PROSTEP AG 
Dolivostrasse 11 
64293 Darmstadt 
Germany 
Phone  +49 6151 9287-0 
Fax 
+49 6151 9287-326 
info@prostep.com 
White Paper 
3
3
D
D
F
F
o
o
r
r
m
m
a
a
t
t
s
s
i
i
n
n
t
t
h
h
e
e
F
F
i
i
e
e
l
l
d
d
o
o
f
f
E
E
n
n
g
g
i
i
n
n
e
e
e
e
r
r
i
i
n
n
g
g
a
a
C
C
o
o
m
m
p
p
a
a
r
r
i
i
s
s
o
o
n
n
When the source system is not available, too costly to propagate 
widely, or full model fidelity is not required, neutral 3D formats are 
essential  when  exchanging  and  distributing  3D  models  in  the 
engineering and other domains. The choice of a format has many 
implications, including which options are available for using the data 
and what follow-up costs will result. Which neutral 3D format is the 
right one for a company is determined by a multitude of criteria.  
This White Paper provides the reader with an overview and serves 
as an orientation guide for identifying which 3D format is the more 
appropriate for a given use case. 
www.prostep.com 
Convert pdf slides to powerpoint online - control software system:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf slides to powerpoint online - control software system:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
White Paper: 3D Formats in the Field of Engineering - a Comparison 
Published by 
PROSTEP AG 
Dolivostrasse 11 
64293 Darmstadt 
Germany 
Phone  +49 6151 9287-0 
Fax 
+49 6151 9287-326 
info@prostep.com 
www.prostep.com 
Editor 
Dr. Arnulf Fröhlich 
Do you have any comments or questions? We look forward to your feedback 
infocenter@prostep.com
© 2011 PROSTEP AG. All rights reserved. 
All trademarks or registered trademarks used herein are the property of their respective 
holders. 
©
PROSTEP AG 
www.prostep.com 
Page 2  
control software system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Read, Edit and Process PPTX File
split PowerPoint file, change the order of PPTX sildes and extract one or more slides from PowerPoint How to convert PowerPoint to PDF, render PowerPoint to
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
slide processing library provides users with access to operate PowerPoint slides/pages in the simplest procedures, for instance, using online clear C# methods
www.rasteredge.com
White Paper: 3D Formats in the Field of Engineering - a Comparison 
Chapter: Contents 
Contents 
Summary.................................................................................................................................4
Introduction............................................................................................................................5
Development and technical attributes.................................................................................7
STEP...................................................................................................................................................7
3D XML................................................................................................................................................7
JT.........................................................................................................................................................7
3D PDF................................................................................................................................................8
Use cases................................................................................................................................9
Viewing engineering data....................................................................................................................9
Data exchange....................................................................................................................................9
Digital mock-up (DMU)......................................................................................................................10
Documentation and archiving............................................................................................................10
Portable PLM document – the use of 3D information in engineering-related domains.....................11
Criteria for comparing the 3D formats...............................................................................12
Free viewers......................................................................................................................................12
Converters and software...................................................................................................................14
Software Development Kits (SDKs)..................................................................................................15
Compression and the resulting file size of the 3D formats................................................................16
Standardization aspect......................................................................................................................18
Which 3D format for which use case?...............................................................................19
For the use case “Viewing”................................................................................................................19
For the use case “Data Exchange”....................................................................................................19
For the use case “DMU”....................................................................................................................19
For the use case “Documentation and Archiving”.............................................................................20
For the use case “Portable PLM Document”.....................................................................................20
Graphical evaluation of the suitability of the formats for the use cases............................................21
Concluding remark...............................................................................................................22
Abbreviations.......................................................................................................................23
Web links / Sources.............................................................................................................24
©
PROSTEP AG 
www.prostep.com 
Page 3  
control software system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
add image to slide, extract slides and merge library SDK, this VB.NET PowerPoint processing control powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
clip art or screenshot to PowerPoint document slide large amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
White Paper: 3D Formats in the Field of Engineering - a Comparison 
Chapter: Summary 
©
PROSTEP AG 
www.prostep.com 
Page 4  
Summary 
In the world of movies and television, 3D is the new buzz word. In the field of engineering, the three-
dimensional representation of products had been a reality for some time. What were once physically 
constructed models are now virtual models, and these virtual 3D models are being used in an 
increasing number of areas outside of engineering. Because CAD systems are not available 
everywhere and the system landscapes in the engineering domain are extremely heterogeneous, 
neutral 3D formats are the formats of choice when exchanging and distributing 3D models with other 
domains and throughout the extended enterprise. 
A large number of “neutral 3D formats” are available for the transfer of 3D models. Each of these 
formats has different attributes, such as a high level of precision regarding the images being 
displayed, small file sizes, versatility and many others.  
When parts are developed in 3D for the engineering domain, the data is initially stored in the original 
format of the software used to design the part. If this 3D CAD data is to be made available to people 
who do not have this software, neutral 3D formats come into play. Essential to the selection of the four 
3D formats examined here - STEP, 3D XML, JT and 3D PDF, is disclosure of the format specification, 
wide-spread use of the format and its (potential) application in other future engineering activities. 
The four formats were examined to determine the extent to which their attributes are suited to five use 
cases that are most frequently found in companies. Usability for the use cases was also the deciding 
factor in selecting the four aforementioned formats for examination rather than other formats such as 
IGES, CGM, DXF, VRML, COLLADA and X3D, which are not widely used in the selected use cases.  
The following use cases were defined: viewing engineering data, data exchange, digital mock-up 
(DMU), documentation and archiving, and use in the portable PLM document, i.e. use of 3D and 
additional information in domains related to engineering. 
In the last two use cases mentioned, the extremely high level of versatility that 3D PDF offers made it 
the clear forerunner. 
3D PDF also satisfied the key requirements of the “Viewing” use case. Taken as a whole, the 
attributes that JT offers also makes it very well suited for this use case. 
JT is very well suited to the use case “DMU”. In principle, 3D XML is also well suited to this use case, 
but it is currently limited to a great degree to applications within the Dassault Systèmes product family. 
If the focus is placed on using a format for data exchange purposes, the STEP format, which was 
standardized a number of years ago and offers numerous applications, is the best choice. 
The table below provides an overview of the results of our examination with regard to the suitability of 
the neutral 3D formats for use in the individual use cases: 
Legend 
Highly suitable 
Well suitable 
Suitable with reservations 
There is no single right answer to the question of which of t
at 
he 3D formats is the “better”. Each form
exhibits different strength in different areas. Which format attributes are to be considered an 
advantage will depend on the circumstances and the use cases in which the format is to be used. 
PROSTEP is confronted with this issue on a day to day basis and in this White Paper provides 
readers with an overview and an orientation guide for identifying which 3D format is appropriate for a
given use case. 
UseCase 
STEP
3D XML
JT
3DPDF
Viewing
Data Exchange
DMU
Documentationand 
Archiving
Portable PLM 
Document
control software system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Use PowerPoint SDK to Create, Load and Save PPT
Besides, users also can get the precise PowerPoint slides count as soon as the PowerPoint document has been loaded by using the page number getting method.
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Extract & Collect PPT Slide(s) Using VB Sample
want to combine these extracted slides into a please read this VB.NET PowerPoint slide processing powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
White Paper: 3D Formats in the Field of Engineering - a Comparison 
Chapter: Introduction 
Introduction 
When CAD data is exchanged with development partners or used directly in development 
processes, it is of vital importance that an appropriate data format is selected. This format 
will determine which options are available for using the data in downstream processes, how 
future-proof the solution is and what follow-up costs will result. 
One key attribute of any neutral 3D format includes versatility, which allows development 
data to be used in departments outside of the engineering department, a high level of data 
security and the ability to extend the format to include future developments. 
In order to come to a conclusion about which 3D format is better suited for use in companies, 
especially in engineering-oriented processes, the following four neutral 3D formats were 
examined:  
ɷ
STEP (STandard for the Exchange of Product model data), 
ɷ
3D XML (eXtensible Markup Language), 
ɷ
JT (Jupiter Tessellation), 
ɷ
3D PDF (Portable Document Format). 
Essential to the selection of these four formats is disclosure of the format specification, wide-
spread use of the format and its relevance for the use cases. Therefore other formats such 
as IGES, CGM, DXF, VRML, COLLADA and X3D, which are not widely used in the selected 
use cases, were not taken into account. 
To assess the suitability of a neutral 3D format, criteria were selected that are relevant to its 
use in practice. This includes easy access to the world of 3D data through the use of free 
viewers. Equally important is the availability of appropriate software and converters so that 
the options and advantages that a format offers can be fully exploited. Suitable software 
development kits (SDKs) should be available to ensure that a format can be adapted to a 
company’s existing system landscape and individual business processes and, if necessary, 
be extended. 
The size of the file created as a result of converting data into a 3D format can also be 
important as far as handling the data is concerned since a crucial factor determining the 
efficient use of system resources is also file size. 
The disclosure and availability of a format specification within the framework of 
standardization can be seen as a good indication of the level of investment protection a 3D 
format offers and the extent to which the future of the format is guaranteed. All these criteria 
ultimately influence the costs that arise when a format is used. 
In order to provide the basic criteria for comparison, the following questions need to be 
answered: 
ɷ
Which free viewers are available? 
ɷ
What converters and products exist that can produce and handle data in the respective 
neutral 3D format? 
ɷ
Which SDKs and support mechanisms are available for the (further) development of 
software? 
ɷ
What are the differences in file size? 
ɷ
Has the format been ratified by a recognized standards organization? 
The formats are then evaluated on the basis of these aspects within the context of the 
following typical use cases: 
ɷ
Visualization of engineering data 
©
PROSTEP AG 
www.prostep.com 
Page 5  
control software system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Merge and Split PowerPoint Document(s) with PPT
of the split PPT document will contain slides/pages 1-4 code in VB.NET to finish PowerPoint document splitting If you want to see more PDF processing functions
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Complete PowerPoint Document Conversion in VB.
It contains PowerPoint documentation features and all PPT slides. Control to render and convert target PowerPoint or document formats, such as PDF, BMP, TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
White Paper: 3D Formats in the Field of Engineering - a Comparison 
Chapter: Introduction 
©
PROSTEP AG 
www.prostep.com 
Page 6 of 24 
ɷ
Data exchange involving exact geometry 
ɷ
Use in digital mock-up (DMU) 
ɷ
Documentation and archiving 
ɷ
Use of 3D information in engineering-related domains (portable PLM document) 
The results of this evaluation are shown in matrix form, which allows the suitability of a 3D 
format for a particular use case to be assessed. How the attributes of a format are to be 
weighted with regard to a concrete use case within a company can only be determined within 
the framework of a competent, independent, and individual customer consultation.  
It is almost impossible to provide a comprehensive comparison of all aspects of the 3D 
formats. This examination is therefore limited to the aspects which experience has shown to 
play an important role in selecting a 3D format in practice. 
Since the basic parameters dictated by business practice will continue to evolve, it is 
intended that this White Paper be updated regularly.
control software system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
Using this VB.NET PowerPoint to PDF converting demo code below, you can easily convert all slides of source PowerPoint document into a multi-page PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Add Image to PowerPoint Document Slide/Page
insert or delete any certain PowerPoint slide without methods to reorder current PPT slides in both powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
www.rasteredge.com
White Paper: 3D Formats in the Field of Engineering - a Comparison 
Chapter: Development and technical attributes 
Development and technical attributes 
STEP 
STEP is a standard for describing product data and is formally defined in the International 
Organization for Standardization (ISO
1
) standard 10303. The description includes not only 
the physical aspects but also the functional aspects of the product. 
The development of STEP started in 1984 as a successor of the formats IGES, SET and 
VDA-FS. In 1994/95, ISO published the initial release of STEP as an international standard 
(IS). Today, the most important parts of STEP relevant to discrete engineering are the 
application protocols (AP) 214 and 203, which are included in ISO IS 10303. These APs can 
be used by a large number of CAD, CAM and CAE systems to import and export product 
data. The ProSTEP iViP Association
2
and PDES, Inc.
3
were the driving forces behind the 
development of STEP. 
In STEP, the geometry of a product can be displayed as a wireframe model, a surface model 
or as a solid. Data compression and simplification are not supported. Since STEP is an 
ASCII format, file size can be reduced significantly by means of external compression, e.g. in 
ZIP format. Although the STEP data model provides for tessellation, this function is not 
supported by the applications available on the market.  
STEP continues to be the subject of further development. At the moment, AP 203 and 
AP 214 are being merged to create AP 242 with the intention of providing a joint standard for 
the aerospace and automotive industries. The business object model will be defined in UML 
(Unified Modeling Language) and XML, thus making it consistent with the current state of the 
art. JT is currently being integrated as a format for the simplified representation of the 
geometry. 
3D XML  
3D XML was published in 2005 by Dassault Systèmes
4
. The 3D XML format is based on 
XML, a standard for creating human-readable documents in the form of a tree structure. 
In 3D XML, parts and assemblies are displayed using an XML-based faceted geometry 
representation. The 3D XML mesh, which is comprised of surfaces and edges, is described 
using nodes, which in turn are connected by means of triangles (for surfaces) and lines (for 
edges). The mesh can also include several Levels Of detail (LOD). LOD management allows 
the definition of a number of tessellation levels (from fine to coarse) for a mesh. 
With the announcement of V6, Dassault Systèmes has announced “3D XML with Authoring” 
in addition to the previously disclosed “3D XML for Viewing”. It is intended to be used for the 
data exchange of exact geometry between V6 applications. 
JT 
JT is a format for describing 3D data that also supports object data and metadata. 
The format was developed in the 1990s by the US company Engineering Animation Inc., 
which was taken over by the UGS Corporation in 1999. In 2007, Siemens acquired the 
company, which is now called “Siemens PLM Software”
5
and is a business unit of the 
Siemens Industry Automation division. 
JT is a binary format whose data model supports various representations of CAD geometry. 
The representations can be stored in a JT file individually or together. 
ɷ
BREP (boundary representation): offers the highest level of representational precision. 
BREP data is compressed using different algorithms and stored without loss. In the 
©
PROSTEP AG 
www.prostep.com 
Page 7  
White Paper: 3D Formats in the Field of Engineering - a Comparison 
Chapter: Development and technical attributes 
©
PROSTEP AG 
www.prostep.com 
Page 8 of 24 
current specification 9.5, two BREP representations are permitted: the traditional JT-
BREP representation and XT-BREP, which is based on the Parasolid boundary 
representation. 
ɷ
Tessellated geometry: a faceted representation of solids and surfaces. Different levels of 
detail (LOD) can be defined within a JT file. A low LOD means a lower level of precision 
but a smaller volume of data, while a very high LOD means an almost exact geometry but 
a large volume of data. 
ɷ
ULP (Ultra-Lightweight Precise): The latest compression method is ULP. The ULP format 
enables a lightweight, semi-precise representation of the 3D geometry. The level of 
precision that ULP offers is significantly higher than for tessellated geometry while the file 
size is significantly smaller. The primary focus lies on providing high quality surface 
geometry that exhibits only minor deviations from the original BREP geometry. 
JT version 8.1 has been published by the ISO as a publicly available specification (PAS). 
The ISO standardization process (q.v. Standardization aspect) is currently under way for the 
recently published JT version 9.5, which has been expanded to include the specification for 
ULP and semantic product manufacturing information (PMI, product metadata) among other 
things. 
3D PDF 
3D PDF is the name of the PDF format which also provides native support for 3D data 
(starting with Version 7 of Adobe
®
Acrobat
® 6
). In 2008, 3D PDF was published as the 
international standard ISO 24517-1 (PDF/E). 
The following CAD geometry representations can be stored in a 3D PDF: 
ɷ
U3D (Universal 3D) was developed by Ecma International
7
and is a compressed file 
format for 3D data that is natively supported by the PDF format. 3D objects in U3D format 
can be inserted into PDF documents and visualized interactively using Adobe Reader 
Version 7 or higher. The PDF standard supports the first and third editions of U3D; both 
these versions can include only tessellated geometry and animation data. 
ɷ
PRC (Project Reviewer Compressed) was purchased in 2009 by Adobe Systems 
Incorporated. This format can be used to store representations as tessellated or precise 
(BREP) geometry. When converting to PRC, different levels of compression can be used. 
Support is also provided for PMI data including geometric dimensioning and tolerancing, 
as well as functional tolerancing and analysis. 
PRC ISO 14739 is currently (as of March 2011) in the Committee Draft (CD) ballot 
process. 
3D PDF also offers all the options that conventional PDF offers, such as multimedia data 
content, access protection and encryption, forms and many more. This makes 3D PDF a 
format with possible applications that extend well beyond the realm of engineering. 
White Paper: 3D Formats in the Field of Engineering - a Comparison 
Chapter: Use cases 
Use cases 
The variety of processes in any company means that there are a multitude of possible 
requirements relating to neutral 3D formats and the use of these formats in engineering 
practice. Based on many years of experience, an attempt has been made to aggregate this 
multitude of possible requirements in five common use cases, which in turn provide the basis 
for assessing the 3D formats. 
The following are typical use cases in which the original data is transferred to a neutral 3D 
format: 
Viewing engineering data 
If the use of a CAD system is not desired, the visualization of engineering data using 3D 
viewers comes into play in a number of different situations: the presentation of product data, 
the representation of 3D models for information purposes (e.g. for a design review or 
marketing) and the realistic representation in virtual reality systems.  
The use case can vary according to the concrete application context involved. While the 
simple viewing of the geometry is sufficient in many cases, in other cases metadata or 
product and manufacturing information (PMI) also needs to be displayed. 
The high-performance visualization of large assemblies or design spaces and neighboring 
geometries is often an important criterion. In cases such as these, it is especially important 
that simplified representations are used. 
The most important requirements are: 
ɷ
The source system-independent representation of the model data (geometry and 
metadata) with the required level of detail. 
ɷ
The ability to filter the product structure, e.g. using views or layers. 
ɷ
The execution of simple measurements. 
ɷ
Representation of product and manufacturing information (PMI). 
ɷ
The ability to represent textures and sources of light for applications in the area of virtual 
reality. 
ɷ
The availability of easy to use, cross-system viewers. 
Data exchange 
In development processes it may be necessary to exchange exact geometry between 
different CAD systems. This is, for example, the case if a supplier uses a different CAD 
system than the one used by the manufacturer. Another common situation is that one of the 
development partners makes a change to the geometry after it has been exchanged. In this 
case, merely viewing the data is not enough. What is needed is a typical and frequently used 
modeling method involving design in context of existing geometry.  
When exchanging exact geometry, additional information describing the product is often 
needed. In this context, a distinction is made between PMI and metadata. While metadata 
refers to descriptions that consist only of text, e.g. information about the author or the release 
status of a model, PMI is often added in the form of 3D annotations. This makes greater 
demands on the underlying data format and on the application doing the processing. This 
means that grouping and filter options are needed to ensure clarity. 
Another frequent requirement is that the processing of PMI be possible subsequent to data 
exchange. The protection of intellectual property (IP) is also playing an increasingly important 
©
PROSTEP AG 
www.prostep.com 
Page 9  
White Paper: 3D Formats in the Field of Engineering - a Comparison 
Chapter: Use cases 
role in data exchange, and it should therefore be possible to take this aspect into 
consideration. 
The most important requirements are: 
ɷ
The transfer of exact geometry and the entire product structure. 
ɷ
The transfer of metadata as well as PMI annotations (depending on the concrete use case 
involved) 
ɷ
Ensuring correlation between the original model and the target model. 
Digital mock-up (DMU) 
In digital mock-up (DMU; computer-aided test model), the mechanical properties of a product 
are examined and checked. This can involve checking the overall geometry with regard to 
dimensions and shape, interference checks, collision checks for assembly and disassembly, 
as well as design space checks. 
For these purposes, the geometry, product structure and metadata are displayed and 
analyzed in a DMU application. A distinction is made between static and dynamic DMU 
analysis. In the case of static DMU, an examination of the static parts is performed. In the 
case of dynamic DMU, the dynamic parts or assemblies are examined.  
The result of the DMU analysis is subsequently summarized and documented in a report. 
As a general rule, a simplified, tessellated representation of the envelope geometry is usually 
sufficient for use in DMU. In the case of measurements, however, it should be noted that the 
level of tessellation accuracy must always be higher than the required measuring accuracy. 
The most important requirements are: 
ɷ
The availability of applications that support the respective required DMU functionality (e.g. 
assembly checks and collision control). 
ɷ
Use of models from different source systems (multi-CAD). 
ɷ
High-quality examination of large assemblies. 
ɷ
Transferability of kinematics from the original model to the target model for dynamic DMU 
analysis. 
Documentation and archiving 
For the purpose of documenting and archiving engineering data, it is normally necessary to 
factor in exact data representation, including all metadata and PMI. The latter is especially 
important with regard to product approval and product documentation if drawings and 
technical documents are being replaced by digital 3D models. There are also often 
compliance requirements that need to be satisfied. 
The most important requirement relating to the documentation and archiving of engineering 
data is that all relevant information be stored in a format that can be read irrespective of a 
specific IT infrastructure and after a long period of time – in the aerospace industry, for 
example, an archiving period of up to 99 years is possible in extreme cases. 
The most important requirements are: 
ɷ
Proper consideration is given to all product data. 
ɷ
Problem-free combination of data from different source systems. 
ɷ
Ensuring that the data can be accessed even after long periods of time (standardized 
format) 
©
PROSTEP AG 
www.prostep.com 
Page 10 of 24 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested