© OECD/IEA 2011 
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D
 
 
Page | 49 
 ICT Industry EUR 3.4 million (31%) 
 Universities EUR 4.3 million (39%) 
Industry  partners  contributed to  61% of the  total  cost.  For  the following  funding  periods,  the 
annual budget increased from an annual EUR 7.2 million in 2010 to over EUR 12 million in 2011 
(this included three full‐scale demonstrations). The increase was due to the increased interest of 
companies, especially those in the ICT sector. 
During the first funding period (September 2009 – February 2011) the main indicators used to 
evaluate SGEM’s success were the achievement of initially defined deliverables and the number 
of publications. In addition, the deliverable list consisted of several practical demonstrations and 
detailed  the  development  environments to  be used in  future  funding periods  (e.g.  simulation 
libraries).  
The following tables describe the results of SGEM (1FP = 1st funding period): 
Publications 
Type 
Journal 
Conference 
BSc 
MSc 
PhD 
Report 
Other 
Total 
 
24 
62 
27 
67 
14 
202 
 
Status 
Finalised during 1FP 
For 2FP 
Public 
Internal 
Draft 
Total 
84 
20 
98 
202 
 
Deliverables 
Status 
Ready for 1FP 
66 
1FP Delayed 
Later FPs 
36 
Total 
102 
 
Of particular significance was the sharing of IP. Although R&D departments in firms carried out 
the  research,  they  shared  the  results.  By  sharing  the  results,  the  focus  is  diverted  from  the 
market thereby creating a strategic, long‐term relationship. Sharing helped wider cross‐industrial 
consortiums to avoid potential market competition later on.  
As 50% of the work is conducted, as well as funded, by industry, stronger ties are forged among 
SMEs, LargeCAP, the academic community, business and industry. 
Lessons  learned:  The  requirement  for  industry  to  generate  50%  of  the  overall  costs  elicited 
stronger commitments to planning and execution of the programme. Programme managers and 
five out of seven work‐package managers are industry partners, and increase in the budget for 
the  second  funding  period  was  primarily  due  to  increased  interest  from  these  partners.  ‐> 
COLLABORATIVE APPROACH, FOCUSING ON INDUSTRY INVOLVEMENT 
The  SGEM  Consortium’s  research  programmes  operate  according  to  the  philosophy  of  open 
innovation. Ownership of IP belongs to the creator. However, every partner is granted royalty‐
free access rights to all IP generated in the research programme. ‐> GOVERNANCE OF IP 
How to convert pdf to ppt for - SDK control service:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
How to convert pdf to ppt for - SDK control service:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D 
© OECD/IEA 2011 
 
Page | 50
Case study 6: Measurement of economic impact and cost benefit 
analysis on national R&D programmes at NEDO (Japan) 
This study was carried out for the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), and the New 
Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) as part of their attempts to 
understand the level of commercial take‐up of energy research and the resulting socio‐economic 
impacts. 
This  research  used  an  econometric  approach  to  calculate  the  cost‐benefit  of  public  R&D 
investment  using  Japan’s  photovoltaic  power  R&D  projects  as  an  example,  focusing  on  the 
additionality of the public investment. The key steps of the work were as follows: 
 Technology stocks were calculated from both public and private R&D investment. 
 Regression analysis was used to calculate relational equations between technology stocks and 
product prices. 
 By reducing the amount of public investment to 0 in the relational equation, the product price 
in the case without public R&D investment was estimated. 
 Consumer surpluses were calculated from the “with” and “without” product prices, using a 
separately  obtained  demand  curve,  and  the  gap  between  the  two  cases  was  taken  as  an 
additional consumer surplus. 
 The cost‐benefit analysis was undertaken using the amount of public R&D investment as the 
cost and the additional consumer surplus as the benefit. 
Data  used  came  from  surveys,  from  data  provided  by  the  statistical  bureau,  from  national 
accounts and from project calculations. 
The  model  was  tested  using  advanced  statistical  techniques  to  ensure  that  the  results  were 
statistically significant. The assessment of prices of PV systems was undertaken under four cases: 
with and without public R&D investment, and with and without the installation incentive grant. 
The study demonstrated the following impacts: 
 Public investment led to a fall in prices for photovoltaic installations by stimulating a market 
and promoting competition. 
 Investment in R&D, having driven down prices, enabled the successful introduction of the 
installation grants scheme,  contributing to an increase in the level  of installed photovoltaic 
capacity. 
 A cost benefit analysis indicated considerable economic benefit from the investments. In 
concrete  terms  it  showed  that  the  costs  outweighed  the  benefits  in  the  1990,  became 
balanced with the cost by 2005 and in the longer run to 2030 the benefits were predicted to 
outrun costs, predicting net benefits of EUR 2.6 billion. This is likely to be an understatement 
since other benefits were not included in the model. 
Lessons learned: Analysis was carried out to see whether the public R&D investment contributed 
to decreasing  the price of photovoltaic  power  systems.  Comparison  of the  cases showed that 
there had indeed been a contribution. ‐> PROVIDE ADEQUATE R&D FUNDING 
The study quantifies the benefits of  research investment,  which  has not always  been detailed 
satisfactorily in the past. In so doing, it highlights the expected difficulties involved in collecting 
and assembling data required for this type of analysis. ‐> R&D MONITORING AND EVALUATION 
SDK control service:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Download Free Trial. Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Easy converting! We try to make it as easy as possible to convert your PPTX/PPT files to PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word
How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word. Online C# Tutorial for Converting PDF, MS-Excel, MS-PPT to Word. PDF, MS-Excel, MS-PPT to Word Conversion Overview.
www.rasteredge.com
© OECD/IEA 2011 
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D
 
 
Page | 51 
Case study 7: Linkages from DOE’s research and development in 
wind energy to commercial renewable power generation (US) 
The  United  States  Office of Planning,  Budget  and Analysis’  Wind &  Hydropower  Technologies 
Program reviewed in 2009 the result of public investment in wind energy, including downstream 
developments  over  the  past  three  decades,  comparing  wind  energy  technology  and  markets 
before and after the DOE Wind Energy Program. 
The main questions included: 
 What is the evidence that Program outputs are linked to downstream technical and market 
developments in commercial power generation? 
 How is the Program linked to others? 
 To whom is the Program linked? 
 Are Program outputs linked to results achieved outside the wind industry and, if so, what are 
those results? 
 Which innovations supported by the Program have been particularly influential? 
 How robust are the linkages? 
The main element of the study was historical tracing, a widely used methodology that establishes 
links and maps routes of knowledge dissemination. 
Tracing  was  assisted  by  multiple  quantitative  and  qualitative  evaluation  techniques,  including 
desk  research  (document  review  and  database  searches);  interviews  with  relevant  actors 
(government  officials,  experts,  industrial  stakeholders,  etc.),  patent  citations  and  bibliometric 
analysis. 
The  study  provided  robust  evidence  regarding  linkages  between  the  US  DOE  Wind  Energy 
Program and the commercial applications of wind energy. On the whole, developments in wind 
energy advanced substantially over the three decades of funding by the Wind Energy Program. 
The  study  also  revealed  intense  collaboration  between  the  stakeholders  of  the  Wind  Energy 
Program, which  resulted in  extensive international network‐building, exchange knowledge and 
technology transfer among academia, research institutes, public bodies, and industry partners in 
engineering, manufacturing and electric utilities. 
Patent analysis revealed 112 patent families originating from research funded by the Program. 
These  patents  were  attributed  to  leading  wind  energy  companies  in  the  US  such  as  General 
Electric,  Distributed  Energy  Systems  and  Clipper  Windpower.  Patent  analysis  also  resulted  in 
examples highlighting the impacts of the patenting activities on sectors beyond wind energy. 
Lessons learned: The broad conclusion from this study is that the Program’s investments in wind 
energy R&D have produced outputs that have been taken up by a diverse group of downstream 
users. ‐> PROVIDE ADEQUATE R&D FUNDING 
The particular challenge of the study was to trace results over a 30‐year period. The authors had 
to  find  solutions  to  fill  data  gaps  and  address  uncertainties.  ‐>  R&D  MONITORING  AND 
EVALUATION 
SDK control service:How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF
How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF. Online C# Tutorial for Converting MS Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint to PDF. How to C#: Convert PPT to PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document. Provide Free Demo Code for PDF Conversion from Microsoft PowerPoint in C# Program.
www.rasteredge.com
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D 
© OECD/IEA 2011 
 
Page | 52
Case study 8: US‐China Clean Energy Research Center  
(US‐China CERC) 
The  US‐China  Clean  Energy  Research  Center  (US‐China  CERC)  was  established  in  2009  as  an 
innovative model for bilateral science and technology (S&T) co‐operation. The US‐China CERC is 
designed  to  facilitate  joint  research  and  development  (R&D)  of  clean  energy  technologies 
through  the  collaborative  development  of  projects,  and  is  characterised  by  shared  funding, 
division of labour and more flexible arrangements for the allocation of IP. 
Priorities  reflect  areas  of  mutual  interest,  in  which  the  US  and  China  have  complementary 
strengths and could benefit from international collaborative research. 
Priority Area 
Research Team 
Leads 
Research Topics 
Goal 
Buildings 
Lawrence Berkeley 
National Laboratory 
(US) 
Ministry of Housing 
and Urban-Rural 
Development (China) 
Monitoring and simulation, building envelope, 
building equipment, building integration, and 
commercialisation research 
To contribute to dramatic 
improvements in the 
energy efficiency of 
buildings (commercial or 
residential) in the US and 
China 
Clean 
Vehicles 
University of Michigan 
(US) 
Tsinghua University 
(China) 
Energy systems analysis, technology 
roadmaps and policies; vehicle-grid 
interactions; vehicle electrification; advanced 
batteries and energy conversion; advanced 
biofuels and clean combustion; and advanced 
lightweight materials and structures 
To implement dramatic 
improvements in 
technologies with potential 
to reduce the dependence 
of vehicles on oil and 
improve vehicle fuel 
efficiency 
Clean Coal 
West Virginia 
University (US) 
Huazhong University of 
Science and 
Technology (China) 
Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) 
with CCS at the million ton scale; large-scale 
post-combustion CO
2
capture, utilisation and 
storage technology; sequestration capacity 
and near-term opportunities; CO
2
-algae 
biofixation and use; theory, development and 
demonstration of oxyfiring combustion; coal-
to-chemicals with capture and co-generation 
To accelerate the 
understanding of key 
issues that face clean coal 
and carbon capture and 
storage 
 
The work of the US‐China CERC is conducted by consortia organised for each of the three priority 
research  areas.  These  consortia  consist  of  entities  or  individuals  from  universities,  academia, 
non‐governmental institutions and industry. 
In total, the US‐China CERC budget is more than USD 150 million in public and private funds over 
a  period  of  five  years.  Research  teams  in  the  US  and  China  are  awarded  grants  under  a 
competitive solicitation process. US funds are used exclusively to support work conducted by US 
participants,  and  similar  arrangements  apply  for  Chinese  funds.  The  work  itself,  however,  is 
jointly planned and executed by participants in both countries. For the US, a condition to receive 
funding  is  that  each  research  consortium  matches  the  level  of  support  received  by  the  US 
Department of Energy (DOE) through cost sharing. 
 
 
 
 
 
SDK control service:C# TIFF: Learn to Convert MS Word, Excel, and PPT to TIFF Image
PPTXDocument doc = new PPTXDocument(@"demo.pptx"); if (null == doc) throw new Exception("Fail to load PowerPoint Document"); // Convert PPT to Tiff.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
VB.NET PowerPoint processing control add-on can do PPT creating, loading We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
© OECD/IEA 2011 
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D
 
 
Page | 53 
Priority Area 
US DOE Funding 
US Partners Funding 
Total Project Funding 
Buildings 
$12.5M 
$16.4M 
$28.9M 
Clean Vehicles 
$12.5M 
$17.3M 
$29.8M 
Clean Coal 
$12.5M 
$13.6M 
$26.1M 
Total US Funding 
$84.8M 
Total Chinese Funding 
$75.0M 
Total Funding to Date 
$159.8M USD 
 
The  Protocol  that  formally  established  the  US‐China  CERC  is  valid  for  ten  years  and  can  be 
renewed  for  five  year  increments  with  mutual  agreement.  However,  future  funding  will  be 
contingent upon an evaluation of progress and efficacy of the model. 
The US‐China CERC’s approach to IP embraces principles of negotiation and mutual benefit, and 
is more accommodating in  its policies regarding other country’s  market access.  Under the US‐
China CERC, IP has been negotiated post award, among the winning participants of the consortia.  
Source: US DOE. More details may be found at the website: http:www.us‐china‐cerc.org 
 
Lessons learned: Results from the US‐China CERC R&D activities are not yet available. However, 
preliminary  conclusions  indicate  the  importance  of  clearly  defined  rules  of  engagement  for 
bilateral R&D co‐operation, as defined in this case by a high‐level CERC Protocol, with IP Annex, 
high‐level government support, and flexible arrangements for the allocation of IP and access to 
markets  as  a  way  to  attract  private  partners  and  leverage  intellectual  capital  and  financial 
resources.  ‐>  INTERNATIONAL  COLLABORATION;  INDUSTRY  INVOLVEMENT  &  GOVERNANCE  
OF IP 
Case study 9: IEA Implementing Agreements (IAs) 
IEA Implementing Agreements (IAs) provide a  flexible mechanism for  governments,  industries, 
businesses  and  non‐governmental  organisations  to  leverage  resources  and improve  results  of 
research  in  energy  technologies  and  related  issues.  Through  these  initiatives,  governments 
partner with industry and other organisations to form a cost‐effective, global energy technology 
network to combine efforts. 
Of  the  76  IAs  created  since  1976,  41  are  still  in  effect,  facilitating  a  wide  range  of  research 
projects, studies, and demonstrations focusing on: 
 cross‐cutting issues (information exchange, modelling, technology transfer); 
 efficient end‐use technologies (buildings, electricity, industry, transport); 
 fossil fuels (greenhouse‐gas mitigation, supply, transformation); 
 fusion power (international experiments); 
 renewable energies and hydrogen (technologies and deployment). 
 
SDK control service:VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
VB.NET PowerPoint - Render PPT to PDF in VB.NET. How to Convert PowerPoint Slide to PDF Using VB.NET Code in .NET. Visual C#. VB.NET. Home > .NET Imaging SDK >
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:VB.NET PowerPoint: Read & Scan Barcode Image from PPT Slide
VB.NET PPT PDF-417 barcode scanning SDK to detect PDF-417 barcode image from PowerPoint slide. VB.NET APIs to detect and decode
www.rasteredge.com
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D 
© OECD/IEA 2011 
 
Page | 54
 
 
Under the auspices of the IAs, a broad range of international activities are carried out, covering 
basic  science,  R&D,  demonstration,  and  deployment.  Activities  include  co‐ordination  and 
planning  of  energy  technology  RD&D  studies  or  projects,  joint  evaluation  and  the  pooling  of 
results. The IAs can also be used to build pilot or demonstration plants. In addition, IAs frequently 
involve information exchange on national programmes and policies; scientific and technological 
advances; and energy legislation, regulations and practices. The figure below shows the scope of 
the IAs activities. 
 
© OECD/IEA 2011 
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D
 
 
Page | 55 
Information
exchange
Exchange
of experts
Studies
Workshops
or symposia
Research
tasks
21%
10%
20%
25%
23%
 
 
The work associated with IAs is generally financed through cost or task sharing, or a combination 
of both. Each approach has its benefits and tradeoffs. Through the years, emphasis has shifted 
from sharing costs to sharing tasks, or a combination of the two. When sharing costs, participants 
contribute to a fund, work is contracted to a general manager, and the results are shared by all. 
Cost sharing provides programmatic consistency and operational flexibility. However, sustained 
cost sharing is often impeded by the need to reconcile international project requirements of a 
common fund  with  the  restraints imposed by national  budgets.  In  task  sharing,  each  country 
participant contributes resources and personnel. Task sharing entails a division of labour, which 
can reduce the workload of participating countries. However, with each country operating on its 
own, integration can be difficult to achieve. 
While no IA will necessarily deliver all possible benefits, the most common include: 
 co‐ordinated planning and co‐operation; 
 information sharing and networking; 
 reduced cost and duplication of work; 
 greater project scale; 
 accelerated development and deployment; 
 strengthened national RD&D capabilities; 
 linking IEA member and non‐member countries; 
 linking research, industry and policy; 
 harmonised technical standards. 
The IEA maintains minimum requirements for operating IAs, thereby establishing a common legal 
approach  for  each  agreement.  These  requirements  address  general  principals,  categories  of 
signatories, length of terms, roles and responsibilities, reporting requirements and IPR. 
Source: IEA EGRD (2008) and IEA (2010b). 
 
Lessons  learned:  IAs  offer  a  long‐standing  flexible  and  effective  mechanism  for  facilitating 
international  co‐operation and  collaboration on  energy  technology  RD&D.  ‐>  INTERNATIONAL 
COLLABORATION 
 
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D 
© OECD/IEA 2011 
 
Page | 56
The majority of IAs seek input, guidance and partnerships with industry. IAs allow companies to 
take  a  seat  at  the  table  and  to  vote,  In  addition,  all  participants  –  whether  government  or 
business  ‐  equally  share  obligations,  contributions,  rights  and  benefits.  ‐>  STRONG 
COLLABORATIVE APPROACH FOCUSING ON INDUSTRY INVOLVEMENT 
IAs often struggle with modest budgets. In moving beyond co‐operation and information sharing 
towards meaningful RD&D planning, collaboration, and joint execution of projects, real financial 
muscle is needed to make the IEA model more effective. ‐> PROVIDE ADEQUATE GOVERNMENT 
FUNDING 
 
© OECD/IEA 2011 
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D
 
 
Page | 57 
Acronyms and abbreviations  
Acronyms 
AEI 
Accelerating Energy Innovation 
APP 
Asia Pacific Partnership 
BDU 
Business Development Unit 
CCS 
carbon capture and storage 
CCSP 
Carbon Capture and Storage Programme 
CEI 
Clean Energy Initiative 
CEM 
Clean Energy Ministerial 
CERT 
Committee on Energy Research and Technology 
CLEEN 
Cluster for Energy and Environment, Finland 
CSLF 
Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum 
CTA 
Technical Centre of Aeronautics 
CTC 
Copersucar Sugarcane Technology Center 
DECC 
Department of Energy and Climate Change 
DOE‐QTR 
Department of Energy Quadrennial Technology Review, US 
EGRD 
IEA Experts’ Group on R&D Priority Setting and Evaluation 
EPEC 
European Policy Evaluation Consortium 
ERA‐Nets 
European Research Area Networks 
ESPRC 
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council 
EIR 
Entrepreneurs‐in‐Readiness 
ETI 
Energy Technology Institute, UK 
ETP 
Energy Technology Perspectives 
EUREC 
European Renewable Energy Research Centres 
EV 
electric vehicle 
FCEP 
Future Combustion Engine Power Plant 
FIT 
feed‐in‐tariffs 
FPs 
Framework Programmes, EU 
GIF 
Generation IV International Forum 
IAs 
IEA Implementing Agreements 
ICTs 
information and communication technologies 
IGCC 
integrated gasification combined cycle 
IEA 
International Energy Agency 
IP 
intellectual property 
IPHE 
International Partnership for the Hydrogen Economy 
KETEP 
Korea Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning 
LTIs 
Leading Technology Institutes 
METI 
Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, Japan 
MMEA 
Measurement, Monitoring and Environmental Assessment 
MPE  
Ministry of Petroleum and Energy, Norway 
NCS  
Norwegian Continental Shelf 
NEDO 
New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organisation 
NIMBY 
not in my backyard 
NNE 
European Non‐Nuclear Energy 
NRTEE 
National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy, Canada 
OECD 
Organisation for Economic Co‐operation and Development 
OG21 
Oil and Gas in the 21
st
 Century 
PCAST 
President’s Council of Advisors in Science and Technology, US 
Good Practice Policy Framework for Energy Technology RD&D 
© OECD/IEA 2011 
 
Page | 58
PHEVs  
plug‐in hybrids electric vehicles 
PPP 
public‐private partnerships 
PV 
photovoltaic 
R&D 
research and development 
RD&D 
research, development and demonstration 
RDD&D 
research, development, demonstration and deployment 
RTD 
Research and Technological Development 
S&T 
science and technology 
SEA 
Swedish Energy Agency 
SGEM 
Smart Grids and Energy Markets 
SMEs 
small medium‐sized enterprises 
US‐China CERC 
US‐China Clean Energy Research Center 
US DOE 
Department of Energy, US 
Abbreviations 
CO
2
 
carbon dioxide 
million 
 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested