“Set her back, John, set her back!” says one.  They backed water.
“Keep away, boy—keep to looard. Confound it, I just expect the
wind has blowed it to us. Your pap’s got the small-pox, and you know
it precious well. Why didn’t you come out and say so? Do you want
to spread it all over?”
“Well,” says I, a-blubbering, “I’ve told every-body before, and they
just went away and left us.”
“Poor devil, there’s something in that. We are right down sorry for
you, but we—well, hang it, we don’t want the small-pox, you see.
Look here, I’ll tell you what to do. Don’t you try to land by yourself,
or you’ll smash everything to pieces. You float along down about
twenty miles, and you’ll come to a town on the left-hand side of the
river. It will be long after sun-up then, and when you ask for help
you tell them your folks are all down with chills and fever. Don’t be
a fool again, and let people guess what is the matter. Now we’re try-
ing to do you a kindness; so you just put twenty miles between us,
that’s a good boy. It wouldn’t do any good to land yonder where the
light is—it’s only a wood-yard.  Say, I reckon your father’s poor, and
I’m bound to say he’s in pretty hard luck. Here, I’ll put a twenty-dol-
lar gold piece on this board, and you get it when it floats by. I feel
mighty mean to leave you; but my kingdom! it won’t do to fool with
small-pox, don’t you see?”
“Hold on, Parker,” says the other man, “here’s a twenty to put on
the board for me. Good-bye, boy; you do as Mr. Parker told you, and
you’ll be all right.”
“That’s so, my boy—good-bye, good-bye. If you see any runaway
niggers you get help and nab them, and you can make some money
by it.”
“Good-bye, sir,” says I; “I won’t let no runaway niggers get by me
if I can help it.”
They went off and I got aboard the raft, feeling bad and low,
because I knowed very well I had done wrong, and I see it warn’t no
use for me to try to learn to do right; a body that don’t get started
right when he’s little ain’t got no show—when the pinch comes there
ain’t nothing to back him up and keep him to his work, and so he
gets beat. Then I thought a minute, and says to myself, hold on;
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
94
Convert pdf into ppt online - application SDK utility:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf into ppt online - application SDK utility:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
s’pose you’d a done right and give Jim up, would you felt better than
what you do now? No, says I, I’d feel bad—I’d feel just the same way
I do now. Well, then, says I, what’s the use you learning to do right
when it’s troublesome to do right and ain’t no trouble to do wrong,
and the wages is just the same? I was stuck.  I couldn’t answer that.
So I reckoned I wouldn’t bother no more about it, but after this
always do whichever come handiest at the time.
I went into the wigwam; Jim warn’t there. I looked all around; he
warn’t anywhere. I says:
“Jim!”
“Here I is, Huck. Is dey out o’ sight yit? Don’t talk loud.”
He was in the river under the stern oar, with just his nose out. I
told him they were out of sight, so he come aboard. He says:
“I was a-listenin’ to all de talk, en I slips into de river en was gwyne
to shove for sho’ if dey come aboard. Den I was gwyne to swim to de
raf’ agin when dey was gone. But lawsy, how you did fool ‘em, Huck!
Dat wuz de smartes’ dodge! I tell you, chile, I’spec it save’ ole Jim—
ole Jim ain’t going to forgit you for dat, honey.”
Then we talked about the money. It was a pretty good raise—twen-
ty dollars apiece. Jim said we could take deck passage on a steamboat
now, and the money would last us as far as we wanted to go in the
free States. He said twenty mile more warn’t far for the raft to go, but
he wished we was already there.
Towards daybreak we tied up, and Jim was mighty particular about
hiding the raft good. Then he worked all day fixing things in bun-
dles, and getting all ready to quit rafting.
That night about ten we hove in sight of the lights of a town away
down in a left-hand bend.
I went off in the canoe to ask about it. Pretty soon I found a man
out in the river with a skiff, setting a trot-line. I ranged up and says:
“Mister, is that town Cairo?”
“Cairo? no. You must be a blame’ fool.”
“What town is it, mister?”
“If you want to know, go and find out. If you stay here botherin’
around me for about a half a minute longer you’ll get something you
won’t want.”
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
95
application SDK utility:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag-and-drop your pptx or ppt file into the drop area.
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK utility:How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word
How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word. PDF, MS-Excel, MS-PPT to Word Conversion Overview. By integrating XDoc.Word SDK into your C#.NET project, PDF, MS
www.rasteredge.com
I paddled to the raft. Jim was awful disappointed, but I said never
mind, Cairo would be the next place, I reckoned.
We passed another town before daylight, and I was going out
again; but it was high ground, so I didn’t go. No high ground about
Cairo, Jim said. I had forgot it. We laid up for the day on a towhead
tolerable close to the left-hand bank. I begun to suspicion something.
So did Jim. I says:
“Maybe we went by Cairo in the fog that night.”
He says:
“Doan’ le’s talk about it, Huck. Po’ niggers can’t have no luck. I
awluz ‘spected dat rattlesnake-skin warn’t done wid its work.”
“I wish I’d never seen that snake-skin, Jim—I do wish I’d never laid
eyes on it.”
“It ain’t yo’ fault, Huck; you didn’ know. Don’t you blame yo’self
‘bout it.”
When it was daylight, here was the clear Ohio water inshore, sure
enough, and outside was the old regular Muddy! So it was all up with
Cairo.
We talked it all over. It wouldn’t do to take to the shore; we could-
n’t take the raft up the stream, of course. There warn’t no way but to
wait for dark, and start back in the canoe and take the chances. So we
slept all day amongst the cottonwood thicket, so as to be fresh for the
work, and when we went back to the raft about dark the canoe was
gone!
We didn’t say a word for a good while. There warn’t anything to
say. We both knowed well enough it was some more work of the rat-
tlesnake-skin; so what was the use to talk about it? It would only look
like we was finding fault, and that would be bound to fetch more bad
luck—and keep on fetching it, too, till we knowed enough to keep
still.
By and by we talked about what we better do, and found there
warn’t no way but just to go along down with the raft till we got a
chance to buy a canoe to go back in. We warn’t going to borrow it
when there warn’t anybody around, the way pap would do, for that
might set people after us.
So we shoved out after dark on the raft.
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
96
application SDK utility:How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF
How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF. MS Office to PDF Conversion Overview. By integrating XDoc.PDF SDK into your C#.NET project, Microsoft Office
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK utility:VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
directly encode converted image source into PDF document file converted image source to PDF format, RasterEdge VB other encoding APIs to convert rendered image
www.rasteredge.com
Anybody that don’t believe yet that it’s foolishness to handle a
snake-skin, after all that that snake-skin done for us, will believe it
now if they read on and see what more it done for us.
The place to buy canoes is off of rafts laying up at shore. But we
didn’t see no rafts laying up; so we went along during three hours and
more. Well, the night got gray and ruther thick, which is the next
meanest thing to fog. You can’t tell the shape of the river, and you
can’t see no distance. It got to be very late and still, and then along
comes a steamboat up the river. We lit the lantern, and judged she
would see it. Up-stream boats didn’t generly come close to us; they go
out and follow the bars and hunt for easy water under the reefs; but
nights like this they bull right up the channel against the whole river.
We could hear her pounding along, but we didn’t see her good till
she was close. She aimed right for us. Often they do that and try to
see how close they can come without touching; sometimes the wheel
bites off a sweep, and then the pilot sticks his head out and laughs,
and thinks he’s mighty smart. Well, here she comes, and we said she
was going to try and shave us; but she didn’t seem to be sheering off
a bit. She was a big one, and she was coming in a hurry, too, looking
like a black cloud with rows of glow-worms around it; but all of a
sudden she bulged out, big and scary, with a long row of wide-open
furnace doors shining like red-hot teeth, and her monstrous bows
and guards hanging right over us. There was a yell at us, and a jin-
gling of bells to stop the engines, a powwow of cussing, and whistling
of steam—and as Jim went overboard on one side and I on the other,
she come smashing straight through the raft.
I dived—and I aimed to find the bottom, too, for a thirty-foot
wheel had got to go over me, and I wanted it to have plenty of room.
I could always stay under water a minute; this time I reckon I stayed
under a minute and a half. Then I bounced for the top in a hurry, for
I was nearly busting. I popped out to my armpits and blowed the
water out of my nose, and puffed a bit. Of course there was a boom-
ing current; and of course that boat started her engines again ten sec-
onds after she stopped them, for they never cared much for raftsmen;
so now she was churning along up the river, out of sight in the thick
weather, though I could hear her.
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
97
application SDK utility:C# TIFF: Learn to Convert MS Word, Excel, and PPT to TIFF Image
C# TIFF - Conversion from Word, Excel, PPT to TIFF. In order to convert Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint to quiet easy to integrate this SDK into your C#
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK utility:VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
to split one PPT (.pptx) document file into smaller sub control add-on can do PPT creating, loading powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
I sung out for Jim about a dozen times, but I didn’t get any answer;
so I grabbed a plank that touched me while I was “treading water,”
and struck out for shore, shoving it ahead of me. But I made out to
see that the drift of the current was towards the left-hand shore, which
meant that I was in a crossing; so I changed off and went that way.
It was one of these long, slanting, two-mile crossings; so I was a
good long time in getting over. I made a safe landing, and clumb up
the bank. I couldn’t see but a little ways, but I went poking along
over rough ground for a quarter of a mile or more, and then I run
across a big old-fashioned double log-house before I noticed it. I was
going to rush by and get away, but a lot of dogs jumped out and
went to howling and barking at me, and I knowed better than to
move another peg.
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
98
application SDK utility:VB.NET PowerPoint: Read & Scan Barcode Image from PPT Slide
VB.NET PPT PDF-417 barcode scanning SDK to detect PDF-417 barcode Allow VB.NET developers to output PPT ISSN barcode scanning result into data string.
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK utility:C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document
VB.NET Read: PDF Text Extract; VB.NET Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document.
www.rasteredge.com
I
n about half a minute somebody spoke out of a window without
putting his head out, and says:
“Be done, boys! Who’s there?”
I says:
“It’s me.”
“Who’s me?”
“George Jackson, sir.”
“What do you want?”
“I don’t want nothing, sir. I only want to go along by, but the dogs
won’t let me.”
“What are you prowling around here this time of night for—
hey?”
“I warn’t prowling around, sir, I fell overboard off of the steamboat.”
“Oh, you did, did you? Strike a light there, somebody. What did
you say your name was?”
“George Jackson, sir. I’m only a boy.”
“Look here, if you’re telling the truth you needn’t be afraid—
nobody’ll hurt you. But don’t try to budge; stand right where you are.
Rouse out Bob and Tom, some of you, and fetch the guns. George
Jackson, is there anybody with you?”
“No, sir, nobody.”
I heard the people stirring around in the house now, and see a light.
The man sung out:
“Snatch that light away, Betsy, you old fool—ain’t you got any
CHAPTER SEVENTEEN
99
sense? Put it on the floor behind the front door. Bob, if you and Tom
are ready, take your places.”
“All ready.”
“Now, George Jackson, do you know the Shepherdsons?”
“No, sir; I never heard of them.”
“Well, that may be so, and it mayn’t. Now, all ready. Step forward,
George Jackson. And mind, don’t you hurry—come mighty slow. If
there’s anybody with you, let him keep back—if he shows himself
he’ll be shot. Come along now. Come slow; push the door open
yourself—just enough to squeeze in, d’ you hear?”
I didn’t hurry; I couldn’t if I’d a wanted to. I took one slow step at a
time and there warn’t a sound, only I thought I could hear my heart.
The dogs were as still as the humans, but they followed a little behind
me. When I got to the three log doorsteps I heard them unlocking
and unbarring and unbolting. I put my hand on the door and pushed
it a little and a little more till somebody said, “There, that’s enough—
put your head in.” I done it, but I judged they would take it off.
The candle was on the floor, and there they all was, looking at me,
and me at them, for about a quarter of a minute: Three big men with
guns pointed at me, which made me wince, I tell you; the oldest, gray
and about sixty, the other two thirty or more—all of them fine and
handsome—and the sweetest old gray-headed lady, and back of her
two young women which I couldn’t see right well. The old gentleman
says:
“There; I reckon it’s all right. Come in.”
As soon as I was in the old gentleman he locked the door and
barred it and bolted it, and told the young men to come in with their
guns, and they all went in a big parlor that had a new rag carpet on
the floor, and got together in a corner that was out of the range of the
front windows—there warn’t none on the side.  They held the candle,
and  took  a  good  look  at  me,  and  all  said,  “Why,  he ain’t  a
Shepherdson—no, there ain’t any Shepherdson about him.” Then the
old man said he hoped I wouldn’t mind being searched for arms,
because he didn’t mean no harm by it—it was only to make sure. So
he didn’t pry into my pockets, but only felt outside with his hands,
and said it was all right. He told me to make myself easy and at
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
100
home, and tell all about myself; but the old lady says:
“Why, bless you, Saul, the poor thing’s as wet as he can be; and
don’t you reckon it may be he’s hungry?”
“True for you, Rachel—I forgot.”
So the old lady says:
“Betsy” (this was a nigger woman), you fly around and get him
something to eat as quick as you can, poor thing; and one of you girls
go and wake up Buck and tell him—oh, here he is himself. Buck,
take this little stranger and get the wet clothes off from him and dress
him up in some of yours that’s dry.”
Buck looked about as old as me—thirteen or fourteen or along
there, though he was a little bigger than me. He hadn’t on anything
but a shirt, and he was very frowzy-headed. He came in gaping and
digging one fist into his eyes, and he was dragging a gun along with
the other one. He says:
“Ain’t they no Shepherdsons around?”
They said, no, ‘twas a false alarm.
“Well,” he says, “if they’d a ben some, I reckon I’d a got one.”
They all laughed, and Bob says:
“Why, Buck, they might have scalped us all, you’ve been so slow in
coming.”
“Well, nobody come after me, and it ain’t right I’m always kept
down; I don’t get no show.”
“Never mind, Buck, my boy,” says the old man, “you’ll have show
enough, all in good time, don’t you fret about that. Go ‘long with
you now, and do as your mother told you.”
When we got upstairs to his room he got me a coarse shirt and a
roundabout and pants of his, and I put them on. While I was at it he
asked me what my name was, but before I could tell him he started
to tell me about a bluejay and a young rabbit he had catched in the
woods day before yesterday, and he asked me where Moses was when
the candle went out. I said I didn’t know; I hadn’t heard about it
before, no way.
“Well, guess,” he says.
“How’m I going to guess,” says I, “when I never heard tell of it
before?”
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
101
“But you can guess, can’t you? It’s just as easy.”
“Which candle?” I says.
“Why, any candle,” he says.
“I don’t know where he was,” says I; “where was he?”
“Why, he was in the dark! That’s where he was!”
“Well, if you knowed where he was, what did you ask me for?”
“Why, blame it, it’s a riddle, don’t you see? Say, how long are you
going to stay here? You got to stay always. We can just have booming
times—they don’t have no school now. Do you own a dog?  I’ve got
a dog—and he’ll go in the river and bring out chips that you throw
in. Do you like to comb up Sundays, and all that kind of foolishness?
You bet I don’t, but ma she makes me. Confound these ole britches!
I reckon I’d better put ‘em on, but I’d ruther not, it’s so warm. Are
you all ready? All right. Come along, old hoss.”
Cold corn-pone, cold corn-beef, butter and butter-milk—that is
what they had for me down there, and there ain’t nothing better that
ever I’ve come across yet. Buck and his ma and all of them smoked
cob pipes, except the nigger woman, which was gone, and the two
young women. They all smoked and talked, and I eat and talked. The
young women had quilts around them, and their hair down their
backs. They all asked me questions, and I told them how pap and me
and all the family was living on a little farm down at the bottom of
Arkansaw, and my sister Mary Ann run off and got married and
never was heard of no more, and Bill went to hunt them and he
warn’t heard of no more, and Tom and Mort died, and then there
warn’t nobody but just me and pap left, and he was just trimmed
down to nothing, on account of his troubles; so when he died I took
what there was left, because the farm didn’t belong to us, and started
up the river, deck passage, and fell overboard; and that was how I
come to be here. So they said I could have a home there as long as I
wanted it. Then it was most daylight and everybody went to bed, and
I went to bed with Buck, and when I waked up in the morning, drat
it all, I had forgot what my name was.  So I laid there about an hour
trying to think, and when Buck waked up I says:
“Can you spell, Buck?”
“Yes,” he says.
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
102
“I bet you can’t spell my name,” says I.
“I bet you what you dare I can,” says he.
“All right,” says I, “go ahead.”
“G-e-o-r-g-e J-a-x-o-n—there now,” he says.
“Well,” says I, “you done it, but I didn’t think you could. It ain’t no
slouch of a name to spell—right off without studying.”
I set it down, private, because somebody might want ME to spell it
next, and so I wanted to be handy with it and rattle it off like I was
used to it.
It was a mighty nice family, and a mighty nice house, too. I hadn’t
seen no house out in the country before that was so nice and had so
much style. It didn’t have an iron latch on the front door, nor a wood-
en one with a buckskin string, but a brass knob to turn, the same as
houses in town. There warn’t no bed in the parlor, nor a sign of a bed;
but heaps of parlors in towns has beds in them. There was a big fire-
place that was bricked on the bottom, and the bricks was kept clean
and red by pouring water on them and scrubbing them with another
brick; sometimes they wash them over with red water-paint that they
call Spanish-brown, same as they do in town.  They had big brass dog-
irons that could hold up a saw-log. There was a clock on the middle
of the mantel-piece, with a picture of a town painted on the bottom
half of the glass front, and a round place in the middle of it for the
sun, and you could see the pendulum swinging behind it. It was beau-
tiful to hear that clock tick; and sometimes when one of these ped-
dlers had been along and scoured her up and got her in good shape,
she would start in and strike a hundred and fifty before she got tuck-
ered out. They wouldn’t took any money for her.
Well, there was a big outlandish parrot on each side of the clock,
made out of something like chalk, and painted up gaudy. By one of
the parrots was a cat made of crockery, and a crockery dog by the
other; and when you pressed down on them they squeaked, but did-
n’t  open  their  mouths  nor  look  different  nor  interested.  They
squeaked through underneath. There was a couple of big  wild-
turkey-wing fans spread out behind those things. On the table in the
middle of the room was a kind of a lovely crockery basket that bad
apples and oranges and peaches and grapes piled up in it, which was
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
103
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested