1
/ 36
HQPlayer Desktop
User Manual
Version 3.1.0
Copyright © 2008-2013 Jussi Laako / Signalyst. All rights reserved.
How to convert pdf file to powerpoint presentation - SDK application API:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
How to convert pdf file to powerpoint presentation - SDK application API:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
2
/ 36
Table of Contents
1.Introduction.........................................................................................................................4
1.1.DSDIFF and DSF playback.........................................................................................4
1.2.Network Audio..............................................................................................................5
2.Main screen.........................................................................................................................6
2.1.Transport selection (library).........................................................................................6
2.2.Transport filters............................................................................................................7
2.3.Song display................................................................................................................7
2.4.Track display................................................................................................................7
2.5.Time display.................................................................................................................7
2.6.Mode display................................................................................................................7
2.7.Convolution..................................................................................................................7
2.8.Phase inversion...........................................................................................................7
2.9.Repeat and Random playback....................................................................................8
2.10.Playlist management.................................................................................................8
2.11.Filter / oversampling selection...................................................................................8
2.12.Noise-shaping / dither / modulator selection...........................................................10
2.13.Sample rate selection..............................................................................................11
2.14.PCM / SDM (DSD) output mode selection..............................................................12
2.15.Volume control.........................................................................................................12
2.16.Position/seek bar.....................................................................................................12
3.Full-screen mode..............................................................................................................13
3.1.Switching views.........................................................................................................13
3.2.Album selection view.................................................................................................13
3.3.Playlist edit view........................................................................................................14
4.Library management.........................................................................................................15
5.Settings.............................................................................................................................17
5.1.DSDIFF/DSF settings................................................................................................18
5.2.Speaker setup............................................................................................................20
5.3.Network Audio Adapter naming.................................................................................22
5.4.ASIO channel mapping..............................................................................................22
6.Convolution engine...........................................................................................................24
7.Registering your copy.......................................................................................................26
7.1.Registering Linux version..........................................................................................26
8.Troubleshooting................................................................................................................27
8.1.Reporting bugs..........................................................................................................27
8.2.Sound problems with USB audio device...................................................................27
8.3.Generic......................................................................................................................27
8.4.Channel mapping.......................................................................................................28
8.5.No rates available......................................................................................................30
8.6.Known workarounds..................................................................................................30
9.Component licenses and trademarks...............................................................................32
9.1.HQPlayer...................................................................................................................32
9.2.FLAC..........................................................................................................................34
9.3.ASIO..........................................................................................................................34
9.4.Qt...............................................................................................................................34
Copyright © 2008-2013 Jussi Laako / Signalyst. All rights reserved.
SDK application API:VB.NET PowerPoint: Use PowerPoint SDK to Create, Load and Save PPT
NET method and sample code in this part will teach you how to create a fully customized blank PowerPoint file by using the smart PowerPoint presentation control
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application API:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
But sometimes, we need to extract or fetch text content from source PDF document file for word processing, presentation and desktop publishing applications.
www.rasteredge.com
3
/ 36
9.5.Botan..........................................................................................................................35
9.6.Trademarks................................................................................................................35
Copyright © 2008-2013 Jussi Laako / Signalyst. All rights reserved.
SDK application API:C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Note: When you get the error "Could not load file or assembly 'RasterEdge.Imaging. Basic' or any How to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert ODT to PDF in C#.NET
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application API:VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
you can choose to show your PPT presentation in inverted clip art or screenshot to PowerPoint document slide & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
4
/ 36
1. Introduction
HQPlayer is a high quality audio player for Windows Vista, Windows 7, Linux and Mac 
OS X. HQPlayer also features several user selectable high quality resamplers as well 
as user selectable dither/noise shaping algorithms.
Some of the more affordable sound cards and D/A converters have suboptimal digital 
and analog filters, while still having support for higher sampling rates. Effect of this can 
reduced by applying high quality upsampling in software before feeding the signal to 
the audio hardware at higher rate. This moves some of the artifacts of the suboptimal 
hardware to higher frequencies, away from the audible band. Many of the home-
theater amplifiers also re-sample internally to 48, 96 or 192 kHz, with the HQPlayer, 
these can be fed at the native rate.
Most modern D/A converters are delta-sigma type. Built-in delta-sigma modulator of 
HQPlayer allows using DSD-capable converters with this native data format, in many 
cases bypassing lot of DSP processing in these converters and allowing more direct 
data path to the conversion stage.
Resampling also allows playback for high resolution audio files on hardware capable 
of only lower sampling rates or bit depths. For lower bit depth playback, high quality 
dither or noise shaping can be employed.
HQPlayer also includes a convolution engine for applying digital room correction filters 
or other kinds of equalization.
These features ensure the best possible audio quality with the available audio 
hardware.
1.1. DSDIFF and DSF playback
Playback of DSDIFF and DSF files is supported. In case hardware and drivers support 
ASIO DSD -mode, or one of the “PCM packed” modes, these files can be played back 
in native format.
For devices capable of only PCM input, PDM (pulse density modulation) content of 
these files is converted to 176.4 (64fs), 352.8 (128fs) or 705.6 kHz (256fs) PCM (pulse 
code modulation) format for playback through PCM audio hardware.The playback rate 
of DSDIFF and DSF files can be further altered by using resampling to chosen rate. 
Thus, playback rates from 32 to 1536 kHz are possible. Used bit depth is always 
maximum supported by the playback hardware.
Also multichannel loudspeaker delay- and level-processing is supported in both 
converted and native modes.
Copyright © 2008-2013 Jussi Laako / Signalyst. All rights reserved.
SDK application API:VB.NET PowerPoint: Merge and Split PowerPoint Document(s) with PPT
documents and save the created new file in the sample code in VB.NET to finish PowerPoint document splitting If you want to see more PDF processing functions
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application API:VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
1odt.pdf"). How to VB.NET: Convert ODP to PDF. This code sample is able to convert ODP file to PDF document. ' odp convert
www.rasteredge.com
5
/ 36
1.2. Network Audio
Network Audio is a way to have remote audio adapters and DACs integrated 
seamlessly with the player application. All the audio processing is performed at the 
player application side, and then streamed asynchronously over the network for 
reproduction.
Copyright © 2008-2013 Jussi Laako / Signalyst. All rights reserved.
Network Audio system
SDK application API:VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Codes to Create Linear and 2D Barcodes on
PowerPoint PDF 417 barcode library is a mature and Install and integrate our PowerPoint PLANET barcode creating to achieve PLANET barcode drawing on PPT file.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application API:How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Windows Viewer
Generally speaking, you can use this .NET document imaging SDK to load, markup, convert, print, scan image and document. Support File Types. PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
6
/ 36
2. Main screen
When the application is first started up, main screen is displayed.
User interface also supports standard multimedia keys and equivalent remote controls. 
It also features two modes, the traditional desktop application mode shown above, and 
new touch-optimized full-screen mode available through the right-most button in the 
toolbar.
Tracks, directory trees and playlist files can be added to the current playlist by drag-
and-drop from outside of the application.
Note! In case you experience clicks/pops between DSDIFF/DSF tracks, creating a 
playlist for the tracks enables special code to reset the modulation state. Playback 
won't be gapless in this mode.
2.1. Transport selection (library)
Transport is the playback source location. It lists all configured FLAC-, DSDIFF-, 
DSF- , WAV- and AIFF- file paths as well as playlist files and a CD-drive. For file path, 
each sub-directory is expected to be an album consisting of files in one of the 
supported formats. Transports are structured in a tree model in Artist / Performer / 
Album / Song order.
Copyright © 2008-2013 Jussi Laako / Signalyst. All rights reserved.
Main screen
7
/ 36
Selecting a new transport represents similar action as changing a CD in physical drive.
When album node is expanded, tracks of the album are listed. Selecting tracks 
switches transport into playlist mode, where individual tracks (from same or different 
album) can be added.
2.2. Transport filters
Transport view can be filtered by entering filtering rules. Rules can be in traditional 
“wildcard” ('*') format, or in Perl-style regular expression format, when prefixed with '#'.
2.3. Song display
For CD, this field is used only to display track numbers.
When playing back FLAC-files, metadata is shown. If metadata is not available a file 
name is shown. For DSDIFF-, DSF-, WAV- and AIFF- files, file name is displayed.
2.4. Track display
Current track number and total number of tracks on a transport is shown on this 
display. For CD, this is the normal track number. For FLAC/DSDIFF/DSF/WAV/AIFF-
files, track numbering is constructed per directory basis based on file name sorting 
order. For preferred order, file names should begin with correct zero-prefixed track 
number.
2.5. Time display
This display shows the selected time information. By default, it is the time from 
beginning of the track. Other possible values are time from end of the track and total 
time from end of the album (transport).
2.6. Mode display
Selected time display mode is indicated here. Shown values are “time” for the time 
from beginning of the track, “remain” for the time from end of the track and “total 
remain” for the time from end of the album. Display mode can be changed by clicking 
this box.
2.7. Convolution
When this button is depressed, convolution processing is completely bypassed. When 
this button is pressed, convolution engine is active and the configured impulse 
responses will be used to process the signal before resampling. Convolution can be 
enabled and disabled during the playback.
Note! When source material sampling rate differs from the impulse sampling rate, 
impulse responses will be scaled to the source material's sampling rate. This can have 
a huge impact on CPU load, and with large impulse responses will require significant 
amount of CPU processing power.
2.8. Phase inversion
Absolute phase can be inverted in cases where volume control is available.
Copyright © 2008-2013 Jussi Laako / Signalyst. All rights reserved.
8
/ 36
2.9. Repeat and Random playback
Current tracklist/playlist can be repeated and played back in random order.
2.10.Playlist management
Clicking the “Clear playlist” -button clears the internal playlist transport. If some other 
transport (such as album) is active, this doesn't have visible effect until new playlist is 
created. Playlist can be also loaded and saved using corresponding buttons.
When other transport than playlist is selected, playlist is still in memory. Transport can 
be switched back to the playlist by clicking the “Activate playlist” button.
Playlist playback of DSDIFF/DSF files is not gapless, but a special code is enabled in 
order to avoid clicks/pops between unrelated tracks.
2.11. Filter / oversampling selection
This selection can be used to switch between resampling filters. This selection has an 
impact on available hardware sampling rates. This selection cannot be changed during 
playback. Different variants of “poly-sinc” are the most recommended by the author.
Copyright © 2008-2013 Jussi Laako / Signalyst. All rights reserved.
9
/ 36
Filter
Description
none
No sample rate conversion happens. Only sample depth is 
changed as needed.
IIR
This is analog-sounding filter, especially suitable for recordings 
containing strong transients, long post-echo is a side effect (not 
usually audible due to masking). A really steep IIR filter is used. 
This filter type is similar to analog filters and has no pre-echo, but 
has a long post-echo. Small amount of pass-band ripple is also 
present. IIR filter is applied in time-domain. This filter performs 
better when resampling with only factor of 2 or 3 and somewhat 
worse at factor of 4 and higher.
FIR
Typical “oversampling” digital filter, generally suitable for most 
uses (slight pre- and post-echo), but best on classical music 
recorded in a real world acoustic environment such as concert hall. 
This is the most ordinary filter type, usually present in hardware. 
This filter is applied in time-domain. It has average amount of pre- 
and post-echo.
asymFIR
Asymmetric FIR, good for jazz/blues, and other music containing 
transients recorded in real world acoustic environment. Otherwise 
same as FIR, but with a shorter pre-echo and longer post-echo. 
Modifies phase response, but not as much as minimum phase 
FIR.
minphaseFIR
Minimum phase FIR, good for pop/rock/electronic music containing 
strong transients such as drums and percussion and where 
recording is made in a studio using multi-track equipment. No pre-
echo, but somewhat long post-echo.
FFT
Technically good steep “brickwall” filter, but might have some side 
effects (pre-echo) on material containing strong transients. This 
filter is similar to FIR, but it is applied in frequency-domain and is 
quite efficient from performance point of view while having rather 
long impulse response.
poly-sinc /
better space
Linear phase polyphase sinc filter. Very high quality linear phase 
resampling filter, can perform most of the typical conversion ratios. 
Good phase response, but has some amount of pre-echo. See 
“FIR” for further details.
poly-sinc-mp /
better transients
Minimum phase polyphase sinc filter, otherwise similar to poly-
sinc. Altered phase response, but no pre-echo. See 
“minphaseFIR” for further details.
poly-sinc-shrt
Otherwise similar as poly-sinc, but shorter pre- and post-echos at 
the expense of filtering quality (not as sharp roll-off and reduced 
stop-band attenuation).
poly-sinc-shrt-mp Minimum phase variant of poly-sinc-shrt. Otherwise similar to poly-
sinc-mp, but shorter post-echo. Most optimal transient 
reproduction.
Copyright © 2008-2013 Jussi Laako / Signalyst. All rights reserved.
10
/ 36
Filter
Description
poly-sinc-hb
Linear-phase polyphase half-band filter with steep cut-off and high 
attenuation.
sinc
This is a special type of filter, slightly similar to FIR, but with a 
possibility of asynchronous operation for conversions from any 
rate to any other rate. Computationally heavy.
polynomial-1
Polynomial interpolation. Most natural polynomial interpolation for 
audio. Only two samples of pre- and post-echo. Frequency 
response rolls off slowly in the top octave. Poor stop-band 
rejection and will thus leak fairly high amount of ultrasonic noise. 
These type of filters are sometimes referred to as “non-ringing” by 
some manufacturers. Not recommended.
polynomial-2
Similar to polynomial-1, but higher stop-band rejection with the 
expense of being a bit less natural for audio. Not recommended.
minringFIR
Minimum ringing FIR. Uses special algorithm to create a linear-
phase filter that minimizes amount of ringing while providing better 
frequency-response and attenuation than polynomial interpolators. 
Performance and ringing is between polynomial and poly-sinc-
short.
*-2s
Two stage oversampling. First stage rate conversion is performed 
by at least by factor of 8 using the selected algorithm, and further 
converted to the final rate using “minringFIR” algorithm. This 
lowers the overall CPU load, while preserving almost the same 
conversion quality. Especially useful for highest output rates.
2.12.Noise-shaping / dither / modulator selection
This selection can be used to switch between different word-length reduction 
algorithms. Especially important when playback hardware supports less than 24 bits. 
This selection cannot be changed during playback.
Copyright © 2008-2013 Jussi Laako / Signalyst. All rights reserved.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested