Machado MV, et al.
 
2012; 11 (4): 440-449
440
Gut microbiota and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
Mariana V. Machado,* Helena Cortez-Pinto*
* Departamento de Gastrenterologia, Hospital Santa Maria, CHLN; Unidade de Nutrição e Metabolismo,
Faculdade de Medicina de Lisboa, IMM,  Lisbon, Portugal.
ABSTRACT
Recent evidence has linked obesity and the metabolic syndrome with gut dysbiota. The precise mechanisms
underlying that association are not entirely understood; however, microbiota can enhance the extraction
of energy from diet and regulate whole-body metabolism towards increased fatty acids uptake from adipo-
se tissue and shift lipids metabolism from oxidation to de novo production. Obesity and high fat diet relate
to a specific gut microbiota, which is enriched in Firmicutes and with less Bacterioidetes. Microbiota can
also play a role in the development of hepatic steatosis, necroinflammation and fibrosis. In fact, some
studies have shown an association between small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, increased intestinal
permeability and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). That association  is, in part, due to  increased
endotoxinaemia and activation of the Toll-like receptor-4 signaling cascade. Preliminary data on probiotics
suggest a potential role in NASH treatment, however randomized controlled clinical trials are still lacking.
Key words. Microbiota, Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, Obesity, Insulin resistance.
Correspondence and reprint requests: Helena Cortez-Pinto
Serviço de Gastrenterologia, Hospital de Santa Maria
Av. Prof. Egas Moniz, 1649-035, Lisboa, Portugal
Tel.: 351217985187. Fax: 351217985142
E mail: hlcortezpinto@netcabo.pt
Manuscript received: March 16, 2012.
Manuscript accepted: April 06, 2012.
July-August, Vol. 11 No.4, 2012: 440-449
CONCISE REVIEW
INTRODUCTION
There are more microbes in the gut than cells
in the human body. The human gut hosts about
1.5 kg i.e. one hundred trillion commensal orga-
nisms, hundreds  to thousands of different  spe-
cies.  Also,  the gut microbiota genome  includes
200,000-300,000  genes,  ten times  more  that  of
the  human  genome.1  This  permissive  over-
crowding most certainly comes with some com-
pensation  to  the  host.  Those  guests  have been
subjected  to  selection  pressure long  before hu-
mans  have  arrived on  this planet,  and  hosting
those  organisms  allow  us  to take advantage  of
400 million years of experience.
The commensal organisms that populate the hu-
man gut are dominated by four main phyla: Firmi-
cutes, 
Bacterioidetes, 
Actinobacteria 
and
Proteobacteria.2 Firmicutes is the  main bacterial
phylum, comprising more than 250 genera, such as
Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Mycoplasma and Clos-
tridium.3 They are  able  to produce  several  short
chain fatty acids (SCFA) like butyrate.2 Bacterioide-
tes is a phylum that includes 20 genera, the most
abundant  of  which  is  Bacteroides  (thetaiotaomi-
cron).3 They are able to produce hydrogen.
The liver  is in  close  anatomical and functional
connection with the gut, through portal circulation,
favoring bidirectional influences. Recent evidence
has linked microbiota to obesity, insulin resistance
and steatosis, issues that will be approached in this
review.
GUT MICROBIOTA AND  OBESITY
The regulation of body weight depends on subtle
mechanisms, and mild changes, as little as a 1% in-
crease in daily calorie intake, may have important
consequences in the long run.4
The first evidence that gut microbiota may inter-
fere with body weight and composition comes from
Backhed, et al.5 They analyzed germ free mice and
conventionally raised mice that were allowed to ac-
quire gut microbiota from birth to adulthood.5 Con-
ventional mice presented more adipose tissue and a
higher percentage of body fat, compared to germ free
mice, although eating less amounts of the same diet.
Mice hosting gut microbiota also presented higher
And paste pdf into powerpoint - Library software API:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
And paste pdf into powerpoint - Library software API:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
441
Gut microbiota and hepatic steatosis
.
 
2012; 11 (4): 440-449
levels of leptin, an orexigenic adipokine, and insulin
resistance, with increased fasting blood glucose and
insulin. They went further and transplanted normal
microbiota harvested from the distal intestine (cae-
cum) of conventionally raised mice into adult germ
free mice, resulting in a 57% increase in body fat
content and insulin resistance within just 14 days.
Those changes were associated with decreased intes-
tinal expression of  fasting induced adipose factor
(Fiaf), also known as angiopoietin-like factor IV, a
circulating lipoprotein lipase inhibitor, thus favo-
ring fatty acid uptake and adipose tissue expansion.
Fiaf also induces peroxisomal proliferator activated
receptor  gamma (PPAR
γγ
γγγ) coactivator 1 (PGC-1
αα
ααα)
that regulates the expression of enzymes involved in
fatty  acid  oxidation.6  In  fact,  germ  free  Fiaf  -/-
knock out (ko) mice have the same amount of body
fat as conventional mice.5 Fiaf may thus be seen as
a mediator in the microbial regulation of the peri-
pheral fat reservoir.
Later on, the same authors showed that, unlike
conventionally raised mice, germ free mice did not
increase their weight when exposed to a high fat,
high carbohydrate diet.6 Diet alone was not suffi-
cient to induce obesity. Germ free mice not only pre-
sented  higher  circulating  Fiaf  levels,  they  also
presented increased skeletal muscle and liver levels
of  phosphorylated  AMP-activated  protein  kinase
(AMPK)  and  its  downstream  targets  involved  in
fatty acid oxidation (acetyl-CoA carboxylase and car-
nitine palmitoyltransferase).6
Not only the presence of intestinal microbiota,
but also its composition may influence body fat. Obe-
sity seems to be associated with a specific microbiome
Figure 1. Mechanisms of intestinal microbiota induced obesity. Intestinal microbiota is able to breakdown otherwise indiges-
tible carbohydrates, converting them into short chain fatty acids (SCFA) and monosaccharides. SCFA not only are substrates of
colonocytes, they also are precursors to de novo lipogenesis and neoglucogenesis, besides binding to specific receptors (GPR43/41)
leading to increased peptide YY, which slows down intestinal transit, promoting nutrient absorption. Monosaccharides can acti-
vate the transcription factor carbohydrate responsive element binding protein (ChREBP), promoting lipogenesis. Nutrient
absorption is more effective since there is an increased blood flow in the mucosa, as a consequence of increased inflammation-
induced vascularization. Microbiota is also able to decrease the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and
decrease fasting induced adipose factor (Fiaf) production, leading to decrease in fatty acid (FA) oxidation and FA uptake, by
adipose tissue and the liver, secondary to an increase in lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity. Microbiota decreases glucagon like
peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion, a known anorexigenic peptide. Finally by manipulating the pattern of conjugated bile acids, it
modifies their absorption and emulsification properties. PGC-1
ααααα
, peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor coactivator.
Gut Microbiota
Breakdown of indigestible
carbohydrates.
(
↑ 
energy extraction from diet).
↑ 
inflammation-induced
intestinal  vascularization
AMPK phosphorylation
Fiat
GLP-1
(anorexigenic peptide)
Modification of the
pattern of conjugated
bile acids
SCFA
• Energy source for colonocytes
• Lipogenesis
• Neoglucogenesis
• GPR43/41 activation 
↑ 
peptide YY
Monosaccharides 
↑ 
ChREBP 
lipogenesis
↑ 
mucosal blood flow 
↑ 
nutrients absorption
fatty acids oxidation
• 
↑ 
LPL 
↑ 
FA uptake
• 
PGC-1
α
FA oxidation
=
Absorption and emulsification properties
Library software API:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Ability to copy selected PDF pages and paste into another PDF file. Copy three pages from test1.pdf and paste into test2.pdf.
www.rasteredge.com
Library software API:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Ability to copy PDF pages and paste into another PDF file. Support ' Copy three pages from test1.pdf and paste into test2.pdf. Dim
www.rasteredge.com
Machado MV, et al.
 
2012; 11 (4): 440-449
442
that is able to extract more energy from the diet.7
Turnbaugh and colleagues showed that genetically
obese mice (ob/ob) wasted less energy in the stools
compared with lean mice. On the other hand, obese
mice presented higher caecal SCFA content, acetate
and butyrate, end products of bacterial carbohydrate
fermentation. Finally, they transplanted germ free
mice with caecal microbiota from both lean and obe-
se mice. When the donor was an obese mouse, germ
free mice gained much more weight and acquired
higher efficiency in extracting calories from their
diet  than  they  did  when  the  donor  was  a  lean
mouse. In other words, the obese phenotype could be
transmissible by the microbiota.7
It was Ley who first showed differences in the mi-
crobiota of the obese.8 In fact, as compared to lean
mice, genetically obese mice (ob/ob) presented a 50%
decrease in Bacterioidetes and a similar increase in
Firmicutes content, which is associated with enrich-
ment of the glycoside hydrolases that break down
indigestible dietary polysaccharides, transport pro-
teins importing the breakdown products and enzy-
mes generating end products such as butyrate and
acetate. Obese mice also presented an increase in
methanogenic Archaea, which is associated with a
lower hydrogen partial pressure, thereby optimizing
bacterial fermentation rates. Those changes in mi-
crobiota can explain why obese mice present an in-
creased capacity to harvest energy from the diet.8
Similar results were found in a mouse model of Wes-
tern-diet induced obesity.9 The increase in Firmicu-
tes was in a particular class, Mollicutes.10
Studies in humans mimicked the same changes in
microbiota with obesity and a high fat diet. A large
study with 154 subjects (adult female monozygotic
and dizygotic twin pairs concordant for leanness or
obesity, and their mothers) showed that the human
intestinal microbiome is shared by family members,
but is specific for each individual. However it is of
interest that there was a comparable degree of
co-variation between adult monozygotic and dizygo-
tic twin pairs, which is suggestive of there being no
genetic inheritance.11 Also, obesity was associated
with decreased bacterial diversity, decreased Bacte-
rioidetes  and  increased  Actinobacteria,  although
with no differences regarding Firmicutes content.
Furthermore, obesity presented different bacterial
genes and metabolic pathways.11 The same group ca-
rried out an experiment that consisted of transplan-
tation  of  human  feces  to  germ  free  mice.  When
humanized mice were switched from a low-fat plant
rich diet to a high-fat, high-sugar diet, the microbio-
ta changed in just 24 h. Western diet fed humanized
mice became  obese,  and  that phenotype  could  be
transmitted to other mice by transplanting their gut
microbiota  to  germ-free  recipients.12  A  different
approach,  with  similar  results,  was  a study  with
obese patients submitted to weight loss intervention
with different diets, with restriction of carbohydrate
or fat.13 Weight loss paralleled a decrease in Firmi-
cutes  and  increase  in  Bacterioidetes  content.  Of
note, the increase in Bacterioidetes occurred earlier
in the carbohydrate-restricted rather than fat-res-
tricted diet, above a threshold of 2% vs. 6% weight
loss.13 Finally, obese patients submitted to bariatric
bypass surgery changed their gut microbiota, with a
decrease in Firmicutes and Archaea content.14 Ano-
ther interesting concept is that differences in gut in-
testinal  microbiota  may  precede  obesity.  Two
pediatric studies, which collected fecal samples from
infants 3 to 12 months old, and prospectively follo-
wed them up for seven to ten years, showed that
children that became obese initially presented lower
numbers of Bacterioidetes, Bifidobacterium and hig-
her numbers of Staphylococcus aureus.15,16
Commensal microbiota is related not only to obe-
sity, but also to its co-morbidities, such as diabetes
mellitus. As with obese patients, diabetics present
different microbiota composition.17-19 Modulation of
microbiota with antibiotics, norfloxacin and ampici-
llin, improves glucose-tolerance in diet-induced obe-
se mice independently of diet intake or adiposity.20
Gut microbiota may promote obesity through se-
veral mechanisms. The first is the possibility of fer-
menting  otherwise  indigestible  carbohydrates  in
SCFA  and  monosaccharide.  SCFA  are  not  only
substrates of colonocytes, they are also cholesterol
or fatty acid precursors, and neoglucogenesis subs-
trates in the liver, with higher exploitation of diet
energy. SCFA bind to specific receptors in intestinal
endocrine cells (GRP43 and GRP41) that lead to an
increase in peptide YY, slowing down bowel transit,
thereby allowing a higher nutrient absorption rate21
and increase in leptin, an orexigenic hormone.22
Increased liver monosaccharide uptake from portal
circulation activates key transcription factors such
as carbohydrate responsive element binding protein
(ChREBP), which regulates lipogenesis.23 Microbio-
ta also increases inflammation-induced vasculariza-
tion  and  blood  flow  in  the  mucosa,  enhancing
nutrient absorption.24 The ability of commensal mi-
cro-organisms  to  decrease  Fiaf  and  AMPK  phos-
phorylation  has  already  been  addressed  in  this
review. Intestinal dysbiosis is also associated with
decreased intestinal glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)
expression, an anorexigenic peptide.25 Finally, intes-
Library software API:C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value. value, The char wil be added into PDF page, 0
www.rasteredge.com
Library software API:VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add file. Insert images into PDF form field in VB.NET. An
www.rasteredge.com
443
Gut microbiota and hepatic steatosis
.
 
2012; 11 (4): 440-449
tinal microbiota modifies the pattern of conjugated
bile  acids, with direct impact  on  their absorption
and emulsification properties.26
GUT MICROBIOTA  AND
NONALCOHOLIC  FATTY  LIVER  DISEASE
Regarding the potential interaction between gut
microbiota and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NA-
FLD) there is evidence from the work of Backhed
and collaborators that transplanting normal micro-
biota harvested from the distal intestine (caecum) of
conventionally raised mice into germ free mice not
only increased body fat, it also specifically increased
liver fat.5 The authors also demonstrated a greater
than two-fold increase in liver triglyceride content,
associated with a higher monosaccharide absorption
from the lumen, promoting de novo fatty acid syn-
thesis, as confirmed by an increased acetyl-CoA car-
boxylase activity and fatty acid synthase.5
NAFLD and steatohepatitis have been associated
with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO)
and  increased  intestinal  permeability.  In  fact,  a
short time after its description, nonalcoholic steato-
hepatitis  (NASH)  was  reported  in  patients  with
SIBO after intestinal bypass, which reverted after a
metronidazol trial or after resection of the bypassed
bowel segment.27 NASH has also been reported in
patients with SIBO associated with small bowel di-
verticulosis.28
Animal models with SIBO have been associated
with NASH histology, which reverts after antibiotic
therapy.29,30
Wigg, et al. studied 23 patients with NASH and 23
healthy controls and evaluated the presence of SIBO
with 14C-D-xylose and lactulose breath test.31 They
found SIBO in 50% of NASH patients as opposed to
22% in controls. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-
αα
ααα)
levels were also increased in NASH patients. However,
they failed to demonstrate increased endotoxaemia or
disturbed intestinal permeability.  Some limitations
were pointed out, namely the lack of a group with sim-
ple steatosis, and the definition of NASH requiring
only macrovesicular steatosis and inflammation on li-
ver histology, the presence of ballooned hepatocytes
not being necessary. The assessment of intestinal per-
meability was restricted to the small bowel. Further-
more, the methodology used has low sensitivity and
specificity.32 Posterior studies also suggested an asso-
ciation between SIBO and NASH33 or severity of hepa-
tic  steatosis.34,35  In  fact,  Miele.  et  al.  evaluated
intestinal permeability with 51Cr-EDTA (ethylene dia-
mine tetra-acetate) in 35 patients with histologically-
confirmed NAFLD, 27 celiac patients and 24 healthy
controls. Intestinal permeability correlated with hepa-
tic steatosis severity, although not with the presence
of NASH. Also, severe steatosis correlated with altered
tight junction integrity, as assessed by immunohisto-
chemistry studies for zonula-occludens-1 (ZO-1) ca-
rried out on duodenal samples.
On the other hand, Farhadi, et al.36 found no diffe-
rence  in  baseline  intestinal  permeability  between
NASH patients and controls when using urinary ex-
cretion of 5-h lactulose/mannitol (L/M) ratio and 24-h
sucralose. Nonetheless, aspirin more frequently trigge-
red increased whole-gut permeability in NASH
patients, thus suggesting an increased susceptibility
to intestinal leakiness. Dysbiosis-related decrease in
glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2), an endogenous
intestinotrophic, further contributes to disturbed
tight  junction  integrity  and  increased  intestinal
permeability.25
Several bacterial bioproducts may be potentially
hepatotoxic e.g. ammonia, phenols, ethanol, among
others.37 Increased intestinal production of ethanol
has been described in obese patients.38 Also, treat-
ment with antibiotics decreases intestinal ethanol
production.33,39 The main bacterial bioproduct that
is likely to be involved in NAFLD/NASH pathogene-
sis is  lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the active compo-
nent  of  endotoxin,  an element  of  the  cell  wall  of
Gram negative bacteria. Endogenous LPS is conti-
nuously produced in the gut with bacterial death.
Its translocation through intestinal capillaries oc-
curs in a toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4)-dependent me-
chanism.  From  there,  LPS  transport  to  target
tissues  is  facilitated  by  lipoproteins,  chylomicra,
synthesized by enterocytes in response to fat in the
diet.
40
In fact, LPS absorption occurs during lipid
absorption.41 LPS binds to lipopolysaccharide bin-
ding-protein  (LBP),  and  that  complex  binds  to
CD14, expressed in inflammatory cells, enterocytes
or in a soluble form. Together, LPS-LBP-CD14, acti-
vate TLR-4, present in inflammatory cells like mo-
nocytes,  Kupffer  cells  and  even stellate  cells.  An
intracellular cascade is triggered, including stress-
activated and mitogen-activated kinases, c-Jun N-
terminal kinase (JNK), nuclear factor κκκκκB (NFκκκκκB)
and interferon-regulatory  factor-3 (IFR-3). NFκκκκκB
translocates to the nucleus where it enhances the
expression of several target genes involved in the in-
flammatory pathway, such as TNF-ααααα, interleukin 1
and 6.37 TLR-4 signaling can thus promote insulin
resistance, hepatic steatosis, inflammation and fi-
brogenesis.
Library software API:VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF file into two or multiple files in ASP.NET webpage online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files in .NET WinForms.
www.rasteredge.com
Library software API:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
www.rasteredge.com
Machado MV, et al.
 
2012; 11 (4): 440-449
444
Cani, et al. exposed mice to a high-fat diet, produ-
cing a two- to three-fold increase in LPS plasma
levels, inducing what has been called metabolic en-
dotoxaemia, as opposed to endotoxaemia in septic
shock, in which LPS levels are 10-50 times higher.42
Also, chronic infusion of low LPS doses in mice mi-
micked the high-fat diet phenotype, causing obesity
and increase in fat body weight percentage, insulin
resistance, adipose tissue macrophage infiltration
and  hepatic  steatosis.  Furthermore,  CD14  -/-  ko
mice were  protected from those metabolic  conse-
quences, either after LPS infusion, or with a high-
fat diet. Similarly, TLR-4 -/- ko mice are protected
from steatosis/NASH development with a methionine-
choline deficient (MCD) diet, an animal  model of
NASH.43  Also,  genetically  obese,  fa/fa  and  ob/ob,
mice are more susceptible to endotoxin hepatotoxici-
ty, rapidly developing NASH after exposure to low
doses of LPS,44 which may be explained by Kupffer
cell dysfunction with decreased phagocytic potential,
decreasing the barrier to the passage of LPS from
portal to systemic circulation, and thus increasing
extrahepatic  cytokine  production.44  In  the  same
way, in MCD-diet and high-fat diet mice, LPS indu-
ces more TNF-a expression,  hepatocyte apoptosis
and death than in mice on a standard diet.45,46
Human studies have also demonstrated that endo-
toxaemia is a risk factor for NAFLD and NASH de-
velopment. Two studies with biopsy-proven NAFLD
patients showed increased endotoxaemia in compari-
son with  healthy controls.47,48  Endotoxaemia was
even higher in NASH patients compared to patients
with simple steatosis.49 Endotoxin plasma levels also
correlated positively with insulin resistance.48 More
recently, Verdam, et al. studied severely obese pa-
tients, and showed that patients with NASH presen-
ted higher IgG antibody anti-endotoxin titres than
patients with healthy livers. Furthermore, those an-
tibody titres progressively increased according to se-
verity of hepatic inflammation.50
In short, several mechanisms may explain the po-
tential steatogenic and pro-inflammatory effect of in-
testinal microbiota. It promotes an increase in free
fatty acid uptake and production by the liver, as pre-
viously explained. On the other hand, an increase in
LPS, through activation of TLR-4 inflammatory sig-
naling cascade, leads to insulin resistance and TNF-
αα
ααα
mediated inflammation, as well as hepatic fibrogene-
sis,  since  stellate  cells  express  those  receptors.37
Among other potentially steatogenic and pro-inflam-
matory bacterial bioproducts is ethanol. Disturbance
in choline metabolism is another important mecha-
nism. Microbiota produces enzymes that catalyze
the first step in the conversion of diet-derived choli-
ne into dimethylamine and trimethylamine.51 That
can have two important consequences in the liver:
the uptake of those hepatotoxic substances52  and
choline  depletion.53  Choline  is  necessary  to  the
VLDL assembly and to lipid export from the liver.44
In that way, microbiota promotes hepatic steatosis,
insulin resistance and lipoperoxidation injury.53,54
Lastly, by changing the bile acid pattern, microbiota
can indirectly promote hepatic steatosis and lipope-
roxidation, through signaling pathway cascades res-
ponsive to bile acids, such as farsenoid X receptor
(FXR) stimulation.26,55
FRUCTOSE, GUT MICROBIOTA AND
NONALCOHOLIC  FATTY  LIVER  DISEASE
Fructose monosaccharide intake has been increa-
sing extraordinarily in recent decades, mostly asso-
ciated with high fructose corn syrup, primarily in the
form of soft drinks.56 The liver is  the main site of
fructose metabolism, since it possesses Glut-5, the
specific receptor.57 Fructose is different from glucose,
since its  metabolism is  insulin-independent  and is
more prone to promote de novo lipogenesis and sti-
mulate triglyceride synthesis.58 It is also more prone
to induce obesity, since it may not cause the level of
satiety equivalent to that of a glucose-based meal,59
besides slowing down the basal metabolic rate.60
Animal models have already demonstrated an as-
sociation  between  fructose  and hepatic  steatosis,
NASH and even hepatic fibrosis development.61-63
Recently it has been shown that in humans, high
fructose consumption also increases the risk of deve-
loping NAFLD.56 It is  also associated with disease
severity, namely hepatic inflammation and more ad-
vanced fibrosis.64
An association between fructose and several risk
factors of NAFLD/NASH is well known. For instan-
ce,  it  is  associated  with  arterial  hypertension
through indirect inhibition of endothelial nitric oxi-
de synthase  caused by  an increase  in  uric  acid.58
Also, insulin requires nitric oxide to stimulate gluco-
se uptake contributing to insulin resistance,65 besi-
des having an indirect action in the insulin cascade
signaling through increased intracellular diacylgly-
cerol. Fructose also is known to be a risk factor for
the development of the full metabolic syndrome, not
only its individual components.66 Nakagawa, et al.
showed that mice fed on a high fructose diet, unlike
those on a high dextrose diet, developed metabolic
syndrome.65 Interestingly, co-treatment with allopu-
rinol (a xanthine oxidase inhibitor) or benzbromarone
Library software API:C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Merge several images into PDF. Insert images into PDF form field.
www.rasteredge.com
Library software API:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Divide PDF File into Two Using C#. This is an C# example of splitting a PDF to two new PDF files. Split PDF Document into Multiple PDF Files in C#.
www.rasteredge.com
445
Gut microbiota and hepatic steatosis
.
 
2012; 11 (4): 440-449
(a uricosuric agent) was able to prevent or reverse
features of the metabolic syndrome, like hyperinsuli-
nemia, systolic hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia
and weight gain.65 Studies in humans confirmed
the association between fructose consumption and
metabolic syndrome.
Not until recently was it proposed that the link
between fructose consumption and hepatic steatosis
is an increase in SIBO and disturbed intestinal per-
meability.67 Bergheim at al. submitted mice to a diet
either with a solution with 30% glucose, 30% fructose,
30% sucrose or water with an artificial sweetener.68
They found that despite the fact that mice exposed
to glucose had a higher caloric intake and increa-
sed weight, fructose exposed mice developed more
hepatic steatosis, and that was associated with in-
creased portal blood LPS levels and TNF-
αα
ααα produc-
tion. Also, co-treatment with antibiotics (polymyxin
B and neomycin) prevented steatosis development in
fructose-fed mice. In another experiment, co-treat-
ment with a prebiotic, oligofructose, prevented hy-
pertriglyceridemia and liver damage associated with
a high-fructose diet.69 Lastly, TLR-4 mutant mice are
resistant to hepatic steatosis, TNF-
αα
ααα induction, lipid
peroxidation and insulin resistance, as compared to
wild  type mice.67 Studies in humans  also showed
that fructose intake was associated not only with
NAFLD but also with an increase in endotoxaemia
and hepatic expression of TLR-4.47 It is not yet un-
derstood what the mechanisms are that lead to bac-
terial  overgrowth  and  increased  intestinal
permeability. However, bacterial flora can ferment
carbohydrates  to  alcohol  when  intestinal  stasis
allows their overgrowth in the upper parts of the
gastrointestinal tract.70 A recent report has also
suggested that fructose consumption is associated
with the activation of serotonin reuptake transpor-
ters,  which  regulate  in testin al  motility  an d
permeability.71
APPROACH  TO  GUT MICROBIOTA
AS A THERAPEUTIC TOOL IN THE
MANAGEMENT  OF  NONALCOHOLIC
FATTY  LIVER  DISEASE
We can interfere with gut microbiota through the
use of several types of compounds: probiotics, pre-
biotics and symbiotics. Probiotics are live commen-
sal micro-organisms that are able to modulate the
intestinal  microbiota  with  benefits  to  the  host’s
health. The most common probiotics in the market
are  Lactobacilli,  Streptococci  and  Bifidobacteria.
Prebiotics are indigestible carbohydrates that stimu-
late the growth and activity of beneficial bacteria,
particularly Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria. Some
examples of prebiotics are lactulose, which increases
the number of Bifidobacteria, and fructooligosaccha-
rides like oligofructose and inulin. Lastly, symbiotics
are products that contain both probiotics and prebio-
tics,  like  a  combination  of  inulin,  Lactobacillus
rhamnosus G and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12.72
Despite numerous papers in this area, it is diffi-
cult to access the true effect of probiotics on NAFLD
prevention or treatment, since the experiments made
use of different animal models and different bacterial
strains.  The  most  frequently  used  probiotic  is
VSL#3, a mixture of different bacteria (Streptococ-
cus thermophilus, Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobac-
terium  longum,  Bifidobacterium  infantis,
Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum,
Lactobacillus casei  and Lactobacillus bulgaricus).
Li,  et al.73 studied the effect of VSL#3, given  for
four weeks, on ob/ob mice submitted to a high fat
diet. VSL#3 improved liver histology, reduced total
hepatic fatty acids content, decreased aminotransfe-
rase plasma levels, and downregulated pro-inflam-
matory JNK and NF
κκ
κκκB pathways. Similar effects
were accomplished with the administration of anti-
TNF-
αα
ααα antibody. In another paper, VSL#3 was able
to improve insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis
in mice on a high fat diet.74 Those effects were belie-
ved to be the consequence  of immune regulation.
The authors showed that high fat diet induced natu-
ral killer T (NKT) cell depletion, which occurs ear-
lier than insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis.
Probiotics were able to prevent NKT cell depletion,
and metabolic benefits were dependent on the latter.
In fact, similar effects are achieved when NKT cells
are transferred from normal controls. Also, probio-
tics were not effective in mice without NKT cells.
Others corroborated the effect of VSL#3 in impro-
ving inflammation, oxidative stress and fibrogenesis
in a high-fat diet or MCD diet fed mice.75,76
In relation to prebiotics, Fan et al. showed that
lactulose decreased hepatic inflammation and portal
vein LPS levels in rats with high fat diet induced
NASH.77 Several animal models of NAFLD also sug-
gested a beneficial effect of oligofructose in preven-
ting hepatic steatosis development.78-80
Regarding studies with probiotics in humans, the-
re are only two pilot studies.81,82 The first study in-
cluded  10  patients  with  biopsy  proven  NASH  in
whom a symbiotic (Lactobacillus acidophilus, bifidus,
rhamnosus, plantarum, salivarius, bulgaricus, lactis,
casei, breve and the prebiotic fructooligosaccharide
with vitamins) was administered for two months.81
Machado MV, et al.
 
2012; 11 (4): 440-449
446
The second  looked at 22  patients with  NAFLD  in
whom VSL#3 was administered for three months.82
Both showed improvement of aminotransferases,
γγ
γγγ-glutamyl  transpeptidase,  TNF-
αα
ααα  and  oxidative
stress markers malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxinone-
nal, while on treatment. A meta-analysis83 concluded
that this preliminary data indicate that probiotics are
well tolerated, may improve liver tests and markers
of lipid peroxidation, suggesting a possible the-
rapeutic role. However, randomized controlled clini-
cal trials would be needed before such compounds
could be recommended as treatment.
CONCLUSIONS
In conclusion, intestinal microbiota may influence
body composition, favoring the expansion of adipose
tissue, contributing to the obesity pandemic. Obese
subjects  have  a  specific  microbiota  that  harvest
energy  from  the  diet  more  effectively,  producing
more SCFA and decreasing Fiaf expression, leading
to greater entry of fatty acids into peripheral adipo-
se tissue and the liver. Also, diet itself, specifically
high fat and fructose consumption, is known to mo-
dulate intestinal microbiota leading to metabolic
endotoxaemia. Endotoxaemia promotes the develop-
ment of insulin resistance, steatosis, inflammation
and hepatic fibrogenesis. However the correlation
between steatosis severity and presence or absence
of NASH with the degree of intestinal permeability
and/or endotoxinaemia has not shown uniform re-
sults among studies.
Recently, it has been shown that hepatic steatosis
and NASH are associated with bacterial prolifera-
tion  and  increased  intestinal  permeability,  so  it
would be expected that interventions that modulate
intestinal microbiota may be beneficial in the pre-
vention  or  even  treatment  of  those  conditions.
However, studies in animal models are difficult to
evaluate since they use different models, different
bacterial strains and different doses. There are only
two pilot studies in humans of probiotic treatment
in patients with NAFLD and NASH, and they sug-
gest a potential role for modulation of gut microbio-
ta. However, randomized clinical trials are needed
before any recommendation can be made.
ABBREVIATIONS
• SCFA: short chain fatty acids.
• Fiaf: fasting induced adipose factor.
• PPAR
γγ
γγγ: peroxisomal proliferator activated re-
ceptor gamma
• PGC-1
αα
ααα: peroxisomal proliferator activated re-
ceptor coactivator.
• ko: knock out.
• AMPK: AMP-activated protein kinase.
• ChREBP: carbohydrate responsive element bin-
ding protein.
• GLP-1: glucagon-like peptide-1.
• NAFLD: nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.
• SIBO: small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.
• NASH: nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.
• TNF-
αα
ααα: tumor necrosis factor alpha.
• 51Cr-EDTA: ethylene diamine tetra-acetate.
• ZO-1: zonula-occludens-1.
• GLP-2: glucagon-like peptide 2.
• LPS: lipopolysaccharide.
• TLR-4: toll-like receptor-4.
• LBP: lipopolysaccharide binding-protein.
• JNK: c-Jun N-terminal kinase.
• NF
κκ
κκκB, nuclear factor 
κκ
κκκB.
• IRF-3: interferon-regulatory factor-3.
• MCD: methionine-choline deficient.
• FXR: farsenoid X receptor.
• NKT cells: natural killer T cells.
REFERENCES
1. Gill  SR,  Pop  M,  Deboy  RT,  Eckburg  PB,  Turnbaugh  PJ,
Samuel BS, Gordon JI, et al. Metagenomic analysis of the
human  distal  gut  microbiome. Science  2006;  312(5778):
1355-1359 [PMID: 16741115].
2. Diamant M, Blaak EE, de Vos WM. Do nutrient-gut-micro-
biota interactions play a role in human obesity, insulin re-
sistance  and  type  2  diabetes? Obes Rev 2011;  12(4):
272-281 [PMID: 20804522].
3. Cani PD, Delzenne NM, Amar J, Burcelin R. Role of gut mi-
croflora in the development of obesity and insulin resistan-
ce  following  high-fat  diet  feeding. Pathologie-Biologie
2008; 56(5): 305-9 [PMID: 18178333].
4. Hill JO. Understanding and addressing the epidemic of obe-
sity:  an  energy  balance  perspective. Endocrine Reviews
2006; 27(7): 750-61 [PMID: 17122359].
5. Backhed F, Ding H, Wang T, Hooper LV, Koh GY, Nagy A, Se-
menkovich CF, Gordon JI. The gut  microbiota  as an envi-
ronmental  factor  that  regulates  fat  storage. Proceedings
of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of
America 2004; 101(44): 15718-23 [PMID: 15505215].
6. Backhed  F,  Manchester  JK,  Semenkovich  CF,  Gordon  JI.
Mechanisms  underlying  the  resistance  to  diet-induced
obesity  in  germ-free  mice. Proceedings of the National
Academy  of  Sciences  of  the  United  States  of  America
2007; 104(3): 979-984 [PMID: 17210919].
7. Turnbaugh PJ, Ley RE, Mahowald MA, Magrini V, Mardis ER,
Gordon JI. An obesity-associated gut microbiome with in-
creased  capacity  for  energy  harvest. Nature  2006;
444(7122): 1027-31 [PMID: 17183312].
8. Ley RE, Backhed F, Turnbaugh P, Lozupone CA, Knight RD,
Gordon JI. Obesity  alters gut microbial ecology. Procee-
dings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United
States  of  America 2005; 102(31): 11070-11075 [PMID:
16033867].
447
Gut microbiota and hepatic steatosis
.
 
2012; 11 (4): 440-449
9. Murphy EF, Cotter PD, Healy S, Marques TM, O’Sullivan O,
Fouhy F, Clarke SF, et al. Composition and energy harves-
ting capacity of the gut microbiota: relationship to diet,
obesity and time in mouse models. Gut 2010; 59(12): 1635-
1642 [PMID: 20926643].
10. Turnbaugh PJ, Backhed F, Fulton L, Gordon JI. Diet-indu-
ced obesity is linked to marked but reversible alterations
in the mouse distal gut microbiome. Cell Host & Microbe
2008; 3(4): 213-23 [PMID:18407065].
11. Turnbaugh PJ, Hamady M, Yatsunenko T, Cantarel BL, Dun-
can A, Ley RE, Sogin ML, et al. A core gut microbiome in
obese  and  lean  twins. Nature 2009;  457(7228):  480-4
[PMID: 19043404].
12. Turnbaugh PJ, Ridaura VK, Faith JJ, Rey FE, Knight R, Gor-
don JI. The effect of diet on the human gut microbiome: a
metagenomic  analysis  in  humanized  gnotobiotic  mice.
Science  Translational  Medicine 2009; 1(6): 6ra14 [PMID:
20368178].
13. Ley RE, Turnbaugh PJ, Klein S, Gordon JI. Microbial ecolo-
gy: human gut  microbes  associated with obesity. Nature
2006; 444(7122): 1022-23 [PMID: 17183309].
14. Zhang H, DiBaise JK, Zuccolo A, Kudrna D, Braidotti M, Yu
Y, Parameswaran P, et al. Human gut microbiota in obesi-
ty  and after gastric bypass. Proceedings of the National
Academy  of  Sciences  of  the  United  States  of  America
2009; 106(7): 2365-70 [PMID: 19164560].
15. Kalliomaki M, Collado MC, Salminen S, Isolauri E. Early diffe-
rences  in  fecal  microbiota  composition  in  children  may
predict overweight. The American Journal of Clinical Nu-
trition 2008; 87(3): 534-8 [PMID: 18326589].
16. Luoto R, Kalliomaki M, Laitinen K, Delzenne NM, Cani PD,
Salminen S, Isolauri E. Initial dietary and microbiological
environments  deviate  in  normal-weight  compared  to
overweight  children at 10 years of age. J Pediatric Gas-
troenterology  and  Nutrition 2011; 52(1): 90-95 [PMID:
21150648].
17. Wu X, Ma C, Han L, Nawaz M, Gao F, Zhang X, Yu P, et al.
Molecular characterisation of the faecal microbiota in pa-
tients  with  type  II diabetes. Current Microbiology 2010;
61(1): 69-78 [PMID: 20087741].
18. Larsen N, Vogensen FK, van den Berg FW, Nielsen DS, An-
dreasen AS, Pedersen BK, et al. Gut microbiota in human
adults with type 2 diabetes differs from non-diabetic adul-
ts. PloS One 2010; 5(2): e9085 [PMID: 20140211].
19. Furet JP, Kong LC, Tap J, Poitou C, Basdevant A, Bouillot
JL, Mariat D, et al. Differential adaptation of human gut
microbiota to bariatric surgery-induced weight loss: links
with metabolic and low-grade inflammation markers. Dia-
betes 2010; 59(12): 3049-57 [PMID: 20876719].
20. Membrez M, Blancher F, Jaquet M, Bibiloni R, Cani PD, Bur-
celin RG, Corthesy I, et al. Gut microbiota modulation with
norfloxacin  and ampicillin  enhances glucose tolerance  in
mice. Faseb J 2008; 22(7): 2416-26 [PMID:18326786].
21. Delzenne NM, Cani  PD.  Interaction  between obesity  and
the gut microbiota: relevance in nutrition. Annual Review
of Nutrition 2011; 31: 15-31 [PMID: 21568707].
22. Xiong Y, Miyamoto N, Shibata K, Valasek MA,  Motoike T,
Kedzierski RM, Yanagisawa M. Short-chain fatty acids sti-
mulate leptin production in adipocytes through the G pro-
tein-coupled receptor GPR41. Proceedings of the National
Academy  of  Sciences  of  the  United  States  of  America
2004; 101(4): 1045-50 [PMID: 14722361].
23. Poupeau A, Postic C. Cross-regulation of hepatic glucose
metabolism via ChREBP and nuclear receptors. Biochimica
et  Biophysica  Acta 2011; 1812(8): 995-1006 [PMID:
21453770].
24. Ding S, Chi MM, Scull BP, Rigby R, Schwerbrock NM, Mag-
ness S, Jobin C, Lund PK. High-fat diet: bacteria interac-
tions promote intestinal inflammation which precedes and
correlates  with obesity  and  insulin  resistance in  mouse.
PloS One 2010; 5(8): e12191 [PMID: 20808947].
25. Cani PD, Possemiers S, Van de Wiele T, Guiot Y, Everard A,
Rottier O, Geurts L, et al. Changes in gut microbiota con-
trol inflammation in obese mice through a mechanism invol-
ving GLP-2-driven improvement  of gut permeability. Gut
2009; 58(8): 1091-103 [PMID: 19240062].
26. Claus SP, Tsang TM, Wang Y, Cloarec O, Skordi E, Mar-
tin  FP,  Rezzi  S,  et  al.  Systemic  multicompartmental
effects of the gut microbiome on mouse metabolic phe-
notypes. Molecular Systems Biology 2008; 4: 219 [PMID:
18854818].
27. Drenick EJ, Fisler J, Johnson D. Hepatic steatosis after in-
testinal bypass. Prevention and reversal by metronidazo-
le,  irrespective  of  protein-calorie  malnutrition.
Gastroenterology 1982; 82: 534-48 [PMID: 6797866].
28. Nazim M, Stamp G, Hodgson HJF. Non-alcoholic steatohe-
patitis associated with  small intestinal diverticulosis and
bacterial overgrowth. Hepato-Gastroentol 1989; 36: 349-
51 [PMID: 2516007].
29. Lichtman SN, Keku J, Schwab JH, et al. Hepatic injury as-
sociated with small bowell overgrowth in rats is prevented
by  metronidazole  and  tetracycline. Gastroenterology
1991; 100: 513-9 [PMID: 1985047].
30. Freund HR. Abnormalities of liver function and hepatic da-
mage associated with total parenteral nutrition. Nutrition
1991; 7(1): 1-5; discussion 5-6 [PMID: 1802177].
31. Wigg  AJ, Roberts-Thomson  IC, Dymock  RB,  McCarthy PJ,
Grose RH, Cummings AJ. The role os small intestinal bacte-
rial  overgrowth,  intestinal  permeability,  endotoxaemia,
and  tumour  necrosis factor alpha in the  pathogenesis  of
non-alcoholic  steatohepatitis. Gut  2001;  48:  206-211
[PMID: 11156641].
32. Bures J, Cyrany J, Kohoutova D, Forstl M, Rejchrt S, Kve-
tina J, Vorisek V, Kopacova M. Small intestinal bacterial
overgrowth  syndrome. World J Gastroenterol  2010;
16(24): 2978-90 [PMID: 20572300].
33. Sajjad  A,  Mottershead  M,  Syn  WK,  Jones  R,  Smith  S,
Nwokolo  CU.  Ciprofloxacin  suppresses  bacterial  over-
growth, increases fasting insulin but does not correct low
acylated ghrelin concentration in non-alcoholic steatohe-
patitis. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics 2005;
22(4): 291-9 [PMID: 16097995].
34. Sabate JM, Jouet P, Harnois F, Mechler C, Msika S, Grossin
M, Coffin B. High prevalence of small intestinal bacterial
overgrowth in patients with morbid obesity: a contributor
to severe hepatic steatosis. Obesity Surgery 2008; 18(4):
371-7 [PMID: 18286348].
35. Miele L, Valenza V, La Torre G, Montalto M, Cammarota G,
Ricci R, Masciana R, et al. Increased intestinal permeability
and tight junction alterations in nonalcoholic fatty liver di-
sease. Hepatology 2009; 49(6): 1877-87 [PMID: 19291785].
36. Farhadi A, Gundlapalli S, Shaikh M, Frantzides C, Harrell L,
Kwasny  MM,  Keshavarzian  A.  Susceptibility  to  gut  leaki-
ness: a possible mechanism for endotoxaemia in non-alco-
holic  steatohepatitis. Liver Int  2008;  28(7):  1026-33
[PMID: 18397235].
37. Abu-Shanab A, Quigley EM. The role of the gut microbiota
in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Nat Rev Gastroenterol
Hepatol 2010; 7(12): 691-701 [PMID:21045794].
38. Nair S, Cope  K,  Risby TH,  Diehl AM. Obesity and female
gender  increase  breath  ethanol  concentration:  potential
implications for the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic steato-
Machado MV, et al.
 
2012; 11 (4): 440-449
448
hepatitis. Am J Gastroenterology 2001;  96(4):  1200-04
[PMID: 11316170].
39. Cope  K,  Risby  T,  Diehl  AM.  Increased  gastrointestinal
ethanol production in obese mice: imlications for fatty li-
ver  disease  pathogenesis. Gastroenterology 2000;  119:
1340-7 [PMID: 11054393].
40. Ghoshal  S,  Witta  J,  Zhong  J,  de  Villiers W,  Eckhardt  E.
Chylomicrons promote intestinal absorption of lipopolysac-
charides. J Lipid Research  2009;  50(1):  90-97  [PMID:
18815435].
41. Laugerette F, Vors  C,  Peretti  N,  Michalski  MC.  Complex
links between dietary  lipids,  endogenous  endotoxins and
metabolic  inflammation. Biochimie  2011;  93(1):  39-45
[PMID: 20433893].
42. Cani PD, Neyrinck AM, Fava F, Knauf C, Burcelin RG, Tuohy
KM, Gibson GR, Delzenne NM. Selective increases of bifido-
bacteria  in  gut  microflora improve  high-fat-diet-induced
diabetes in mice through a mechanism associated with en-
dotoxaemia. Diabetologia 2007;  50(11):  2374-83  [PMID:
17823788].
43. Rivera CA, Adegboyega P, van Rooijen N, Tagalicud A, All-
man M, Wallace M. Toll-like receptor-4 signaling and Ku-
pffer  cells  play  pivotal  roles  in  the  pathogenesis  of
non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. J Hepatology 2007;  47(4):
571-9 [PMID: 17644211].
44. Yang SQ, Lin HZ, Lane MD, Clemens M, Diehl AM. Obesity
increases sensitivity to endotoxin liver injury: implicatio-
ns  for  the  pathogenesis  of  steatohepatitis. Proc Natl
Acad Sci USA 1997; 94: 2557-62 [PMID: 9122234].
45. Kudo H, Takahara T, Yata Y, Kawai K, Zhang W, Sugiyama
T. Lipopolysaccharide triggered  TNF-alpha-induced  hepa-
tocyte apoptosis in a murine non-alcoholic  steatohepati-
tis  model. J Hepatology  2009;  51(1):  168-75  [PMID:
19446916].
46. Huang H, Liu T, Rose JL, Stevens RL, Hoyt DG. Sensitivity
of mice to lipopolysaccharide is increased by a high satu-
rated fat and cholesterol diet. J Inflammation 2007; 4: 22
[PMID: 17997851].
47. Thuy S,  Ladurner R, Volynets  V,  Wagner  S, Strahl  S,  Ko-
nigsrainer A, Maier KP, et al. Nonalcoholic fatty liver di-
sease  in  humans  is  associated  with  increased  plasma
endotoxin and  plasminogen activator  inhibitor  1 concen-
trations  and  with  fructose  intake. J Nutrition  2008;
138(8): 1452-5 [PMID: 18641190].
48. Harte AL, da  Silva  NF, Creely SJ,  McGee KC, Billyard  T,
Youssef-Elabd EM, Tripathi G, et al. Elevated endotoxin le-
vels  in  non-alcoholic  fatty  liver  disease. J Inflammation
2010; 7: 15 [PMID: 20353583].
49. Ruiz AG, Casafont F, Crespo J, Cayon A, Mayorga M, Este-
banez A, Fernadez-Escalante JC, et al.  Lipopolysacchari-
de-binding protein plasma levels and liver TNF-alpha gene
expression in obese patients: evidence for  the  potential
role  of  endotoxin  in  the  pathogenesis  of  non-alcoholic
steatohepatitis. Obesity Surgery 2007;  17(10):  1374-80
[PMID: 18000721].
50. Verdam FJ, Rensen SS, Driessen A, Greve JW, Buurman WA.
Novel evidence for chronic exposure  to endotoxin in hu-
man  nonalcoholic  steatohepatitis. J Clinical Gastroente-
rology 2011; 45(2): 149-52 [PMID: 20661154].
51. Zeisel SH, Wishnok JS, Blusztajn JK. Formation of methyla-
mines from ingested choline and lecithin. J Pharmacology
and  Experimental  Therapeutics 1983; 225(2): 320-4
[PMID: 6842395].
52. Lin  JK,  Ho  YS. Hepatotoxicity  and  hepatocarcinogenicity
in rats fed squid with or without exogenous nitrite. Food
Chem Toxicol 1992; 30(8): 695-702 [PMID: 1328003].
53. Dumas ME, Barton RH, Toye A, Cloarec O, Blancher C, Ro-
thwell A, Fearnside J, et al. Metabolic profiling reveals a
contribution of gut microbiota to fatty liver phenotype in
insulin-resistant mice. Proceedings of the National Acade-
my  of  Sciences  of  the  United  States  of  America 2006;
103(33): 12511-6 [PMID: 16895997].
54. Spencer MD, Hamp TJ, Reid RW, Fischer LM, Zeisel SH, Fo-
dor  AA.  Association  between  composition  of  the  human
gastrointestinal microbiome and development of fatty li-
ver  with  choline  deficiency. Gastroenterology  2011;
140(3): 976-86 [PMID: 21129376].
55. Martin FP, Wang Y, Sprenger N, Yap IK, Rezzi S, Ramadan
Z, Pere-Trepat E, et al. Top-down systems biology integra-
tion of conditional prebiotic modulated transgenomic inte-
ractions  in  a  humanized  microbiome  mouse  model.
Molecular Systems Biology 2008; 4: 205 [PMID: 18628745].
56. Ouyang X, Cirillo P, Sautin Y, McCall S, Bruchette JL, Diehl
AM, Johnson RJ, Abdelmalek MF. Fructose consumption as
a risk factor for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. J Hepa-
tology 2008; 48(6): 993-9 [PMID: 18395287].
57. Joost HG, Thorens B. The extended GLUT-family of sugar/
polyol  transport  facilitators:  nomenclature,  sequence
characteristics, and potential function of its novel mem-
bers (review). Molecular Membrane Biology 2001;  18(4):
247-56 [PMID: 11780753].
58. Lim  JS,  Mietus-Snyder M,  Valente  A,  Schwarz  JM,  Lustig
RH. The role of fructose in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and
the metabolic syndrome. Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol
2010; 7(5): 251-64 [PMID: 20368739].
59. Teff KL, Elliott SS, Tschop M, Kieffer TJ, Rader D, Heiman
M, Townsend RR, et al. Dietary fructose reduces circula-
ting insulin and leptin,  attenuates postprandial suppres-
sion  of  ghrelin, and increases triglycerides  in  women. J
Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 2004; 89(6): 2963-
72 [PMID: 15181085].
60. Jurgens H, Haass  W,  Castaneda TR, Schurmann  A, Koeb-
nick C, Dombrowski F, Otto B, et al. Consuming fructose-
sweetened  beverages  increases  body  adiposity  in  mice.
Obesity Research 2005; 13(7): 1146-56 [PMID: 16076983].
61. Ackerman Z, Oron-Herman  M, Grozovski  M, Rosenthal T,
Pappo O, Link G, Sela BA. Fructose-induced fatty liver di-
sease: hepatic effects of blood pressure and plasma trigly-
ceride  reduction. Hypertension  2005;  45(5):  1012-8
[PMID: 15824194].
62. Davail S, Rideau N, Bernadet MD, Andre JM, Guy G, Hoo-
Paris R.  Effects  of  dietary fructose  on  liver steatosis  in
overfed mule  ducks. Hormone and Metabolic Research =
Hormon- und Stoffwechselforschung = Hormones et Meta-
bolisme 2005; 37(1): 32-5 [PMID: 15702436].
63. Kohli  R,  Kirby  M,  Xanthakos  SA,  Softic  S,  Feldstein  AE,
Saxena  V,  Tang  PH,  et al.  High-fructose,  medium  chain
trans fat  diet  induces liver  fibrosis  and  elevates  plasma
coenzyme Q9 in a novel murine model of obesity and nonal-
coholic  steatohepatitis. Hepatology 2010;  52(3):  934-44
[PMID: 20607689].
64. Abdelmalek MF, Suzuki A, Guy C, Unalp-Arida A, Colvin R,
Johnson RJ, Diehl AM. Increased fructose consumption is
associated with fibrosis severity in patients with nonalco-
holic fatty liver disease. Hepatology 2010; 51(6): 1961-71
[PMID: 20301112].
65. Nakagawa T, Hu H, Zharikov S, Tuttle KR, Short RA, Glus-
hakova O, Ouyang X, et al. A causal role for uric acid in
fructose-induced metabolic syndrome. Am J Physiol Renal
Physiol 2006; 290(3): F625-F631 [PMID: 16234313].
66. Johnson RJ, Segal MS, Sautin Y, Nakagawa T, Feig DI, Kang
DH, et al. Potential role of sugar (fructose) in the epide-
449
Gut microbiota and hepatic steatosis
.
 
2012; 11 (4): 440-449
mic of hypertension, obesity and the metabolic syndrome,
diabetes, kidney disease, and cardiovascular disease. Am
 Clinical  Nutrition 2007; 86(4): 899-906 [PMID:
17921363].
67. Spruss A, Kanuri G, Wagnerberger S, Haub S, Bischoff SC,
Bergheim I. Toll-like receptor 4 is involved in the develop-
ment of fructose-induced hepatic steatosis in mice. Hepa-
tology 2009; 50(4): 1094-104 [PMID: 19637282].
68. Bergheim I, Weber S, Vos M, Kramer S, Volynets V, Kase-
rouni  S,  McClain  CJ,  Bischoff  SC.  Antibiotics  protect
against  fructose-induced  hepatic  lipid  accumulation  in
mice: role of endotoxin. J Hepatology 2008; 48(6): 983-92
[PMID: 18395289].
69. Busserolles J, Gueux E, Rock E, Demigne C, Mazur A, Rays-
siguier Y. Oligofructose  protects against the hypertrigly-
ceridemic  and  pro-oxidative  effects  of  a  high  fructose
diet  in  rats. J Nutrition  2003;  133(6):  1903-8  [PMID:
12771337].
70. Baraona E, Julkunen R, Tannenbaum L, Lieber CS. Role of
intestinal bacterial overgrowth in ethanol production and
metabolism in rats. Gastroenterology 1986; 90(1): 103-10
[PMID: 3940238].
71. Haub S, Kanuri G, Volynets V, Brune T, Bischoff SC, Berg-
heim I. Serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) plays a cri-
tical  role  in  the  onset  of  fructose-induced  hepatic
steatosis in mice. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol
2010; 298(3): G335-G344 [PMID: 19713474].
72. Iacono A, Raso GM, Canani RB, Calignano A, Meli R. Probio-
tics as an emerging therapeutic strategy to treat NAFLD:
focus on molecular and biochemical mechanisms. J Nutri-
tional  Biochemistry 2011; 22(8): 699-711 [PMID:
21292470].
73. Li Z, Yang S, Lin H, Huang J, Watkins PA, Moser AB, Desi-
mone C, et al. Probiotics and antibodies to TNF inhibit in-
flammatory activity  and improve  nonalcoholic fatty liver
disease. Hepatology  2003;  37(2):  343-50  [PMID:
12540784].
74. Ma X, Hua J, Li Z. Probiotics improve high fat diet-induced
hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance by increasing he-
patic NKT cells. J Hepatology 2008; 49(5): 821-30 [PMID:
18674841].
75. Esposito E, Iacono  A,  Bianco  G, Autore  G,  Cuzzocrea S,
Vajro P, Canani RB, et al. Probiotics reduce the inflamma-
tory response induced  by  a high-fat diet in the  liver  of
young  rats. J Nutrition  2009;  139(5):  905-11  [PMID:
19321579].
76. Velayudham A, Dolganiuc A, Ellis M, Petrasek J, Kodys
K, Mandrekar  P,  Szabo  G.  VSL#3 probiotic  treatment
attenuates  fibrosis  without  changes  in  steatohepati-
tis in a diet-induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis mo-
del  in  mice. Hepatology 2009;  49(3):  989-97  [PMID:
19115316].
77. Fan JG, Xu ZJ, Wang GL. Effect of lactulose on establish-
ment of a rat non-alcoholic steatohepatitis model. World J
Gastroenterol 2005; 11(32): 5053-6 [PMID: 16124065].
78. Delzenne NM, Cani PD, Neyrinck AM. Modulation of gluca-
gon-like peptide 1 and energy metabolism by inulin and oli-
gofructose: experimental data. J Nutrition 2007; 137(11
Suppl.): 2547S-2551S [PMID: 17951500].
79. Daubioul CA, Horsmans Y, Lambert P, Danse E, Delzenne
NM. Effects of oligofructose on glucose and lipid metabo-
lism in patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis: results
of a pilot study. European J Clinical Nutrition 2005; 59(5):
723-726 [PMID: 15770222].
80. Daubioul CA, Taper HS, De Wispelaere LD, Delzenne NM.
Dietary  oligofructose  lessens hepatic  steatosis, but  does
not prevent hypertriglyceridemia in obese zucker  rats. J
Nutrition 2000; 130(5): 1314-9 [PMID: 10801936].
81. Loguercio C, De Simone T, Federico A, Terracciano F, Tuc-
cillo C, Di Chicco M, Carteni M. Gut-liver axis: a new point
of attack to treat chronic liver damage? Am J Gastroen-
terology 2002; 97(8): 2144-6 [PMID: 12190198].
82. Loguercio  C,  Federico  A, Tuccillo  C, Terracciano F,
D’Auria MV, De Simone C, Del Vecchio Blanco C. Be-
neficial effects  of  a  probiotic  VSL#3  on  parameters
of liver dysfunction in chronic liver diseases. J Clini-
cal  Gastroenterology 2005; 39(6): 540-3 [PMID:
15942443].
83. Lirussi  F,  Mastropasqua E,  Orando  S, Orlando  R. Probio-
tics for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and/or steatohe-
patitis. Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online)
2007(1): CD005165 [PMID: 17253543].
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested