© OECD/IEA 2011 
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D
 
 
Page | 29 
properties and phenomena. As  they are strongly dependent on data availability, they may  not 
capture contextual  detail.  Qualitative  evaluation methods can  address  this  gap by providing  a 
means to collect evidence of change based on behaviours, opinions and effects, which can often 
be demonstrated but not objectively measured. Qualitative studies also provide an opportunity 
to identify effects and to investigate some of factors behind them.  
In  any  evaluation multiple methods  will  be  used. However, some  methods  are  more  relevant 
than  others  depending  on  the  timing  of  the  evaluation  process  (Table  3).  Other  factors 
influencing the choice of evaluation methods include resources and data availability.  
Table 3 Relevance of evaluation methods  
Method 
Ex ante 
Interim 
Ex post 
Qualitative 
Peer review 
Panel review 
Case studies 
Historical tracing 
Network analysis 
Prospective studies (foresight 
and technology assessments) 
Quantitative 
Bibliometrics and patent 
analysis 
Cost-benefit analysis 
Macroeconomic modelling 
Microeconomic modelling 
Source: Adapted from Technopolis. 
 
Experience  shows that the  more  effort put  into  preparing evaluations,  the better  they can  be 
carried out and the less the risk of unnecessary effort from the evaluators or unwelcome burden 
on  the managers and participants. Planned evaluations  that  are  an  integral part  of the  policy 
development/programme design will be more informative and require less resource than a series 
of ad hoc activities. Where possible evaluations should be integrated at the design stage of the 
programme  or policy  to  help  identify  well  thought  out  and  explicit  objectives.  Any  evaluation 
framework needs to be sufficiently flexible to take account of changing circumstances and not be 
constrained by preconceived expectations. 
Box 11 EPEC: Evaluation and Impact Assessment of the European Non Nuclear Energy RTD Programme 
The European Commission established an agreement  with the  European Policy Evaluation Consortium 
(EPEC) to carry out the Evaluation and Impact Assessment of the European Non‐Nuclear Energy (NNE) 
Research  and  Technological  Development  (RTD)  Programme,  part  of  the  Framework  Programme  for 
Research and Technological Development, which is the main vehicle of EU‐sponsored R&D.  
The scale and scope of the evaluation was a major challenge for the evaluators. In addition to spanning the 
two consecutive Framework Programmes (FP5 and FP6), it was necessary to assess almost 600 projects 
funded  across  eight  different  sub‐areas  (i.e.  solar;  wind;  biofuels,  other  renewables  –  including 
geothermal; hydropower and ocean energy; clean fossil fuels and CCS; energy storage and distribution; 
socio‐economic and policy related projects; and hydrogen and fuel cells). As a result, the evaluation team 
had to set up a complex evaluation methodology and thorough quality assurance procedures. 
Convert pdf into ppt online - Library SDK class:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf into ppt online - Library SDK class:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D 
© OECD/IEA 2011 
 
Page | 30
Evaluation indicators 
Evaluation relies on the identification of specific indicators that can be used as a basis to make 
objective judgements about a policy or programme progress/success. An indicator is a measure 
of  a characteristic  or attribute of an intervention, or  of the  context in  which  the intervention 
takes place.  
Indicators can be either quantitative or qualitative. Quantitative indicators are mainly concerned 
with  input‐  and  outcome‐related  data,  rather  than  the  impacts  of  an  intervention.  Indeed, 
quantitative  indicators are based  on  the systematic  collection of data on  all beneficiaries of a 
policy or programme – some of which will come from the monitoring system, which are difficult 
and  costly to collect within the framework of  an evaluation process. Qualitative indicators are 
typically used when the objectives cannot be captured with only quantitative data. Usually, both 
types are combined – depending on the data available and on the results expected – to ensure a 
comprehensive evaluation.   
A  review  of  research‐ and  energy‐related evaluation  and  assessment  reveals  some  commonly 
used quantitative and qualitative indicators (Table 4). This is not an exhaustive list, but rather as a 
sampling of the range of practices across countries and institutions. 
 
 
The team chose to use a mixture of evaluation methods, notably: 
•  In‐depth desk research and challenge analysis, based on programme and project documents; 
•  Analysis of FP5 and FP6 NNE RTD project databases and social network analysis; 
•  On‐line survey to FP5 and FP6 NNE project participants; 
•  Interview  programme  with  key  Commission  staff,  experts,  project  co‐ordinators  and  participants, 
policy makers, and stakeholders; and 
•  Thematic workshops with experts and stakeholders in the NNE area. 
The analysis highlighted a large number of findings and evaluation results, which can largely be grouped 
into four overriding themes: 
•  All areas, even the mature ones, confronted important technological opportunities or challenges that 
required a mix of sometimes very fundamental research and a great deal of learning by doing and 
experimentation.  
•  The volume of key outputs was substantial, at around seven referenced articles per EUR 1 million. It 
should be noted, however, that this level of research “productivity” is not especially strong when 
compared  with  equivalent  metrics  for  selected  national  energy‐research  programmes  (e.g.  the 
Engineering  and  Physical  Sciences  Research  Council  (ESPRC) in  the  United Kingdom  =  28;  VIB  in 
Flanders = 11; the Leading Technology Institutes (LTIs) in the Netherlands = 10).  
•  Collaboration among public and private researchers and engineers was at the core of the added value 
for all projects investigated. New and rejuvenated public‐private partnerships were reported to be 
important FP‐specific outcomes. 
•  Individual participants are realising commercial benefits as a result of the supported projects. The 
most common commercial  outcomes are successful  demonstration of novel technologies and  the 
creation of new products and services. Spin‐offs and licenses are reported by 7% of all projects, which 
is high for a research support programme. 
Source: Technopolis. 
Library SDK class:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag-and-drop your pptx or ppt file into the drop area.
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK class:How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word
How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word. PDF, MS-Excel, MS-PPT to Word Conversion Overview. By integrating XDoc.Word SDK into your C#.NET project, PDF, MS
www.rasteredge.com
© OECD/IEA 2011 
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D
 
 
Page | 31 
Table 4 Examples of indicators used in the evaluation of research‐related programmes 
Stage of RDD&D  
Scope of the 
assessment 
Example of generic indicators used in 
the evaluation of RDD&D programmes 
Type of indicator 
Basic research 
Input 
Increase in annual government R&D 
expenditures 
Context / quantitative 
Quality of research 
Number of citations in high-impact 
journals 
Programme /quantitative 
Relevance of research 
Evidence of correspondence with national 
research agenda/roadmap 
Programme /qualitative 
Productivity of research 
Number of annual publications compared 
to the average number of publications of 
researchers in the same field of research 
during the same year 
Programme / Benchmark / 
quantitative 
Impact of research 
Number of further research projects 
opened as a consequence of an initial 
research project 
Programme / quantitative 
Technology 
development 
Input 
Evidence of technical support received to 
develop the technology to the next step 
Programme / qualitative 
Relevance of the 
technology 
Market share of national enterprises in the 
field compared with other countries 
Context / benchmark / 
quantitative 
Productivity 
Number of patents, licenses, spin-offs 
Programme / quantitative 
Collaboration with 
enterprises 
Number of new collaborative agreements 
concluded by the research organisation 
with enterprises 
Programme / quantitative 
Technology 
deployment 
Economic attractiveness 
Annual amount of venture capital attracted 
in the spin-offs created 
Programme / quantitative 
Use of the technology by 
other enterprises 
Annual income from patenting and 
licensing 
Programme / quantitative 
Use by policy makers 
Evidence of reference to the technology in 
policy-making documents / regulations 
Programme / qualitative 
Impact on enterprises’ 
competitiveness 
% of market share increase in the domain
Programme / quantitative 
Wider impact on 
sustainable development 
Decrease of the carbon footprint of 
households and/or industries 
Context / quantitative 
Source: Technopolis. 
 
In evaluation, indicators are used to measure progress towards predefined objectives; as such, they 
should be developed as an integral part of the programme framework at the time objectives are 
set.  An  important  feature  of  indicators  is  that they  do  not  necessarily  remain  static  during  the 
lifetime of the intervention, but can evolve to remain aligned as needed.  
Ideally, indicators should make it possible to assess the efficiency and effectiveness of a policy or 
programme.  The development  of  such  indicators will  depend  on  data availability;  in  turn,  their 
ability  to  present  an  accurate picture will  require  an  assessment  of  their  sensitivity to  external 
factors.  
Library SDK class:How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF
How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF. MS Office to PDF Conversion Overview. By integrating XDoc.PDF SDK into your C#.NET project, Microsoft Office
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK class:VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
directly encode converted image source into PDF document file converted image source to PDF format, RasterEdge VB other encoding APIs to convert rendered image
www.rasteredge.com
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D 
© OECD/IEA 2011 
 
Page | 32
The main data sources for indicators include: 
 Resource use, as well as inputs and outputs. 
 Surveys of: 
 
Results and impacts at the level of beneficiaries (programme indicators); 
 
Impacts on the wider population (programme and context indicators). 
 Statistical data regarding the impacts on the wider population (context indicators). 
To some extent, there will always be a trade‐off between data availability, policy development 
needs  and  the  timing  of  programming  rounds.  Impact  data  will  only  begin  to  emerge  at  a 
relatively late stage in the programme lifetime; sometimes, indicators regarding the sustainability 
of the programme will not become apparent until after its completion. But the need to decide 
whether to extend a programme means that waiting until the programme is finished for feedback 
and  an  ex post impact assessment  is not  an  option. Such a decision normally has to be taken 
earlier to reserve a budget line for continuation or the programme may be lost in the budgeting 
process.  
In summary, monitoring and evaluation provide a record and generate knowledge for  visibility 
and legitimacy, learning and quality development of public interventions and help to steer policy 
and strategy development. Evaluation of energy RD&D interventions should:  
 Identify what aspects worked well – and what was less effective – in terms of both what was 
done (inputs), what was achieved (outputs) and how achievements are realised (processes). 
 Help plan current and future projects or programmes (by improving the performance of the 
intervention, or identifying new opportunities). 
 Assess whether particular approaches add value and/or provide value for investment. 
 Develop good practice and avoid repeating mistakes. 
 Produce usable recommendations on the basis of evidence. 
 Shape dissemination strategy and feed information into the decision‐making process (IEA 
EGRD, 2010a). 
 
Library SDK class:C# TIFF: Learn to Convert MS Word, Excel, and PPT to TIFF Image
C# TIFF - Conversion from Word, Excel, PPT to TIFF. In order to convert Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint to quiet easy to integrate this SDK into your C#
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK class:VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
to split one PPT (.pptx) document file into smaller sub control add-on can do PPT creating, loading powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
© OECD/IEA 2011 
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D
 
 
Page | 33 
Chapter 4. Trends in RD&D funding, priorities  
and practices  
Trends in funding and priorities 
In 2009, several governments directed their stimulus funds towards clean energy RD&D projects. 
As a  result, public sector  RD&D in 2009  rose to its highest level ever,  eclipsing  those  reached 
during  the  1970s  oil  crisis.  But  in  2010  spending  levels  once  again  dropped  falling  to  levels 
comparable to 2008 (IEA, 2011a). Initial budget data for  2011  indicate  that  in some countries 
spending on clean energy RD&D is again on the rise (Table 5). 
Table 5 Estimate of current global levels of public spending on clean energy RD&D  
Technology area 
Latest public spending global  
(million 2010 USD) 
EE buildings 
840 
EE industry 
790 
Clean coal 
620 
CCS 
1 670 
Electric vehicles and vehicle efficiency 
1 700 
Solid biofuels, biogases and waste 
400 
Liquid biofuels 
920 
Solar PV 
940 
Solar CSP 
240 
Wind 
480 
Geothermal 
140 
Hydro 
170 
Renewables not specified 
994 
Nuclear energy 
5 280 
Total 
15 184 
Note: These figures are estimated based on IEA data complemented by country submissions as part of the Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM) 
process, as well as data collected from Harvard for Major Emerging Economies study.  
Source: IEA data; Kempener et al., 2010. 
 
Spending on nuclear power still accounts for the largest share of global spending on low‐carbon 
energy technologies (roughly 35%). It remains to be seen whether this level of spending will be 
maintained  given  recent  events  at  the  Fukushima  power  plant  in  Japan.  In  general,  RD&D 
spending on nuclear energy has fallen sharply since the mid‐1970s, when it accounted for over 
70%.  The  trend  has  moved  toward  renewable  energy,  cleaner  fossil  fuel,  and  emerging 
technologies such as smart grids and electric vehicles.  
Spending on renewables has risen rapidly over the last decade and now accounts for over 28% of 
total  public  spending  on  clean  energy  RD&D,  although  this  varies  markedly,  depending  on 
region’s priorities and resources. In general, the United States and Europe spend more on RD&D 
for renewables than does the Pacific region or emerging economies (Figure 4).  
 
Library SDK class:VB.NET PowerPoint: Read & Scan Barcode Image from PPT Slide
VB.NET PPT PDF-417 barcode scanning SDK to detect PDF-417 barcode Allow VB.NET developers to output PPT ISSN barcode scanning result into data string.
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK class:C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document
VB.NET Read: PDF Text Extract; VB.NET Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document.
www.rasteredge.com
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D 
© OECD/IEA 2011 
 
Page | 34
The 2009 stimulus  funds for energy RD&D  were,  to  a large extent, attributed to cleaner  fossil 
fuels research. Since then, the trend has reversed. Data show that spending on all fossil fuels and 
renewables is about equal.  
The IEA found that, despite the generous funding announced for CCS RD&D, only half has been 
allocated  to  specific  large‐scale  demonstration  projects  as  some  funds  required  equal 
contribution from industry. Given current  policy uncertainty and the large funds required,  few 
firms  were  willing  to  match  government  funds  for  demonstrating  CCS.  Australia  and  Norway 
spend just over 30% of their clean energy RD&D budgets on CCS; Canada spends 37%.  
Governments  are  also  ramping  up  investment  in  electric  vehicles  (EVs)  and  plug‐in  hybrids 
electric  vehicles  (PHEVs),  announcing  ambitious  targets  for  their  sales  (20  million  by  2020). 
Enhanced RD&D will be fundamental to reaching these targets.  
Spending on research into energy efficiency has been fairly steady since 2000, distributed across 
industry,  residential  and  commercial  buildings.  However,  large  differences  are  evident  across 
countries in per‐capita  spending on clean energy RD&D  (as a  function of  GDP per capita) and 
total CO
emissions (Figure 4). Scandinavian countries have RD&D expenditures on a per‐capita 
basis that are up to ten times higher than those countries such as the United Kingdom or Spain. 
Finland,  Japan  and  Australia  spend  the  highest  proportion  of  GDP  on  low‐carbon  RD&D. 
Switzerland, France  and Finland spend most on low‐carbon RD&D in  terms of total  emissions. 
Data on emerging economies are less comprehensive than data for IEA countries, but it is clear 
that they have some way to go before reaching the low‐carbon RD&D spending of IEA countries. 
Also, as private sector data are not included, the picture may be distorted to some extent.  
Figure 4 Public sector low carbon RD&D spending per capita as a function of GDP per capita and  
CO
2
 emissions 
Brazil 
OECD Europe
South Africa 
Canada 
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
100
1 000
10 000
GDP/capita (thousand 2011 USD)
C02 emissions, logarithmic scale (Mt C02)
Canada
OECD Europe
OECD Pacific
UnitedStates
 
Note: The share of spending on renewable energy is shown in green. 
Source: IEA data, Kempener et al., 2010. 
 
 
 
 
 
© OECD/IEA 2011 
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D
 
 
Page | 35 
Box 12 Quality and availability of data on spending for energy RD&D  
 
The general call to boost spending on energy RD&D is vital, but some argue that it may be too 
narrowly focussed: it may well be that additional investment is also needed in other areas that 
can  ultimately  feed  into  energy.  Innovation  may  occur  through  convergence,  notably  in  the 
“merging  of  distinct  technologies,  processing  disciplines  or  devices  into  a  unified  whole  that 
creates a host of new pathways and opportunities” (MIT, 2011). For instance, mapping scientific 
activity through the number of patents that influence green technologies shows that the fields of 
chemistry  and  material  science  are  at  least  as  important  as  research  on  energy  and  the 
environment. Encouraging the development of more generic and general purpose technologies,
2
 
such as materials technologies, nanotechnologies, life sciences, green chemistry and information 
and communication technologies (ICTs), may be just as important as spending on energy RD&D 
(OECD,  2010).  For  example,  to  boost  renewable  energy  RD&D,  instead  of  targeting  specific 
generating technologies (e.g. wind, ocean, solar), governments could allocate public funding to 
enabling technologies such as energy storage or grid management (Johnstone et al., 2010). 
Diverse trends are evident in how countries apportion spending on clean energy RD&D and how 
that spending has shifted over the last decade (Table 6). While geothermal and nuclear power 
have seen the most reductions in public spending, other renewable sources, notably solar PV, 
have seen increases in funding over the last five years. Stimulus spending in the United States 
benefited all  categories.  CCS  has also  seen  a  significant increase  in  RD&D  funding.  It  is  more 
difficult  to  gauge  the  trend  in  CCS  and  advanced  vehicles,  as  measurements  of  research 
sponsored  by  the  public  sector  began  only  recently.  Note,  however,  that  although  many 
countries  have reduced or maintained levels of spending on nuclear RD&D, it still receives the 
lion’s share of funding. 
 
 
                                                                                
 
2
 As defined by Carlaw et al. (2007), a General Purpose Technology (GPT) is “a major transforming technology that is widely used for 
multiple purposes and that has many spillovers, particularly in enabling the development of new products, new processes and new 
forms of organisation in places well beyond the industry that produces the GPT itself”. 
Information on clean energy RD&D in both the public and private sectors is still inadequate, and urgently 
needs to be improved through better quality, transparency and completeness. The IEA collects the most 
comprehensive data on government funding of RD&D activities in the field of energy across countries. 
However, there are several challenges that arise when collecting high‐quality energy RD&D data, and, as a 
result, the IEA data is inhomogeneous and not fully comparable among countries. 
Private  energy  RD&D  investment  data  are  very  limited  as  spending  is  not  widely  reported.  Where 
information does exist, it is reported at the aggregate level, which does not allow for a breakdown by 
technology area. The IEA (2010) suggests that some 50% of RD&D spending will come from the private 
sector, but there is no clear indication about where the spending will be directed.   
The lack of reliable data on private spending is an important limitation. If government RD&D funding is to 
complement business RD&D funding, governments need to know what types of RD&D business is likely to 
fund.  For  example,  if  new  scientific  and  technical  knowledge  is  increasingly  important  to  industrial 
innovation,  and  business  is  funding  less  fundamental  research,  then  governments  may  find  it  more 
effective to allocate more of their own resources to basic research. Further, in some technology areas (e.g. 
energy efficiency), the private sector is believed to be the largest funder of RD&D, making it very difficult 
for the public sector to evaluate if sufficient funds are being allocated. Private and public RD&D spending 
should be complementary and better co‐ordination is needed to avoid overlap.  
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D 
© OECD/IEA 2011 
 
Page | 36
Table 6 Change in public sector spending levels on low carbon RD&D  
Country 
EE 
buildings 
EE 
industry 
Vehicle 
Efficiency 
CCS 
Solid 
biofuels, 
biogases 
and waste 
Solar 
PV 
Wind 
Geothermal 
Hydro  Nuclear 
Australia 
+++++ 
N/A 
N/A 
+++++ 
+++ 
Austria 
++ 
N/A 
++ 
Canada 
+++++ 
++ 
+++ 
+++++ 
Denmark 
++ 
+++ 
N/A 
++ 
++ 
N/A 
N/A 
-- 
Finland 
++++ 
++ 
+++ 
N/A 
++ 
N/A 
++++ 
N/A 
-- 
France 
++++ 
++ 
+++ 
+++++ 
+++++ 
+++ 
N/A 
Germany 
++ 
N/A 
N/A 
+++ 
++ 
N/A 
Hungary 
+++++ 
+++++ 
N/A 
N/A 
+++++ 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
-- 
Ireland 
++++ 
++ 
N/A 
N/A 
+++++ 
+++++ 
++ 
N/A 
N/A 
Italy 
+++ 
+++++ 
N/A 
+++++ 
++ 
+++++ 
N/A 
N/A 
Japan 
+++++ 
++++ 
N/A 
--- 
N/A 
N/a 
Korea 
++++ 
++ 
++++ 
++ 
-- 
+++ 
++ 
++ 
-- 
Netherlands 
--- 
+++++ 
++ 
N/A 
N/A 
New 
Zealand 
+++ 
N/A 
N/A 
++++ 
N/A 
+++ 
N/A 
N/A 
Norway 
+++ 
N/A 
++ 
+++++ 
+++++ 
+++++ 
N/A 
++ 
Portugal 
N/A 
-- 
N/A 
N/A 
+++++ 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
Spain 
++ 
++ 
N/A 
++ 
N/A 
N/A 
Sweden 
N/A 
++ 
++ 
-- 
Switzerland 
++ 
++ 
++ 
Turkey 
N/A 
-- 
N/A 
+++++ 
++ 
N/A 
N/A 
United 
Kingdom 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
-- 
+++++ 
N/A 
N/A 
++ 
United 
States 
++ 
+++ 
++ 
N/A 
+++++ 
N/A 
++ 
++++ 
+++ 
++ 
Notes: S = Stable; + = increase; ++ = greater than 100% increase; +++ = greater than 200% increase; ++++ greater than 300% increase; +++++ 
greater than 400% increase; ‐ = decrease; ‐‐ = decrease of more than 50%. Table 6 compares the last two 5‐year periods of data that are 
available for each country, and assesses the magnitude of the change in spending from one period of time to the next. Australia, Austria, 
Finland, Germany, Italy, New Zealand, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom 2001 – 2005 and 2006 – 2010. Canada, Denmark, Japan, Korea, 
Norway, Portugal, Spain, United States 2002 – 2006 and 2007 – 2011. France, Hungary, Ireland, Netherlands, Turkey 2000 – 2004 and 2005 – 
2009. 
New trends in government practices 
A variety of restructuring processes that can facilitate investment in energy RD&D, some of which 
have been tested in the  business sector to improve returns from RD&D investments, are now 
being implemented by the public sector. These include: 
 New funding models: Research laboratories rely less on central funding and more on mixed 
models. Several research centres  are  jointly funded by  the public and private  sector,  often 
with a clear focus on specific energy technologies. In France, the Carnot Institutes are part of a 
multidisciplinary  research  network  of  public  sector  research  bodies  pursuing  collaborative 
research  with  private  companies. Their  activities  represent  45%  of  the research funded by 
companies and performed by French public laboratories (IEA EGRD, 2010b).  
© OECD/IEA 2011 
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D
 
 
Page | 37 
 Links to the market and industry: Explicit links between research programmes and market 
needs  have  led  to  public‐private  partnerships  (PPPs)  to  encourage  cost  reductions, 
information  sharing,  technology  transfer  and  institutional  reform.  However,  the  design  of 
these PPPs differs from country to country, ranging from project‐based co‐operations to more 
institutionalised forms, such as innovation agencies. The US Department of Energy (US DOE) 
has  experimented  with  alternative  models  to  develop  new  avenues  for  partnership,  one 
example  being  the  Entrepreneurs‐in‐Readiness  (EIR)  programme,  which  gives  venture 
capitalists, affiliated  with  innovation  sites  access  to publicly  available  technologies,  market 
studies, patents and  inventors. In exchange,  entrepreneurs foresee applications  not readily 
apparent in inventions, and bring a disciplined approach to test their assumptions of market 
applicability (De Vore, 2011).  
 New staff structures: Traditional academic disciplines are being replaced by problem‐ or 
product‐oriented  structures.  A  favoured  mechanism  is  a nationwide  network of specialised 
research units. The US DOE energy  innovation hubs represent an example of topic‐specific, 
ambitious concentrations of multidisciplinary talent. The hubs emulate collaborations of the 
previous Bell Labs and the Manhattan Project (IEA EGRD, 2010b).  
 Open, transparent, participatory and collaborative: Beside the recent trend towards a broader 
involvement  of  diverse  stakeholders,  several  open  source  models  eschew  centralised 
resources  in  favour  of  widespread  collaboration  achieved  through  the  simple  distributive 
capabilities offered by the Internet, and work well in low‐cost information technology sectors.  
 Leveraging intellectual property through licensing or by spinning off separate companies to 
commercialise technology: Revenues from licensing or the appreciation of stock in spin‐offs 
can  provide  a  financial  return  to  technology  that  might  be  available  but  otherwise  goes 
unused.  Concentrix  Solar,  a spin‐off  company that  is  also  a  shareholder  of  the  Fraunhofer 
Institute  in  Germany,  was  granted  an  exclusive  license  to  the  Institute’s  technology. 
Fraunhofer helped Concentrix Solar by building pilot production plants and then leasing the 
facilities to the new company (IEA EGRD, 2010). 
Additional evidence is needed, however, of the effectiveness of these approaches in encouraging 
innovation in the energy sector.  
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D 
© OECD/IEA 2011 
 
Page | 38
Conclusion  
The  transition  to  a  low‐carbon  economy  clearly  requires  accelerating  energy  innovation  and 
technology adoption. RD&D will have a key role in bringing down capital costs as technologies 
move  down  the  learning  curve,  thereby  contributing  to  the  inception  and  realisation  of 
innovative  low‐carbon  technologies.  However,  RD&D  will  not  play this  role  fully unless  public 
policies  give  effective  signals  to  market  players.  Governments  need  to  intervene  with  well‐
targeted energy technology policies on both the supply and demand sides.  
Identifying  a  clear  strategic  framework  in  which  innovation  can  thrive,  and  within  which 
effectiveness and efficiency of individual policies can be assessed is key. This paper attempts to 
provide  recommendations  for  the  development  of  a  clear  policy  framework  for  energy 
technology RD&D.   
Particular focus  is provided  to the  energy RD&D strategy and  priorities  in various  countries. A 
preliminary  conclusion  is  that  while  countries  have  been  favouring  certain  technologies  over 
others, based on decisions on which areas are to receive funding (Table 6), clear priorities are not 
always determined through structured analysis and documented processes. A review of stated 
energy RD&D priorities, based on announced technology programmes and strategies, and recent 
spending  trends  reveals  some  important  deviations  from  stated  priorities  and  actual  RD&D 
funding (Table 1). 
As the AEI project advances, performance assessment of IEA member countries and other major 
economies should be made against the other five criteria for a good practice framework set out 
in this paper. In addition, the interventions required for technology deployment and the linkages 
with RD&D will be further addressed to improve the analysis. 
 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested