© OECD/IEA 2011 
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D
 
 
Page | 39 
Case Studies 
Countries  are  diverse.  They  have different social and  political situations,  different  overall and 
energy economies, and, in particular, different indigenous energy resources. It follows that their 
RD&D requirements and capacity to address them will be equally diverse, and must be tailored to 
national perspectives that reflect each country’s energy circumstances, and its ability to fund and 
pursue related projects and implement the results of RD&D. 
Experiences  cannot  be  transferred  seamlessly  across  countries,  sectors  or  technologies  since 
aspects are often unique and subject to national circumstances. However, certain lessons may be 
transferred  to  other  national  contexts,  such  as  successful  and  unsuccessful  responses  to 
particular circumstances. A country seeking to improve the effectiveness of RD&D policies and 
programmes  can  learn  valuable  lessons  via  the  examination  of  country  studies  on  what  has 
worked and what has not. This can save time, and costly experimenting. 
The following  case studies illustrate  how elements of the good practice framework for energy 
RD&D policy have been applied in various countries. As many of these case studies are recent, 
the  evaluations  are  preliminary,  and  founded  on  the  views  of  industry  and  policy  makers 
interviewed as part of the AEI project. Case studies were selected based on initial country visits 
and as the project evolves, additional case studies will be added to provide broader geographical 
coverage and a better understanding of the  topic.  Table 7 matches the case studies  reviewed 
with the different features of the good practice framework.  
Table 7 Matching case studies with Good Practice Framework categories 
Good Practices 
Framework 
FOKUS 
(Sweden) 
DEMO 
2000 
(Norway) 
WBSO (The 
Netherlands) 
Proalcool 
(Brazil) 
SGEM 
(Finland) 
NEDO 
(Japan) 
Linkages 
from 
DOE’s 
R&D (US) 
US-
China 
CERC 
IEA 
Implementing 
Agreements 
Energy RD&D 
strategy and 
priorities 
 
 
Public RD&D 
funding and 
policy support 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Energy RD&D 
governance 
 
 
 
 
Collaborative 
approach, 
engaging 
industry 
 
 
 
 
 
 
RD&D 
monitoring and 
evaluation 
 
 
 
 
International 
collaboration 
 
 
Case study 1: FOKUS ‐ Strategic planning effort informed by 
monitoring and evaluation (Sweden) 
FOKUS is  the strategic planning process  used  by the  Swedish Energy Agency  (SEA). Created  in 
2006, it formulates the vision, sets priorities, and identifies the short and medium‐term goals of 
the programme for energy RD&D, innovation and commercialisation. To achieve those goals, it 
targets  a  wide  range  of  measures  ranging  from  basic  research  and  support  for  large  scale 
demonstration plants to product development. 
Add pdf to powerpoint - software control dll:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Add pdf to powerpoint - software control dll:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D 
© OECD/IEA 2011 
 
Page | 40
The  process  covers  six  themes.  For  each  of  these  themes,  a  “Development  Platform”  is 
established to guide  the programme through  the  involvement  of  stakeholders (predominantly 
industry). The strategies and priorities resulting from using FOKUS are then translated into yearly 
implementation plans for the SEA. Activities and results are reported yearly to the government. 
Funding is allocated largely through  planning groups and studies, with the help of stakeholder 
representatives or other advisory bodies. Regular peer reviews are undertaken to ensure quality 
and  relevance.  Besides  top‐down  planning,  FOKUS  identifies  bottom‐up  opportunities  for 
researchers and entrepreneurs. It supports innovation and product development projects, which 
are evaluated on the basis of business plans, commercial prospects, and relevance in the fields of 
technology and energy.  
The Platform representatives possess the following characteristics: 
 Good overview of the area 
 Strong interest in RD&D 
 Entrepreneurial competence 
 Knowledge of the energy‐related innovation system 
 Knowledge of the market, including legislation, costs, policies and measures 
 Extensive network  
 Close contact with executives in their respective organisations 
The table below presents the total spending (i.e. allocations by the SEA) within the energy RD&D 
programme, to which the FOKUS planning applies. The rows in the table marked as “Large scale 
demonstration”, represent special once‐off allocations based on FOKUS analyses. The remaining 
rows include spending on all activities funded within the EU framework of state aid. The current 
annual  budget  is  about  USD  140  million.  However,  the  Swedish  government  granted  an 
exceptional allocation to large scale demonstration projects, raising the budget for 2011 to about 
USD 189 million. 
Thematic Area 
2004 
2005 
2006 
2007 
2008 
2009 
2010 
Total 
08-10 
The Building as an 
Energy System 
10.4  8% 
4.6 
8% 
9.0 
8%  13.1  11%  14.4  11%  14.3  7% 
9.2 
7% 
37.9 
9% 
The Transport 
System  
23.0 
19% 
16.3 
27% 
31.2 
28% 
33.1 
29% 
42.6 
32% 
89.4 
47% 
94.6 
47% 
226.7 
52% 
…of which for "Large 
scale demonstration" 
39.5 
42.3 
Fuelbased 
Energy Systems 
41.4 
33% 
13.4 
23% 
25.6 
23% 
22.8 
20% 
29.0 
22% 
35.7 
19% 
31.1 
19% 
95.8 
22% 
Energy Intensive 
Industry 
17.4  14%  10.1  17%  19.0  17%  16.7  15%  11.5  9%  11.5  6%  17.2  6% 
40.2 
9% 
…of which for "Large 
scale demonstration" 
1.5 
7.7 
The Power System 
15.2  12%  5.5 
9%  14.7  13%  14.3  13%  17.9  13%  24.5  13%  36.5  13%  78.9  18% 
…of which for "Large 
scale demonstration" 
11.9 
6.3 
Energy Systems 
Studies; etc 
16.7  13%  9.8  16%  12.6  11%  13.9  12%  17.4  13%  16.6  9%  17.9  9% 
52.5  12% 
Total Energy Agency 
Funding 
124.1
100% 
59.8 
100% 
112.2
100%
113.9
100%
133.4
100%
192.0
100% 
206.5 
100% 
439.4 
100%
software control dll:C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
software control dll:VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Add Image to PDF Page in VB.NET. Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document Using XDoc.PDF SDK for VB.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
© OECD/IEA 2011 
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D
 
 
Page | 41 
Overall, FOKUS leverages the same amount of financing from industry and other stakeholders as 
does SEA. However, leverage differs according to area (e.g. energy intensive industry receives a 
larger share of industry funding than do energy systems), type of activity (e.g. basic research is 
usually  100%  agency  funding,  while  activities  closer  to  the  market  receive  more  industry 
financing). Thus, public funding of projects may range from 0% to 100%. 
The share of public and private financing for FOKUS over a three year period are as follows: 
Finance 
2007 
2008 
2009 
MUSD 
MUSD 
MUSD 
Energy Agency 
113.9 
47 
133.4 
51 
192 
42 
Industry 
130.2 
53 
127.4 
49 
265.4 
58 
Total 
244.1 
100 
260.8 
100 
457.4 
100 
 
FOKUS also monitors and evaluates ongoing RD&D efforts. The indicators used may be divided in 
two classes: those for building knowledge and competence, and those for commercialisation and 
other potential uses of the results. 
Indicators for the building of knowledge and 
competence 
Indicators used for commercialisation and other 
utilisation of results 
Doctoral of Licentiate Degrees (number) 
Patents and licenses (number) 
Number of senior researchers in the energy field (number) 
Venture capital invested (MUSD) 
Scientific publications in peer reviewed journals (number) 
The potential user of the results supports the project 
already in the R&D stage (% or MUSD) 
Other communication of results; conference contributions, 
report, etc (number) 
The potential of the results is actively involved in the 
project already in the R&D stage (yes/no) 
Results and competence from funded RD&D used for new 
policies and measures, political decisions, etc (yes/no) 
Type of user of the results (SME/large company/public 
sector) 
Collaboration with stakeholders through co-financing, co-
operative research, etc (yes/no) 
New companies and/or new employment opportunities 
created (number) 
New PhD’s or Licentiates from the funded work employed 
in the energy business or in relevant government agencies 
(number) 
New/better products/services introduced on the market, 
nationally or internationally (yes/no) 
Participation in international networks (yes/no) 
New methods or solutions are used or ready for use 
(yes/no) 
Cross-disciplinary approach (yes/no) 
Activities contribute to regional growth (yes/no) 
New results are used in education (yes/no) 
 
The 2008 evaluation of patents revealed the following:  
Thematic area 
Patents granted 
2007 
Applications 
submitted 2007 
Patents granted 
2008 
Applications 
submitted 2008 
Building  
12 
Transport  
13 
11 
Fuelbased  
Industry  
software control dll:VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
www.rasteredge.com
software control dll:C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
www.rasteredge.com
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D 
© OECD/IEA 2011 
 
Page | 42
Power system 
13 
Systems; other* 
Total   
21 
41 
20 
52 
* includes international collaborative projects, etc. 
 
FOKUS led to the establishment of a Business Development Unit (BDU) in 2006, charged with the 
specific task  of promoting innovation and marketing the companies’ ideas in  the field of clean 
energy technology. Firms included in the BDU (currently 40 companies) receive support from the 
SEA, primarily in the form of loans, expertise and networks, until they are ready to expand. 
 
Lesson learned: Thanks to the FOKUS programme, the prioritisation process has been sharpened, 
the  hierarchy  of  visions  and  goals  has  become  more  constructive,  and  the  efforts  on 
commercialisation  have  improved.  At  the  same  time,  further  improvements  particularly  with 
regard  to  co‐operation  with  other  national  and  international  actors  could  be  sought.  ‐> 
STRUCTURED  ANALYSIS  PROCESS  TO  DEFINE  COHERENT  PRIORITIES  AND  OPTIMISE 
INVESTMENT  
FOKUS is closely tied to and informed by monitoring and evaluation. Evaluation is an integral part 
of the  design  of the  programme. Evaluation outcomes have fed back into the  programme, an 
example of this is the creation of a Business Development Unit (BDU) to fill university start up 
gap. Evaluation results serve as input for the SEA on future portfolio decisions. ‐> RESULTS FROM 
EVALUATION FEED BACK INTO PORTFOLIO DECISIONS 
Stakeholder involvement is organised through the development platforms that provide guidance 
to the programme. In addition FOKUS leverages the same amount of financing from industry and 
other stakeholders as does the SEA. ‐> STRONG COLLABORATIVE APPROACH 
Case study 2: DEMO 2000: demonstrating oil & gas technologies 
(Norway) 
Created  by  the Norwegian  Ministry  of  Petroleum and Energy  (MPE)  in 1999,  the  DEMO  2000 
programme helps demonstrate and pilot specific projects to increase the value of exploration and 
development  of  hydrocarbon  resources  on  the  Norwegian  Continental  Shelf  (NCS),  and  to 
develop Norwegian products and services for the global offshore market. 
Specific projects funded under DEMO 2000 are defined in the “Oil and Gas in the 21st Century” 
strategy (OG21), a unified national technology strategy for Norway’s oil and gas industry, which 
includes exploration, improved hydrocarbon recovery and cost‐effective operations in the Arctic 
and deep water environments. 
Parameters 
2009 
2010 
Company turnover 
5,1 MUSD 
9,0 MUSD 
Part of turnover related to foreign markets  
- - 
2,9 MUSD 
Number of Employees  
109 
195 
Private Venture Capital    
6,4 MUSD 
28,4 MUSD 
Number of new products on market   
15 
65 
Number of IPRs  
24 
software control dll:C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Sticky Note to PDF Page in C#.NET. Able to add notes to PDF using C# source code in Visual Studio .NET framework.
www.rasteredge.com
software control dll:C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit
allowed to load and view PowerPoint without Microsoft Office software installed, create PDF file, Tiff image and HTML file from PowerPoint, add annotations to
www.rasteredge.com
© OECD/IEA 2011 
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D
 
 
Page | 43 
The  programme  is  organised  in  a  large  number  of  collaborative  projects,  bringing  together 
suppliers,  Norwegian  and  international  oil  companies  and  –  to  a  lesser  extent  –  Norwegian 
research institutions. Participants contribute funds in a co‐financing arrangement with the MPE. 
Of the six calls for applications between 1999 and 2005, 111 projects were awarded contracts. 
Distribution of funding was as follows: 
Round 
Number of project 
Distribution of funding in MNOK (%) 
applications 
awards 
DEMO 2000 
Contractors 
Oil companies 
Sum 
211 
32 
76.53 
22.62% 
98.10 
28.99% 
163.78 
48.40% 
338.42 
158 
23 
68.03 
27.13% 
63.48 
25.32% 
119.23 
47.55% 
250.74 
56 
20 
47.60 
24.19% 
73.13 
37.17% 
76.00 
38.63% 
196.73 
11 
11.43 
12.02% 
9.72 
10.22% 
73.96 
77.77% 
95.11 
50 
16 
43.40 
26.59% 
47.98 
29.39% 
71.88 
44.03% 
163.25 
42 
15 
29.73 
24.02% 
29.69 
23.99% 
64.34 
51.99% 
123.75 
SUM 
528 
111 
276.72 
23.69% 
322.09 
27.58% 
569.19 
48.73%  1168.00 
Source: Hansen et al. (2005) 
 
The table above shows that DEMO 2000 attracts supplementary funding from oil companies and 
contractors through joint funding of projects. The programme’s share of 23.69% of funding (EUR 
34 million)  has  triggered  76.31% (EUR 110 million)  of funds,  thanks to contributions from  the 
contractors  themselves  (EUR  40  million,  27,58%)  and  oil  company  sponsors  (EUR  70  million, 
48.73 %). 
Since 2000, more than 215 pilot and demonstration projects have been carried out at a total cost 
of  approximately  around  EUR  300  million  (NOK  2.6  billion),  of  which  20%  was  government‐
funded. The budget for 2010 is around EUR 11 million (NOK 100 million) (IEA Norway IDR, 2011). 
DEMO 2000 was evaluated in 2005 (Hansen et al., 2005). The report came out with a favourable 
analysis  of  the  programme  activities,  concluding  that  without  its  support  and  funding,  the 
majority of  the deliverables from  the projects would  at best have become available at  a later 
stage and at a smaller scale, or would not have materialised at all. Potential financial gains of the 
DEMO 2000 programme were assessed along two axes: 
 The value of the resulting products and services in terms of increased revenue for the 
Norwegian supplier industry world wide; and 
 The value of the technology, products and services developed in terms of reduced cost and 
increased production/recovery for the NCS as seen from an oil company point of view. 
To quantify the value of the projects resulting from the DEMO 2000 the following indicators were 
assessed through a survey: 
Service companies
Oil companies 
Improved productivity
Increasing hydrocarbon production 
Increased revenue in Norway and internationally
Increasing ultimate recovery 
Increased market share in Norway and internationally 
Reducing costs in exploration 
Growth potential in Norway and internationally 
Reducing costs in development 
Reducing costs in production 
Reducing costs in abandonment 
 
software control dll:C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PowerPoint
load and view PowerPoint without Microsoft Office software installed, convert PowerPoint to PDF file, Tiff image and HTML file, as well as add annotations in
www.rasteredge.com
software control dll:RasterEdge XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET - SDK for PowerPoint Document
Convert. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Extract, copy and paste PowerPoint Pages. Annotation & Thumbnail. Add and burn annotation to PowerPoint.
www.rasteredge.com
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D 
© OECD/IEA 2011 
 
Page | 44
From 1999 to mid‐2005, the value of DEMO 2000 projects on the Norwegian Continental Shelf 
(NCS) is estimated to be approximately EUR 370 to 560 million. Based on information from the 
companies  supporting  the  projects  in  the  DEMO  2000  portfolio,  an  indicator  for  the  total 
expected  future  value  from these  products  and  services  –  calculated  by  adding  the  potential 
value as reported for the individual projects – is estimated to be between EUR 9.2 to 16.7 billion 
for the NCS. 
Lessons  learned:  The  DEMO  2000  programme  shows  the  importance  of  end‐user  support  in 
setting priorities for new technologies. ‐> STRONG COLLABORATIVE APPROACH  
The programme also shows the need for filling in gaps in the innovation chain, and strengthening 
the  weakest  links.  DEMO  2000  attracts  supplementary  funding  from  oil  companies  and 
contractors  through  joint  funding  of  projects.  ‐>  PROVIDE  ADEQUATE  FUNDING  TO 
DEMONSTRATING NEW TECHNOLOGIES  
Case study 3: WBSO Research and Development (Promotion) Act 
(The Netherlands) 
The WBSO was implemented in 1994 to encourage private R&D investment in the Netherlands 
and is regarded as the single most important R&D policy instrument in the country. The WBSO is 
a fairly traditional tax credit scheme, which reduces a company’s tax on wages by calculating the 
number of R&D hours worked and the hourly wages of R&D staff. 
The WBSO offers different incentives depending on the type of taxpayer. For companies that pay 
taxes on staff wages, the WBSO reduces contributions. In 2010, there was a reduction of 50% of 
the first EUR 220,000 of the total R&D wage bill and 18% of the remaining R&D wages capped at 
EUR 14 million per year. The self‐employed receive a EUR 12,031 deduction if they have spent at 
least 500 hours on R&D tasks per year.  
In particular, WBSO offers bonuses for start‐up companies, which can be regarded as a success 
story for R&D spending when one considers that R&D wage deduction for start‐up companies can 
be as high as 64% for the first EUR 220,000 of the total per‐year R&D wage bill.  
Since 1994, the WBSO budget has increased annually for a total of EUR 870 million in 2011. The 
portion of the total WBSO budget which falls under Energy R&D has remained steadily since 2003 
at about 8%. 
The 2001‐2005 Evaluation of the Dutch WBSO R&D Tax Scheme concluded that every Euro of tax 
relief from  the WBSO  resulted  in an average EUR 1.72 increase  in R&D  investment (see table 
below). The WBSO had the highest additionality impact on small firms; the additional investment 
becomes lower as firm size increases. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
© OECD/IEA 2011 
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D
 
 
Page | 45 
Characteristic 
2000 
2003 
2004 
2005 
Share of energy projects in the WBSO 
6,2% 
9,1% 
9,0% 
8,6% 
Volume of energy research in the WBSO  
[EUR mln] 
163,7 
247,9 
251,8 
247,6 
of which privately funded 
147,0 
221,1 
223,1 
220,8 
of which publicly funded 
16,7 
26,8 
28,7 
26,7 
Privately funded research subdivided into 
main categories 
Energy saving [EUR mln] 
94,1 
117,3 
119,8 
118,6 
Fossil fuels 
14,4 
55,0 
53,4 
53,4 
Renewable energy 
18,2 
22,5 
24,0 
25,6 
Energy generation 
20,3 
26,4 
25,9 
23,2 
Total 
147,0 
221,1 
223,1 
220,8 
Source: Agency NL. 
 
Part of WBSO’s success may be attributed to its relatively low administrative burden. The WBSO 
was externally determined to be less than EUR 0.05 per EUR 1 WBSO credit. 
Lesson  learned:  The  WBSO  shows  that,  when  implementing  a  tax  credit  programme,  it  is 
essential  to  ensure  that  the  administrative  burden  of  the  programme  will  not  outweigh  its 
benefit.  If  the  administrative  burden  is  deemed  too  high  by  firms,  when  compared  with  the 
potential  benefit,  they  will  not  take  advantage  of  the  credit  and  the  programme  will  not  be 
successful. ‐> PAYING ATTENTION AT THE GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE  
One of the most innovative aspects of WBSO regards the bonus for start‐up companies, which 
have been playing an important role as a source of innovation that is subsequently adopted and 
adapted by larger firms. ‐> SUPPORTING R&D IN SMEs AND START‐UP COMPANIES 
Case study 4: Brazil’s National Alcohol Programme (Proalcool) 
The  Proalcool programme was established  as  a response to  the 1973  oil  crisis,  which further 
distorted  the internal balance  of  payments  and  stimulated even  higher inflation in  Brazil.  The 
programme had three explicit objectives, notably: improving commercial balance by reducing the 
demand of  imported fuel;  improving agricultural production; and expanding the production  of 
domestic capital goods, through rising demand for agricultural and distillation equipment. 
Proalcool was based on the allocation of a large quantity of governmental subsidies distributed to 
the ethanol producers, consumers and to the car manufacture industry. The programme boosted 
ethanol use in the country through a variety of methods. 
On the production side, the main incentives were agriculture and industrial financing, production 
acquisition guaranteed, and fixed subsidised prices. Measures included: 
 A yearly production quota for both sugar and ethanol produced by farmers and millers, and 
establishing export controls. 
 Production goals for ethanol (3.5 billion litres by 1980, and 10.7 billion litres by 1985); 
 Fixed  prices  aimed  at  a  parity between ethanol  and  sugar,  despite  more  attractive 
international prices for sugar than for ethanol (competition subsidy). 
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D 
© OECD/IEA 2011 
 
Page | 46
 Low interest loans to ethanol distilleries through the Bank of Brazil, and favourable credit 
conditions for mills to increase their production capacity. 
On the demand side, measures adopted by the government included: 
 Mandatory blends for ethanol in gasoline (progressively increased to 25%). 
 Subsidised and regulated prices for ethanol. A price cap guaranteed that ethanol prices would 
not  be  higher  than  65%  of  gasoline  prices  at  the  pump,  increasing  attractiveness  for 
consumers. 
 Providing priority for ethanol vehicles to governmental fleets (public procurement). 
 Subsidising ethanol vehicles (e.g., reducing taxes on new cars and on annual registration fees 
for ethanol vehicles; providing  longer‐term  financing for the purchase of ethanol‐dedicated 
cars; and requiring car manufacturers to sell cars run on ethanol for the same price as those 
run on gasoline, despite the higher production costs). 
 Making the sale of ethanol at gas stations compulsory; determining the opening of filling 
stations during the weekends (as they used to be closed for gasoline). 
These measures were supplemented by other tactics, including: 
 Public R&D support. R&D was necessary to initially adapt the internal combustion engine to 
ethanol,  and  launch  vehicles  that  would  run  solely  on  ethanol.  Work  carried  out  at  the 
Technical  Centre  of  Aeronautics  (CTA),  an  agency  from  the  Ministry  of  Defence,  was 
instrumental  in  helping  to  develop  the  ethanol‐based  auto  engines.  Similarly,  the 
government’s pushing of the industry led  to the technological breakthrough of  flexible fuel 
vehicles  (FFVs).  FFV  engine  is  based  on  the  ethanol  engine,  but  with  the  necessary 
introduction of the electronic  injection,  which  required several modifications  of the  engine 
(Kaltner  et  al.,  2005).  Investments  in  sugarcane  agronomic  research  were  also  pivotal  for 
lowering  production  costs,  and  allowing  ethanol producers  to  survive  without  government 
subsidies. The bulk of this agricultural research has been done by the public sector. 
 Private R&D investment. In the state of São Paulo, innovation expanded more dynamically 
than  in  the rest  of  the  country,  and was marked  by  the supremacy  of  private  over  public 
sector research. The key players in the São Paulo innovation system focus their research in 
agriculture,  to  develop  new  sugarcane  varieties.  One  important  example  is  Copersucar 
Sugarcane  Technology  Center  (CTC),  which  has  been  a  leader  in  the  introduction  of 
innovations  in  the  sugar‐ethanol  agroindustry,  and  was  responsible  for  notable  gains  in 
ethanol production efficiency over the last decades. Copersucar was initially established as a 
private regional co‐operative of large sugar and ethanol producers, created with the aim of 
introducing  incremental  innovations  that  improved  the  efficiency  of  sugar  extraction  from 
cane and fermentation from cane syrup.  
 Partnerships with local automobile producers, notably Ford, General Motors, Volkswagen and 
Fiat,  to  develop  engines  fuelled  exclusively  with  ethanol.  A  specific  line  of  credit  was 
implemented to subsidise the car industry to produce ethanol‐dedicated cars (Zapata et al., 
2008). Following a  government‐sponsored protocol, all  major automobile manufacturers  in 
Brazil  were  required  to  phase‐in  ethanol‐only  vehicles  and  phase‐out  gasoline  cars.  The 
protocol was very ambitious, aiming at the production of 250,000 ethanol‐dedicated vehicles 
by 1980; 300,000 by 1981 and 350,000 by 1982. By 1985, 85%‐90% of Brazil's new cars were 
alcohol  powered.  Two  million  of  the  total  of  ten  million  cars  were  fuelled  completely  by 
ethanol. 
 Investment in the fuel distribution infrastructure. The state owned Petrobras company built 
most of the fuel distribution infrastructure for ethanol (as it enjoyed a monopoly which lasted 
© OECD/IEA 2011 
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D
 
 
Page | 47 
until 1997), through the availability of its transport logistics and distribution and gas station 
networks. 
 Comprehensive consumer information campaigns to advertise the incentives and increase 
credibility of the technology. 
The combination of government subsidies, high international oil prices and the local production 
of ethanol‐dedicated vehicles, with good public acceptance, constituted the perfect environment 
for the expansion of ethanol and growth of the Brazilian biofuels industry. 
Since  the  late  1990s,  however,  Brazil’s  sugarcane  ethanol  industry  has  operated  without 
government  subsidies,  and  without  price,  supply,  or  demand  controls.  Government  is  only 
present  in  the  rate  regulation  of  ethanol  blending  in  gasoline  (presently  around  25%). 
Government also gives an incentive to ethanol and FFV cars by charging a lower rate of Tax on 
Manufactured Goods (IPI) than that for gasoline‐run cars.  
A  past  study  attempted  to estimate  investment in Proalcool over  a 20‐year period  and  found 
overall subsidies to be approximately USD 30 billion (Goldenberg, 2007). In addition, the Brazilian 
Federal Audit Council (Tribunal de Contas da União) found that until 1989, 56% of investment in 
Proalcool had been in the form of public loans, with the remaining 44% from private resources. 
The reduction  in cane ethanol production  costs, averaging  about 3.5%  per  year from  1976 to 
1994 (De Carvalho, 1996) and then averaging 1.9% per year from 1980 to 2005, represents one of 
the key benefits of the programme, since it has made cane ethanol roughly competitive with oil, 
especially  since  2005.  Other  indicators  can also  be  used  to  measure  the results  of  Proalcool, 
including: 
Expansion in sugar and ethanol production
 
From 1975 to 1983, Brazilian production of ethanol increased to 
7.95 billion liters; the production installed capacity went from 
904 million to 11.1 billion liters per harvest.
 
Increase in ethanol productivity
 
In 1980, 4,200 liters of ethanol were produced per cane hectare; in 
2003, 6,350 liters of ethanol were produced per cane hectare (i.e, a 
51.2% productivity increase in the period) (Moraes et al., 2006).
 
Reduction in car pollution levels
 
About 20%, according to Bajay et al. (1996).
 
Oil savings
 
Different studies come to estimates varying in range, but the main 
result is the same: net savings. Goldenberg (2007), for instance, 
estimates that more than USD 50 billion in petroleum imports were 
saved over 20 years of Proalcool.
 
 
Lessons learned:  State  intervention  through  policies and  the  allocation  of  a large  quantity  of 
governmental  subsidies,  distributed  to  the  ethanol  producers,  consumers  and  to  the  car 
manufacture  industry  were  directly  responsible  for  the  success  of  the  Brazilian  ethanol 
programme. In particular, the government had a very important role in supporting the market in 
its enfant phase and during its crisis in the 1990s; (ii) investing in infrastructure; (iii) investing in 
R&D to reduce costs and increase efficiency; and, finally, (iv) gradually reducing support and state 
intervention. ‐> BOTH TECHNOLOGY‐PUSH AND MARKET‐PULL POLICIES ARE IMPORTANT 
Proalcool has gone from a highly innovative period, marked by high government intervention, to 
a more conservative attitude towards subsidies. However, deregulation in the sugar and ethanol 
sector was gradually implemented, so that agents could adjust accordingly. It holds lessons for 
other  efforts aiming  to promote new technologies  that  subsidies  may  be needed  for  decades 
rather  than  just  a  few  years.  The  decline  of  state  intervention  in  the  sector  took  place 
progressively, and in a transparent way, and motivated private actors to respond, for instances, 
increasing expenditures and participation in R&D to increase productivity, and technological and 
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D 
© OECD/IEA 2011 
 
Page | 48
managerial  efficiency  at  the  mills.  ‐>  POLICY  SUPPORT  MECHANISMS  SHOULD  BE 
TRANSITIONAL, BUT SUBSIDIES MAY BE NEEDED FOR A LONG PERIOD OF TIME 
Case study 5: Smart Grids and Energy Markets (SGEM) 
programme within CLEEN, Ltd. – Cluster for Energy and 
Environment (Finland) 
Established in 2008, CLEEN is a limited liability company with EUR 2.5 million in equity, funded to 
create co‐operative “clusters,” or networks, around key strategic clean energy and environmental 
technologies. Its main goal is to speed‐up and stimulate innovation through a detailed research 
agenda  that  facilitates  long‐term  co‐operation  among  industry,  SMEs  and  the  academic 
community.  
Industry  and  academia  carry  out a  50/50 share  in  research.  Industry  receives  35%  to  50%  of 
public funding and research institutes up to 90% (generally 70% from public sponsors and 20% 
from the government budgets of research institutes); the remainder is covered by industry. 
At the time of writing, CLEEN had launched the following on‐going programmes in Finland: Smart 
Grids  and  Energy  Markets  (SGEM);  Measurement,  Monitoring  and  Environmental  Assessment 
(MMEA);  Future  Combustion  Engine  Power  Plant  (FCEP);  and  Carbon  Capture  and  Storage 
Programme (CCSP). 
SGEM  is  one  of  the  most  successful  CLEEN  programmes.  Launched  in  September  2009,  the 
targeted duration is five years, with a market launch possible after three. The goal of SGEM is to 
develop  international  smart  grid  solutions  that  can  be  demonstrated  in  a  real  environment 
utilising  Finnish  RD&D  infrastructure.  Technological  development  phases  span  from  basic 
research advances to demonstrations. 
The goal of SGEM is to increase energy efficiency and integrate distributed energy resources into 
the  grid.  The  programme  aims  to  strengthen  Finland’s  position  as  a  global  energy  and 
environment  cluster,  and  facilitate  new  possibilities  for  exports.  An  important  aspect  is  the 
integration of Finnish ICT know‐how into the energy sector. 
The main components of the SGEM research are: 
 smart grid drivers and scenarios, market integration and new business models; 
 future infrastructure of power systems; 
 active resources of the smart grid;  
 customer interface for the smart grid; and 
 intelligent management and operation of smart grids. 
The SGEM Consortium consists of six energy companies, six technology suppliers, seven ICT and 
telecom  companies,  and  eight  research  institutes.  The  variety  of  partners  provides  a  good 
combination of core competences for the development of innovative smart grid solutions.  
Original funding for the SGEM 5‐year programme was EUR 36 million, and the actual spending for 
the first 18 months (September 2009 – February 2011) was EUR 10.3 million, with the following 
breakdown of total spending: 
 Energy Companies EUR 1.3 million (12%) 
 Power technology suppliers EUR 1.9 million (18%) 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested