Annual Reports: Presenting Your Successes
C O M M U N I C AT I O N S
A Detailed Guide To Creating Professional Annual Reports
How to change pdf to powerpoint - application SDK utility:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
How to change pdf to powerpoint - application SDK utility:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Launched in 1982 by Jim and Patty Ro u s e ,
The Enterprise Foundation is a national,
nonprofit housing and community d e ve l o p-
ment organizationdedicated to bringing lasting
i m p rove m e n t sto distressed communities.  
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT LIBRARY™
This book is part of the Enterprise Community
Development Library, an i n valuable re f e rence collection
for nonprofit organizationsdedicated to revitalizing and
reconnecting neighborhoodsto mainstream America.
One of many resources available t h rough Enterprise, it
offers industry - p roven informationin simple, easy-to-
read formats. From planning to governance, fund rais-
ing to money management, and program operations to
communications, the Community De ve l o p m e n t
L i b r a ry will help your organization succeed.
ADDITIONAL ENTERPRISE RESOURCES
The Enterprise Foundation provides nonprofit 
organizations with expert consultation and training 
as well as an extensive collection of print and online
tools. For more information, please visit our Web site
at www.enterprisefoundation.org.
Copyright 1999, The Enterprise Foundation, Inc.
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 0-942901-39-8
No content from this publication may be reproduced or
transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or
mechanical, including photocopying, recording or any infor-
mation storage and retrieval system, without permission
from the Communications department of The Enterprise
Foundation. However, you may photocopy any worksheets 
or sample pages that may be contained in this manual.
This publication is designed to provide accurate and authori-
tative information on the subject covered. It is sold with the
understanding that The Enterprise Foundation is not render-
ing legal, accounting or other project-specific advice. For
expert assistance, contact a competent professional.
application SDK utility:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Online Powerpoint to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Then just wait until the conversion from Powerpoint to PDF is complete and download the file.
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK utility:RasterEdge XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET - SDK for PowerPoint Document
Able to view and edit PowerPoint rapidly. Convert. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Convert PowerPoint to HTML5. Convert PowerPoint to Tiff. Convert PowerPoint to Jpeg
www.rasteredge.com
Table of Contents
Introduction   2
Elements of a Good Annual Report   3
Eight Steps to Success   4
Writing the Annual Report   6
Design Elements   8
Using Consultants or Freelancers   10
Annual Report Timeline    11
Distributing Your Annual Report   12
Sample Budget    13
Checklist From Start to Finish   15
Appendix: Sample Pages   16
1
About This Manual
What is an annual report?
An annual report is a credible, versatile document through which
you can communicate the successes of your organization. An annual
report authenticates your community development organization and
shows that you are operationally and financially sound.
Annual Re p o rts: Presenting Your Successegs   ves you the tools to make yo u r
voice heard by organization supporters and stakeholders. It is designed
to help the staff of nonprofit community development organizations
c reate effective annual re p o rts and make the process less intimidating.
This manual includes examples, checklists and information to help you: 
n
Understand the elements of a good annual report.
n
Follow the eight steps to creating a successful document.
n
Write and design the report.
n
Hire consultants or freelancers.
n
Distribute the annual report.
n
Create a budget.
This manual is part of the Communicationss eries within The Enterprise
Foundation’s Community Development Library™. This series provides
detailed information on all aspects of communications — from devel-
oping a central message to creating a comprehensive communications
strategy. Other manuals in the series provide information on:
n
Creating brochures and newsletters
n
Developing action alerts
n
Working effectively with the media
n
Writing marketing sheets 
n
Organizing neighborhood tours
n
Creating a message for your organization and identifying an audience
application SDK utility:C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit
to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to PDF; Convert Image to PDF; Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK utility:How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint. Overview for How to Use XDoc.PowerPoint in C# .NET Programming Project. PowerPoint Conversion.
www.rasteredge.com
Introduction
As more and more nonprofits vie for the same
pool of support and dollars, accountability is
more important than ever. People are more
likely to support you financially when they see
concrete evidence that their dollars are being
used wisely. Your annual report can be the 
determining factor.
An annual report familiarizes readers with your
nonprofit on every level: objective, mission,
financial status, projects, programs and people.
With its focus on financial information and
yearlong accomplishments, this document sub-
stantiates your nonprofit’s contributions to 
the community and bestows instant credibility.
Using photos and personal stories of your cus-
tomers and supporters to illustrate your suc-
cesses makes your story come alive.
Developing an annual report can be time-con-
suming and expensive, but it is time and money
well spent if it’s well written and designed, and
provides appropriate information. After all, it’s a
document that will have a long life, stand as an
introduction to potential donors and serve as
your nonprofit’s general marketing brochure.
But what if your nonprofit does not have the
resources or a sufficient number of successful
projects to justify producing a traditional annual
report? Change the name! Call it a community
report or an annual review. Do not let a title
stop you from touting your financial stability
and accomplishments.
2
People are more likely to support you financially
when they see concrete evidence that their dollars
are being used wisely. Your annual report can be
the determining factor.
application SDK utility:C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PowerPoint
Such as load and view PowerPoint without Microsoft Office software installed, convert PowerPoint to PDF file, Tiff image and HTML file, as well as add
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK utility:VB.NET PowerPoint: Read, Edit and Process PPTX File
create image on desired PowerPoint slide, merge/split PowerPoint file, change the order of How to convert PowerPoint to PDF, render PowerPoint to SVG
www.rasteredge.com
3
Corporate benefactors and others who read a lot of annual reports expect to find information in 
a certain order within the document. This makes it easier for you to organize the information for your
annual report. However, this also challenges you to make the text concise, conveying important
information in few words. Pictures, which create visual interest, must be selected carefully to deliver
the impact you want. 
Elements of a Good Annual Report
n
Front cover — title and theme plus the
organization’s name and logo 
n
Letter from the executive director 
or board president 
n
Mission statement — one or two sentences
describing your nonprofit’s goal and purpose
n
Optional — table of contents
n
History of your nonprofit
n
The organization’s philosophy and beliefs
n
Statistics and profiles of the people you serve
n
Highlights of accomplishments for the year
— projects, programs, services
n
Optional — future plans
n
Map illustrating the geography of your pro-
ject, the location(s) of your program and
your organization’s sphere of influence
n
Financial statements — audited or not
audited is acceptable
n
Awards, grants, loans and donations your
nonprofit has received
n
Roster — the executive director’s name 
and board members’ names and affiliations
n
Optional — staff listing
n
Acknowledgments of all contributors, 
supporters and volunteers
n
Back cover — your nonprofit’s logo,
address, phone and fax numbers, email 
and Web site addresses, any photographer
and sponsor credits
Typically, an annual report is organized in the following order:
application SDK utility:VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password. Remove password from PDF. Set PDF security level. VB: Change and Update PDF Document Password.
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK utility:C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET
C# PowerPoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET. Online C# Tutorial for Converting PowerPoint to PDF (.pdf) Document. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion Overview.
www.rasteredge.com
Tackling a project as important and encom-
passing as an annual report requires organiza-
tion.  Use the following eight steps to ensure
the process moves forward and does not
become an onerous burden to your nonprofit.
STEP 1
KEEP GOOD RECORDS
Because your annual re p o rt chronicles a year of
h i s t o ry and accomplishments, your entire staff
should be able to contribute to the project. It is
essential that each staffer keeps re c o rds to sup-
p o rt your achievements — dates, events, peo-
ple, recognition, etc. Trying to backtrack and
collect year-old information is difficult, and the
results are too often incomplete or inaccurate.
STEP 2
APPOINT A PROJECT LEADER
Assign overall authority to one person. Look for
a conscientious staff member with good commu-
nications and organizational skills, and an eye for
clarity and cre a t i v i t y. As project leader, this per-
son is responsible for developing and managing
the budget; meeting deadlines; re c ruiting writers,
designers and pro o f readers; and overseeing all
aspects of the production pro c e s s .
STEP 3
ESTABLISH A BUDGET
Your budget should include staff time and,
depending on the skills of your staff, the cost
of hiring writers, designers, photographers and
the cost of printing. An example is provided 
in the Sample Budget section.
STEP 4
DEVELOP A THEME
Decide on key messages and build a theme
that encompasses them, such as “1,500
Homes in Fi ve Years,” or “Thanks to Ou r
Pioneers.” A theme gives you a framew o rk for
your language and graphics. It also helps yo u
p resent your information concisely. You can
c reate a new theme or tie in to one being used
in your other marketing materials. Invite key
staff and board members to participate in
d e veloping the theme. Brainstorm ideas. 
STEP 5
PRESENT A PROFESSIONAL APPEARANCE
An annual report covers a variety of topics,
from heartwarming stories that illustrate your
programs to the financial highlights of the past
year. You must package this diverse mix of
information so it comes across intelligently,
clearly and credibly. The right choice of words
and visuals is critical. Use headlines and sub-
heads to guide readers through the content.
Charts and bulleted copy can present informa-
tion concisely as well as add visual interest to
the page. Choose art and photos that comple-
ment your text. 
Look at other annual re p o rts to see the range
of possibilities, what you like and do not like,
the type of information included and typical
organization. Ask staff and volunteers to bring
in samples they like. Ask board members and
p a rtner organizations for a copy of their
annual re p o rts. Your public library may 
also be a re s o u rc e .
4
Eight Steps to Success
STEP 6
BE ACCURATE — FROM FACTS 
TO FINANCIALS
An annual re p o rt is a statement of your cre d i-
bility so double-check all facts and figure s .
Make certain your financial information adds
u p, and you have counted correctly the num-
ber of people you have served and the number
of homes you have rehabilitated. Allocate yo u r
funds corre c t l y. Do not lump funds under
general overhead that really belong elsew h e re ,
or you could present a misleading picture of
your operating expenses. 
Because your financial statement is the com-
ponent that differentiates your annual report
f rom other marketing materials, you must
a l l ow time to compile the appropriate data
a c c u r a t e l y. Notify your financial officer and
your accountant in advance of the information
you will want and when you will want it.
Your list of accomplishments — projects, pro-
grams and services — should be inclusive, so
double-check with your staff and your board 
to ensure that you capture all of the highlights.
Identify the V I Ps who lent their support as we l l
as your supporters, donors, grantors, vo l u n t e e r s
and partners. Double- and triple-check the
spelling of their names, titles and affiliations.
STEP 7
PICTURE YOUR WORK IN WORDS 
AND PHOTOS
Write about what your nonprofit does to benefit
people and the community. Use photos to send
s t rong messages and instantly telegraph the
community support your nonprofit is re c e i v i n g .
Sh ow dignitaries, civic leaders and donors inter-
acting with the people you serve and your staff.
Include before and after pictures of pro p e rt i e s
you have re n ovated. Pi c t u res validate the work
your organization does — your day care kids
at play, a first-time home buye r, a neighbor-
hood cleanup or a block watch on patro l .
Seeing is believing.
Determine the photos you want to use accord-
ing to the message you want to send or the
point you want to make, not by the photos
you have on file. Hiring a professional pho-
tographer is a good investment. 
STEP 8
CHOOSE A GOOD PRINTER
Most nonprofit annual reports are booklets
printed in two or more colors of ink, so select 
a reliable printer that specializes in these types
of jobs. Ask for recommendations and com-
pare price quotes, especially if you will need
the printer to do more than just the printing.
Ensure the printer provides you with a proof
(called a blueline) even if you are printing in
only one ink color. Allow at least three weeks
for printing, more if you print a full-color re p o rt .
5
Your annual report should tell three stories: the
effect your work is having in the neighborhood,
the community support you enjoy and your
ability to manage finances successfully. While
they are separate stories, they are interrelated —
as your annual report should show. 
Here are guides to help you organize your
annual report.
BUILD AROUND A THEME
St a rt by selecting your theme, either creating a
n ew one or building on a theme you are curre n t l y
using in another communications tool. Put the
theme on your cover and use it as an organizing
element throughout the annual re p o rt .
TELL YOUR HUMAN AND 
FINANCIAL STORIES
Put your most significant projects, programs
and activities up front. Include basics like who,
what, when, where, how and why. Highlight the
benefits you have provided to the community
and the support you have received. This will be
important to your broad audience of politicians,
corporate donors and neighborhood residents. 
It’s not enough to show your constituents that
your nonprofit is a good money manager. You
must also touch their hearts with the people you
have served, the community improvements you
have made and the community support you
receive. Nothing does this like anecdotes about
real people. Intersperse them among the facts
and figures. Always acknowledge investors,
donors and partners. Add a few sentences that
clearly explain how people or organizations can
give you money or other support.
CREATE A CONSISTENT STYLE 
Use headlines for each section and subheads for
greater detail. This helps people who skim your
annual report quickly grasp the substance.
While everyone on staff can provide informa-
tion, it’s a good idea to have one person draft
the final report so the writing style and tone 
a re consistent. Write in the active voice to 
g i ve your text more energy and make yo u r
w o rds convincing.
6
Writing the Annual Report
ORGANIZE YOUR INFORMATION 
Present your information in an easy-to-
f o l l ow format, grouping your successes
in thematic sections. Sample pages in
the appendix illustrate how one non-
p rofit organized its annual re p o rt into
sections. Affordable housing pro j e c t s
we re presented in the section In ve s t i n g
in Hope T h rough Affordable Ho u s i n g .
Su p p o rt for other initiatives and com-
munity development corporations was
s h own in the section Su p p o rt i n g
Gr a s s roots In i t i a t i ve s .
Be sure to include complete contact infor-
mation in one location and double-check
it, especially the phone numbers, for accu-
r a c y. Often placed on the back cove r, this
information should include:
n
Organization name
n
Ad d re s s
n
Telephone and fax numbers
n
Email addre s s
n
Web site
FOCUS ON HIGHLIGHTS
Re p o rting the details of eve rything your non-
p rofit has done would dilute your message and
s well the size of your annual re p o rt. Select high-
lights from the key accomplishments gathere d
during your brainstorming session. Qu a n t i f y
your highlights: how many people we re helped,
h ow many houses we re rehabbed, how much
money was raised, which dignitaries we re
i n vo l ved, the level of community support
re c e i ved or the number of hours your vo l u n-
teers worked. 
BE ACCURATE
Accuracy is critical to your credibility and
image, so re-add numbers, triple-check the
spelling of dignitaries’ names and dial phone
numbers to be certain they are right. Double-
checking only takes a few minutes and avoids
months of embarrassment. 
Do not rely on computerized “spell check” to
catch problems. For example, the function will
not identify a mistake when “we housed five
families” ends up as “we hosed five families.”
Always have two people proofread the docu-
ment, especially the financials. Have people in
charge of the projects or programs you are writ-
ing about verify your facts. 
WRITE POWERFUL PHOTO CAPTIONS
Captions are the second most-read item of any
report (headlines are first). Use captions to pro-
vide pertinent, valuable information. For exam-
ple, write captions for photos of VIPs so readers
do not miss the significance of their support.
That being said, not all photos need a caption 
if they are explained in the text. Avoid using
“stock” photos (photos purchased for the sole
purpose of illustrating a concept). Because you
do real work with real people, it is important to
your credibility to show real photos of those
people and the work you do.
7
The design of your annual re p o rt is as import a n t
as the content. Because design and content work
together to project a professional image, think
about the message the design conveys. He re are
nine elements you need to think about. A word
of caution: Just because you have graphic capa-
bilities on your computer doesn’t make you a
graphic artist. Depending on the skills of some-
one on your staff, this may be one project for
which you choose to rely on a professional. 
O N E
DESIGN AND LAYOUT 
Although your budget will dictate how fancy
the re p o rt will be, you can add effects that will
make it interesting and attract readers. To begin
with, the front cover should be visually appeal-
ing and invite readers to open your annual
re p o rt. On the inside, use photographs, illustra-
tions and graphics that relate to your theme.
Choose type fonts and colors consistent with
your other marketing materials. Use white
space as a strategic design element. Keep in
mind, howe ve r, that if your annual re p o rt is 
too glossy or printed in full color, some audi-
ences will think it an inappropriate use of
funds. T h e re is a fine line between being eye -
catching and being too extravagant. 
T W O
TYPE FACES AND TREATMENTS
Although your computer has a variety of type
fonts, use only two or three styles throughout
your annual report. Use italic or bold for
emphasis. Never use a font size smaller than 
10 point; anything smaller is too hard to read.
Maintain a type-size hierarchy, making head-
lines largest, subheads next largest, then body
text, then captions. Most often, designers rec-
ommend using a sanserif type, like Helvetica,
for headlines, subheads and captions, and a
serif type, like Times Roman, for the "body
copy" or main text of the document.
T H R E E
F I N A N C I A L S
Format financial information according to stan-
d a rd accounting practices. Be sure all numbers
a re aligned pro p e r l y, with dollar signs placed
a p p ro p r i a t e l y. While you must use columns 
of figures, pie charts and graphs are an exc e l -
lent way to show readers at a glance where the
money comes from and where it goes. Ge t
financial information from your financial offi-
cer on disk. If you have to  input the numbers,
you increase the risk of errors. Pro o f re a d .
Pro o f read. Pro o f re a d .
A sample financial statement is included 
in the appendix.
F O U R
P H O T O G R A P H Y
A good picture is worth a thousand word s .
Pi c t u res of people receiving awards, helping
others or attending your events are tre m e n-
dous testimonials. En s u re the photos yo u
select re p resent dive r s i t y. Mix old and yo u n g ,
males and females, children, families and dig-
nitaries interacting with the people you serve. 
If you do not have the photos you want, hire 
a photographer to take pictures at several of
your sites. Be explicit as to the pictures yo u
want. If your budget prohibits hiring a pro f e s-
sional, you may be able to re c ruit a photography
student. Use all-purpose 35mm color film
whether your pictures will be printed in black
and white or full color. This way, you will begin
to build a library of good photography that yo u
can use for other communications vehicles. 
Another source of photos may be the digni-
taries and company executives who attended
your events. They are often accompanied by
staff photographers and may let your nonprofit
use their photos for free.
8
Design Elements
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested