how to
sell
yourself 
communication 
and presentation
techniques
a CNet
guide for 
voluntary and
community
groups
CNet
EMPOWERING
COMMUNITIES
Online pdf converter to powerpoint - application SDK tool:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Online pdf converter to powerpoint - application SDK tool:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Part One: 
Ccommunication and Presentations
  Reasons for ineffective listening          page 2
2   Different Techniques: 
Writing versus Speaking                     page 3
3   A final thought                                  page 3
4   What you need to know about 
your audience                                   page 3
5   Check list for speaking to 
external audiences                             page 4
  Start with general objectives               page 5
  Mind-Mapping                                  page 5
  Making Your First Impression              page 5
 Closing Sentences                             page 6
10 Avoid Jargon and Abbreviations          page 6
11 How to Design Visual Aids                 page 6
12 Considerations for Visual Aids            page 7
13 How to look professional when 
using visual aids                               page 8
14 The Overhead Projector                     page 9
15 Laptop Computers                            page 10
16 35mm Slides                                    page 11
Part Two: 
Presentation
17 Reading a Paper                               page 12
18 Planned Improvisation                       page 13
19 Why is Body Language important?      page 15
20 Eye Communication                          page 15
21 Hands                                             page 15
22 Position and Posture                         page 16
23 Why should you Practice?                 page 17
24 Check list for 
Conference Appearances                   page 19
25 Where are you Speaking?                  page 19
26 Familiarity Breeds Confidence            page 21
27 How to use Interest Prompts             page 21
Part Three:
Writing for the Newspapers: 
Press Releases, Stories and Letters
28 Publicity                                           page 22
29 Creating a Newsletter                         page 23
30 How to present Copy and Layout         page 25
31 Writing a Copy                                  page 25
32 Some other hints                               page 25
33 Layout and Design                             page 25
34 Timing your Advertisement                 page 25
35 Six Classic Rules                               page 26
36 And some other hints                         page 26
37 Poster Design and Production             page 26
Contents
How to do Communications and Presentations : page 2
Part One
COMMUNICATION AND 
PRESENTATIONS
1. Reasons for ineffective listening
You may begin to wonder whether there is any
point in your attempting to speak if no one is likely
to listen to you.
Here are some other reasons why people may not
be giving you their full attention:
They anticipate what is going to be said and
switch off.
They are planning what to say when it’s their
turn.
They may be tired or worried, i.e. they may
have too much on their mind to concentrate.
They can’t hear or they find your voice dull
and monotonous.
The topic is too complex and difficult to follow
or the topic is too simple and basic.
You lack credibility, confidence and structure,
and use too much jargon.
The chairs are hard; it’s either too hot or too
cold; and the sound of traffic is very 
distracting.
You can also download a copy of this booklet and others in the
series by going on our website: www.cnet.org.uk
application SDK tool:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Online Powerpoint to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK tool:XDoc.Converter for .NET, Support Documents and Images Conversion
Convert Word, Excel and PDF to image. Next Steps. Download Free Trial Download and try Converter for .NET with online support. See Pricing
www.rasteredge.com
How to do Communications and Presentations : page 3
3. A final thought
After a 10 minute talk listeners will have 
understood and retained approximately half of
what was said and a couple of days later they’ll
only remember about a quarter.
Summary
Learn how to become a more effective listener.
Remember a speaker has the flexibility to alter
their message for different audiences.
Create a positive impression – keep in mind
that how you speak is as important as what
you say.
4. What you need to know about
your audience.
You know why you are speaking, but do they? So
ask the following questions:
Why are they there?
What do they expect?
What do they want or need?
What’s their level of knowledge/
What is their attitude likely to be to you and
your views?
Have they any past experiences that will 
influence them towards or against you?
Why are they there?
If you are speaking at a meeting in your own
workplace it is possible your audience has no
choice about attending: they are there because it
is the Friday afternoon meeting.
Sometimes you have invited your audience to 
listen to you, for example you are making a 
presentation to a prospective customer.
Alternatively, a client may have asked you to give
a progress report on their project. At a public 
conference, your audience may have paid to
attend.
Ask yourself whether your audience have chosen
to listen to you and are there of their own free will,
or whether they were sent – this can make a 
significant difference in their attitude towards you.  
What do they expect?
You must satisfy your audiences expectations – if
they are expecting a report on your experience
with flexitime for office staff, telling them about
problems you have finding a suitable garage to
service the company vans will not be relevant. 
Beware of confusing your objective with your
audience’s expectations. They are not the same.
What do they want or need?
To achieve your objective, or reach your 
destination with all your fellow travellers, you must
make the journey relevant to them. Your message
must satisfy their needs. This doesn’t mean that
you change the content of your message, but 
simply that you put yourself in your audience’s
shoes and present it from their point of view.
A breakdown of needs listed below should be 
satisfied by your argument:
Saving money.
Increasing productivity.
Writer
Writer can’t see 
reader.
Writer can’t react.
Writer relies on words
only.
Writer can carefully
choose words, but
cannot change them.
suit the listeners.
Writer explains topic
only once and reader
can reread.
Speaker
Speaker can see 
listener.
Speaker can slow
down/speed up/repeat
and involve listeners.
Speaker can use body
language and voice
for emphasis, 
enthusiasm and 
emotion.
Speaker can be more
flexible and relevant
by modifying and
altering words and
phrases to suit the 
listeners.
Speaker must have a
simple, easy-to-follow
structure, frequent
summaries and 
relevant examples
because listeners
can’t relisten.
2.Different Techniques: 
Writing versus Speaking
You should be aware of the difference between 
listening and reading so that you can adjust your
approach and successfully reach your audience.
application SDK tool:C#: How to Use SDK to Convert Document and Image Using XDoc.
This online C# tutorial will tell you how to implement conversion to Tiff file from PDF, Word You may use our converter SDK to easily convert PDF, Word, Excel
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK tool:RasterEdge XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET - SDK for PowerPoint Document
Add image to specified position on PowerPoint page. Next Steps. Download Free Trial Download and try PDF for .NET with online support. See Pricing
www.rasteredge.com
How to do Communications and Presentations : page 4
Saving time.
Improving quality.
This is by no means a complete list; you’ll be able
to identify the needs of your own audience when
you start to think about them in this way.
What’s their level of knowledge?
Here are some questions you must ask as part of
your audience research:
How much do they already know about the
topic?
How much do they think they know?
How much do they want to know?
How much do they need to know so that you
achieve the result you want?
The last question is the most important, but you
can only answer it when you have some idea of
the knowledge they have already.
In a situation where you are aware that there will
be a varied level of knowledge, you can give
enough background information to enable 
everyone to understand your talk. For example:
‘you’ll probably remember that the dip in sales
revenue last October was due to the cancellation
of the large Australian order. I think we need to
bear this in mind when looking at these figures.’
Avoid using phrases like ‘for the benefit of those
who don’t know…’ or ‘for the less experienced
among you…’ No one wants to be identified (even
to him – or herself) as one of the ignorant.
Proper preperation and practice prevent poor
performance
What is their attitude likely to be to you and
your views?
In favour? Against? Indifferent? Open- minded?
If, before you speak, you are aware of any 
negative attitudes you can attempt to overcome
objections within your talk:
You maybe wondering how we can achieve this
without taking on more staff.
If this sounds like an expensive proposal, may I
suggest you look at it this way?
Many people say I look too young to have
enough experience to cope with the problems of
this department.
Have they any past experiences that will 
influence them towards or against you?
Bad experiences colour people’s judgements and
often create an invisible barrier that prevents your
message from being received and understood.
You must acknowledge and remove this obstacle if
you are to reach your destination with your 
listeners;
I know that a similar experiment using 
temporary staff failed last year, but let me show
you how my scheme is different.
5.Check list for speaking to external
audiences.
On occasion you may be asked to speak outside
your own workplace as a panellist, a guest 
speaker or a workshop leader chairing a 
discussion, or as an after-lunch or dinner speaker.
The more you can discover about the audience
and the location, the more confident and effective
you will be as a speaker. This check list will help
you.
Who? Find out about your audience; ask your 
contact all the specific questions listed below:
How many will be present?
What is their position/occupation/title?
What is their background/education/
culture/race?
What is their sex, male/female/male and
female?
What is their age?
Where? Make sure you know the exact address
and telephone number, available parking, nearest
railway station/airport. What type of room/hall/
office/conference centre will you be in?
When? What is the day of the week, the date and
the exact time?
What? What is the topic and any specific angle,
as well as the reason foe inviting you?
How? Will there be a stage? Is there a microphone
and, if so what type? What equipment is 
available? How will the audience be sitting? In
rows/ a semi-circle/with tables?
Duration? How long should you speak and does
this include question time? When will the 
application SDK tool:VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Studio .NET HTML5 PDF Viewer PDF Viewer control as well as a powerful online PDF converter.
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK tool:VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer. view, Annotate,Convert documents online using ASPX. XDoc.HTML5 Viewer. XDoc.Windows Viewer. XDoc.Converter. View & Process. XDoc.PDF. Scanning.
www.rasteredge.com
How to do Communications and Presentations : page 5
questions be taken? Will there be a panel 
discussion?
Other speakers? Names and telephone numbers
of any other speakers would be useful.
6. Start with general objectives
General objectives fall into the following 
categories:
To inform/teach/train.
To stimulate/motivate/inspire.
To persuade/convince/sell.
To explore/debate/negotiate.
To amuse/entertain.
Writing down your objective in clear, precise terms
is often difficult, but if you refer to the general
objectives, they should help you. Remember that
you will sometimes need to combine several
objectives for example: my objective is to sell
training to them. However, I also informthem of
the content of the courses, inspirethem with 
previous successes, motivatethem by showing
them how economical our training is in 
comparison with other companies and persuade
them with logical arguments. Remember that one
general objective should predominate; don’t 
confuse yourself with a mixture of too many 
general objectives, but always aim to include
some entertainment.
Do write out your objective. Remember it must be
specific,but also achievable.
7. Mind-Mapping
So far in your preparation you’ve discovered as
much as you can about your fellow travellers and
you have chosen your destination. Your third step
is to study the map. What routes will be most
effective in helping you reach your destination?
What material should you include in your talk to
help you achieve your objective?
Draw a circle in the centre of your paper and write
in it the subject of your talk and, as you let your
mind free-wheel around it, jot down any ideas that
come to you. Place down your ideas on lines 
radiating from the central topic. You’ll find that
each idea triggers off others so that you can 
continuously build on them. The advantage of this
mind map (see diagram below) is that you have
plenty of space to add new thoughts and you can
also expand on those you have already jotted
down.
Summary
Who is going to listen? Find out about the 
audience.
Brain-storm a mind map. Don’t be judgemental;
be creative
Select ideas. Choose a few key points to
achieve your objective.
In other words, get to know your fellow 
travellers, choose your destination, study the
map and finally choose the paths that will take
you there together.
As you can see you need to spend sufficient time
and effort on the body of your talk before you
reach the stage where you can choose your 
opening sentences.
8. Making Your First Impression
Your opening words to your audience must be
enticing, seductive and should make them want to
listen to you. You need to capture their attention,
stop their minds wandering and show them you’re
worth listening to. It’s a tall order, but essential if
you expect to achieve your objectives.
It’s as simple as A, B, C and D:
Attention– capture their attention.
Benefits – show them what they will gain from 
listening.
Credentials– give them your credentials for
speaking.
HIGH STAFF 
TURNOVER
SOLUTIONS
COSTS
MORALE
MONEY
EFFECTS
REASONS
LOW MORALE
POOR SERVICE
application SDK tool:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Studio .NET HTML5 PDF Viewer PDF Viewer control as well as a powerful online PDF converter.
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK tool:DocImage SDK for .NET: Web Document Image Viewer Online Demo
Try Online Demo Now. Please click Browse to upload a file to display in web viewer. Suppported files are Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, Tiff, Dicom and main
www.rasteredge.com
How to do Communications and Presentations : page 6
Direction and Destination– tell them your 
structure.
This may seem a lot to fit into one paragraph, but
it can be covered in less than a minute.
Ask a question:
‘Can you remember what you were doing on
Tuesday 11 August last year?
‘Have you any idea how many hours you spend
in you car each week?
As you read through those questions, you may
have quickly thought of your own answers and
that is what the audience does, or else they listen
for an answer from the speaker.
Questions engage the minds of the audience and
make them concentrate. Don’t make your opening
question too involved otherwise they will be 
working out the answer and won’t be listening to
your next sentence; do make the question relevant
to the audience.
9. Closing Sentences
Your listeners’ attentionwill always be at itshighest 
at the beginning and at the end of your talk, so
you must take advantage of this and conclude with
a positive restatement of your message. Your 
conclusion shouldn’t come as a surprise. It should
be predictable in order to allow the audience to
pay maximum attention. It should be brief and not
include material.  
Below are some ways that you can end decisively.
Summarise. Use phrases like ‘’in conclusion’, ‘to
sum up’ or ‘finally’, to indicate that you are about
to finish. Be sure to end shortly after these words
– don’t continue for another 5 minutes.
10. Avoid Jargon and Abbreviations
Beware of speaking in terms that are unfamiliar to
your audience – this can be very distracting and
can cause many of your listeners to switch their
energy to pondering on the meaning of a phrase or
an abbreviation and so lose the thread of your
argument.
Some terminology or abbreviations, which are part 
of your everyday vocabulary when talking to 
colleagues, could be misleading or even 
incomprehensible to many people. Carefully trim
these distractions from your talk. Explain 
abbreviations at the beginning of your talk. If you
feel you must use shorthand because the 
abbreviated names are too long, remember to
include the full name from time to time.
11. How to Design Visual Aids
Visual aids properly used, are an effective way to
hold your audience’s attention. 
Adding Audience Value:
The object of most presentations is to inform or
persuade, or a combination of both, but 
information received by listening is retained for
less time than that which is received by seeing.
This means that visual aids help to make your talk
more memorable. They also help to explain 
complex ideas in a form that is easily understood; 
relationships and comparisons can be shown
more clearly in a visual format; statistics, figures
and financial data in general are more digestible
and comprehensible when presented visually.
Visuals can reinforce an idea that you have already 
discussed in words; for instance you could outline
a cost-saving theory and then show visually what
the actual savings would be in practice.
Avoiding Aid Dependency:
Make sure your visual is an aid and not a 
distraction, and make sure your aid is visual.
Beware of adding visuals to your presentation for
the wrong reasons; they can take time, be difficult
to use and confuse the audience. Many speakers
use them as a prompt. They have most of their
presentation on slides and refer to them 
throughout their talk. This is an insult to the 
audience!  Such speakers are ignoring all the
advantages of talking to a live audience and 
suffering all the disadvantages of reading. Your
audience can be reminded of your key points after
you have spoken them, so use a visual to 
summarise but not as a prompt.
Don’t use visuals to brighten up an uninteresting
talk – improve your talk and only use a visual to
illustrate it more vividly.  Also use visuals to;
Present facts, concepts, figures, in a 
comparative or structured form.
Aid comprehension and prevent 
misunderstandings.
Reinforce your message.
How to do Communications and Presentations : page 7
Focus your listener’s attention.
Maintain interest and help retention.
Motivate the audience to make a decision.
Add humour and spice.
Keep them uniform.
Don’t use too many types of visual and don’t
attempt to make them too diverse. A jumble of
typefaces and styles and a mixture of colours
gives the impression that both speaker and 
company are disorganised and confused. Choose
a clear, simple font likeArial or a classic font like
Times New Roman,and a type no smaller then
28 point, and use it throughout your slides with a
bold background colour to create a smart effect.
Maintain a consistent style throughout for borders,
headings and company logo position. If you are
using transitions, ensure they are uniform and only
use the special effects sparingly for impact.
12. Considerations for Visual Aids
Once you have decided that your talk would 
benefit from the inclusion of some visual material,
choosing how to display it can be difficult. The
table below shows the advantages and 
disadvantages of the various types of visual aid
and you’ll see that not one of them is perfect.
However, here are some of the considerations for
you to bear in mind, when selecting a visual style.
Visual Aids
 Advantages Disadvantages
Blackboards:
 No mechanisms to go wrong; flexible; mistakes
easily corrected; can be quickly erased
 Chalk is messy to use; creates a classroom
atmosphere; difficult to erase well if old; suitable
for small groups only; not portable
Whiteboards:
 Similar advantages to blackboards; also 
presentation clearer with special pens; easy and
cleaner to use.
 Limited to small groups; generally only available
in training rooms; not portable.
Flip Chart:
 Easy to use; not much can go wrong; readily
available; cheap; versatile – can be used 
pre-written or constructed during the course of the
talk; portable.
 Can be difficult to write on quickly; only suitable
for small audience of less than 25.
Overhead Projector:
 Transparencies easily and economically 
produced on PowerPoint; flexible; possible to
change order or omit slides during presentation;
build up of information possible with several
slides; screen is bright and clear in normal room
light; suitable for small or large audiences; can be
used like the flip chart with a continuous roll of
acetate so that the speaker can write calculations
or notes on to it.
 Can break down or suffer bulb failure, usually
fan cooled so produces background noise that can
be distracting; must be constantly switched on
and off so as not to leave irrelevant material or
blank screen showing; speaker has to be careful
not to obscure audience’s view of the screen with
the projector.
Laptops/Data Projectors:
 Have all the advantages of overhead projector
and 35mm slides; available to most presenters;
smooth transitions between slides; looks 
professional; use of special effects and sound
adds impact and interest; can check visual by
looking at laptop, not over shoulder to screen.
 Maximum of two people can see laptop screen
so usually a data projector is required; extended
set-up time and technical failure can reflect badly
on the presenter; presenter can be tied to laptop
unless remote control is used; colour on PC may
change when projected.
Video Clips:
 Can be incorporated into laptop presentation or
played on monitors; adds movement and external
presenters.
 Sound reproduction on laptop can be low 
quality so use external speakers; use sparingly or
the video will dominate your presentation.
33mm Slides:
 Very sharp, bright image; focuses attention of
audience; wide variety of material can be shown;
easily stored and carried; projectors readily 
available; fast and smooth operation; suits any
size audience; useful for more formal method of
presentation.
 Low light makes it difficult for audience to make
notes and for the speaker to maintain eye contact;
less flexible than overhead projector; cannot
change order or omit slides; artwork can be
expensive largely replaced by data projectors.
How to do Communications and Presentations : page 8
Physical Objects:
 Can save a lot of unnecessary description;
ensures everyone has uniform idea of what 
speaker is talking about; members of the audience
can handle them – direct contact is always useful;
versatile; models; objects and props often easily
available.
 Passing round objects is time consuming and
distracting; small groups only, holding up article
unsuitable for small objects or large audiences;
models can be expensive to prepare.
Available Equipment
Most organisations have either a data projector or
an overhead projector and flip chart, but if you are
presenting a talk off site, check the specifications
of the data projector.  
Size of Audience
If the audience can’t see what’s on the visual, you
are likely to antagonise them and lose their 
attention. Certain aids aren’t suitable for groups of
more than 25 people. I.e. flip chart, blackboard,
whiteboard. This is a rough estimate, and the size
and layout of the room may allow you to increase
or decrease that number. If you are presenting to a
small group of five or six people, don’t dismiss 
the idea of visuals as inappropriate; a large screen
is not always necessary as you can easily project
on to a blank wall.
Size and layout of room
Long, narrow rooms with poor lighting are not
suitable for the smaller aids such as flip charts.
Sometimes conference facilities are located in
rooms with pillars or asymmetric walls that can
make it difficult to set up a screen, which is visible
to all the audience. If you are sitting on a platform
you may have to rearrange the speakers’ chairs so
that they don’t obstruct the screen.
Lighting
You may have to darken the room, as some
offices may not have blinds at the windows.
Overhead projector slides can be shown in natural
light, but occasionally you will need to block out
sunlight directly on to the screen. Also, 35mm and
low power data projectors need dimmed lights.
Avoid shadows on the flip chart if possible and
don’t place it against a window or another source
of bright light as this will make it difficult to read.
Seating arrangements.
Make sure you arrange the seating so that 
everyone has a clear view of the screen.
The Colour Wheel
If you want vibrant colours use the ones from
opposite sides for example, orange and blue or
yellow and purple. An image stands out strongly
when a warm colour is combined with a cool
colour. A common example of this is yellow on a
blue background.
However, some colours change or lose their 
intensity when they are projected. Always avoid
white letters on a yellow background or vice versa
and pink on red, as they become invisible. You can
use a primary background colour to indicate the
various sections of your talk, i.e. the sales 
manager could use blue on the slides when 
illustrating her section on key accounts, and
change to red when she moved on to new 
business. Avoid combinations of green and red, as
these will be indistinguishable to people who are
colour blind. The key to using colour successfully
is to keep it simple.
13. How to look professional when
using visual aids
It is one thing to have excellent visuals to hand,
but it’s important to use them competently. Here
are some tips to help you look professional.
Flip charts:
Always carry your own marker pens as they
can dry out quickly and those supplied may not
write well; also, you can be sure that you have
the right thickness and colour for your purpose.
PURPLE
RED
ORANGE
BLUE
GREEN
YELLOW
How to do Communications and Presentations : page 9
You can prepare the flip chart in advance, but if
the paper is thin, only write on every other
page, otherwise some of your audience will
attempt to decipher what is written on the next
page. Use block capitals in a variety of colours
to ensure that your visual is easy to read and
attractive to look at. Remember to hide your
prepared flip chart until it is relevant so that it
creates maximum impact. Flip chart pads are 
usually 60cm by 80cm, but they are also 
available in larger sizes and a smaller variety for 
use with desktop easels. If you are drawing
graphs or working out calculations seek out
paper printed with faint squares – they are
invisible to the audience but make it easier to
write in a straight line.
The heights of some easels are adjustable.
Practice turning the pages over and if there is
any difficulty, lower the easel or arrange for one
of your listeners to help you at the appropriate
time.
Use a paper-clip or fold over the corner of the
page to indicate your next visual or a visual to
which you want to refer back during the course
of your talk.
Flip charts are not suitable for large audiences
so their use is limited to informal groups of 
approximately 25 people or fewer, and are used
most effectively during the course of a 
presentation to note information given by 
members of the audience, to calculate, to show
organisational change, to illustrate a 
management model or to highlight and 
summarise essential points. This can serve as
a visual reminder and a listener who has been
distracted can tune back in by glancing at the
flip chart. Your main points on the flip chart
can help you to summarise at the end of your
talk.  
Consider using two flip charts so that one can
display the key ideas, while the other is used as
a scribbling pad.
Using a flip chart in mind-mapping sessions is
helpful as it enables all the points to be visible
to your group. As each sheet is completed you
can tear it off and stick it onto the walls around
the room so that you can make up a complete
picture.
Writing clearly and quickly in front of an 
audience is not easy and, if you’re planning to
use it frequently, find time to practise as it’s a
skill that can be learnt.
Hints on using the flip chart:
Always remove the previous speaker’s chart.
Stand to one side of the easel, on the left if
you’re right-handed and on the right if you’re
left-handed, so that as you write you are not
obstructing the audience’s view; this position
allows you to glance over your shoulder 
occasionally, to keep eye contact with your 
listeners. Also stand to one side of the easel if
you are indicating points on the flip chart.
Don’t hang on to the easel for support.
Never write and speak at the same time. This is
one of the most difficult rules to follow but
remember that anything that you say while you
are writing will not be heard by your listeners; 
they will be concentrating on what you are 
writing and not listening, and your voice will be
muffled as it will be directed at the flip chart
and not at your audience.
Don’t hold a marker pen in your hand when
you’re not writing.
Look at the audience and not at the flip chart.
Speakers break this rule more often than any
other because eye contact with the audience is
difficult and looking at a familiar flip chart is
comforting. Learn to overcome this problem
and stand square to the audience and not half
turned to the flip chart.
14. The Overhead Projector
This visual aid is suitable for large and small 
audiences, and slides are easy to make. The
smaller desk version can be carried to locations
that don’t have suitable equipment.
Most overhead projectors are used to project
slides on to a screen, but when a roll of acetate
film covers the top it can be used in a similar
manner to a flip chart, i.e. to note down audience
contributions, to summarise decisions, to show
calculations or to use as a scribbling block for the
speaker to illustrate theories and suppositions
visually.
You can use pre-drawn diagrams or outlines and
then complete them in front of the audience while  
How to do Communications and Presentations : page 10
explaining the significance of the additional 
material. Alternatively you can place an incomplete
transparency under the acetate roll and draw on
the finishing lines without marking a transparency
you may want to use on another occasion.
As the speaker sits alongside the projector facing
the audience, he can continue to make eye contact
as he writes, which he can’t do while using the flip
chart. This secondary use of the overhead 
projector is generally more suited to lectures and
informal training sessions.
Hints on using the OHP:
Always switch off the projector before 
removing your transparency. The speaker who
waves her transparency over the projector is
providing a minor distraction and a blank 
screen is unpleasant to look at. If you have a
series of slides simply move the next slide into
place without switching off.
Point at the transparency and not at the screen
to indicate any vital information.
15. Laptop Computers
Laptop presentations have become very common. 
If you are wanting help in this sort of
presentation, contact Bradford CVS or Keighley
CVS for advice. 
The advantage of using laptop visuals are:
New material can be incorporated e.g. up-to-
the-minute accurate sales figur.
Presentations can be customised easily.
The transition between slides are smooth.
Text builds are hassle-free and key points can
be highlighted.
Video clips can be added.
Colour, backgrounds and professional 
templates add impact.
The disadvantages are also all the points listed
above. Presenters (and their audiences) can get
carried away with the technology, so instead of
adding value, the visuals hijack the presentation.
Screen:
If you are presenting to a couple of people you
can do it directly from the laptop. Ensure that the
screen is not catching any reflected light and that
the image is visible to your listeners.
In the absence of a screen, or in a small space,
you may wish to project directly onto a plain wall;
however, you should expect a reduction in the
quality of the image.
Where you position the screen will depend on how
dominant you want your slides to be. If you are
illustrating 80 percent of your presentation, place
the screen centrally; if only 20 percent of your talk
has visual support, you should be centre stage.
Place the screen to your left, which makes it 
easier for the audience to look from you to the
screen and read visuals from left to right.
For larger, more formal presentations you may
wish to use rear screen projection. The projector is
placed behind the screen and is invisible to the
audience. A special opaque screen is needed for
back projection, together with a projector with a
reverse image feature.
Projector:
Data or LCD projectors are portable and usually
used with a laptop. It is possible to download your
presentation on to a memory card (PCMCIA) and
eliminate the need for a laptop. However, some
functions such as transitions will not be projected.
DLP (Digital Light Processing) projectors, 
particularly the three-chip design, give a better,
clear picture, but you should aim for 750/800
ANSI lumens (which is the brightness 
measurement) for an audience of approximately
20. Be sure to have an appropriate stand for the
projector – an OHP trolley is too low.
Plasma screens are installed in some boardrooms
and used as a n alternative to a projector, and also
double up as a monitor for video-conferencing.
They are not portable so cannot replace the data
projector for offsite presentations. Although the
picture quality is very high, they can only be used
for audiences of under fifteen because of their 
size.
Laptop:
The rule of thumb for laptops is simple – get the
fastest you can lay your hands on and always run
it from the mains.
Ensure you have a video display card if you want
to show clips and a video card so that you can
input from TV, video or from your own camcorder.
You will also need a sound card. Be aware of
infringing on copyright laws if you use audio or 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested