HttpClient Tutorial
Oleg Kalnichevski
Jonathan Moore
Jilles van Gurp
Pdf to powerpoint converter - software Library dll:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf to powerpoint converter - software Library dll:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
ii
Preface ................................................................................................................................... iv
1. HttpClient scope ......................................................................................................... iv
2. What HttpClient is NOT ............................................................................................. iv
1. Fundamentals ....................................................................................................................... 1
1.1. Request execution ..................................................................................................... 1
1.1.1. HTTP request ................................................................................................. 1
1.1.2. HTTP response ............................................................................................... 2
1.1.3. Working with message headers ........................................................................ 2
1.1.4. HTTP entity ................................................................................................... 3
1.1.5. Ensuring release of low level resources ............................................................ 5
1.1.6. Consuming entity content ................................................................................ 6
1.1.7. Producing entity content .................................................................................. 6
1.1.8. Response handlers .......................................................................................... 7
1.2. HttpClient interface ................................................................................................... 8
1.2.1. HttpClient thread safety .................................................................................. 8
1.2.2. HttpClient resource deallocation ...................................................................... 9
1.3. HTTP execution context ............................................................................................ 9
1.4. HTTP protocol interceptors ...................................................................................... 10
1.5. Exception handling .................................................................................................. 11
1.5.1. HTTP transport safety ................................................................................... 11
1.5.2. Idempotent methods ...................................................................................... 12
1.5.3. Automatic exception recovery ........................................................................ 12
1.5.4. Request retry handler .................................................................................... 12
1.6. Aborting requests .................................................................................................... 13
1.7. Redirect handling .................................................................................................... 13
2. Connection management ..................................................................................................... 15
2.1. Connection persistence ............................................................................................. 15
2.2. HTTP connection routing ......................................................................................... 15
2.2.1. Route computation ........................................................................................ 15
2.2.2. Secure HTTP connections ............................................................................. 15
2.3. HTTP connection managers ..................................................................................... 16
2.3.1. Managed connections and connection managers .............................................. 16
2.3.2. Simple connection manager ........................................................................... 16
2.3.3. Pooling connection manager .......................................................................... 17
2.3.4. Connection manager shutdown ...................................................................... 17
2.4. Multithreaded request execution ............................................................................... 17
2.5. Connection eviction policy ....................................................................................... 19
2.6. Connection keep alive strategy ................................................................................. 20
2.7. Connection socket factories ...................................................................................... 20
2.7.1. Secure socket layering ................................................................................... 21
2.7.2. Integration with connection manager .............................................................. 21
2.7.3. SSL/TLS customization ................................................................................. 21
2.7.4. Hostname verification ................................................................................... 21
2.8. HttpClient proxy configuration ................................................................................. 22
3. HTTP state management ..................................................................................................... 24
3.1. HTTP cookies ......................................................................................................... 24
3.2. Cookie specifications ............................................................................................... 24
3.3. Choosing cookie policy ............................................................................................ 25
3.4. Custom cookie policy .............................................................................................. 26
software Library dll:C#: How to Use SDK to Convert Document and Image Using XDoc.
You may use our converter SDK to easily convert PDF, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Tiff, and Dicom files to raster images like Jpeg, Png, Bmp and Gif.
www.rasteredge.com
software Library dll:C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document
Microsoft PowerPoint to PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.Converter ›› C# Converter: PowerPoint to PDF. You maybe interested: PDF in C#,
www.rasteredge.com
HttpClient Tutorial
iii
3.5. Cookie persistence ................................................................................................... 26
3.6. HTTP state management and execution context ......................................................... 26
4. HTTP authentication .......................................................................................................... 28
4.1. User credentials ....................................................................................................... 28
4.2. Authentication schemes ............................................................................................ 28
4.3. Credentials provider ................................................................................................. 29
4.4. HTTP authentication and execution context ............................................................... 30
4.5. Caching of authentication data ................................................................................. 31
4.6. Preemptive authentication ........................................................................................ 31
4.7. NTLM Authentication .............................................................................................. 32
4.7.1. NTLM connection persistence ....................................................................... 32
4.8. 
SPNEGO
/Kerberos Authentication ............................................................................... 33
4.8.1. 
SPNEGO
support in HttpClient ......................................................................... 33
4.8.2. GSS/Java Kerberos Setup .............................................................................. 33
4.8.3. 
login.conf
file ............................................................................................ 34
4.8.4. 
krb5.conf
krb5.ini
file ............................................................................. 34
4.8.5. Windows Specific configuration .................................................................... 34
5. Fluent API ......................................................................................................................... 36
5.1. Easy to use facade API ............................................................................................ 36
5.1.1. Response handling ........................................................................................ 37
6. HTTP Caching ................................................................................................................... 38
6.1. General Concepts .................................................................................................... 38
6.2. RFC-2616 Compliance ............................................................................................. 39
6.3. Example Usage ....................................................................................................... 39
6.4. Configuration .......................................................................................................... 39
6.5. Storage Backends .................................................................................................... 40
7. Advanced topics ................................................................................................................. 41
7.1. Custom client connections ........................................................................................ 41
7.2. Stateful HTTP connections ....................................................................................... 41
7.2.1. User token handler ........................................................................................ 42
7.2.2. Persistent stateful connections ........................................................................ 42
7.3. Using the FutureRequestExecutionService ................................................................. 43
7.3.1. Creating the FutureRequestExecutionService .................................................. 43
7.3.2. Scheduling requests ....................................................................................... 43
7.3.3. Canceling tasks ............................................................................................. 44
7.3.4. Callbacks ...................................................................................................... 44
7.3.5. Metrics ......................................................................................................... 44
software Library dll:XDoc.Converter for .NET, Support Documents and Images Conversion
file converter SDK supports various commonly used document and image file formats, including Microsoft Office (2003 and 2007) Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, Tiff
www.rasteredge.com
software Library dll:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Online Powerpoint to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue
www.rasteredge.com
iv
Preface
The Hyper-Text Transfer Protocol (HTTP) is perhaps the most significant protocol used on the Internet
today. Web services, network-enabled appliances and the growth of network computing continue to
expand the role of the HTTP protocol beyond user-driven web browsers, while increasing the number
of applications that require HTTP support.
Although the java.net package provides basic functionality for accessing resources via HTTP, it doesn't
provide the full flexibility or functionality needed by many applications. HttpClient seeks to fill this
void by providing an efficient, up-to-date, and feature-rich package implementing the client side of
the most recent HTTP standards and recommendations.
Designed for extension while providing robust support for the base HTTP protocol, HttpClient may
be of interest to anyone building HTTP-aware client applications such as web browsers, web service
clients, or systems that leverage or extend the HTTP protocol for distributed communication.
1. HttpClient scope
• Client-side HTTP transport library based on HttpCore [http://hc.apache.org/httpcomponents-core/
index.html]
• Based on classic (blocking) I/O
• Content agnostic
2. What HttpClient is NOT
• HttpClient is NOT a browser. It is a client side HTTP transport library. HttpClient's purpose is
to transmit and receive HTTP messages. HttpClient will not attempt to process content, execute
javascript embedded in HTML pages, try to guess content type, if not explicitly set, or reformat
request / rewrite location URIs, or other functionality unrelated to the HTTP transport.
software Library dll:RasterEdge XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET - SDK for PowerPoint Document
Able to view and edit PowerPoint rapidly. Convert. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Convert PowerPoint to HTML5. Convert PowerPoint to Tiff. Convert PowerPoint to Jpeg
www.rasteredge.com
software Library dll:C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit
View PDF in WPF; C#.NET: View Word in WPF; C#.NET: View Excel in WPF; C#.NET: View PowerPoint in WPF; C#.NET: View Tiff in WPF. XDoc.Converter for C#; XDoc.PDF
www.rasteredge.com
1
Chapter 1. Fundamentals
1.1. Request execution
The most essential function of HttpClient is to execute HTTP methods. Execution of an HTTP method
involves one or several HTTP request / HTTP response exchanges, usually handled internally by
HttpClient. The user is expected to provide a request object to execute and HttpClient is expected to
transmit the request to the target server return a corresponding response object, or throw an exception
if execution was unsuccessful.
Quite naturally, the main entry point of the HttpClient API is the HttpClient interface that defines the
contract described above.
Here is an example of request execution process in its simplest form:
CloseableHttpClient httpclient = HttpClients.createDefault();
HttpGet httpget = new HttpGet("http://localhost/");
CloseableHttpResponse response = httpclient.execute(httpget);
try {
<...>
} finally {
response.close();
}
1.1.1. HTTP request
All HTTP requests have a request line consisting a method name, a request URI and an HTTP protocol
version.
HttpClient supports out of the box all HTTP methods defined in the HTTP/1.1 specification: 
GET
,
HEAD
POST
PUT
DELETE
TRACE
and 
OPTIONS
. There is a specific class for each method type.: 
HttpGet
,
HttpHead
HttpPost
HttpPut
HttpDelete
HttpTrace
, and 
HttpOptions
.
The Request-URI is a Uniform Resource Identifier that identifies the resource upon which to apply
the request. HTTP request URIs consist of a protocol scheme, host name, optional port, resource path,
optional query, and optional fragment.
HttpGet httpget = new HttpGet(
"http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=httpclient&btnG=Google+Search&aq=f&oq=");
HttpClient provides 
URIBuilder
utility class to simplify creation and modification of request URIs.
URI uri = new URIBuilder()
.setScheme("http")
.setHost("www.google.com")
.setPath("/search")
.setParameter("q", "httpclient")
.setParameter("btnG", "Google Search")
.setParameter("aq", "f")
.setParameter("oq", "")
.build();
HttpGet httpget = new HttpGet(uri);
software Library dll:C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET
RasterEdge Visual C# .NET PowerPoint to PDF converter library control (XDoc.PowerPoint) is a mature and effective PowerPoint document converting utility.
www.rasteredge.com
software Library dll:VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
editing if they integrate this VB.NET PDF converter control with for converting MicroSoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint document to PDF file in VB
www.rasteredge.com
Fundamentals
2
System.out.println(httpget.getURI());
stdout >
http://www.google.com/search?q=httpclient&btnG=Google+Search&aq=f&oq=
1.1.2. HTTP response
HTTP response is a message sent by the server back to the client after having received and interpreted
a request message. The first line of that message consists of the protocol version followed by a numeric
status code and its associated textual phrase.
HttpResponse response = new BasicHttpResponse(HttpVersion.HTTP_1_1, 
HttpStatus.SC_OK, "OK");
System.out.println(response.getProtocolVersion());
System.out.println(response.getStatusLine().getStatusCode());
System.out.println(response.getStatusLine().getReasonPhrase());
System.out.println(response.getStatusLine().toString());
stdout >
HTTP/1.1
200
OK
HTTP/1.1 200 OK
1.1.3. Working with message headers
An HTTP message can contain a number of headers describing properties of the message such as
the content length, content type and so on. HttpClient provides methods to retrieve, add, remove and
enumerate headers.
HttpResponse response = new BasicHttpResponse(HttpVersion.HTTP_1_1, 
HttpStatus.SC_OK, "OK");
response.addHeader("Set-Cookie", 
"c1=a; path=/; domain=localhost");
response.addHeader("Set-Cookie", 
"c2=b; path=\"/\", c3=c; domain=\"localhost\"");
Header h1 = response.getFirstHeader("Set-Cookie");
System.out.println(h1);
Header h2 = response.getLastHeader("Set-Cookie");
System.out.println(h2);
Header[] hs = response.getHeaders("Set-Cookie");
System.out.println(hs.length);
stdout >
Set-Cookie: c1=a; path=/; domain=localhost
Set-Cookie: c2=b; path="/", c3=c; domain="localhost"
2
The most efficient way to obtain all headers of a given type is by using the 
HeaderIterator
interface.
Fundamentals
3
HttpResponse response = new BasicHttpResponse(HttpVersion.HTTP_1_1, 
HttpStatus.SC_OK, "OK");
response.addHeader("Set-Cookie", 
"c1=a; path=/; domain=localhost");
response.addHeader("Set-Cookie", 
"c2=b; path=\"/\", c3=c; domain=\"localhost\"");
HeaderIterator it = response.headerIterator("Set-Cookie");
while (it.hasNext()) {
System.out.println(it.next());
}
stdout >
Set-Cookie: c1=a; path=/; domain=localhost
Set-Cookie: c2=b; path="/", c3=c; domain="localhost"
It also provides convenience methods to parse HTTP messages into individual header elements.
HttpResponse response = new BasicHttpResponse(HttpVersion.HTTP_1_1, 
HttpStatus.SC_OK, "OK");
response.addHeader("Set-Cookie", 
"c1=a; path=/; domain=localhost");
response.addHeader("Set-Cookie", 
"c2=b; path=\"/\", c3=c; domain=\"localhost\"");
HeaderElementIterator it = new BasicHeaderElementIterator(
response.headerIterator("Set-Cookie"));
while (it.hasNext()) {
HeaderElement elem = it.nextElement(); 
System.out.println(elem.getName() + " = " + elem.getValue());
NameValuePair[] params = elem.getParameters();
for (int i = 0; i < params.length; i++) {
System.out.println(" " + params[i]);
}
}
stdout >
c1 = a
path=/
domain=localhost
c2 = b
path=/
c3 = c
domain=localhost
1.1.4. HTTP entity
HTTP messages can carry a content entity associated with the request or response. Entities can be found
in some requests and in some responses, as they are optional. Requests that use entities are referred
to as entity enclosing requests. The HTTP specification defines two entity enclosing request methods:
POST
and 
PUT
. Responses are usually expected to enclose a content entity. There are exceptions to this
rule such as responses to 
HEAD
method and 
204 No Content
304 Not Modified
205 Reset Content
responses.
HttpClient distinguishes three kinds of entities, depending on where their content originates:
Fundamentals
4
• streamed:   The content is received from a stream, or generated on the fly. In particular, this
category includes entities being received from HTTP responses. Streamed entities are generally not
repeatable.
• self-contained:   The content is in memory or obtained by means that are independent from a
connection or other entity. Self-contained entities are generally repeatable. This type of entities will
be mostly used for entity enclosing HTTP requests.
• wrapping:  The content is obtained from another entity.
This distinction is important for connection management when streaming out content from an HTTP
response. For request entities that are created by an application and only sent using HttpClient, the
difference between streamed and self-contained is of little importance. In that case, it is suggested to
consider non-repeatable entities as streamed, and those that are repeatable as self-contained.
1.1.4.1. Repeatable entities
An entity can be repeatable, meaning its content can be read more than once. This is only possible with
self contained entities (like 
ByteArrayEntity
or 
StringEntity
)
1.1.4.2. Using HTTP entities
Since an entity can represent both binary and character content, it has support for character encodings
(to support the latter, ie. character content).
The entity is created when executing a request with enclosed content or when the request was successful
and the response body is used to send the result back to the client.
To read the content from the entity, one can either retrieve the input stream via the
HttpEntity#getContent()
method, which returns an 
java.io.InputStream
, or one can supply an
output stream to the 
HttpEntity#writeTo(OutputStream)
method, which will return once all content
has been written to the given stream.
When  the  entity  has  been  received  with  an  incoming  message,  the  methods
HttpEntity#getContentType()
and 
HttpEntity#getContentLength()
methods can be used for
reading the common metadata such as 
Content-Type
and 
Content-Length
headers (if they are
available). Since the 
Content-Type
header can contain a character encoding for text mime-types
like text/plain or text/html, the 
HttpEntity#getContentEncoding()
method is used to read this
information. If the headers aren't available, a length of -1 will be returned, and NULL for the content
type. If the 
Content-Type
header is available, a 
Header
object will be returned.
When creating an entity for a outgoing message, this meta data has to be supplied by the creator of
the entity.
StringEntity myEntity = new StringEntity("important message", 
ContentType.create("text/plain", "UTF-8"));
System.out.println(myEntity.getContentType());
System.out.println(myEntity.getContentLength());
System.out.println(EntityUtils.toString(myEntity));
System.out.println(EntityUtils.toByteArray(myEntity).length);
stdout >
Fundamentals
5
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8
17
important message
17
1.1.5. Ensuring release of low level resources
In order to ensure proper release of system resources one must close either the content stream associated
with the entity or the response itself
CloseableHttpClient httpclient = HttpClients.createDefault();
HttpGet httpget = new HttpGet("http://localhost/");
CloseableHttpResponse response = httpclient.execute(httpget);
try {
HttpEntity entity = response.getEntity();
if (entity != null) {
InputStream instream = entity.getContent();
try {
// do something useful
} finally {
instream.close();
}
}
} finally {
response.close();
}
The difference between closing the content stream and closing the response is that the former will
attempt to keep the underlying connection alive by consuming the entity content while the latter
immediately shuts down and discards the connection.
Please note that the 
HttpEntity#writeTo(OutputStream)
method is also required to ensure proper
release of system resources once the entity has been fully written out. If this method obtains an instance
of 
java.io.InputStream
by calling 
HttpEntity#getContent()
, it is also expected to close the stream
in a finally clause.
When working with streaming entities, one can use the 
EntityUtils#consume(HttpEntity)
method
to ensure that the entity content has been fully consumed and the underlying stream has been closed.
There can be situations, however, when only a small portion of the entire response content needs to be
retrieved and the performance penalty for consuming the remaining content and making the connection
reusable is too high, in which case one can terminate the content stream by closing the response.
CloseableHttpClient httpclient = HttpClients.createDefault();
HttpGet httpget = new HttpGet("http://localhost/");
CloseableHttpResponse response = httpclient.execute(httpget);
try {
HttpEntity entity = response.getEntity();
if (entity != null) {
InputStream instream = entity.getContent();
int byteOne = instream.read();
int byteTwo = instream.read();
// Do not need the rest
}
} finally {
response.close();
}
Fundamentals
6
The connection will not be reused, but all level resources held by it will be correctly deallocated.
1.1.6. Consuming entity content
The recommended way to consume the content of an entity is by using its 
HttpEntity#getContent()
or 
HttpEntity#writeTo(OutputStream)
methods. HttpClient also comes with the 
EntityUtils
class,
which exposes several static methods to more easily read the content or information from an entity.
Instead of reading the 
java.io.InputStream
directly, one can retrieve the whole content body in a
string / byte array by using the methods from this class. However, the use of 
EntityUtils
is strongly
discouraged unless the response entities originate from a trusted HTTP server and are known to be
of limited length.
CloseableHttpClient httpclient = HttpClients.createDefault();
HttpGet httpget = new HttpGet("http://localhost/");
CloseableHttpResponse response = httpclient.execute(httpget);
try {
HttpEntity entity = response.getEntity();
if (entity != null) {
long len = entity.getContentLength();
if (len != -1 && len < 2048) {
System.out.println(EntityUtils.toString(entity));
} else {
// Stream content out
}
}
} finally {
response.close();
}
In some situations it may be necessary to be able to read entity content more than once. In this case
entity content must be buffered in some way, either in memory or on disk. The simplest way to
accomplish that is by wrapping the original entity with the 
BufferedHttpEntity
class. This will cause
the content of the original entity to be read into a in-memory buffer. In all other ways the entity wrapper
will be have the original one.
CloseableHttpResponse response = <...>
HttpEntity entity = response.getEntity();
if (entity != null) {
entity = new BufferedHttpEntity(entity);
}
1.1.7. Producing entity content
HttpClient provides several classes that can be used to efficiently stream out content throught HTTP
connections. Instances of those classes can be associated with entity enclosing requests such as
POST
and 
PUT
in order to enclose entity content into outgoing HTTP requests. HttpClient provides
several classes for most common data containers such as string, byte array, input stream, and file:
StringEntity
ByteArrayEntity
InputStreamEntity
, and 
FileEntity
.
File file = new File("somefile.txt");
FileEntity entity = new FileEntity(file, 
ContentType.create("text/plain", "UTF-8"));        
HttpPost httppost = new HttpPost("http://localhost/action.do");
httppost.setEntity(entity);
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested