much redder and yellower and prettier than real ones is, but they
warn’t real because you could see where pieces had got chipped off
and showed the white chalk, or whatever it was, underneath.
This table had a cover made out of beautiful oilcloth, with a red
and blue spread-eagle painted on it, and a painted border all around.
It come all the way from Philadelphia, they said. There was some
books, too, piled up perfectly exact, on each corner of the table.  One
was a big family Bible full of pictures. One was ‘Pilgrim’s Progress,’
about a man that left his family, it didn’t say why. I read considerable
in it now and then. The statements was interesting, but tough.
Another was ‘Friendship’s Offering,’ full of beautiful stuff and poet-
ry; but I didn’t read the poetry. Another was Henry Clay’s Speeches,
and another was Dr. Gunn’s Family Medicine, which told you all
about what to do if a body was sick or dead. There was a hymn book,
and a lot of other books. And there was nice split-bottom chairs, and
perfectly sound, too—not bagged down in the middle and busted,
like an old basket.
They had pictures hung on the walls—mainly Washingtons and
Lafayettes, and battles, and Highland Marys, and one called “Signing
the Declaration.” There was some that they called crayons, which one
of the daughters which was dead made her own self when she was
only fifteen years old. They was different from any pictures I ever see
before—blacker, mostly, than is common. One was a woman in a
slim black dress, belted small under the armpits, with bulges like a
cabbage in the middle of the sleeves, and a large black scoop-shovel
bonnet with a black veil, and white slim ankles crossed about with
black tape, and very wee black slippers, like a chisel, and she was
leaning pensive on a tombstone on her right elbow, under a weeping
willow, and her other hand hanging down her side holding a white
handkerchief and a reticule, and underneath the picture it said “Shall
I Never See Thee More Alas.” Another one was a young lady with her
hair all combed up straight to the top of her head, and knotted there
in front of a comb like a chair-back, and she was crying into a hand-
kerchief and had a dead bird laying on its back in her other hand
with its heels up, and underneath the picture it said “I Shall Never
Hear Thy Sweet Chirrup More Alas.” There was one where a young
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
104
Convert pdf to editable ppt online - application SDK tool:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to editable ppt online - application SDK tool:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
lady was at a window looking up at the moon, and tears running
down her cheeks; and she had an open letter in one hand with black
sealing wax showing on one edge of it, and she was mashing a locket
with a chain to it against her mouth, and underneath the picture it
said “And Art Thou Gone Yes Thou Art Gone Alas.” These was all
nice pictures, I reckon, but I didn’t somehow seem to take to them,
because if ever I was down a little they always give me the fan-tods.
Everybody was sorry she died, because she had laid out a lot more of
these pictures to do, and a body could see by what she had done what
they had lost. But I reckoned that with her disposition she was hav-
ing a better time in the graveyard. She was at work on what they said
was her greatest picture when she took sick, and every day and every
night it was her prayer to be allowed to live till she got it done, but
she never got the chance. It was a picture of a young woman in a
long white gown, standing on the rail of a bridge all ready to jump
off, with her hair all down her back, and looking up to the moon,
with the tears running down her face, and she had two arms folded
across her breast, and two arms stretched out in front, and two more
reaching up towards the moon—and the idea was to see which pair
would look best, and then scratch out all the other arms; but, as I was
saying, she died before she got her mind made up, and now they kept
this picture over the head of the bed in her room, and every time her
birthday come they hung flowers on it. Other times it was hid with a
little curtain. The young woman in the picture had a kind of a nice
sweet face, but there was so many arms it made her look too spidery,
seemed to me.
This young girl kept a scrap-book when she was alive, and used to
paste obituaries and accidents and cases of patient suffering in it out
of the Presbyterian Observer, and write poetry after them out of her
own head. It was very good poetry. This is what she wrote about a
boy by the name of Stephen Dowling Bots that fell down a well and
was drownded:
ODE TO STEPHEN DOWLING BOTS, DEC’D
And did young Stephen sicken,
And did young Stephen die?
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
105
application SDK tool:Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
to convert PDF document to editable & searchable to text converter control toolkit can convert PDF document to Download and try RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF for .NET
www.rasteredge.com
And did the sad hearts thicken,
And did the mourners cry?
No; such was not the fate of
Young Stephen Dowling Bots;
Though sad hearts round him thickened,
‘Twas not from sickness’ shots.
No whooping-cough did rack his frame,
Nor measles drear with spots;
Not these impaired the sacred name
Of Stephen Dowling Bots.
Despised love struck not with woe
That head of curly knots,
Nor stomach troubles laid him low,
Young Stephen Dowling Bots.
O no. Then list with tearful eye,
Whilst I his fate do tell.
His soul did from this cold world fly
By falling down a well.
They got him out and emptied him;
Alas it was too late;
His spirit was gone for to sport aloft
In the realms of the good and great.
If Emmeline Grangerford could make poetry like that before she was
fourteen, there ain’t no telling what she could a done by and by. Buck
said she could rattle off poetry like nothing. She didn’t ever have to
stop to think. He said she would slap down a line, and if she could-
n’t find anything to rhyme with it would just scratch it out and slap
down another one, and go ahead. She warn’t particular; she could
write about anything you choose to give her to write about just so it
was sadful. Every time a man died, or a woman died, or a child died,
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
106
she would be on hand with her “tribute” before he was cold. She
called them tributes. The neighbors said it was the doctor first, then
Emmeline, then the undertaker—the under-taker never got in ahead
of Emmeline but once, and then she hung fire on a rhyme for the
dead person’s name, which was Whistler. She warn’t ever the same
after that; she never complained, but she kinder pined away and did
not live long. Poor thing, many’s the time I made myself go up to the
little room that used to be hers and get out her poor old scrap-book
and read in it when her pictures had been aggravating me and I had
soured on her a little. I liked all that family, dead ones and all, and
warn’t going to let anything come between us. Poor Emmeline made
poetry about all the dead people when she was alive, and it didn’t
seem right that there warn’t nobody to make some about her now she
was gone; so I tried to sweat out a verse or two myself, but I couldn’t
seem to make it go somehow. They kept Emmeline’s room trim and
nice, and all the things fixed in it just the way she liked to have them
when she was alive, and nobody ever slept there. The old lady took
care of the room herself, though there was plenty of niggers, and she
sewed there a good deal and read her Bible there mostly.
Well, as I was saying about the parlor, there was beautiful curtains
on the windows: white, with pictures painted on them of castles with
vines all down the walls, and cattle coming down to drink. There was
a little old piano, too, that had tin pans in it, I reckon, and nothing
was ever so lovely as to hear the young ladies sing “The Last Link is
Broken” and play “The Battle of Prague” on it. The walls of all the
rooms was plastered, and most had carpets on the floors, and the
whole house was whitewashed on the outside.
It was a double house, and the big open place betwixt them was
roofed and floored, and sometimes the table was set there in the
middle of the day, and it was a cool, comfortable place. Nothing
couldn’t be better.  And warn’t the cooking good, and just bushels of
it too!
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
107
C
ol. Grangerford was a gentleman, you see.  He was a gentleman
all over; and so was his family. He was well born, as the saying is, and
that’s worth as much in a man as it is in a horse, so the Widow
Douglas said, and nobody ever denied that she was of the first aris-
tocracy in our town; and pap he always said it, too, though he warn’t
no more quality than a mudcat himself. Col. Grangerford was very
tall and very slim, and had a darkish-paly complexion, not a sign of
red in it anywheres; he was clean shaved every morning all over his
thin face, and he had the thinnest kind of lips, and the thinnest kind
of nostrils, and a high nose, and heavy eyebrows, and the blackest
kind of eyes, sunk so deep back that they seemed like they was look-
ing out of caverns at you, as you may say. His forehead was high, and
his hair was black and straight and hung to his shoulders. His hands
was long and thin, and every day of his life he put on a clean shirt
and a full suit from head to foot made out of linen so white it hurt
your eyes to look at it; and on Sundays he wore a blue tail-coat with
brass buttons on it. He carried a mahogany cane with a silver head to
it. There warn’t no frivolishness about him, not a bit, and he warn’t
ever loud. He was as kind as he could be—you could feel that, you
know, and so you had confidence. Sometimes he smiled, and it was
good to see; but when he straightened himself up like a liberty-pole,
and the lightning begun to flicker out from under his eyebrows, you
wanted to climb a tree first, and find out what the matter was after-
wards. He didn’t ever have to tell anybody to mind their manners—
everybody was always good-mannered where he was. Everybody
CHAPTER EIGHTEEN
108
loved to have him around, too; he was sunshine most always—I
mean he made it seem like good weather. When he turned into a
cloudbank it was awful dark for half a minute, and that was enough;
there wouldn’t nothing go wrong again for a week.
When him and the old lady come down in the morning all the
family got up out of their chairs and give them good-day, and didn’t
set down again till they had set down. Then Tom and Bob went to
the sideboard where the decanter was, and mixed a glass of bitters
and handed it to him, and he held it in his hand and waited till Tom’s
and Bob’s was mixed, and then they bowed and said, “Our duty to
you, sir, and madam;” and they bowed the least bit in the world and
said thank you, and so they drank, all three, and Bob and Tom
poured a spoonful of water on the sugar and the mite of whisky or
apple brandy in the bottom of their tumblers, and give it to me and
Buck, and we drank to the old people too.
Bob was the oldest and Tom next—tall, beautiful men with very
broad shoulders and brown faces, and long black hair and black eyes.
They dressed in white linen from head to foot, like the old gentle-
man, and wore broad Panama hats.
Then there was Miss Charlotte; she was twenty-five, and tall and
proud and grand, but as good as she could be when she warn’t stirred
up; but when she was she had a look that would make you wilt in
your tracks, like her father. She was beautiful.
So was her sister, Miss Sophia, but it was a different kind. She was
gentle and sweet like a dove, and she was only twenty.
Each person had their own nigger to wait on them—
Buck too. My nigger had a monstrous easy time, because I warn’t
used to having anybody do anything for me, but Buck’s was on the
jump most of the time.
This was all there was of the family now, but there used to be
more—three sons; they got killed; and Emmeline that died.
The old gentleman owned a lot of farms and over a hundred nig-
gers. Sometimes a stack of people would come there, horseback, from
ten or fifteen mile around, and stay five or six days, and have such
junketings round about and on the river, and dances and picnics in
the woods daytimes, and balls at the house nights.  These people was
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
109
mostly kinfolks of the family. The men brought their guns with
them. It was a handsome lot of quality, I tell you.
There was another clan of aristocracy around there—five or six
families—mostly of the name of Shepherdson. They was as high-
toned and well born and rich and grand as the tribe of Grangerfords.
The Shepherdsons and Grangerfords used the same steam-boat land-
ing, which was about two mile above our house; so sometimes when
I went up there with a lot of our folks I used to see a lot of the
Shepherdsons there on their fine horses.
One day Buck and me was away out in the woods hunting, and
heard a horse coming. We was crossing the road. Buck says:
“Quick! Jump for the woods!”
We done it, and then peeped down the woods through the leaves.
Pretty soon a splendid young man come galloping down the road,
setting his horse easy and looking like a soldier. He had his gun
across his pommel. I had seen him before. It was young Harney
Shepherdson. I heard Buck’s gun go off at my ear, and Harney’s hat
tumbled off from his head.  He grabbed his gun and rode straight to
the place where we was hid. But we didn’t wait. We started through
the woods on a run. The woods warn’t thick, so I looked over my
shoulder to dodge the bullet, and twice I seen Harney cover Buck
with his gun; and then he rode away the way he come—to get his
hat, I reckon, but I couldn’t see. We never stopped running till we
got home. The old gentleman’s eyes blazed a minute—‘twas pleasure,
mainly, I judged—then his face sort of smoothed down, and he says,
kind of gentle:
“I don’t like that shooting from behind a bush. Why didn’t you step
into the road, my boy?”
“The Shepherdsons don’t, father. They always take advantage.”
Miss Charlotte she held her head up like a queen while Buck was
telling his tale, and her nostrils spread and her eyes snapped. The two
young men looked dark, but never said nothing. Miss Sophia she
turned pale, but the color come back when she found the man warn’t
hurt.
Soon as I could get Buck down by the corn-cribs under the trees by
ourselves, I says:
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
110
“Did you want to kill him, Buck?”
“Well, I bet I did.”
“What did he do to you?”
“Him? He never done nothing to me.”
“Well, then, what did you want to kill him for?”
“Why, nothing—only it’s on account of the feud.”
“What’s a feud?”
“Why, where was you raised? Don’t you know what a feud is?”
“Never heard of it before—tell me about it.”
“Well,” says Buck, “a feud is this way: A man has a quarrel with
another man, and kills him; then that other man’s brother kills him;
then the other brothers, on both sides, goes for one another; then the
cousins chip in—and by and by everybody’s killed off, and there ain’t
no more feud. But it’s kind of slow, and takes a long time.”
“Has this one been going on long, Buck?”
“Well, I should reckon! It started thirty year ago, or som’ers along
there. There was trouble ‘bout something, and then a lawsuit to set-
tle it; and the suit went agin one of the men, and so he up and shot
the man that won the suit—which he would naturally do, of course.
Anybody would.”
“What was the trouble about, Buck?—land?”
“I reckon maybe—I don’t know.”
“Well,  who  done  the  shooting?  Was  it  a  Grangerford  or  a
Shepherdson?”
“Laws, how do I know? It was so long ago.”
“Don’t anybody know?”
“Oh, yes, pa knows, I reckon, and some of the other old people;
but they don’t know now what the row was about in the first place.”
“Has there been many killed, Buck?”
“Yes; right smart chance of funerals. But they don’t always kill. Pa’s
got a few buckshot in him; but he don’t mind it ‘cuz he don’t weigh
much, anyway. Bob’s been carved up some with a bowie, and Tom’s
been hurt once or twice.”
“Has anybody been killed this year, Buck?”
“Yes; we got one and they got one. ‘Bout three months ago my
cousin Bud, fourteen year old, was riding through the woods on
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
111
t’other side of the river, and didn’t have no weapon with him, which
was blame’ foolishness, and in a lonesome place he hears a horse a-
coming behind him, and sees old Baldy Shepherdson a-linkin’ after
him with his gun in his hand and his white hair a-flying in the wind;
and ‘stead of jumping off and taking to the brush, Bud ‘lowed he
could out-run him; so they had it, nip and tuck, for five mile or
more, the old man a-gaining all the time; so at last Bud seen it warn’t
any use, so he stopped and faced around so as to have the bullet holes
in front, you know, and the old man he rode up and shot him down.
But he didn’t git much chance to enjoy his luck, for inside of a week
our folks laid him out.”
“I reckon that old man was a coward, Buck.”
“I reckon he warn’t a coward. Not by a blame’ sight. There ain’t a
coward amongst them Shepherdsons—not a one. And there ain’t no
cowards amongst the Grangerfords either. Why, that old man kep’ up
his end in a fight one day for half an hour against three Grangerfords,
and come out winner. They was all a-horseback; he lit off of his horse
and got behind a little woodpile, and kep’ his horse before him to
stop the bullets; but the Grangerfords stayed on their horses and
capered around the old man, and peppered away at him, and he pep-
pered away at them. Him and his horse both went home pretty leaky
and crippled, but the Grangerfords had to be fetched home—and one
of ‘em was dead, and another died the next day. No, sir; if a body’s
out  hunting  for cowards  he  don’t want  to  fool  away any  time
amongst them Shepherdsons, becuz they don’t breed any of that
kind.”
Next Sunday we all went to church, about three mile, everybody a-
horseback. The men took their guns along, so did Buck, and kept
them between their knees or stood them handy against the wall. The
Shepherdsons done the same. It was pretty ornery preaching—all
about brotherly love, and such-like tiresomeness; but everybody said
it was a good sermon, and they all talked it over going home, and
had such a powerful lot to say about faith and good works and free
grace and preforeordestination, and I don’t know what all, that it did
seem to me to be one of the roughest Sundays I had run across yet.
About an hour after dinner everybody was dozing around, some in
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
112
their chairs and some in their rooms, and it got to be pretty dull.
Buck and a dog was stretched out on the grass in the sun sound
asleep. I went up to our room, and judged I would take a nap myself.
I found that sweet Miss Sophia standing in her door, which was next
to ours, and she took me in her room and shut the door very soft,
and asked me if I liked her, and I said I did; and she asked me if I
would do something for her and not tell anybody, and I said I would.
Then she said she’d forgot her Testament, and left it in the seat at
church between two other books, and would I slip out quiet and go
there and fetch it to her, and not say nothing to nobody. I said I
would. So I slid out and slipped off up the road, and there warn’t
anybody at the church, except maybe a hog or two, for there warn’t
any lock on the door, and hogs likes a puncheon floor in summer-
time because it’s cool. If you notice, most folks don’t go to church
only when they’ve got to; but a hog is different.
Says I to myself, something’s up; it ain’t natural for a girl to be in
such a sweat about a Testament.  So I give it a shake, and out drops
a little piece of paper with “Half-past two” wrote on it with a pencil.
I ransacked it, but couldn’t find anything else. I couldn’t make any-
thing out of that, so I put the paper in the book again, and when I
got home and upstairs there was Miss Sophia in her door waiting for
me.  She pulled me in and shut the door; then she looked in the
Testament till she found the paper, and as soon as she read it she
looked glad; and before a body could think she grabbed me and give
me a squeeze, and said I was the best boy in the world, and not to tell
anybody. She was mighty red in the face for a minute, and her eyes
lighted up, and it made her powerful pretty. I was a good deal aston-
ished, but when I got my breath I asked her what the paper was
about, and she asked me if I had read it, and I said no, and she asked
me if I could read writing, and I told her “no, only coarse-hand,” and
then she said the paper warn’t anything but a book-mark to keep her
place, and I might go and play now.
I went off down to the river, studying over this thing, and pretty
soon I noticed that my nigger was following along behind. When we
was out of sight of the house he looked back and around a second,
and then comes a-running, and says:
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
113
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested