J
oana
C
hiavari
and
C
eCilia
T
am
INFORMATION PAPER
GOOD PRACTICE POLICY 
FRAMEWORK FOR ENERGY 
TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT 
AND DEMONSTRATION (RD&D) 
2011
November
Accelerating Energy Innovation Series
How to add pdf to powerpoint presentation - software control project:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
How to add pdf to powerpoint presentation - software control project:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
software control project:VB.NET PowerPoint: Use PowerPoint SDK to Create, Load and Save PPT
an empty PowerPoint file with our reliable .NET PPT document add-on; a fully customized blank PowerPoint file by using the smart PowerPoint presentation control
www.rasteredge.com
software control project:VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
index = 1 End If correctOrder.Add(index) Next clip art or screenshot to PowerPoint document slide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
J
oana
C
hiavari
and
C
eCilia
T
am
INFORMATION PAPER
2011
November
This information paper was prepared for the Accelerating Energy Innovation Project of the International 
Energy Agency (IEA). It was drafted by the Energy Technology Policy Division of the IEA. This paper reflects 
the views of the IEA Secretariat, but does not necessarily reflect those of individual IEA member countries. 
For further information, please contact Joana Chiavari at joana.chiavari@iea.org 
GOOD PRACTICE POLICY 
FRAMEWORK FOR ENERGY 
TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT 
AND DEMONSTRATION (RD&D) 
Accelerating Energy Innovation Series
software control project:VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Codes to Create Linear and 2D Barcodes on
Here is a market-leading PowerPoint barcode add-on within VB.NET class, which means it as well as 2d barcodes QR Code, Data Matrix, PDF-417, etc.
www.rasteredge.com
software control project:VB.NET PowerPoint: Merge and Split PowerPoint Document(s) with PPT
For Each doc As [String] In dirs docList.Add(doc) Next code in VB.NET to finish PowerPoint document splitting If you want to see more PDF processing functions
www.rasteredge.com
INTERNATIONAL ENERGY AGENCY
The International Energy Agency (IEA), an autonomous agency, was established in November 1974. 
Its primary mandate was – and is – two-fold: to promote energy security amongst its member 
countries through collective response to physical disruptions in oil supply, and provide authoritative 
research and analysis on ways to ensure reliable, affordable and clean energy for its 28 member 
countries and beyond. The IEA carries out a comprehensive programme of energy co-operation among 
its member countries, each of which is obliged to hold oil stocks equivalent to 90 days of its net imports. 
The Agency’s aims include the following objectives: 
n  Secure member countries’ access to reliable and ample supplies of all forms of energy; in particular, 
through maintaining effective emergency response capabilities in case of oil supply disruptions. 
n  Promote sustainable energy policies that spur economic growth and environmental protection 
in a global context – particularly in terms of reducing greenhouse-gas emissions that contribute 
to climate change. 
n  Improve transparency of international markets through collection and analysis of 
energy data. 
n  Support global collaboration on energy technology to secure future energy supplies 
and mitigate their environmental impact, including through improved energy 
efficiency and development and deployment of low-carbon technologies.
n  Find solutions to global energy challenges through engagement and 
dialogue with non-member countries, industry, international 
organisations and other stakeholders.
IEA member countries:
Australia
Austria 
Belgium
Canada
Czech Republic
Denmark
Finland 
France
Germany
Greece
Hungary
Ireland 
Italy
Japan
Korea (Republic of)
Luxembourg
Netherlands
New Zealand 
Norway
Poland
Portugal
Slovak Republic
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
Turkey
United Kingdom
United States
The European Commission 
also participates in 
the work of the IEA.
Please note that this publication 
is subject to specific restrictions 
that limit its use and distribution. 
The terms and conditions are available 
online at 
www.iea.org/about/copyright.asp
© OECD/IEA, 2011
International Energy Agency 
9 rue de la Fédération 
75739 Paris Cedex 15, France
www.iea.org
software control project:VB.NET PowerPoint: Add Image to PowerPoint Document Slide/Page
of "AddPage", "InsertPage" and "DeletePage" to add, insert or delete any certain PowerPoint slide without & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
www.rasteredge.com
software control project:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
text content from source PDF document file for word processing, presentation and desktop How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references
www.rasteredge.com
© OECD/IEA 2011 
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D
 
 
Page | 3 
Table of Contents 
Acknowledgements .......................................................................................................................... 5 
Executive Summary .......................................................................................................................... 6 
IEA Accelerating Energy Innovation project .............................................................................. 6 
Next steps .................................................................................................................................. 7 
Introduction ...................................................................................................................................... 8 
Chapter 1. Good practice policy framework for energy technology RD&D .................................... 12 
Coherent energy RD&D strategy and priorities ....................................................................... 12 
Adequate and stable government RD&D funding and policy support .................................... 13 
Co‐ordinated energy RD&D governance ................................................................................. 15 
A strong collaborative approach, engaging industry through PPPs ........................................ 17 
Effective RD&D monitoring and evaluation ............................................................................ 18 
Strategic international collaboration ....................................................................................... 19 
Chapter 2. Energy RD&D strategy and priority setting ................................................................... 21 
Energy RD&D strategy ............................................................................................................. 21 
Priority setting for energy RD&D ............................................................................................. 22 
Energy RD&D priorities in various countries ........................................................................... 24 
Chapter 3. Monitoring and evaluating energy technology RD&D .................................................. 26 
Monitoring progress as it happens .......................................................................................... 26 
Evaluating outcomes ............................................................................................................... 27 
Evaluation methods ................................................................................................................. 28 
Evaluation indicators ............................................................................................................... 30 
Chapter 4. Trends in RD&D funding, priorities and practices ......................................................... 33 
Trends in funding and priorities .............................................................................................. 33 
New trends in government practices ...................................................................................... 36 
Conclusion ....................................................................................................................................... 38 
Case Studies .................................................................................................................................... 39 
Case study 1: FOKUS ‐ Strategic planning effort informed by monitoring and evaluation 
(Sweden) .................................................................................................................................. 39 
Case study 2: DEMO 2000: demonstrating oil & gas technologies (Norway) ......................... 42 
Case study 3: WBSO Research and Development (Promotion) Act (The Netherlands) .......... 44 
Case study 4: Brazil’s National Alcohol Programme (Proalcool) ............................................. 45 
Case study 5: Smart Grids and Energy Markets (SGEM) programme within CLEEN, Ltd. – 
Cluster for Energy and Environment (Finland) ........................................................................ 48 
Case study 6: Measurement of economic impact and cost benefit analysis on national  
R&D programmes at NEDO (Japan) ......................................................................................... 50 
software control project:C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
In order to run the sample codes, the following steps would be necessary. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PowerPoint.dll.
www.rasteredge.com
software control project:VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
In order to run the sample codes, the following steps would be necessary. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PowerPoint.dll.
www.rasteredge.com
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D 
© OECD/IEA 2011 
 
Page | 4
Case study 7: Linkages from DOE’s research and development in wind energy to  
commercial renewable power generation (US) ...................................................................... 51 
Case study 8: US‐China Clean Energy Research Center (US‐China CERC) ............................... 52 
Case study 9: IEA Implementing Agreements (IAs) ................................................................. 53 
Acronyms and abbreviations ......................................................................................................... 57 
References ...................................................................................................................................... 59 
List of figures 
Figure 1 Schematic of the innovation system ................................................................................... 8 
Figure 2 An energy RD&D policy framework based on good practices .......................................... 12 
Figure 3 Priority setting for energy RD&D ...................................................................................... 23 
Figure 4 Public sector low carbon RD&D spending per capita as a function of GDP per capita  
  and CO
2
 emissions ............................................................................................................ 34 
List of tables 
Table 1 Review of stated energy RD&D priorities for governments based on announced 
technology programmes or strategies ............................................................................... 24 
Table 2 Classification framework for energy RD&D evaluation ...................................................... 28 
Table 3 Relevance of evaluation methods ...................................................................................... 29 
Table 4 Examples of indicators used in the evaluation of research‐related programmes ............. 31 
Table 5 Estimate of current global levels of public spending on clean energy RD&D .................... 33 
Table 6 Change in public sector spending levels on low carbon RD&D .......................................... 36 
Table 7 Matching case studies with Good Practice Framework categories ................................... 39 
List of boxes 
Box 1 The rationale for government intervention to support low‐carbon RD&D ............................ 9 
Box 2 FOKUS: a strategic planning effort informed by monitoring and evaluation (Case Study 1) 13 
Box 3 The DEMO 2000 programme (Case Study 2) ........................................................................ 13 
Box 4 WBSO Research and Development (Promotion) Act (Case Study 3) .................................... 14 
Box 5 Brazil’s National Alcohol Programme (Proalcool) (Case Study 4) ......................................... 15 
Box 6 CLEEN Ltd. – Cluster for Energy and Environment (Case Study 5) ........................................ 18 
Box 7 Linkages between US DOE’s Wind Energy Program and the commercial applications of  
wind energy (Case Study 7) ................................................................................................... 19 
Box 8 US‐China Clean Energy Research Center (US‐China CERC) (Case Study 8) ........................... 20 
Box 9 Korea’s strategic approach to energy RD&D ......................................................................... 22 
Box 10 Energy RD&D priority setting in Norway and the role of ENERGI 21 Strategy ................... 23 
Box 11 EPEC: Evaluation and Impact Assessment of the European Non Nuclear Energy RTD  
  Programme .......................................................................................................................... 29 
Box 12 Quality and availability of data on spending for energy RD&D .......................................... 35 
© OECD/IEA 2011 
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D
 
 
Page | 5 
Acknowledgements 
The paper was written by Joana Chiavari and Cecilia Tam with the support of the IEA Experts’ 
Group on R&D Priority Setting and Evaluation (EGRD), and the network of innovation experts 
created for the Accelerating Energy Innovation project, who are the source of a number of the 
ideas  discussed here and provided advice  and  comments throughout the  process. Particular 
thanks are also due to Kevin Breen, who provided support on RD&D funding data and priorities, 
and Carrie Pottinger who also provided important input. Bo Diczfalusy, Director of SPT, and Lew 
Fulton,  Acting  Head  of  the  Energy  Technology  Policy  Division,  provided  valuable  input  and 
guidance. This work was guided by the IEA Committee on Energy Research and Technology. Its 
members provided important reviews and comments that helped to improve the document. Very 
helpful suggestions and feedback were provided by the delegations of Finland, Japan, Sweden, 
Netherlands,  Norway  and  United  States,  who  contributed  to  the  development  of  the  case 
studies. Former IEA colleagues Peter Taylor, Tom Kerr and Tracy Logan were also important in the 
early stages of this work. A special thanks to Marilyn Smith, who offered significant guidance and 
direct input during the editorial and production process, and to Cheryl Haines for editing. The 
authors would also like to thank the IEA publications team, in particular Muriel Custodio and 
Corinne Hayworth, as well as Annette Hardcastle and Catherine Smith for their support. 
For more information on this document, contact: 
 
Joana Chiavari, IEA Secretariat 
Tel: +33 1 40 57 67 06 
Email: joana.chiavari@iea.org 
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D 
© OECD/IEA 2011 
 
Page | 6
Executive Summary 
Innovation is a key driver in the transition to a low‐carbon economy. Technological change and 
development will significantly enhance the portfolio of options available and, over time, will bring 
down the cost of achieving global climate change goals. Governments have an important role in 
this context. They can help by creating an attractive environment for research, development and 
demonstration  (RD&D)  and  safeguarding  the  drivers  of  innovation.  Well‐designed  targeted 
technology policies on both the supply and demand sides are  a fundamental ingredient in a 
strategy to accelerate innovation. While the specific combination of policy measures will depend 
on country circumstances, in all cases it will be important to set the appropriate framework to 
allow breakthroughs to happen. 
IEA Accelerating Energy Innovation project 
Accelerating Energy Innovation (AEI) is a new project being launched by the International Energy 
Agency (IEA). It aims to assist countries both within the Organisation for Economic Co‐operation 
and Development (OECD) and beyond in establishing a clear framework in which innovation of 
clean energy technologies can thrive, and within which effective and efficient policies can be 
identified,  with  the  specific  goal  of  advancing  research,  development,  demonstration  and, 
ultimately, deployment (RDD&D) of clean energy technologies. To this end, this first AEI paper 
draws on analysis of  literature, past  IEA  work and country experiences (via case  studies) to 
identify good practices to support the design and implementation of a strategic framework for 
energy technology policies.  
This summary of successful strategies to accelerate energy technology development and bring 
innovative products into the market place provides a timely learning opportunity for decision 
makers in the public and private sectors, and responds to the interrelated challenges of climate 
change mitigation, economic development and energy security.  
To  support  countries  in  their  bids  to  achieve  steady  progress  and  breakthroughs  in  energy 
technology, this paper identifies preliminary “lessons learned” and success factors. It builds on 
work of the IEA Committee on Energy Research and Technology (CERT) and its Experts’ Group on 
R&D Priority Setting and Evaluation (EGRD). The document uses IEA energy statistics and energy 
indicators, information from IEA In‐Depth Policy Reviews of member countries, IEA technology 
roadmaps  and  the  IEA  network  of  Implementing  Agreements  (Technology  Collaboration 
Network).  
Additional  data  has  been  gathered through  interviews  and  country  visits with  experts  from 
government,  academia and industry, as well as via an informal global network of innovation 
experts specially created for the AEI project. The AEI team developed and used a questionnaire to 
gather information on specific national RD&D programmes and policies while also drawing on 
statistical and empirical data available in the countries.  
Good practice policy framework for energy technology RD&D 
The  AEI  project  proposes  six recommendations  for  good practice  in  the  development of  an 
energy RD&D policy framework. These include: 
1. Coherent energy RD&D strategy and priorities. 
2. Adequate government RD&D funding and policy support. 
© OECD/IEA 2011 
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D
 
 
Page | 7 
3. Co‐ordinated energy RD&D governance. 
4. Strong collaborative approach, engaging industry through public private partnerships (PPPs). 
5. Effective RD&D monitoring and evaluation. 
6. Strategic international collaboration. 
To further explore the basis for these recommendations, this paper is divided into six sections. 
The Introduction provides a rationale for direct public support for low‐carbon energy RD&D. 
Chapter 1 addresses key elements that countries need to take into account when developing a 
good practice policy framework for energy technology RD&D. Energy RD&D strategy and priority 
setting are the  focus of  Chapter 2,  followed  by  a detailed look at  effective  monitoring and 
evaluation of energy RD&D in Chapter 3. Importantly, Chapter 4 reviews general trends in RD&D 
funding, priorities and practices. The paper concludes with a review of selected case studies that 
highlight good practices in energy RD&D policies and programmes. 
Next steps 
In this paper, great emphasis has been placed on the first element of the energy RD&D policy 
framework.  A  preliminary  conclusion  is  that  while  countries  have  been  favouring  certain 
technologies  over  others,  based  on  decisions  on  which  areas  are  to  receive  funding,  clear 
priorities are not always determined through structured analysis and documented processes. A 
review  of  stated  energy  RD&D  priorities,  based  on  announced  technology  programmes  and 
strategies, and recent spending trends reveal some important deviations from stated priorities 
and actual RD&D funding. 
As the AEI project advances, performance assessment of IEA member countries and other major 
economies should be made against the other five criteria for a good practice framework set out 
in this paper. In addition, the interventions required for technology deployment and the linkages 
with RD&D will be further addressed to improve the analysis. 
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D 
© OECD/IEA 2011 
 
Page | 8
Introduction 
This paper begins with an analysis of RD&D, starting from an understanding of research and 
development (R&D) as comprising creative work undertaken on a systematic basis in order to 
increase the stock of knowledge, including knowledge of man, culture and society, and the use of 
this stock of knowledge to devise new products and applications. The term R&D covers three 
activities:  basic research,  applied research,  and experimental development. Demonstration  is 
also included since it is a fundamental part of the development of new technologies and can be 
defined  as  a  project  involving  an  innovation
1
 operated  at  or  near  full  scale  in  a  realistic 
environment to aid  policy or promote  the  use of innovation  (OECD,  2002) and to show the 
viability of its applications.  
Speaking of RDD&D simplifies the process of innovation into a linear model. In reality, innovation 
is known to be incremental, cumulative and assimilative, and radical innovations often (but not 
always) develop outside the linear process (Fri, 2003). Feedbacks, linkages and parallel pathways 
are often present in well‐functioning innovation systems: for example, feedback from the market 
and  from  technology  users  during  the  commercialisation  and  diffusion  phases  can  lead  to 
additional RD&D, driving continuous innovation (Figure 1). 
Figure 1 Schematic of the innovation system  
 
Policy environment - Tax incentives, subsidies,regulations
Demonstration
Deployment
Research and
Development
Basic
Research
Government,firms,venturecapitalandequitymarkets
Investments
Marketpull
Commer-
cialisation
(diffusion)
Policy interventions
Product/technology push
Consumers
Energysectors
Gover ment
Exports
n
Demand
Academia
Research centres
Business
Supply
Framework conditions: macro economicstability,education
andskills development,innovative business climate, IPprotection etc.
Innovation chain
Feedbacks
 
Source: IEA, 2008. 
 
                                                                                
 
1
 The Oslo Manual (3rd edition, 2005) describes an innovation as the implementation of a new or significantly improved product (good 
or service) or process, a new marketing method, or a new organisational method in business practices, workplace organisation or 
external relations. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested