Issue 3 April 2005 
European crop wild relative diversity  
assessment and conservation forum 
Conserving plant genetic resources 
for use now and in the future 
Crop wild relative 
ISSN 1742-3627 (Print) 
ISSN 1742-3694 (Online) 
PGR Forum - EVK2-2001-00192 - Fifth Framework Programme for Energy, Environment and Sustainable Development 
www.pgrforum.org 
Converting pdf to powerpoint - C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
convert pdf to powerpoint slides; changing pdf to powerpoint file
Converting pdf to powerpoint - VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
add pdf to powerpoint presentation; pdf to ppt converter online
 
Crop wild relative
Issue 3 April 2005
Correspondence address
Shelagh Kell, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK 
Email: s.p.kell@bham.ac.uk
Copyright 
© University of Birmingham 2003. All rights reserved. The University of Birmingham edits and 
publishes 
Crop wild relative 
on behalf of the European crop wild relative diversity assessment and 
conservation forum (PGR Forum). PGR Forum is funded by the European Community Fifth Framework 
Programme for Energy, Environment and Sustainable Development. Project code EVK2-2001-00192
Issue 3 April 2005 
Crop wild relative 
Editorial
............................................................................................................................
3
Monitoring evolutionary changes in forest trees: general concepts  
and a case study in European black poplar (Populus nigra L.) François Lefèvre 
.....
 A global initiative to conserve crop wild relatives in situ Annie Lane
........................
Distribution of creeping marshwort (Apium repens (Jacq.) Lag.) populations  
in Hungary G. Vörösváry, L. Holly
and 
N. Riezing 
........................................................
11 
Genetic erosion and pollution assessment methodologies: a summary of  
PGR Forum Workshop 5 Sónia R. Dias, Eliseu Bettencourt 
and 
Brian Ford-Lloyd 
.....
13 
PGR Forum at the XIth OPTIMA Meeting Lori de Hond 
and 
José M. Iriondo 
.............
14 
 Changes in grassland management and its effect on plant diversity  
Åsmund Asdal 
................................................................................................................
15 
 First International Conference on Crop Wild Relative Conservation and Use 
.......
18 
 4th Planta Europa Conference: PGR Forum represented Brian Ford-Lloyd 
..............
18  
Novel sewerage treatment technologies: a new group of potential  
crop plants emerges to be conserved in situ Béla Baji 
.............................................
19 
 Genetic variation in wild Brassicas in England and Wales  
Sarah Watson-Jones
Nigel Maxted 
and 
Brian Ford-Lloyd 
............................................
20 
Editors
 
Shelagh Kell 
Nigel Maxted 
Brian Ford-Lloyd  
 Design and layout
:  
Shelagh Kell 
 Front cover
Oryza eichingeri
in Sri Lanka
Photo: Annie Lane, 
International Plant Genetic 
Resources Institute 
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
This PowerPoint document converting library component offers reliable C#.NET PowerPoint document rendering APIs for developers PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
adding pdf to powerpoint slide; how to convert pdf into powerpoint slides
C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET
Online C# Tutorial for Converting PowerPoint to PDF (.pdf) Document. PowerPoint Why do we need this PowerPoint to PDF converting library? In
how to add pdf to powerpoint; converting pdf to powerpoint online
3
Crop wild relative
Issue 3 April 2005 
Above
: Creeping marshwort (
Apium repens
), Bokod, Hungary.  This strictly 
protected species is a very rare wild relative of cultivated celery (
Apium 
graveolens
) present in the Hungarian flora (see article, page 11) 
Tünde Kovács 
C rop wild relative 
Issue 3 is brought to you in PGR 
Forum’s third and final year, but with so much to 
report, two more issues are planned before the 
end of the year, and the good news is that due to the popularity 
of the newsletter, funding has already been secured for a further 
three issues after the end of the project. It is also anticipated that 
Crop wild relative 
will continue to be published under the aus-
pices of the Crop Wild Relative Specialist Group (CWRSG) of 
the IUCN Species Survival Commission, which will be inaugu-
rated this year. 
It is now less than six months until the First International Confer-
ence on Crop Wild Relative Conservation and Use (see page 
18), which will be a landmark in PGR conservation, highlighting 
crop wild relatives (CWR) as a critical but neglected resource. A 
varied and stimulating programme is under preparation, includ-
ing topics not covered by PGR Forum such as 
ex situ 
conserva-
tion and use of CWR. Combined with the backdrop of the an-
cient Valley of Temples, the azure of the Mediterranean Sea and 
the unrelenting hospitality of the Sicilian people, the Conference 
is sure to be a huge success. Whether you are a conservation 
manager, plant breeder, policy-maker, information manager, 
researcher or other individual interested in crop wild relatives, be 
sure not to miss this historic event. For information and registra-
tion details visit http://www.pgrforum.org/conference.htm
The activities of PGR Forum have centred around a number of 
workshops, each one addressing specific issues related to CWR 
conservation. Four three-day workshops have taken place to 
date, the latest being “Genetic erosion and pollution assessment 
methodologies”, held on Terceira Island, the Azores, Portugal, 8-
11 September 2004 (see page 13). The final workshop in the 
series, “Threat and conservation assessment” will take place in 
Korsør, Denmark, 27-30 April 2005, and will be reported on in 
the next issue of 
Crop wild relative
It is through these intensive and productive workshops that PGR 
Forum has been able to achieve so much in a relatively short 
time. A number of publications are under preparation as a result 
of the workshops and associated research, including a manual 
in the IPGRI Technical Bulletin series that addresses practical 
guidelines for 
in situ 
CWR population management and monitor-
ing, and a number of articles to be published in peer-reviewed 
journals such as 
Biodiversity and Conservation
. In addition, the 
proceedings of the First International Conference on Crop Wild 
relative Conservation and Use will be published by CAB Interna-
tional (http://www.cabi.org/
), a copy of which will be included 
with Conference registration. It is anticipated that these publica-
tions will have a significant impact on CWR conservation and 
exploitation, both within and outside Europe. 
While we are waiting for these major peer-reviewed publications 
to appear on our shelves, 
Crop wild relative 
continues to provide 
a more immediate medium through which to publish articles and 
news items addressing CWR conservation and use. Issue 3 
provides us with an insight into a wide range of CWR topics, 
including an article raising awareness about wild plants being 
assessed for their use in sewerage treatment (see page 19). We 
also learn about the threatened CWR 
Apium repens
in Hungary 
(page 11), the importance of monitoring evolutionary change in 
forest tree species (page 4), how changes in grassland manage-
ment practices are altering the landscape and its component 
plant species in Norway (page 15),  the relationship between 
ecogeographic and genetic variation in populations of wild 
Bras-
sica 
in England and Wales (page 20), and a GEF-funded project 
addressing the conservation of CWR in five countries: Armenia, 
Bolivia, Madagascar, Sri Lanka and Uzbekistan (page 7). 
We hope you enjoy reading this issue and encourage you to 
distribute the newsletter amongst your colleagues. Issue 4 will 
follow closely behind Issue 3, and will focus on delivering a draft 
programme and cultural event details of the First International 
Conference on Crop Wild Relative Conservation and Use. 
Please continue to send us your articles and items for future 
issues of 
Crop wild relative
Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Then just wait until the conversion from Powerpoint to PDF is complete and download the file Creating a PDF from PPTX/PPT has never been so easy Easy converting!
convert pdf to editable powerpoint online; how to add pdf to powerpoint slide
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Best C#.NET PDF Converter SDK for converting PDF to HTML in Visual Studio .NET. This is a C# programming example for converting PDF to HTML.
convert pdf to powerpoint slides; convert pdf pages to powerpoint slides
 
Crop wild relative
Issue 3 April 2005
Monitoring evolutionary changes in forest trees: 
general concepts and a case study in European black 
poplar (Populus nigra L.)  
François Lefèvre 
INRA Mediterranean Forest Research Unit, Avignon, France, lefevre@avignon.inra.fr
perspective of adaptation is relevant to all organisms, but par-
ticularly in the case of forest trees when the time needed to 
reach population equilibrium (i.e. hundreds of generations or 
thousands of years) exceeds the time scale of environmental 
stability.  
 General concepts regarding genetic erosion and hybridisa-
tion-introgression 
Monitoring evolutionary changes requires a measure of the rate 
of evolution. The concept of effective population size gives such 
a measure. The term is sometimes confusing;  see Nunney 
(2000) for a detailed discussion on its significance. It comes 
from Wright-Fisher's model population, submitted to genetic drift 
as a single evolutionary force that erodes genetic diversity and 
increases inbreeding, with no mutation and no selection. Under 
a series of assumptions (hermaphrodism, panmixia etc.), the 
rate of evolution in this model population, regarding either diver-
sity or inbreeding, is entirely determined by its effective size 
Ne
This theoretical population is the reference to which any real 
population can be compared: the effective size 
Ne
of an actual 
population is the size of the model population that would have 
exactly the same rate of evolution. In other words, 
Ne
is a unit for 
measuring the decrease in diversity or the increase of inbreed-
ing. More precisely, the evolutionary changes are proportional to 
1/
Ne
: no evolution at all (purely theoretical) would be an infinite 
effective size; a constant rate of evolution corresponds to a con-
stant 
Ne
; whereas an acceleration of genetic erosion corre-
sponds to a decreasing 
Ne.
(Fig. 2) 
To understand the value of the parameter 
Ne
, we can start from 
Wright-Fisher's model population and eliminate its assumptions 
one at a time. It can be shown how 
Ne
decreases, i.e. evolution 
accelerates, under several factors: biological factors (true or 
“Preserving forest genetic resources 
in the long run relies on three 
complementary activities: (i) 
sustainable management of the 
forest, (ii) protection of sites and 
reserve areas, (iii) specific 
programmes for the conservation of 
target genetic resources” 
onservation of genetic resources: the need for a 
global and dynamic approach  
Forest genetic resources exist in a continuous gradient 
of population types from cultivated to wild, which interact through 
gene flow or exchange of pathogens (Lefèvre, 2004). The inten-
sity of domestication, which can be defined as the genetic 
changes of anthropogenic origin in the cultivated pool, also var-
ies from one species to another. In Europe, poplars (
Populus 
L.) 
(Fig. 1) are an example of a highly domesticated resource; most 
cultivated populations exist in monoclonal stands of interspecific 
hybrids, while the wild riparian populations go extinct due to 
habitat deterioration. For species like spruce (
Picea 
spp.) or 
pines (
Pinus
spp.), domestication reaches the point of improved 
population varieties, whereas for other species, like oaks 
(
Quercus 
spp.) and beech (
Fagus 
spp.) for example, domestica-
tion is generally restricted to seed transfer from selected 
"natural" stands. Finally, there are some species like mountain 
ash (
Sorbus 
spp.) or pear (
Pyrus 
spp.), generally with a scat-
tered distribution, that are only exploited as a wild resource with 
no direct genetic improvement. The European forests consist of 
a mixture of cultivated and wild genetic resources that must be 
considered collectively. Preserving forest genetic resources in 
the long run relies on three complementary activities: (i) sustain-
able management of the forest, (ii) protection of sites and re-
serve areas, (iii) specific programmes for the conservation of 
target genetic resources. 
The term "conservation", when applied to genetic resources, can 
be misleading. Genetic resources are subject to constant 
change (e.g. genetic erosion and genetic pollution) and the cur-
rent state of 
in situ 
diversity cannot therefore be considered as 
an objective to be maintained 
per se
. Current population size, 
genetic diversity or even adaptedness of the resource are not 
stable nor ideal parameters, but rather instantaneous values 
resulting from dynamic processes. Therefore, the question is 
how to monitor the dynamics of the whole system. This dynamic 
Figure 1. 
European black poplar, 
Populus nigra 
L., an example of a CWR in 
forestry with a conservation plan at the European level 
François Lefèvre 
VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
This guide give a series of demo code directly for converting MicroSoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint document to PDF file in VB.NET application.
convert pdf document to powerpoint; export pdf into powerpoint
VB.NET PowerPoint: Complete PowerPoint Document Conversion in VB.
Converting PowerPoint document to PDF file can be quite simple provided that this VB.NET PowerPoint Converting SDK is correctly installed and utilized.
how to convert pdf to powerpoint in; copying image from pdf to powerpoint
5
Crop wild relative
Issue 3 April 2005 
partial dioecism, departure from panmixia), demographic factors 
(variation of population size across generations, variance in 
mating success, generation overlap) and environmental factors 
(selection). Human activities interfere with each of these biologi-
cal, demographic and environmental factors; the question then is 
how much 
Ne
is affected and how much the evolutionary 
changes are re-oriented. In practice, the objective is not to esti-
mate 
Ne
for a real population, but rather to use it to compare 
different strategies or practices. For instance, a silviculture that 
will enhance the variance in mating success will decrease 
Ne
and therefore increase inbreeding. 
Concerning the concepts of hybridisation and introgression, a 
complete review can be found in Allendorf 
et al.
(2001). In trees, 
as for most plant genetic resources, the concepts must be con-
sidered in a broad sense, i.e. including the intraspecific level: 
typically, gene flow between wild and cultivated populations. 
Here, we are more interested in the anthropogenic impact on 
gene exchanges between populations. Due to their long genera-
tion time, and the relatively recent human impact, trees will 
rarely reach the point of introgression, which requires several 
generations of backcrossing. The central question is the impact 
of gene flow on the fitness or the adaptedness of the population: 
a comprehensive synthesis on this issue was made by Lenor-
mand (2002).  
The impact of gene flow results from balanced effects (Fig. 3). 
On the positive side of the balance, say "reinforcement" in refer-
ence to the practice sometimes used in conservation biology, 
introduction of an alien pool can increase the actual population 
size (demographic rescue for a local population in sharp de-
cline), and it can also increase genetic diversity and reduce 
inbreeding. By contrast, on the negative side, say "extinction", it 
can lead to demographic swamping (the new generation in en-
tirely made of hybrid forms that will reproduce badly them-
selves), it increases migration load (bring in maladapted genes), 
and it can reduce the actual population size (if the alien or the 
hybrid becomes super-fit). The outcome of balanced effects will 
vary from one situation to another. However, some general ten-
dencies can be hypothesized (Lenormand, 2002). The negative 
impacts of the "extinction" side of the balance are reduced 
when: (i) the local taxon is not rare, (ii) reproductive barriers are 
strong, (iii) generation time is long, (iv) selfing or vegetative 
propagation occurs, (v) differential selection is enhanced. 
Specific features for trees 
Genetic markers reveal higher genetic diversity for trees than 
any other organism, including both global diversity at the taxo-
nomic level and within-population diversity (Hamrick, Godt and 
Sherman-Broyles, 1992). Moreover, the genetic differentiation 
among tree populations is weak. Considering that post-glacial 
re-colonisation of trees was rapidly achieved in few generations, 
the observed pattern of genetic diversity is explained by inten-
sive gene flow among populations. The importance of migration 
as an evolutionary force in trees is further enhanced by the long 
juvenile phase: when a new site is colonised, migrants accumu-
late over years before they start to reproduce themselves, thus 
reducing the founder effect (Austerlitz 
et al
., 2000). 
In spite of recent colonisation and important gene flow, tree 
populations rapidly develop local adaptation, and clinal variation 
is often observed for adaptive traits, e.g. phenology in oaks 
(Ducousso, Guyon and Kremer, 1996). The rapid effect of selec-
tion is also observed on recently transplanted tree populations 
(Skrøppa and Kohman, 1997). Local adaptation is a dynamic 
process where natural selection is balanced by other processes 
that prevent the population from reaching an "optimal" genetic 
composition: gene flow (migration load), interaction among spe-
cies and temporal fluctuations of environment. Therefore, popu-
lations maintain a high level of genetic diversity for adaptive 
traits, which is essential for future evolution. Climate change will 
directly affect the current generation of trees and their proge-
nies. In response to this environmental change, three adaptive 
strategies are expected for forests: individual phenotypic plastic-
ity is an immediate response, then, rapid genetic evolution can 
occur in few generations, and, finally, migration of populations 
will probably take more time than the other processes. A com-
prehensive study of adaptive potential in 
Pinus contorta
popula-
tions was published by Rehfeldt, Wykoff and Ying (2001). 
“In practice, the objective is not to 
estimate Ne for a real population, but 
rather to use it to compare different 
strategies or practices. For instance, 
a silviculture that will enhance the 
variance in mating success will 
decrease Ne and therefore increase 
inbreeding” 
N
e
= 7 
N
= 30 
Figure 2.
Genetic erosion
: the effective population size 
Ne
is a standardised 
parameter measuring the rate of evolution of the genetic diversity in a 
population, i.e. erosion of diversity (top) or increase of consanguinity. The lower 
the value of 
Ne
, the more intense evolution of the diversity. Infinite 
Ne
means no 
evolution, constant 
Ne
means a constant rate of evolution, decrease in 
Ne
means 
an acceleration of genetic erosion. Rather than monitoring the genetic diversity, 
we can monitor the evolution of diversity by predicting what human activities will 
increase or decrease 
Ne
.  
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Free C#.NET SDK library and components for converting PDF file in .NET Windows applications, ASP.NET web programs and .NET console application.
how to add pdf to powerpoint presentation; convert pdf into ppt
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Word in C#.NET. Online C#.NET Tutorial for Converting PDF to Word (.doc/ .docx) Document with .NET XDoc.PDF Library in C#.NET Class.
converting pdf to ppt; convert pdf into powerpoint online
 
Crop wild relative
Issue 3 April 2005
Genetic erosion, the reduction of within-population diversity, can 
directly affect the adaptive potential of our forests and should be 
avoided. Based on recent studies of the impact of domestication 
in crop plants, we can conclude that breeding and selection 
activities generally do not represent a major threat of genetic 
erosion in trees, except in the particular cases of low initial diver-
sity (Lefèvre, 2004). Population management, not only restricted 
to silviculture, has a direct impact on demographic parameters: 
life cycle, dispersal, mating system, survival and mating suc-
cess. It should not affect the processes that maintain a high level 
of diversity within tree populations. This is a rather general state-
ment, but all population management practices have their own 
advantages and drawbacks, and each case must be considered 
individually (see Lefèvre (2004) for a review). Genetic erosion is 
itself a dynamic process that can be accelerated or slowed down 
by population management (Lefèvre 
et al
., 2004). 
Wolf, Takebayashi and Rieseberg (2001) proposed a general 
frame for monitoring the risk related to genetic pollution. It must 
be stressed that introductions, landscape fragmentation and 
habitat disturbance influence the process of hybridisation and 
introgression. The first step is risk assessment. Assessing the 
occurrence and frequency of hybridisation often raises technical 
difficulties, particularly in the case of intra-specific hybridisation. 
Risk assessment is also needed to estimate the variation of 
frequency among cohorts, as well as the relative fertility of hy-
brid types. The second step is to reduce the impact of hybridisa-
tion if considered as a risk. This can be achieved in several 
ways: through elimination of hybrids and invasive species, or by 
improving habitat in order to enhance competition and differen-
tial selection between local and hybrid forms. In particular, the 
impact of commercial seed transfer on local genetic resources 
depends both on the origin of the seeds and the destination site 
(Lefèvre, 2004); in an optimal situation, the risk of maladapted-
ness should be avoided through sufficient preliminary tests; a 
higher risk is expected when the local resource has small 
Ne
Populus nigra as a case study 
The European black poplar, 
Populus nigra
L., is a genetic re-
source of interest for breeding. Natural populations have se-
verely declined over Europe due to habitat disturbance of ripar-
ian areas. A network of the EUFORGEN programme was spe-
cifically dedicated to this resource (see http://
www.ipgri.cgiar.org/networks/euforgen/Networks/Poplars/
PN_home.asp
). Complementary approaches for its conservation 
can be applied: 
ex situ
collections for the areas where natural 
populations have disappeared or where natural regeneration 
does not occur anymore, 
in situ
management of conservation 
stands whenever possible, or reserve areas of riparian forests. 
Three objectives are generally assigned to 
in situ
conservation 
of forest genetic resources: (i) ensure the regeneration in suffi-
cient quantity, (ii) ensure the genetic quality of the regeneration 
for further evolutionary processes, (iii) preserve the ecological 
and genetic characteristics. The EUFORGEN Network recently 
published guidelines for 
in situ
management of this pioneer spe-
cies that are briefly introduced hereafter (Lefèvre 
et al
., 2001).  
The first point in these guidelines was to identify the different 
population types that can be found today in Europe, and assign 
to each of them a potential specific role in the conservation plan. 
Indeed, large naturally regenerating and self-sustainable poplar 
stands are rare in Europe, but small stands can also play a role, 
and, in other cases, ecological management can promote natu-
ral regeneration. The second point was to inform on the interac-
tion between ecosystem dynamics and poplar population biol-
ogy. We can expect that for most pioneer species, population 
dynamics will mainly be controlled through the dynamics of the 
ecosystem rather than through direct control of demography. For 
instance, regeneration will generally not take place where the 
reproductive individuals occur, but in recently opened areas. The 
third point was to make some recommendations for restoration 
projects, as already planned in some countries. Finally, we ad-
dressed the question of criteria and indicators to be used for 
monitoring 
in situ
conservation units. Related to these guide-
lines, a joint European Research project was launched that in-
vestigated the following topics of interest for conservation, 
among other research tasks: gene flow, mating system, clonal 
propagation, introgression (Van Dam and Bordacs, 2002).  
“large naturally regenerating and 
self-sustainable poplar stands are 
rare in Europe, but small stands can 
also play a role, and, in other cases, 
ecological management can promote 
natural regeneration” 
reinforcement 
extinction
demographic swamping 
migration load  
reduce Ne 
demographic rescue 
increase diversity 
reduce inbreeding 
Figure 3. 
Gene flow, which results from natural migration or artificial 
transplantation followed by hybridisation, has a many-fold impact on the local 
genetic resources. Depending on the size of local populations, on the genetic 
diversity of the migrant pool and the adaptedness of the migrant pool to local 
conditions, the balanced effects will result in positive or negative impact. The risk 
of extinction of the local germplasm is reduced when the local taxon is not rare, 
when reproductive barriers are stong, when generation time is long, when selfing 
or vegetative propagation occurs or when differential selection is enhanced. 
C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
and WinForms applications. Support converting PDF document to SVG image within C#.NET project without quality loss. C# sample code
changing pdf to powerpoint file; converter pdf to powerpoint
7
Crop wild relative
Issue 3 April 2005 
Literature cited 
Allendorf, F. W., R. F. Leary, P. Spruell and J. K. Wenburg 2001. The problems 
with hybrids: setting conservation guidelines Trends in Ecology and Evolution 
16
613-622. 
Austerlitz, F., S. Mariette, N. Machon, P. H. Gouyon and B. Godelle 2000. 
Effects of colonization processes on genetic diversity: differences between 
annual plants and tree species. Genetics 
154
: 1309-1321. 
Ducousso, A., J. P. Guyon and A. Kremer 1996. Latitudinal and altitudinal 
variation of bud burst in western populations of sessile oak (
Quercus petraea
(Matt.) Liebl. Annales des Sciences Forestières 
53
: 775-782. 
Hamrick, J. L., M. J. W. Godt and S. L. Sherman-Broyles 1992. Factors 
influencing levels of genetic diversity in woody plant species. New Forests 
6
: 95-
124. 
Lefèvre, F. 2004. Human impacts on forest genetic resources in the temperate 
zone: an updated review. Forest Ecology and Management 
197
: 257-271. 
Lefèvre, F., N. Barsoum, B. Heinze, D. Kajba, P. Rotach, S. M. G. de Vries and 
J. Turok 2001. EUFORGEN Technical Bulletin : 
in situ
conservation of 
Populus 
nigra
. International Plant Genetic Resources Institute, Rome, Italy. 
Lefèvre, F., B. Fady, D. Fallour-Rubio, D. Ghosn and M. Bariteau 2004. Impact 
of founder population, drift and selection on the genetic diversity of a recently 
translocated tree population. Heredity (in press, available on line) 
Lenormand, T. 2002. Gene flow and the limits to natural selection. Trends in 
Ecology and Evolution 
17
: 183-189. 
Nunney, L., 2000. The limits to knowledge in conservation genetics - The value 
of effective population size. Evolutionary Biology 
32
: 179-194. 
Rehfeldt, G. E., W. R. Wykoff and C. C. Ying 2001. Physiological plasticity, 
evolution, and impacts of a changing climate on 
Pinus contorta
. Climatic Change 
50
: 355-376. 
Skrøppa, T. and K. Kohmann 1997. Adaptation to local conditions after one 
generation in Norway spruce. Forest Genetics 
4
: 171-177. 
Van Dam, B. C. and S. Bordacs 2002. Genetic diversity in river populations of 
European black poplar. Proceedings of an International Symposium, Szekszard, 
Hungary. 
Wolf, D. E., N. Takebayashi and L. H. Rieseberg 2001. Predicting the risk of 
extinction through hybridization. Conservation Biology 
15
: 1039-1053. 
A global initiative to conserve crop wild relatives in situ 
Annie Lane 
International Plant Genetic Resources Institute (IPGRI), Via dei Tre Denari, 472/a, 00057 Maccarese (Fiumicino), Rome, Italy, a.lane@cgiar.org
“I 
n situ 
conservation of crop wild 
relatives through enhanced infor-
mation management and field 
application” is a UNEP/GEF supported
project that addresses national and 
global needs to improve global food se-
curity through effective conservation and 
use of crop wild relatives. This multi-
faceted five year project was launched in 
2004 and brings together five countries 
and six international organizations to 
manage and make use of the wild rela-
tives of vitally important crops. 
The natural populations of many crop 
wild relatives are increasingly at risk and 
they are at present poorly conserved, for 
a range of reasons. There are technical 
problems involved in developing conser-
vation plans for such a diverse range of 
species with different biological charac-
teristics, ecological requirements, con-
servation status and uses. There are 
also political, administrative and infra-
structural problems that limit effective 
in 
situ
conservation actions. In many cases, 
collaboration between different minis-
tries, agencies or institutions is required 
where there is no tradition of collabora-
tion and, in fact may even be a history of 
competition. While many countries al-
ready have conservation initiatives in 
place (e.g. gene banks and protected 
areas) few of these target crop wild rela-
tives (Meilleur and Hodgkin, 2004). An 
assessment of 
in situ
conservation of 
Lupinus
spp. in Spain, for example, 
showed that protected areas do not con-
sider crop wild relative populations 
unless they are an endangered species 
(Parra-Quijano, Draper and Iriondo, 
2003). Undoubtedly, however, a major 
limitation is in the capacity to bring to-
gether and use information that does 
exist. A number of studies have shown 
that substantial amounts of information 
often exist (e.g. Thormann 
et al
., 1999) 
but that it is dispersed among different 
institutions and agencies in different 
countries and international organizations, 
and is often biased towards food crops  
The project was developed to address 
national and global needs to improve 
conservation of crop wild relatives, focus-
ing on improved management and use of 
information on these species. It brings 
together five countries - Armenia, Bolivia, 
Madagascar, Sri Lanka and Uzbekistan - 
with IPGRI as the project manager, and 
five other international conservation 
agencies - the Food and Agriculture 
Organization of the United Nations 
(FAO), Botanic Gardens Conservation 
International (BGCI), the United Nations 
Environment Programme’s World Con-
servation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-
WCMC), IUCN - The World Conservation 
Union and the German Centre for Docu-
mentation and Information in Agriculture 
(ZADI) - to enhance the conservation 
status of selected crop wild relatives in 
each country. Each of the countries has 
significant numbers of important and 
Above
: Wild vanilla 
Vanilla 
sp.,
Ankarafantsika 
National Park, Madagascar; an important spice 
common in markets and on the street 
Annie Lane 
 
Crop wild relative
Issue 3 April 2005
threatened taxa of crop wild relatives. 
Each is also among the world’s biodiver-
sity hotspots; places that have the high-
est concentrations of unique biodiversity 
on the planet. They are also the places 
at greatest risk of loss of diversity.  
Project development and implementa-
tion 
The preceding two year design and de-
velopment phase of the project analysed 
the conservation situation for crop wild 
relatives in the five countries. It was 
found that relatively little is known of the 
conservation status of these species, no 
management plans have been devel-
oped for reserves with such species in 
mind, no modern information manage-
ment systems exist, and no 
in situ 
con-
servation projects or monitoring activities 
targeted to crop wild relatives were cur-
rently in place
.
All of the partner coun-
tries expressed their desire to improve 
the conservation and wise use of these 
important resources in a sustainable and 
cost-effective way. To achieve this, they 
decided to use approaches that maxi-
mize the use of existing information and 
conservation resources in ways that are 
widely applicable to the different taxa 
that occur within their borders. 
This first year of project implementation 
is dominated by activities to establish 
infrastructure, processes and personnel. 
The first International Steering Commit-
tee (ISC) meeting was held in Sri Lanka 
in July 2004 to refine budgets and work 
plans and to confirm the course for the 
first year. Each country has now estab-
lished a project management unit to 
coordinate in-country activities and work 
with the global project management unit 
established at IPGRI. An Information 
Management Committee (IMC) has been 
formed to drive the information compo-
nents of the project and its first workshop 
and meeting were held in October 2004. 
Representatives from each of the five 
countries and six international organiza-
tions attended as well as a representa-
tive from PGR Forum. A Technical Advi-
sory Committee will soon be established 
to provide advice and guidance to the 
ISC on technical matters.  
Other activities during the first year will 
include the development of collaborative 
agreements for exchange of information 
both within and between countries and 
for the coordination of 
in situ
conserva-
tion activities within countries. Informa-
tion will be collected on the current level 
of awareness of crop wild relatives and 
the conservation and management 
status of wild relative populations in pro-
tected areas so as to provide a baseline 
against which to measure project per-
formance and impacts of activities in 
relation to these aspects. In this regard, 
a detailed monitoring and evaluation plan 
will be developed collaboratively by the 
national and global project management 
units. 
Key elements 
The project has four major components, 
the first two of which focus on the sys-
tematic compilation, access and use of 
information related to crop wild relatives. 
Application of this information will signifi-
cantly enhance the development of ef-
fective 
in situ
conservation and monitor-
ing strategies for crop wild relatives, 
which is the major focus of the third com-
ponent, and in raising awareness, the 
fourth component.   
Component 1.  International information 
management system.
An information 
portal dedicated to crop wild relatives will 
be developed to serve as a gateway for 
access for the global community allowing 
users to search for information through a 
single web address. CD-ROM products 
will also be distributed to users through-
out the world who may not have access 
to the internet. The system will bring 
together information from available na-
tional and international sources on the 
identity, status, distribution and potential 
use of crop wild relatives. The five par-
ticipating countries will provide informa-
tion from their systems as the project 
develops and it is hoped that other coun-
tries will also provide their information in 
due course. The national partners will 
also test the effectiveness of access and 
use of the international system to support 
country conservation decisions.  
The major activities under this compo-
nent are:  
(a) Design of the system will involve all 
international partners and national infor-
mation experts. The design of the Inter-
national Information System is co-funded 
by GTZ, an international cooperation 
enterprise for sustainable development. 
The design process will also address 
issues of ownership, custodianship, ac-
cess, use, exploitation and intellectual 
property.  
(b) Joint terminology which will provide 
definition of relevant terms, their specifi-
cation and the relationship between 
them. The main entry point for accessing 
information is likely to be species name. 
Sixty four crop genera comprising about 
12, 000 species have at this stage been 
identified as the focus of the project, 
though this number is likely to increase 
with inclusion of a greater number of 
crops listed in Annex 1 of the Interna-
tional Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources 
for Food and Agriculture (ITPGRFA), 
which came into force on June 29, 2004, 
Above: 
Wild pepper (
Piper 
sp.) in the Limestone 
grottos of Walvulpana, SE of Colombo, Sri Lanka 
Annie Lane 
“Sixty four crop genera comprising about 12, 000 
species have at this stage been identified as the 
focus of the project, though this number is likely to 
increase with inclusion of a greater number of 
crops listed in Annex 1 of the International Treaty 
on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and 
Agriculture”  
9
Crop wild relative
Issue 3 April 2005 
for which multilateral exchange agree-
ments are envisaged. The terminology 
development work will directly support 
national information management in the 
five partner countries. 
(c) Development of infrastructure that will 
provide a cost-effective internet based 
system that can host information gath-
ered and compiled by partners. Analyti-
cal tools suitable for spatial information 
and geographic analysis will allow the 
distribution of crop wild relatives to be 
visualized and related to variables such 
as climate, edaphic factors and land use 
and social-economic factors such as 
human population and poverty.  
(d) Content development will ensure that 
information maintained by relevant inter-
national and national organizations is 
made available to users. Resources for 
content development will be primarily 
targeted to national partners to support 
their information access work.  
At the first IMC meeting it was agreed 
that the system design would be based 
on the model used by Global Biodiversity 
Information Facility (GBIF). Information 
categories were agreed and work was 
initiated on the development of descrip-
tors. It is expected that the work on de-
scriptors will be finalized by the end of 
2004 and countries and international 
organizations can then begin to enter 
data and modify information categories 
and their descriptors.  
Component 2. National information sys-
tems.
In all the five partner countries 
information exists in herbaria and 
ex situ
gene banks that can be used to deter-
mine the likely location of populations of 
species of crop wild relatives. Information 
on the extent and distribution of pro-
tected areas is also available from natu-
ral resource management agencies, and 
information on the use of crop wild rela-
tives can be found in institutions at-
tached to the Ministry of Agriculture, 
universities and colleges.  The country 
partners will be actively involved in the 
development of the international system 
and will ensure that procedures can be 
used by national institutes and organiza-
tions. Information from national sources 
in the five countries will be brought to-
gether using common protocols and 
procedures for information sharing and 
data management to ensure effective 
movement of information between inter-
national and national systems, as well as 
between national agencies. 
The national partners will analyze exist-
ing information holdings, establish nec-
essary infrastructure, develop appropri-
ate hardware and software systems and 
national data exchange protocols and 
ensure that the information is available to 
the information system. Their systems 
will include aspects of species biology, 
ecology, conservation status, distribution, 
crop production potential, local commu-
nity uses and existing conservation ac-
tions and information sources on crop 
wild relatives.  
Component 3.  Enhanced capacity and 
conservation actions.
Lack of capacity, 
including the absence of an effective 
operational framework and national plans 
to deal specifically with conservation of 
crop wild relatives, has been identified as 
a significant obstacle to their conserva-
tion and use. This component contains a 
range of activities to improve country 
capacity to effectively conserve and use 
crop wild relatives. A solid legal structure 
is needed and decision-making proce-
dures for identification of priority conser-
vation actions need to provide for the 
participation of all stakeholders. The 
legal framework as it relates to 
in situ
conservation of these species will be 
reviewed in each country. Recommenda-
tions will be made where new or modified 
legislation is required. Similarly, benefit-
sharing practices are to be framed into 
legal rules that set out entitlements. Sup-
porting the development of an opera-
tional framework will be a series of train-
ing activities and these are will include 
information management, Red Listing 
procedures, participatory approaches 
and benefit sharing issues.  
The partners in each country will imple-
ment and monitor conservation strate-
gies that are needed to conserve priority 
crop wild relatives 
in situ
. Countries will 
undertake ecogeographic surveys and 
analysis on three to five taxa and use 
this information to refine procedures for 
using spatial information as a tool in 
conservation management and monitor-
ing. Specific conservation actions will be 
identified by integrating information on 
the species themselves, information on 
Above
: Participants at the First Information Management Workshop of the GEF-funded project, 
In situ 
conservation of crop wild relatives through enhanced information management and field application, held at 
IPGRI Headquarters, Rome, 4-7 October 2004 
“Lack of capacity, 
including the absence 
of an effective 
operational framework 
and national plans to 
deal specifically with 
conservation of crop 
wild relatives, has been 
identified as a 
significant obstacle to 
their conservation and 
use” 
10  
Crop wild relative
Issue 3 April 2005
the existing conservation actions and the 
use of these species at local and govern-
ment level. A selected set of actions that 
are identified as high priority will be im-
plemented and tested for operational 
effectiveness and sustainability. An ac-
tion plan will be developed for at least 
one protected area per country that con-
tains crop wild relatives, and at least two 
significant 
in situ
crop wild relative con-
servation demonstration projects will be 
implemented and assessed with a view 
to their application as national (and po-
tentially international) models for sus-
tained conservation. Priority will be given 
to working with wild relatives of crops of 
importance to the partner countries. 
However, wild relatives important for 
crop improvement in one country may 
only occur in other countries. This inter-
national dimension will be reflected by 
working on wild relatives of a common 
agreed list of crops. In this way, the out-
comes will provide globally relevant solu-
tions to improving conservation of crop 
wild relatives.   
Component 4.  Public awareness.
Awareness concerning the need for con-
servation of plant genetic resources 
(PGR) and especially crop wild relatives 
is relatively recent. Awareness of PGR 
has increased since the approval of the 
ITPGRFA but knowledge of the value of 
crop wild relatives to plant diversity and 
sustainable livelihoods is low. The output 
will raise awareness within the countries 
and internationally of the importance of 
considering crop wild relatives and their 
value for improving agricultural produc-
tion. Country and international partners 
will work together to develop interna-
tional public awareness activities that 
ensure that project outputs are made 
available to conservation workers in non-
target countries. These activities will be 
targeted at various sectors involved in 
PGR such as policy makers, conserva-
tion managers, plant breeders and local 
users.  
The outcomes of the project will be 
widely disseminated nationally and glob-
ally and successful strategies (best prac-
tices) will be readily transferable to other 
countries with significant populations of 
crop wild relatives. In this way, global 
efforts to conserve biological diversity in 
general, and crop wild relatives in par-
ticular, will be accelerated and optimized 
for the benefit of both the global commu-
nity and local users.  
It is clear that the initiatives developed 
under this project have much in common 
with the aims and objectives of PGR 
Forum. Thus, there is great potential to 
share information, experiences and les-
sons and to generate synergistic benefits 
to both projects and to similar initiatives 
around the world. We expect that the 
UNEP-GEF Crop Wild Relatives Project 
will provide a sustainable information and 
decision-making framework for current 
and subsequent work on the conserva-
tion of crop wild relatives and in doing so 
make a significant global contribution to 
their conservation and use.  Whilst wild 
relatives have already contributed many 
useful genes to crop plants, there is 
great potential to significantly improve 
our knowledge, information dissemina-
tion systems and, ultimately, effective 
use of these species. This will lead to 
further improvements in crop production 
and, critically for subsistence farmers, 
reduced risk of crop failure and improved 
food security. 
Literature cited 
Meilleur, B. A. and T. Hodgkin 2004. 
In situ
conser-
vation of crop wild relatives: status and trends. 
Biodiversity and Conservation 
13
: 663-684. 
Parra-Quijano, M., D. Draper and J. M. Iriondo 
2003. Assessing 
in situ
conservation of 
Lupinus
spp. in Spain through GIS. Crop wild relative 
1
: 8-9. 
Thormann, I., D. Jarvis, J. Dearing, and T. Hodgkin 
1999. Internationally available information sources 
for the development of 
in situ
conservation strate-
gies for wild species useful for food and agriculture. 
Plant Genetic Resources Newsletter 
11
(8): 38-50. 
Above
: Participants at the First Information Management Workshop of the GEF-funded project, 
In situ 
conservation of crop wild relatives through enhanced information management and field application, held at 
IPGRI Headquarters, Rome, 4-7 October 2004 
Shelagh Kell 
“Countries will undertake ecogeographic surveys 
and analysis on three to five taxa and use this 
information to refine procedures for using spatial 
information as a tool in conservation management 
and monitoring” 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested