“Mars Jawge, if you’ll come down into de swamp I’ll show you a
whole stack o’ water-moccasins.”
Thinks I, that’s mighty curious; he said that yesterday. He oughter
know a body don’t love water-moccasins enough to go around hunt-
ing for them.
What is he up to, anyway? So I says:
“All right; trot ahead.”
I followed a half a mile; then he struck out over the swamp, and
waded ankle deep as much as another half-mile. We come to a little
flat piece of land which was dry and very thick with trees and bush-
es and vines, and he says:
“You shove right in dah jist a few steps, Mars Jawge; dah’s whah dey
is. I’s seed ‘m befo’; I don’t k’yer to see ‘em no mo’.”
Then he slopped right along and went away, and pretty soon the
trees hid him. I poked into the place a-ways and come to a little
open patch as big as a bedroom all hung around with vines, and
found a man laying there asleep—and, by jings, it was my old
Jim!
I waked him up, and I reckoned it was going to be a grand sur-
prise to him to see me again, but it warn’t.  He nearly cried he was
so glad, but he warn’t surprised. Said he swum along behind me that
night, and heard me yell every time, but dasn’t answer, because he
didn’t want nobody to pick him up and take him into slavery again.
Says he:
“I got hurt a little, en couldn’t swim fas’, so I wuz a considable
ways behine you towards de las’; when you landed I reck’ned I
could ketch up wid you on de lan’ ‘dout havin’ to shout at you,
but when I see dat house I begin to go slow. I ‘uz off too fur to
hear what dey say to you—I wuz ‘fraid o’ de dogs; but when it
‘uz all quiet agin I knowed you’s in de house, so I struck out for
de woods to wait for day. Early in de mawnin’ some er de niggers
come along, gwyne to de fields, en dey tuk me en showed me dis
place, whah de dogs can’t track me on accounts o’ de water, en
dey brings me truck to eat every night, en tells me how you’s a-
gitt’n along.”
“Why didn’t you tell my Jack to fetch me here sooner, Jim?”
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
114
Convert pdf to powerpoint online no email - Library software class:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to powerpoint online no email - Library software class:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
“Well,  ‘twarn’t  no use to ‘sturb you,  Huck,  tell  we  could do
sumfn—but we’s all right now. I ben a- buyin’ pots en pans en vittles,
as I got a chanst, en a-patchin’ up de raf’ nights when—”
“What raft, Jim?”
“Our ole raf’.”
“You mean to say our old raft warn’t smashed all to flinders?”
“No, she warn’t. She was tore up a good deal—one en’ of her was;
but dey warn’t no great harm done, on’y our traps was mos’ all los’.
Ef we hadn’ dive’ so deep en swum so fur under water, en de night
hadn’ ben so dark, en we warn’t so sk’yerd, en ben sich punkin-heads,
as de sayin’ is, we’d a seed de raf’.  But it’s jis’ as well we didn’t, ‘kase
now she’s all fixed up agin mos’ as good as new, en we’s got a new lot
o’ stuff, in de place o’ what ‘uz los’.”
“Why, how did you get hold of the raft again, Jim—did you catch her?”
“How I gwyne to ketch her en I out in de woods?  No; some er de
niggers foun’ her ketched on a snag along heah in de ben’, en dey
hid her in a crick ‘mongst de willows, en dey wuz so much jawin’
‘bout which un ‘um she b’long to de mos’ dat I come to heah ‘bout
it pooty soon, so I ups en settles de trouble by tellin’ ‘um she don’t
b’long to none uv um, but to you en me; en I ast ‘m if dey gwyne to
grab a young white genlman’s propaty, en git a hid’n for it? Den I
gin ‘m ten cents apiece, en dey ‘uz mighty well satisfied, en wisht
some mo’ raf’s ‘ud come along en make ‘m rich agin. Dey’s mighty
good to me, dese niggers is, en whatever I wants ‘m to do fur me I
doan’ have to ast ‘m twice, honey. Dat Jack’s a good nigger, en pooty
smart.”
“Yes, he is. He ain’t ever told me you was here; told me to come,
and he’d show me a lot of water-moccasins. If anything happens HE
ain’t mixed up in it. He can say he never seen us together, and it ‘ll
be the truth.”
I don’t want to talk much about the next day. I reckon I’ll cut it
pretty short. I waked up about dawn, and was a-going to turn over
and go to sleep again when I noticed how still it was—didn’t seem to
be anybody stirring. That warn’t usual. Next I noticed that Buck was
up and gone. Well, I gets up, a-wondering, and goes down stairs—
nobody around; everything as still as a mouse. Just the same outside.
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
115
Library software class:RasterEdge.com General FAQs for Products
Q3: Why there's no license information in my it via the email which RasterEdge's online store sends powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:RasterEdge Product License Agreement
is active, you may contact RasterEdge via email. permitted by applicable law, in no event shall powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
www.rasteredge.com
Thinks I, what does it mean? Down by the wood-pile I comes across
my Jack, and says:
“What’s it all about?”
Says he:
“Don’t you know, Mars Jawge?”
“No,” says I, “I don’t.”
“Well, den, Miss Sophia’s run off! ‘deed she has.  She run off in de
night some time—nobody don’t know jis’ when; run off to get mar-
ried to dat young Harney Shepherdson, you know—leastways, so dey
‘spec. De fambly foun’ it out ‘bout half an hour ago—maybe a little
mo’—en’ I tell you dey warn’t no time los’. Sich another hurryin’ up
guns en hosses you never see! De women folks has gone for to stir up
de relations, en ole Mars Saul en de boys tuck dey guns en rode up
de river road for to try to ketch dat young man en kill him ‘fo’ he kin
git acrost de river wid Miss Sophia. I reck’n dey’s gwyne to be mighty
rough times.”
“Buck went off ‘thout waking me up.”
“Well, I reck’n he did! Dey warn’t gwyne to mix you up in it. Mars
Buck he loaded up his gun en ‘lowed he’s gwyne to fetch home a
Shepherdson or bust. Well, dey’ll be plenty un ‘m dah, I reck’n, en
you bet you he’ll fetch one ef he gits a chanst.”
I took up the river road as hard as I could put. By and by I begin
to hear guns a good ways off. When I came in sight of the log store
and the woodpile where the steamboats lands I worked along under
the trees and brush till I got to a good place, and then I clumb up
into the forks of a cottonwood that was out of reach, and watched.
There was a wood-rank four foot high a little ways in front of the
tree, and first I was going to hide behind that; but maybe it was luck-
ier I didn’t.
There was four or five men cavorting around on their horses in the
open place before the log store, cussing and yelling, and trying to get
at a couple of young chaps that was behind the wood-rank alongside
of the steamboat landing; but they couldn’t come it.  Every time one
of them showed himself on the river side of the woodpile he got shot
at. The two boys was squatting back to back behind the pile, so they
could watch both ways.
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
116
Library software class:VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB.NET Convert Excel to PDF document free
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
or no border. Free online Excel to PDF converter without email. Quick integrate online C# source code into .NET class. C# Demo Code: Convert Excel to PDF in
www.rasteredge.com
By and by the men stopped cavorting around and yelling. They
started riding towards the store; then up gets one of the boys, draws
a steady bead over the wood-rank, and drops one of them out of his
saddle.  All the men jumped off of their horses and grabbed the hurt
one and started to carry him to the store; and that minute the two
boys started on the run. They got half way to the tree I was in before
the men noticed. Then the men see them, and jumped on their hors-
es and took out after them. They gained on the boys, but it didn’t do
no good, the boys had too good a start; they got to the woodpile that
was in front of my tree, and slipped in behind it, and so they had the
bulge on the men again. One of the boys was Buck, and the other
was a slim young chap about nineteen years old.
The men ripped around awhile, and then rode away.  As soon as
they was out of sight I sung out to Buck and told him. He didn’t
know what to make of my voice coming out of the tree at first. He
was awful surprised. He told me to watch out sharp and let him
know when the men come in sight again; said they was up to some
devilment or other—wouldn’t be gone long. I wished I was out of
that tree, but I dasn’t come down. Buck begun to cry and rip, and
‘lowed that him and his cousin Joe (that was the other young chap)
would make up for this day yet. He said his father and his two broth-
ers was killed, and two or three of the enemy. Said the Shepherdsons
laid for them in ambush. Buck said his father and brothers ought to
waited for their relations—the Shepherdsons was too strong for
them. I asked him what was become of young Harney and Miss
Sophia. He said they’d got across the river and was safe. I was glad of
that; but the way Buck did take on because he didn’t manage to kill
Harney that day he shot at him—I hain’t ever heard anything like it.
All of a sudden, bang! bang! bang! goes three or four guns—the
men had slipped around through the woods and come in from
behind without their horses!  The boys jumped for the river—both of
them hurt—and as they swum down the current the men run along
the bank shooting at them and singing out, “Kill them, kill them!” It
made me so sick I most fell out of the tree. I ain’t a-going to tell all
that happened—it would make me sick again if I was to do that. I
wished I hadn’t ever come ashore that night to see such things. I ain’t
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
117
Library software class:VB.NET Image: RasterEdge JBIG2 Codec Image Control for VB.NET
The encoded images in PDF file can also be viewed and processed online through our VB.NET PDF web viewer. No, image quality will not degrade.
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:C#: Frequently Asked Questions for Using XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .
If you have additional questions or requests, please send email to support@rasteredge. com. The site configured in IIS has no permission to operate.
www.rasteredge.com
ever going to get shut of them—lots of times I dream about them.
I stayed in the tree till it begun to get dark, afraid to come down.
Sometimes I heard guns away off in the woods; and twice I seen lit-
tle gangs of men gallop past the log store with guns; so I reckoned
the trouble was still a-going on. I was mighty downhearted; so I
made up my mind I wouldn’t ever go anear that house again, because
I reckoned I was to blame, somehow.  I judged that that piece of
paper meant that Miss Sophia was to meet Harney somewheres at
half-past two and run off; and I judged I ought to told her father
about that paper and the curious way she acted, and then maybe he
would a locked her up, and this awful mess wouldn’t ever happened.
When I got down out of the tree I crept along down the river bank
a piece, and found the two bodies laying in the edge of the water, and
tugged at them till I got them ashore; then I covered up their faces,
and got away as quick as I could. I cried a little when I was covering
up Buck’s face, for he was mighty good to me.
It was just dark now. I never went near the house, but struck
through the woods and made for the swamp. Jim warn’t on his
island, so I tramped off in a hurry for the crick, and crowded through
the willows, red-hot to jump aboard and get out of that awful coun-
try. The raft was gone! My souls, but I was scared! I couldn’t get my
breath for most a minute.  Then I raised a yell. A voice not twenty-
five foot from me says:
“Good lan’! is dat you, honey? Doan’ make no noise.”
It was Jim’s voice—nothing ever sounded so good before. I run
along the bank a piece and got aboard, and Jim he grabbed me and
hugged me, he was so glad to see me. He says:
“Laws bless you, chile, I ‘uz right down sho’ you’s dead agin. Jack’s
been heah; he say he reck’n you’s ben shot, kase you didn’ come
home no mo’; so I’s jes’ dis minute a startin’ de raf’ down towards de
mouf er de crick, so’s to be all ready for to shove out en leave soon as
Jack comes agin en tells me for certain you IS dead. Lawsy, I’s mighty
glad to git you back again, honey.
I says:
“All right—that’s mighty good; they won’t find me, and they’ll
think I’ve been killed, and floated down the river—there’s something
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
118
Library software class:C# Tiff Convert: How to Convert Dicom to Tiff Image File
If you need to convert and change one image to another image in C# program, there would be no need for RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PowerPoint.dll.
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:RasterEdge Product License Options
Among all listed products on purchase page, Twain SDK has no Server License and only SDK To know more details or make an order, please contact us via email.
www.rasteredge.com
up there that ‘ll help them think so—so don’t you lose no time, Jim,
but just shove off for the big water as fast as ever you can.”
I never felt easy till the raft was two mile below there and out in the
middle of the Mississippi. Then we hung up our signal lantern, and
judged that we was free and safe once more. I hadn’t had a bite to eat
since yesterday, so Jim he got out some corn-dodgers and buttermilk,
and pork and cabbage and greens—there ain’t nothing in the world
so good when it’s cooked right—and whilst I eat my supper we
talked and had a good time. I was powerful glad to get away from the
feuds, and so was Jim to get away from the swamp. We said there
warn’t no home like a raft, after all. Other places do seem so cramped
up and smothery, but a raft don’t. You feel mighty free and easy and
comfortable on a raft.
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
119
T
wo or three days and nights went by; I reckon I might say they
swum by, they slid along so quiet and smooth and lovely. Here is the
way we put in the time. It was a monstrous big river down there—
sometimes a mile and a half wide; we run nights, and laid up and hid
daytimes; soon as night was most gone we stopped navigating and
tied up—nearly always in the dead water under a towhead; and then
cut young cottonwoods and willows, and hid the raft with them.
Then we set out the lines. Next we slid into the river and had a swim,
so as to freshen up and cool off; then we set down on the sandy bot-
tom where the water was about knee deep, and watched the day-light
come. Not a sound anywheres—perfectly still—just like the whole
world was asleep, only sometimes the bullfrogs a-cluttering, maybe.
The first thing to see, looking away over the water, was a kind of dull
line—that was the woods on t’other side; you couldn’t make nothing
else out; then a pale place in the sky; then more paleness spreading
around; then the river softened up away off, and warn’t black any
more, but gray; you could see little dark spots drifting along ever so
far away—trading scows, and such things; and long black streaks—
rafts; sometimes you could hear a sweep screaking; or jumbled up
voices, it was so still, and sounds come so far; and by and by you
could see a streak on the water which you know by the look of the
streak that there’s a snag there in a swift current which breaks on it
and makes that streak look that way; and you see the mist curl up off
of the water, and the east reddens up, and the river, and you make
out a log-cabin in the edge of the woods, away on the bank on
CHAPTER NINETEEN
120
t’other side of the river, being a woodyard, likely, and piled by them
cheats so you can throw a dog through it anywheres; then the nice
breeze springs up, and comes fanning you from over there, so cool
and fresh and sweet to smell on account of the woods and the flow-
ers; but sometimes not that way, because they’ve left dead fish laying
around, gars and such, and they do get pretty rank; and next you’ve
got the full day, and everything smiling in the sun, and the song-
birds just going it!
A little smoke couldn’t be noticed now, so we would take some fish
off of the lines and cook up a hot breakfast. And afterwards we would
watch the lonesomeness of the river, and kind of lazy along, and by
and by lazy off to sleep. Wake up by and by, and look to see what
done it, and maybe see a steamboat coughing along up-stream, so far
off towards the other side you couldn’t tell nothing about her only
whether she was a stern-wheel or side-wheel; then for about an hour
there wouldn’t be nothing to hear nor nothing to see—just solid lone-
someness. Next you’d see a raft sliding by, away off yonder, and maybe
a galoot on it chopping, because they’re most always doing it on a raft;
you’d see the axe flash and come down—you don’t hear nothing; you
see that axe go up again, and by the time it’s above the man’s head
then you hear the k’chunk!—it had took all that time to come over the
water. So we would put in the day, lazying around, listening to the
stillness. Once there was a thick fog, and the rafts and things that
went by was beating tin pans so the steamboats wouldn’t run over
them. A scow or a raft went by so close we could hear them talking
and cussing and laughing—heard them plain; but we couldn’t see no
sign of them; it made you feel crawly; it was like spirits carrying on
that way in the air. Jim said he believed it was spirits; but I says:
“No; spirits wouldn’t say, ‘Dern the dern fog.’”
Soon as it was night out we shoved; when we got her out to about
the middle we let her alone, and let her float wherever the current
wanted her to; then we lit the pipes, and dangled our legs in the
water, and talked about all kinds of things—we was always naked,
day and night, whenever the mosquitoes would let us—the new
clothes Buck’s folks made for me was too good to be comfortable,
and besides I didn’t go much on clothes, nohow.
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
121
Sometimes we’d have that whole river all to ourselves for  the
longest time. Yonder was the banks and the islands, across the water;
and maybe a spark—which was a candle in a cabin window; and
sometimes on the water you could see a spark or two—on a raft or a
scow, you know; and maybe you could hear a fiddle or a song com-
ing over from one of them crafts. It’s lovely to live on a raft. We had
the sky up there, all speckled with stars, and we used to lay on our
backs and look up at them, and discuss about whether they was made
or only just happened. Jim he allowed they was made, but I allowed
they happened; I judged it would have took too long to make so
many. Jim said the moon could a laid them; well, that looked kind of
reasonable, so I didn’t say nothing against it, because I’ve seen a frog
lay most as many, so of course it could be done. We used to watch
the stars that fell, too, and see them streak down. Jim allowed they’d
got spoiled and was hove out of the nest.
Once or twice of a night we would see a steamboat slipping along
in the dark, and now and then she would belch a whole world of
sparks up out of her chimbleys, and they would rain down in the
river and look awful pretty; then she would turn a corner and her
lights would wink out and her powwow shut off and leave the river
still again; and by and by her waves would get to us, a long time after
she was gone, and joggle the raft a bit, and after that you wouldn’t
hear nothing for you couldn’t tell how long, except maybe frogs or
something.
After midnight the people on shore went to bed, and then for two
or three hours the shores was black—no more sparks in the cabin
windows. These sparks was our clock—the first one that showed
again meant morning was coming, so we hunted a place to hide and
tie up right away.
One morning about daybreak I found a canoe and crossed over a
chute to the main shore—it was only two hundred yards—and pad-
dled about a mile up a crick amongst the cypress woods, to see if I
couldn’t get some berries. Just as I was passing a place where a kind
of a cowpath crossed the crick, here comes a couple of men tearing
up the path as tight as they could foot it. I thought I was a goner, for
whenever anybody was after anybody I judged it was me—or maybe
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
122
Jim. I was about to dig out from there in a hurry, but they was pret-
ty close to me then, and sung out and begged me to save their lives—
said  they hadn’t been doing nothing, and was being chased for
it—said there was men and dogs a-coming. They wanted to jump
right in, but I says:
“Don’t you do it. I don’t hear the dogs and horses yet; you’ve got
time to crowd through the brush and get up the crick a little ways;
then you take to the water and wade down to me and get in—that’ll
throw the dogs off the scent.”
They done it, and soon as they was aboard I lit out for our tow-
head, and in about five or ten minutes we heard the dogs and the
men away off, shouting.  We heard them come along towards the
crick, but couldn’t see them; they seemed to stop and fool around a
while; then, as we got further and further away all the time, we
couldn’t hardly hear them at all; by the time we had left a mile of
woods behind us and struck the river, everything was quiet, and we
paddled over to the towhead and hid in the cottonwoods and was
safe.
One of these fellows was about seventy or upwards, and had a bald
head and very gray whiskers. He had an old battered-up slouch hat
on, and a greasy blue woollen shirt, and ragged old blue jeans britch-
es stuffed into his boot-tops, and home-knit galluses—no, he only
had one. He had an old long-tailed blue jeans coat with slick brass
buttons flung over his arm, and both of them had big, fat, ratty-look-
ing carpet-bags.
The other fellow was about thirty, and dressed about as ornery.
After breakfast we all laid off and talked, and the first thing that
come out was that these chaps didn’t know one another.
“What got you into trouble?” says the baldhead to t’other chap.
“Well, I’d been selling an article to take the tartar off the teeth—
and it does take it off, too, and generly the enamel along with it—
but I stayed about one night longer than I ought to, and was just in
the act of sliding out when I ran across you on the trail this side of
town, and you told me they were coming, and begged me to help
you to get off. So I told you I was expecting trouble myself, and
would scatter out with you.  That’s the whole yarn—what’s yourn?
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
123
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested