
All of these devices (iPods, smartphones, etc.) are in fact sophisticated “computers” and 
are “personal,” meaning they serve the needs of individuals. It is not appropriate to use 
today’s marketing categories to interpret the meaning of these earlier predictions. By a 
reasonable interpretation of the prediction and the current reality, the prediction is 
correct. 
“Most portable computers will not have keyboards” is listed by this same observer as 
“false.” When I wrote this more than a decade ago, every portable computer had an 
(alphanumeric) keyboard. Today, the majority of portable computers such as MP3 
players, cameras, phones, tablets, game players and many other varieties indeed do not 
have keyboards. The full quote of my prediction makes it clear that I am referring to 
computerized devices that “make phone calls, access the Web, monitor body functions, 
pro
vide directions, and provide a variety of other services.”
Another observer cites my prediction that “there will be computer displays that project 
images directly onto the eyes” as “false.” The prediction did not say that all displays 
would be this way or that it would be the majority, or even common. There are indeed 
wearable displays, such as those made in the United States by Microvision for both 
military and other mobile applications.  
In Japan, companies like Brother and NEC have already been 
producing different series of wearable displays that are 
available to consumers. Virtual retinal displays, initially 
developed for military use, have been deployed by several 
military units, such as the 
U.S. Army’s Stry
ker Brigade, for 
several years. 
(Left) 
NEC’s ³Tele Scouter´ Retinal Imaging Display uses glasses 
and lasers to send images to the retina. (Photo courtesy of NEC) 
How My Predictions Are Faring 
Page|7 
Beyond virtual retinal displays, Stanford University researchers are also developing a 
new generation of retinal implants that allow blind people to see and that could also 
enhance normal human vision. 
This same observer said 
that “three
-dimensional chi
ps are commonly used” 
w
as “false.” 
But it is not false. While not yet commonly used in all chips, most semiconductors 
fabricated today for MEMS and CMOS image sensors are in fact 3D chips, using vertical 
stacking technology. 
These first 3D circuits were developed by Matrix Semiconductor (now SanDisk) in 2001, 
Tachyon Semiconductor in 2002, MagnaChip Semiconductor and Tezzaron 
Semiconductor in 2004, and Ziptronix and Raytheon in 2007
In December 2010, Samsung announced a new 8GB dual inline memory module 
(DIMM) that stacks memory chips on top of each other using 
through silicon via
(TSV), which increases the density of the memory by 50% compared to conventional 
DIMM technology. 
Using the TSV technology will also improve speed, while reducing power consumption. 
The TSV technology creates micron-sized holes through the chip silicon vertically 
instead of just horizontally, creating a much denser architecture. The chips are likely to 
be generally available to equipment manufacturers by the end of 2011. 
IBM is also developing 3D microchips with stacked cores capable of higher data transfer 
rates with less heat and required energy. Semtech Corp. is working with IBM and its 3D 
through-silicon via (TSV) technology to develop a high-performance ADC/DSP 
platform. The proposed device has applications in fiber optic telecommunications, high 
performance RF sampling and filtering, test equipment and instrumentation, and sub-
array processing for phased array radar systems. 
TSV 3D technologies are expected to be used for memory in 2012 and microprocessors 
in 2014. Analysts predict that by 2015, 3D chips with TSVs will be 6% of the overall 
semiconductor market
The existence of “translating telephone technology” (speech
-to-speech translation) by 
2009 has been cited as incorrect. I have been demonstrating a prototype of a translating 
telephone since 2008, but as of June 2009, there were no translating telephones 
commercially available. 
How My Predictions Are Faring 
Page|8 
(Right) The Jibbigo Spanish-English voice translator app for 
iPhone (Photo courtesy of Mobile Technologies, LLC) 
However, just a few months later, in December 2009, 
translating telephone applications were not only 
available, but among the most popular applications for 
BlackBerry, Symbian, iPhone, and Android phones. 
Sakhr Software launched its first real-time, spoken 
Arabic translator for BlackBerry and iPhone systems in 
June 2009, followed by the Jibbigo two-way Spanish-
English voice translator for iPhones in October 2009, 
and its Japanese-English, Chinese-English, and Iraqi-
English versions in 2010. 
I suppose one could argue how “common” 
the use of speech-to-speech translation is 
today, but it is already a popular application. For example, Jibbigo became the number 
one iPhone app in Japan just a few days after its official launch in Tokyo. Translating 
telephone technology is likely to become quite popular on many smartphones worldwide 
in 2010. 
In Japan, NEC is developing Tele Scouter, a head-mounted optical display that will also 
work as a universal translator, scheduled for commercial release in late 2010. My 
prediction was that speech-to-
speech would be “commonly used,” not that it would be 
ubiquitous. 
The $4.99 Word Lens iPhone app from QuestVisual uses optical character recognition to 
identify words in an image and translate them, and then draw them back on the screen. It 
currently offers only English to Spanish and Spanish to English translation. Other 
languages are planned. 
More references 
Los Angeles Times | 
³
Need a translation? Google awaits your call
´
The New York Times | 
³
I, Translator
´
The status of these predictions changes very quickly. In November 2009, the idea of 
large-vocabulary, continuous, speaker-independent speech recognition using a cell phone 
appeared to some observers as still far off in the future. 
Just one month later, this became the most popular free app for the iPhone (Dragon 
Dictation from Nuance, which used to be Kurzweil Computer Products, my first major 
company) as well as the popular Google Mobile App on iPhone, Blackberry, and Nokia 
S60 mobile phones, and on Google Nexus One and other Android phones. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested