THE ADVENTURES OF
THE ADVENTURES OF
HUCKLEBERR
HUCKLEBERRY F
I
NN
Y F
I
NN
BY 
MARK TWA
I
N
A
G
L
A S S B O O K
C
L
A S S I C
How to change pdf to powerpoint slides - control SDK system:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
How to change pdf to powerpoint slides - control SDK system:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
HUCKLEBERRY FINN
control SDK system:C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
Microsoft PowerPoint Document Processing Control in Visual C#.NET of RasterEdge .NET Imaging SDK is a reliable and professional PowerPoint slides/pages editing
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
4 2 3 1 5" or change a certain image, clip art or screenshot to PowerPoint document slide provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
T
he
A
dventures of
H
uckleberry
F
inn
(Tom Sawyer’s Comrade)
by 
Mark Twain
  G L A S S B O O K
C L A S S I C
control SDK system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
If you want to change the order of current library SDK, this VB.NET PowerPoint processing control powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Use PowerPoint SDK to Create, Load and Save PPT
Besides, users also can get the precise PowerPoint slides count as soon as the PowerPoint document has been loaded by using the page number getting method.
www.rasteredge.com
NOTICE
PERSONS attempting to find a motive in this narrative will be pros-
ecuted; persons attempting to find a moral in it will be banished; per-
sons attempting to find a plot in it will be shot.
BY ORDER OF THE AUTHOR,
Per G.G., Chief of Ordnance.
control SDK system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Extract & Collect PPT Slide(s) Using VB Sample
want to combine these extracted slides into a please read this VB.NET PowerPoint slide processing powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Merge and Split PowerPoint Document(s) with PPT
of the split PPT document will contain slides/pages 1-4 code in VB.NET to finish PowerPoint document splitting If you want to see more PDF processing functions
www.rasteredge.com
EXPLANATORY
IN this book a number of dialects are used, to wit:  the Missouri
negro dialect; the extremest form of the backwoods Southwestern
dialect; the ordinary “Pike County” dialect; and four modified vari-
eties of this last. The shadings have not been done in a haphazard
fashion, or by guesswork; but painstakingly, and with the trustworthy
guidance and support of personal familiarity with these several forms
of speech.
I make this explanation for the reason that without it many readers
would suppose that all these characters were trying to talk alike and
not succeeding.
THE AUTHOR
control SDK system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Complete PowerPoint Document Conversion in VB.
contains PowerPoint documentation features and all PPT slides. to render and convert target PowerPoint document to or document formats, such as PDF, BMP, TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
Using this VB.NET PowerPoint to PDF converting demo code below, you can easily convert all slides of source PowerPoint document into a multi-page PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
C
HAPTER
O
NE
1
C
HAPTER
T
WO
5
C
HAPTER
T
HREE
11
C
HAPTER
F
OUR
16
C
HAPTER
F
IVE
20
C
HAPTER
S
IX
25
C
HAPTER
S
EVEN
32
C
HAPTER
E
IGHT
39
C
HAPTER
N
INE
50
C
HAPTER
T
EN
54
C
HAPTER
E
LEVEN
58
C
HAPTER
T
WELVE
66
C
HAPTER
T
HIRTEEN
73
C
HAPTER
F
OURTEEN
79
C
HAPTER
F
IFTEEN
84
C
HAPTER
S
IXTEEN
90
C
HAPTER
S
EVENTEEN
99
C
HAPTER
E
IGHTEEN
108
C
HAPTER
N
INETEEN
120
CONTENTS
v
control SDK system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Add Image to PowerPoint Document Slide/Page
in Jpeg form, and users can change it to add, insert or delete any certain PowerPoint slide without powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:C# PowerPoint: C# Guide to Add, Insert and Delete PPT Slide(s)
file and it includes all slides and properties to view detailed guide for each PowerPoint slide processing & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
www.rasteredge.com
C
O
N
T
E
N
T
S
vi
C
HAPTER
T
WENTY
129
C
HAPTER
T
WENTY
-O
NE
138
C
HAPTER
T
WENTY
-T
WO
148
C
HAPTER
T
WENTY
-T
HREE
154
C
HAPTER
T
WENTY
-F
OUR
160
C
HAPTER
T
WENTY
-F
IVE
166
C
HAPTER
T
WENTY
-S
IX
174
C
HAPTER
T
WENTY
-S
EVEN
182
C
HAPTER
T
WENTY
-E
IGHT
189
C
HAPTER
T
WENTY
-N
INE
198
C
HAPTER
T
HIRTY
208
C
HAPTER
T
HIRTY
-O
NE
212
C
HAPTER
T
HIRTY
-T
WO
221
C
HAPTER
T
HIRTY
-T
HREE
227
C
HAPTER
T
HIRTY
-F
OUR
234
C
HAPTER
T
HIRTY
-F
IVE
240
C
HAPTER
T
HIRTY
-S
IX
247
C
HAPTER
T
HIRTY
-S
EVEN
253
C
HAPTER
T
HIRTY
-E
IGHT
260
C
HAPTER
T
HIRTY
-N
INE
267
C
HAPTER
F
ORTY
273
C
HAPTER
F
ORTY
-O
NE
279
C
HAPTER
F
ORTY
-T
WO
286
T
HE
C
HAPTER
L
AST
294
CHAPTER ONE
1
HUCKLEBERRY FINN
Scene: The Mississippi Valley
Time: Forty to fifty years ago
Y
ou don’t know about me, without you have read a book by the
name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; but that ain’t no matter. That
book was made by Mr. Mark Twain, and he told the truth, mainly.
There was things which he stretched, but mainly he told the truth.
That is nothing. I never seen anybody but lied one time or another,
without it was Aunt Polly, or the widow, or maybe Mary. Aunt
Polly—Tom’s Aunt Polly, she is—and Mary, and the Widow Douglas
is all told about in that book, which is mostly a true book, with some
stretchers, as I said before.
Now the way that the book winds up is this: Tom and me found
the money that the robbers hid in the cave, and it made us rich. We
got six thousand dollars apiece—all gold. It was an awful sight of
money when it was piled up. Well, Judge Thatcher he took it and put
it out at interest, and it fetched us a dollar a day apiece all the year
round—more than a body could tell what to do with. The Widow
Douglas she took me for her son, and allowed she would sivilize me;
but it was rough living in the house all the time, considering how dis-
mal regular and decent the widow was in all her ways; and so when I
couldn’t stand it no longer I lit out. I got into my old rags and my
sugar-hogshead again, and was free and satisfied. But Tom Sawyer he
hunted me up and said he was going to start a band of robbers, and
I might join if I would go back to the widow and be respectable. So
I went back.
The widow she cried over me, and called me a poor lost lamb, and
she called me a lot of other names, too, but she never meant no harm
by it. She put me in them new clothes again, and I couldn’t do noth-
ing but sweat and sweat, and feel all cramped up. Well, then, the old
thing commenced again. The widow rung a bell for supper, and you
had to come to time.  When you got to the table you couldn’t go
right to eating, but you had to wait for the widow to tuck down her
head and grumble a little over the victuals, though there warn’t really
anything the matter with them,—that is, nothing only everything
was cooked by itself. In a barrel of odds and ends it is different;
things get mixed up, and the juice kind of swaps around, and the
things go better.
After supper she got out her book and learned me about Moses and
the Bulrushers, and I was in a sweat to find out all about him; but by
and by she let it out that Moses had been dead a considerable long
time; so then I didn’t care no more about him, because I don’t take
no stock in dead people.
Pretty soon I wanted to smoke, and asked the widow to let me. But
she wouldn’t. She said it was a mean practice and wasn’t clean, and I
must try to not do it any more. That is just the way with some people.
They get down on a thing when they don’t know nothing about it.
Here she was a-bothering about Moses, which was no kin to her, and
no use to anybody, being gone, you see, yet finding a power of fault
with me for doing a thing that had some good in it. And she took
snuff, too; of course that was all right, because she done it herself.
Her sister, Miss Watson, a tolerable slim old maid, with goggles on,
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
2
had just come to live with her, and took a set at me now with a
spelling-book. She worked me middling hard for about an hour, and
then the widow made her ease up. I couldn’t stood it much longer.
Then for an hour it was deadly dull, and I was fidgety. Miss Watson
would say, “Don’t put your feet up there, Huckleberry;” and “Don’t
scrunch up like that, Huckleberry—set up straight;” and pretty soon
she would say, “Don’t gap and stretch like that, Huckleberry—why
don’t you try to behave?” Then she told me all about the bad place,
and I said I wished I was there. She got mad then, but I didn’t mean
no harm. All I wanted was to go somewheres; all I wanted was a
change, I warn’t particular. She said it was wicked to say what I said;
said she wouldn’t say it for the whole world; she was going to live so
as to go to the good place. Well, I couldn’t see no advantage in going
where she was going, so I made up my mind I wouldn’t try for it.  But
I never said so, because it would only make trouble, and wouldn’t do
no good.
Now she had got a start, and she went on and told me all about the
good place. She said all a body would have to do there was to go
around all day long with a harp and sing, forever and ever. So I didn’t
think much of it. But I never said so. I asked her if she reckoned Tom
Sawyer would go there, and she said not by a considerable sight. I
was glad about that, because I wanted him and me to be together.
Miss Watson she kept pecking at me, and it got tiresome and lone-
some. By and by they fetched the niggers in and had prayers, and
then everybody was off to bed. I went up to my room with a piece of
candle, and put it on the table. Then I set down in a chair by the
window and tried to think of something cheerful, but it warn’t no
use. I felt so lonesome I most wished I was dead. The stars were shin-
ing, and the leaves rustled in the woods ever so mournful; and I
heard an owl, away off, who-whooing about somebody that was
dead, and a whippowill and a dog crying about somebody that was
going to die; and the wind was trying to whisper something to me,
and I couldn’t make out what it was, and so it made the cold shivers
run over me. Then away out in the woods I heard that kind of a
sound that a ghost makes when it wants to tell about something
that’s on its mind and can’t make itself understood, and so can’t rest
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
3
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested