xviii / SYNOPTIC TABLE OF CONTENTS
The End of Science
Enlightenment and unity (281). J. S. Bell (282), quantum
connectedness (282), the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen thought ex-
periment (283), superluminal communication (288), the prin-
ciple of local causes (288), Bell's theorem (290), the Freedman-
Clauser experiment (291), the Aspect experiment (294),
contrafactual defmiteness (299), super-determinism (300), the
Many Worlds Theory (again) (301), summary (302), the philos-
ophy of quantum mechanics (304), David Bohm (305), unbro-
ken wholeness (306), implicate order (307), the "new" thought
instrument (308), eastern psychologies (309), the metaphor of
physics (310), Kali (311), the Path without Form (313), the
circle dance (314).
How to add pdf to powerpoint presentation - C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
convert pdf to ppt online without email; convert pdf to powerpoint
How to add pdf to powerpoint presentation - VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
how to convert pdf to powerpoint; convert pdf file to powerpoint presentation
Cast of Characters
THOMAS YOUNG
1803 (double-slit experiment)
ALBERT MICHELSON, EDWARD MORLEY
1887 (Michelson-Morley experiment)
GEORGE FRANCIS FITZGERALD
1892 (FitzGerald contractions)
HENDRIK ANTOON LORENTZ
1893 (Lorentz transformations}
ELECTRON
1897 (discovered)
MAX PLANCK
1900 (quantum hypothesis)
ALBERT EINSTEIN
1905 (photon theory)
1905 (special theory of relativity)
HERMANN MINKOWSKI
1908 (space-time)
NUCLEUS
1911 (discovered)
NIELS BOHR
1913 (specific-orbits model of the atom)
ALBERT EINSTEIN
1915 (general theory of relativity)
LOUIS DE BROGLIE
1924 (matter waves)
NIELS BOHR, H. A. KRAMERS, JOHN SLATER
1924 (first concept of probability waves)
WOLFGANG PAULI
1925 (exclusion principle)
xix
VB.NET PowerPoint: Use PowerPoint SDK to Create, Load and Save PPT
an empty PowerPoint file with our reliable .NET PPT document add-on; a fully customized blank PowerPoint file by using the smart PowerPoint presentation control
pdf to powerpoint converter; images from pdf to powerpoint
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
index = 1 End If correctOrder.Add(index) Next clip art or screenshot to PowerPoint document slide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
convert pdf file to powerpoint; convert pdf to editable ppt online
xx / CAST OF CHARACTERS
WERNER HEISENBERG
1925 (matrix mechanics)
ERWIN SCHRODINGER
7926 (Schrodinger wave equation)
1926 (equates matrix mechanics with wave mechanics)
1926 (visits Bohr in Copenhagen to attack the idea of quantum
jumps—and gets the flu)
MAX BORN
1926 (probability interpretation of wave function)
NIELS BOHR
1927 (complementarity)
CLINTON DAVISSON, LESTER GERMER
1927 (Davisson-Germer experiment)
WERNER HEISENBERG
1927 (uncertainty principle)
COPENHAGEN INTERPRETATION OF QUANTUM
MECHANICS
1927
PAUL DIRAC
1928 (anti-matter)
NEUTRON
1932 (discovered)
POSITRON
1932 (discovered)
JOHN VON NEUMANN
1932 (quantum logic)
ALBERT EINSTEIN, BORIS PODOLSKY, NATHAN ROSEN
1935 (EPR paper)
HIDEKI YUKAWA
1935 (predicts meson)
MESON
1947 (discovered)
RICHARD FEYNMAN
1949 (Feynman diagrams)
SIXTEEN NEW PARTICLES
1947-1954 (discovered)
MANY WORLDS INTERPRETATION OF
QUANTUM MECHANICS
1957
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Codes to Create Linear and 2D Barcodes on
Here is a market-leading PowerPoint barcode add-on within VB.NET class, which means it as well as 2d barcodes QR Code, Data Matrix, PDF-417, etc.
pdf to powerpoint conversion; adding pdf to powerpoint slide
VB.NET PowerPoint: Merge and Split PowerPoint Document(s) with PPT
For Each doc As [String] In dirs docList.Add(doc) Next code in VB.NET to finish PowerPoint document splitting If you want to see more PDF processing functions
convert pdf into ppt online; how to convert pdf to powerpoint slides
CAST OF CHARACTERS / xxi
DAVID FINKELSTEIN
1958 (one-way membrane hypothesis)
QUASARS
7,962 (discovered)
QUARKS
1964 (hypothesized)
J. S. BELL
1964 (Bell's theorem)
DAVID BOHM
1970 (implicate order)
HENRY STAPP
1971 (nonlocal connections re. Bell's theorem)
STUART FREEDMAN, JOHN CLAUSER
1972 (Freedman-Clauser experiment)
TWELVE NEW PARTICLES
1974-1977 (discovered)
ALAIN ASPECT
1982 (Aspect experiment)
VB.NET PowerPoint: Add Image to PowerPoint Document Slide/Page
of "AddPage", "InsertPage" and "DeletePage" to add, insert or delete any certain PowerPoint slide without & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
picture from pdf to powerpoint; convert pdf to editable ppt
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
text content from source PDF document file for word processing, presentation and desktop How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references
how to convert pdf file to powerpoint presentation; chart from pdf to powerpoint
Foreword
When Gary Zukav announced his plans for this book, creating
the outline with Al Huang and me watching at a dinner table
at Esalen, 1976, I did not realize the magnitude of the job he
took on with such joy. Watching the book grow has been
instructive and rewarding, because Zukav has insisted on going
through the whole evolution of the quantum relativistic phys-
ics of today, treating it as it is, an unfolding story. As a result
this book is not only readable, but it also puts the reader in
touch with all the various ways that physicists have worked
out for talking about what is so hard to talk about. In short,
Gary Zukav has written a very good book for laymen.
Zukav's attitude to physics is rather close to mine, so I
must be a layman too, and it is more stimulating to talk phys-
ics with him than with most professionals. He knows that
physics is—among other things—an attempt to harmonize with
a much greater entity than ourselves, requiring us to seek,
formulate and eradicate first one and then another of our most
cherished prejudices and oldest habits of thought, in a never-
ending quest for the unattainable.
Zukav has graciously offered me this place to add my own
emphases to his narrative. Since it has been three years since
we met, I must sift my memory for a while.
Migrating whales come to mind first. I remember us standing
on the Esalen cliffs and watching them cavort as they headed
south. Next comes to mind beautiful Monarch butterflies,
dotting the fields from the first day, and covering one magic
tree as thick as leaves in a grand finale. Between the whales
and the butterflies it was difficult for us to feel self-important
and very easy for us to play.
The very difficulty of communicating with the physicists at
Esalen helped me to realize how differently most physicists
think about quantum mechanics than I do. Not that my way is
xxiii
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
In order to run the sample codes, the following steps would be necessary. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PowerPoint.dll.
how to convert pdf into powerpoint on; conversion of pdf to ppt online
VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
In order to run the sample codes, the following steps would be necessary. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PowerPoint.dll.
how to convert pdf slides to powerpoint; convert pdf slides to powerpoint online
xxv / FOREWORD
new, it is one of two ways already pointed out in John Von
Neumann's 1932 book, The Mathematical Foundation of Quan-
tum mechanics
1 Quantum mechanics deals with propositions defined by
processes of preparation and observation involving subject and
object and obeying a new logic, not with objective properties
of the object alone
2 Quantum mechanics deals with objective properties of
the object alone, obeying the old logic, but they jump in a
random way when an observation is made
Most working physicists seem to see one of these ways (the
second) and not the other Perhaps personality can determine
the direction of science I think there are ' thing minds and
"people ' minds Good parents, psychologists and writers have
to be 'people ' people, while mechanics, engineers and physi-
cists tend to be thing" people Physics has become too scary
for such physicists because it is already so thingless New
evolutions, as profound as those of Einstein and Heisenberg,
are waiting for a new generation of more daring and inte-
grated thinkers
While most physicists take for granted the quantum tools of
their dailv work, there is a vanguard already testing roads to
the next physics, and a rearguard still conscientiously holding
the road back to the old Bell's theorem is mainly important
to the latter, and its prominence in the book does not mean it
uncovers problems in present-day quantum physics Rather
Bell's theorem drives toward a view that most physicists al-
ready assume that quantum mechanics is something new and
different
Here it helps to distinguish between a complete theory,
predicting everything, what Newtonians look for (it does not
seem that Newton was a strict Newtonian, since he wanted
God to reset the world clock now and then) and a maximal
theory, predicting as much as possible, what quantum physi-
cists look for In spite of their controversy, Einstein and Bohr
both agreed, in their different ways that quantum mechanics
is incomplete, and even that it is not vet maximal What they
really debated was whether or not an incomplete theory can
be maximal Throughout their famous controversy Einstein
argued, Alas, our theory is too poor for experience, ' and
Bohr replied, "No, no' Experience is too rich for our theory'
just as some existential philosophers despair at the indetermi
FOREWORD / xxv
nacy of life and the existence of choices, and others feel elan
vital
One of the features of quantum mechanics that leads to such
controversy is its concern with the nonexistent, the potential
There is some of this in all language, or words could only be
used once, but quantum mechanics is more involved with
probabilities than classical mechanics Some people feel this
discredits quantum theory, makes it less than maximal theory
So it is important to mention in defense of quantum theory
that in spite of indeterminacy, quantum mechanics can be
entirely expressed in yes-or-no terms about individual experi-
ments, just like classical mechanics, and that probabilities can
be derived as a law of large numbeis and need not be
postulated I prefer to state the difference between classical
and quantum theories not as presented in textbooks, but thus
Once sufficient data is given, classical mechanics gives >es-or-no
answers for all further questions while quantum mechanics
simply leaves unanswered some questions in the theory, to be
answered by experience I wish here also to note the regrettable
tendency, in myself also, to feel that quantum mechanics must
thereby deny physcial existence to those answers that are
foi .id in experience only, not in the theory, such as the mo-
mentum of a localized electron So involved are we in our
symbol systems
After a week of talking, the conference was still working on
the elements of quantum logic, and never did get far into the
new quantum time concepts we wanted to try out, but it
made it easier to move on to the next set of problems, which
occupy me today Quantum mechanics is characterized by its
unanswered questions Some logicians, Martin Davis for one,
have suggested these may be related to the undecidable
propositions dominating logic since Godel I used to know
better Nowadays I think they may be right, the common
element being reflexivity and the impossibility for finite systems
of total self-knowledge The proper study of mankind is endless,
it seems I hope these ideas work out and Gary Zukav writes a
book about them He does it well
DAVID FINKELSTEIN
New
July 1978
Introduction
My first exposure to quantum physics occurred a few years
ago when a friend invited me to an afternoon conference at
the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in Berkeley, California. At
that time, I had no connections with the scientific communi-
ty, so I went to see what physicists were like. To my great
surprise, I discovered that (1), I understood everything that
they said, and (2), their discussion sounded very much like a
theological discussion. I scarcely could believe what I had
discovered. Physics was not the sterile, boring discipline that
I had assumed it to be. It was a rich, profound venture which
had become inseparable from philosophy. Incredibly, no one
but physicists seemed to be aware of this remarkable devel-
opment. As my interest in and knowledge of physics grew,
I resolved to share this discovery with others. This book is a
gift of my discovery. It is one of a series.
Generally speaking, people can be grouped into two cate-
gories of intellectual preference. The first group prefers
explorations which require a precision of logical processes.
These are the people who become interested in the natural
sciences and mathematics. They do not become scientists be-
cause of their education, they choose a scientific education
because it gratifies their scientific mental set. The second
group prefers explorations which involve the intellect in a less
logically rigorous manner. These are the people who become
interested in the liberal arts. They do not have a liberal arts
mentality because of their education, they choose a liberal arts
education because it gratifies their liberal arts mental set.
Since both groups are intelligent, it is not difficult for
members of one group to understand what members of the
other group are studying. However, I have discovered a no-
table communication problem between the two groups. Many
times my physicist friends have attempted to explain a con-
xxvii
xxvin / INTRODUCTION
cept to me and, in their exasperation, have tried one explanation
after another, each one of which sounded (to me) abstract,
difficult to grasp, and generally abstruse When I could com-
prehend, at last, what they were trying to communicate, inev-
itably I was surprised to discover that the idea itself was actu-
ally quite simple Conversely, I often have tried to explain a
concept in terms which seemed (to me) laudably lucid, but
which, to my exasperation, seemed hopelessly vague, ambigu-
ous, and lacking in precision to my physicist friends I hope
that this book will be a useful translation which will help those
people who do not have a scientific mental set (like me) to un-
derstand the extraordinary process which is occurring in theo-
retical physics Like any translation, it is not as good as the
ongmal work and, of course, it is subject to the shortcomings
of the translator For better or worse, my first qualification as
a translator is that, like you, I am not a physicist
To compensate for my lack of education in physics (and for
my liberal arts mentality) I asked, and received, the assistance
of an extraordinary group of physicists (They are listed in the
acknowledgments) Four of them in particular, read the entire
manuscript As each chapter was completed, I sent a copy of
it to each physicist and asked him to correct any conceptual or
factual errors which he found (Several other physicists read
selected chapters)
My original intention was to use these comments to correct
the text However, I soon
ered that my physicist friends
had given more attention to the manuscript than I had dared
to hope Not only were their comments thoughtful and pene-
trating, but, taken together, they formed a significant volume
of information by themselves The more I studied them, the
more strongly I felt that I should share these comments with
you Therefore, in addtion to correcting the manuscript with
them, I also included in the footnotes those comments which
do not dupicate the corrected text In particular, I footnoted
those comments which would have slowed the flow of the text
or made it technical, and those comments which disagreed
with the text and also disagreed with the comments of the
other physicists By publishing dissenting opinions in the foot-
notes, I have been able to include numerous ideas which
would have lengthened and complicated the book if they had
been presented in the text From the beginning of The Danc-
ing Wu Li Masters to the end, no term is used which is not
explained immediately before or after its first use This rule is
INTRODUCTION / xxix
not followed in the footnotes This gives, the footnotes an
unmitigated freedom of expression However, it also means
that the footnotes contain terms that are not explained hefore,
during, or after their use The text respects your status as
newcomer to a vast and exciting realm The footnotes do not
However, if you read the footnotes as vou read the book,
you will have the rare opportunity to see what four of the
finest physicists in the world have to say about it as they in
effect, read it along with you Their footnotes punctuate, illus-
trate, annotate, and jab at everything in the text Better than
it can be described, these footnotes reveal the aggressive
precision with which men of science seek to remove the
flaws from the work of a fellow scientist, even if he is an
untrained colleague, like me, and the work is nontechnical,
like this book
The ' new physics, ' as it is used in this book, means quantum
mechanics which began with Max Planck s theory of quanta
in 1900, and relativity, which began with Albert Einstein's
special theory of relativity in 1905 The old physics is the
physics of Isaac Newton, which he discovered about three
hundred years ago 'Classical physics means any physics that
attempts to explain reality in such a manner that for every
element of physical reality there is a corresponding element
in the theory Therefore, 'classical physics includes the phys-
ics of Isaac Newton and relativity, both of which are structured
in this one-to-one manner It does not, however, include
quantum mechanics, which, as we shall see, is one of the
things that makes quantum mechanics unique
Be gentle with yourself as you read This book contains
many rich and multifaceted stories, all of which are heady
(pun
?
) stuff You cannot learn them all at once any more than
you can learn the stories told in War and Peace Crime and
Punishment, and Les Miserables all at once I suggest that you
read this book for your pleasure, and not to learn what is in it
There is a complete index at the back of the book and a good
table of contents in the front Between the two of them, you
can return to any subject that catches your interest More-
over by enjoying yourself, you probably will remember more
than if you had set about to learn it all
One last note, this is not a book about physics and eastern
philosophies Although the poetic framework of Wu Li is con-
ducive to such comparisons this book is about quantum phys-
ics and relativity In the future I hope to write another book
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested