C++ Primer, Fifth Edition
a predicate that it applies to each element in the given range. count_if
returns a count of how often the predicate is true. Use count_if to rewrite
the portion of our program that counted how many words are greater than
length 6.
Exercise 10.21: Write a lambda that captures a local int variable and
decrements that variable until it reaches 0. Once the variable is 0 additional
calls should no longer decrement the variable. The lambda should return a
bool that indicates whether the captured variable is 0.
10.3.4. Binding Arguments
Lambda expressions are most useful for simple operations that we do not need to use
in more than one or two places. If we need to do the same operation in many places,
we should usually define a function rather than writing the same lambda expression
multiple times. Similarly, if an operation requires many statements, it is ordinarily
better to use a function.
It is usually straightforward to use a function in place of a lambda that has an
empty capture list. As we’ve seen, we can use either a lambda or our isShorter
function to order the vector on word length. Similarly, it would be easy to replace
the lambda that printed the contents of our vector by writing a function that takes a
string and prints the given string to the standard output.
However, it is not so easy to write a function to replace a lambda that captures local
variables. For example, the lambda that we used in the call to find_if compared a
string with a given size. We can easily write a function to do the same work:
Click here to view code image
bool check_size(const string &s, string::size_type sz)
{
return s.size() >= sz;
}
However, we can’t use this function as an argument to find_if. As we’ve seen,
find_if takes a unary predicate, so the callable passed to find_if must take a
single argument. The lambda that biggies passed to find_if used its capture list
to store sz. In order to use check_size in place of that lambda, we have to figure
out how to pass an argument to the sz parameter.
The Library 
bind
Function
We can solve the problem of passing a size argument to check_size by using a new
www.it-ebooks.info
Changing pdf to powerpoint file - C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
how to convert pdf to powerpoint on; pdf to ppt
Changing pdf to powerpoint file - VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
pdf to powerpoint; how to add pdf to powerpoint slide
C++ Primer, Fifth Edition
library function named bind, which is defined in the functional header. The bind
function can be thought of as a general-purpose function adaptor (§ 9.6, p. 368). It
takes a callable object and generates a new callable that “adapts” the parameter list of
the original object.
The general form of a call to bind is:
Click here to view code image
auto newCallable = bind(callable, arg_list);
where 
newCallable
is itself a callable object and 
arg_list
is a comma-separated list of
arguments that correspond to the parameters of the given 
callable
. That is, when we
call 
newCallable
newCallable
calls 
callable
, passing the arguments in 
arg_list
.
The arguments in 
arg_list
may include names of the form _
n
, where 
n
is an integer.
These arguments are “placeholders” representing the parameters of 
newCallable
. They
stand “in place of” the arguments that will be passed to 
newCallable
. The number 
n
is
the position of the parameter in the generated callable: _1 is the first parameter in
newCallable
, _2 is the second, and so forth.
Binding the 
sz
Parameter of 
check_size
As a simple example, we’ll use bind to generate an object that calls check_size
with a fixed value for its size parameter as follows:
Click here to view code image
// check6 is a callable object that takes one argument of type string
// and calls check_size on its given string and the value 6
auto check6 = bind(check_size, _1, 6);
This call to bind has only one placeholder, which means that check6 takes a single
argument. The placeholder appears first in 
arg_list
, which means that the parameter
in check6 corresponds to the first parameter of check_size. That parameter is a
const string&, which means that the parameter in check6 is also a const
string&. Thus, a call to check6 must pass an argument of type string, which
check6 will pass as the first argument to check_size.
The second argument in 
arg_list
(i.e., the third argument to bind) is the value 6.
That value is bound to the second parameter of check_size. Whenever we call
check6, it will pass 6 as the second argument to check_size:
Click here to view code image
string s = "hello";
bool b1 = check6(s);  // check6(scalls check_size(s, 6)
Using bind, we can replace our original lambda-based call to find_if
Click here to view code image
www.it-ebooks.info
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
Enable batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. Support to overwrite PDF and save rotation changes to original PDF file.
convert pdf pages to powerpoint slides; pdf to powerpoint conversion
VB.NET Word: Word Conversion SDK for Changing Word Document into
VB.NET Word - Convert Word to PDF Using VB. How to Convert Word Document to PDF File in VB.NET Application. Visual C#. VB.NET. Home
copying image from pdf to powerpoint; image from pdf to ppt
C++ Primer, Fifth Edition
auto wc = find_if(words.begin(), words.end(),
[sz](const string &a)
with a version that uses check_size:
Click here to view code image
auto wc = find_if(words.begin(), words.end(),
bind(check_size, _1, sz));
This call to bind generates a callable object that binds the second argument of
check_size to the value of sz. When find_if calls this object on the strings in
words those calls will in turn call check_size passing the given string and sz.
So, find_if (effectively) will call check_size on each string in the input range
and compare the size of that string to sz.
Using 
placeholders
Names
The _
n
names are defined in a namespace named placeholders. That namespace
is itself defined inside the std namespace (§ 3.1, p. 82). To use these names, we
must supply the names of both namespaces. As with our other examples, our calls to
bind assume the existence of appropriate using declarations. For example, the
using declaration for _1 is
Click here to view code image
using std::placeholders::_1;
This declaration says we’re using the name _1, which is defined in the namespace
placeholders, which is itself defined in the namespace std.
We must provide a separate using declaration for each placeholder name that we
use. Writing such declarations can be tedious and error-prone. Rather than separately
declaring each placeholder, we can use a different form of using that we will cover in
more detail in § 18.2.2 (p. 793). This form:
Click here to view code image
using namespace namespace_name;
says that we want to make all the names from 
namespace_name
accessible to our
program. For example:
Click here to view code image
using namespace std::placeholders;
makes all the names defined by placeholders usable. Like the bind function, the
placeholders namespace is defined in the functional header.
Arguments to 
bind
www.it-ebooks.info
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Merge Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint data to PDF form. together and save as new PDF, without changing the previous two PDF documents at all
convert pdf slides to powerpoint online; how to convert pdf into powerpoint presentation
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to perform PDF file password adding, deleting and changing in Visual Studio .NET project use C# source code in .NET class. Allow
pdf page to powerpoint; convert pdf file to powerpoint presentation
C++ Primer, Fifth Edition
As we’ve seen, we can use bind to fix the value of a parameter. More generally, we
can use bind to bind or rearrange the parameters in the given callable. For example,
assuming f is a callable object that has five parameters, the following call to bind:
Click here to view code image
// g is a callable object that takes two arguments
auto g = bind(f, a, b, _2, c, _1);
generates a new callable that takes two arguments, represented by the placeholders
_2 and _1. The new callable will pass its own arguments as the third and fifth
arguments to f. The first, second, and fourth arguments to f are bound to the given
values, a, b, and c, respectively.
The arguments to g are bound positionally to the placeholders. That is, the first
argument to g is bound to _1, and the second argument is bound to _2. Thus, when
we call g, the first argument to g will be passed as the last argument to f; the second
argument to g will be passed as g’s third argument. In effect, this call to bind maps
g(_1, _2)
to
f(a, b, _2, c, _1)
That is, calling g calls f using g’s arguments for the placeholders along with the
bound arguments, a, b, and c. For example, calling g(X, Y) calls
f(a, b, Y, c, X)
Using to 
bind
to Reorder Parameters
As a more concrete example of using bind to reorder arguments, we can use bind
to invert the meaning of isShorter by writing
Click here to view code image
// sort on word length, shortest to longest
sort(words.begin(), words.end(), isShorter);
// sort on word length, longest to shortest
sort(words.begin(), words.end(), bind(isShorter, _2, _1));
In the first call, when sort needs to compare two elements, A and B, it will call
isShorter(A, B). In the second call to sort, the arguments to isShorter are
swapped. In this case, when sort compares elements, it will be as if sort called
isShorter(B, A).
Binding Reference Parameters
By default, the arguments to bind that are not placeholders are copied into the
www.it-ebooks.info
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
creating, loading, merge and splitting PDF pages and Files, adding a page into PDF document, deleting unnecessary page from PDF file and changing the position
adding pdf to powerpoint; convert pdf to powerpoint using
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Supports for changing image size. this .NET PDF to TIFF conversion control, C# developers can render and convert PDF document to TIFF image file with no loss
how to convert pdf into powerpoint on; change pdf to powerpoint
C++ Primer, Fifth Edition
callable object that bind returns. However, as with lambdas, sometimes we have
arguments that we want to bind but that we want to pass by reference or we might
want to bind an argument that has a type that we cannot copy.
For example, to replace the lambda that captured an ostream by reference:
Click here to view code image
// os is a local variable referring to an output stream
// c is a local variable of type char
for_each(words.begin(), words.end(),
[&os, c](const string &s) { os << s << c; });
We can easily write a function to do the same job:
Click here to view code image
ostream &print(ostream &os, const string &s, char c)
{
return os << s << c;
}
However, we can’t use bind directly to replace the capture of os:
Click here to view code image
// error: cannot copy os
for_each(words.begin(), words.end(), bind(print, os, _1, '
'));
because bind copies its arguments and we cannot copy an ostream. If we want to
pass an object to bind without copying it, we must use the library ref function:
Click here to view code image
for_each(words.begin(), words.end(),
bind(print, ref(os), _1, ' '));
The ref function returns an object that contains the given reference and that is itself
copyable. There is also a cref function that generates a class that holds a reference to
const. Like bind, the ref and cref functions are defined in the functional
header.
Backward Compatibility: Binding Arguments
Older versions of C++ provided a much more limited, yet more complicated,
set of facilities to bind arguments to functions. The library defined two
functions named bind1st and bind2nd. Like bind, these functions take a
function and generate a new callable object that calls the given function with
one of its parameters bound to a given value. However, these functions can
bind only the first or second parameter, respectively. Because they are of
much more limited utility, they have been 
deprecated
in the new standard. A
deprecated feature is one that may not be supported in future releases.
www.it-ebooks.info
C# TIFF: Learn to Convert MS Word, Excel, and PPT to TIFF Image
Now, you may load an Excel (.xlsx) file and convert it using RasterEdge.Imaging. PowerPoint; demo code is for rendering and changing PowerPoint (.pptx) document
embed pdf into powerpoint; conversion of pdf to ppt online
VB.NET Image: How to Generate Freehand Annotation Through VB.NET
relocating, resizing, rotating, deleting, changing color attributes is easy to annotate image file with freehand drawn as an annotation on documents, like PDF.
add pdf to powerpoint; export pdf to powerpoint
C++ Primer, Fifth Edition
Modern C++ programs should use bind.
Exercises Section 10.3.4
Exercise 10.22: Rewrite the program to count words of size 6 or less using
functions in place of the lambdas.
Exercise 10.23: How many arguments does bind take?
Exercise 10.24: Use bind and check_size to find the first element in a
vector of ints that has a value greater than the length of a specified
string value.
Exercise 10.25: In the exercises for § 10.3.2 (p. 392) you wrote a version
of biggies that uses partition. Rewrite that function to use
check_size and bind.
10.4. Revisiting Iterators
In addition to the iterators that are defined for each of the containers, the library
defines several additional kinds of iterators in the iterator header. These iterators
include
• Insert iterators: These iterators are bound to a container and can be used to
insert elements into the container.
• Stream iterators: These iterators are bound to input or output streams and
can be used to iterate through the associated IO stream.
• Reverse iterators: These iterators move backward, rather than forward. The
library containers, other than forward_list, have reverse iterators.
• Move iterators: These special-purpose iterators move rather than copy their
elements. We’ll cover move iterators in § 13.6.2 (p. 543).
10.4.1. Insert Iterators
An inserter is an iterator adaptor (§ 9.6, p. 368) that takes a container and yields an
iterator that adds elements to the specified container. When we assign a value
through an insert iterator, the iterator calls a container operation to add an element at
a specified position in the given container. The operations these iterators support are
listed in Table 10.2 (overleaf).
Table 10.2. Insert Iterator Operations
www.it-ebooks.info
VB.NET Image: Easy to Create Ellipse Annotation with VB.NET
to display extra information on your document image file. ellipse annotation to document files, like PDF & Word your document or image by changing its parameters
how to change pdf to powerpoint slides; how to convert pdf into powerpoint slides
C#: How to Edit XDoc.HTML5 Viewer Toolbar Commands
principle also applies equally to changing tabs order exception that four tabs, namely File, Annotation, Signature var _userCmdDemoPdf = new UserCommand("pdf");
convert pdf back to powerpoint; convert pdf file to powerpoint online
C++ Primer, Fifth Edition
There are three kinds of inserters. Each differs from the others as to where elements
are inserted:
• back_inserter (§ 10.2.2, p. 382) creates an iterator that uses push_back.
• front_inserter creates an iterator that uses push_front.
• inserter creates an iterator that uses insert. This function takes a second
argument, which must be an iterator into the given container. Elements are
inserted ahead of the element denoted by the given iterator.
Note
We can use front_inserter 
only
if the container has push_front.
Similarly, we can use back_inserter 
only
if it has push_back.
It is important to understand that when we call inserter(c, iter), we get an
iterator that, when used successively, inserts elements ahead of the element originally
denoted by iter. That is, if it is an iterator generated by inserter, then an
assignment such as
* it = va1;
behaves as
Click here to view code image
it = c.insert(it, val); // it points to the newly added element
++it; // increment it so that it denotes the same element as before
The iterator generated by front_inserter behaves quite differently from the one
created by inserter. When we use front_inserter, elements are always
inserted ahead of the then first element in the container. Even if the position we pass
to inserter initially denotes the first element, as soon as we insert an element in
front of that element, that element is no longer the one at the beginning of the
container:
Click here to view code image
list<int> 1st = {1,2,3,4};
list<int> lst2, lst3;     // empty lists
// after copy  completes, 1st2 contains 4 3 2 1
www.it-ebooks.info
C++ Primer, Fifth Edition
copy(1st.cbegin(), lst.cend(), front_inserter(lst2));
// after copy completes, 1st3 contains 1 2 3 4
copy(1st.cbegin(), lst.cend(), inserter(lst3, lst3.begin()));
When we call front_inserter(c), we get an insert iterator that successively calls
push_front. As each element is inserted, it becomes the new first element in c.
Therefore, front_inserter yields an iterator that reverses the order of the
sequence that it inserts; inserter and back_inserter don’t.
Exercises Section 10.4.1
Exercise 10.26: Explain the differences among the three kinds of insert
iterators.
Exercise 10.27: In addition to unique (§ 10.2.3, p. 384), the library
defines function named unique_copy that takes a third iterator denoting a
destination into which to copy the unique elements. Write a program that
uses unique_copy to copy the unique elements from a vector into an
initially empty list.
Exercise 10.28: Copy a vector that holds the values from 1 to 9 inclusive,
into three other containers. Use an inserter, a back_inserter, and a
front_inserter, respectivly to add elements to these containers. Predict
how the output sequence varies by the kind of inserter and verify your
predictions by running your programs.
10.4.2. iostream Iterators
Even though the iostream types are not containers, there are iterators that can be
used with objects of the IO types (§ 8.1, p. 310). An istream_iterator (Table 10.3
(overleaf)) reads an input stream, and an ostream_iterator (Table 10.4 (p. 405))
writes an output stream. These iterators treat their corresponding stream as a
sequence of elements of a specified type. Using a stream iterator, we can use the
generic algorithms to read data from or write data to stream objects.
Table 10.3. istream_iterator Operations
www.it-ebooks.info
C++ Primer, Fifth Edition
Table 10.4. ostream Iterator Operations
Operations on 
istream_iterators
When we create a stream iterator, we must specify the type of objects that the
iterator will read or write. An istream_iterator uses >> to read a stream.
Therefore, the type that an istream_iterator reads must have an input operator
defined. When we create an istream_iterator, we can bind it to a stream.
Alternatively, we can default initialize the iterator, which creates an iterator that we
can use as the off-the-end value.
Click here to view code image
istream_iterator<int> int_it(cin);   //   reads ints from cin
istream_iterator<int> int_eof;       //   end iterator value
ifstream in("afile");
istream_iterator<string> str_it(in); //   reads strings from "afile"
As an example, we can use an istream_iterator to read the standard input into a
vector:
Click here to view code image
istream_iterator<int> in_iter(cin);  // read ints from cin
istream_iterator<int> eof;           // istream ''end'' iterator
www.it-ebooks.info
C++ Primer, Fifth Edition
while (in_iter != eof)  // while there's valid input to read
// postfix increment reads the stream and returns the old value of the iterator
// we dereference that iterator to get the previous value read from the stream
vec.push_back(*in_iter++);
This loop reads ints from cin, storing what was read in vec. On each iteration, the
loop checks whether in_iter is the same as eof. That iterator was defined as the
empty istream_iterator, which is used as the end iterator. An iterator bound to a
stream is equal to the end iterator once its associated stream hits end-of-file or
encounters an IO error.
The hardest part of this program is the argument to push_back, which uses the
dereference and postfix increment operators. This expression works just like others
we’ve written that combined dereference with postfix increment (§ 4.5, p. 148). The
postfix increment advances the stream by reading the next value but returns the 
old
value of the iterator. That old value contains the previous value read from the stream.
We dereference that iterator to obtain that value.
What is more useful is that we can rewrite this program as
Click here to view code image
istream_iterator<int> in_iter(cin), eof;  // read ints from cin
vector<int> vec(in_iter, eof);  // construct vec from an iterator range
Here we construct vec from a pair of iterators that denote a range of elements. Those
iterators are istream_iterators, which means that the range is obtained by
reading the associated stream. This constructor reads cin until it hits end-of-file or
encounters an input that is not an int. The elements that are read are used to
construct vec.
Using Stream Iterators with the Algorithms
Because algorithms operate in terms of iterator operations, and the stream iterators
support at least some iterator operations, we can use stream iterators with at least
some of the algorithms. We’ll see in § 10.5.1 (p. 410) how to tell which algorithms
can be used with the stream iterators. As one example, we can call accumulate with
a pair of istream_iterators:
Click here to view code image
istream_iterator<int> in(cin), eof;
cout << accumulate(in, eof, 0) << endl;
This call will generate the sum of values read from the standard input. If the input to
this program is
23 109 45 89 6 34 12 90 34 23 56 23 8 89 23
then the output will be 664.
www.it-ebooks.info
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested