young men was barefooted, and some of the children didn’t have on
any clothes but just a tow-linen shirt. Some of the old women was
knitting, and some of the young folks was courting on the sly.
The first shed we come to the preacher was lining out a hymn. He
lined out two lines, everybody sung it, and it was kind of grand to
hear it, there was so many of them and they done it in such a rous-
ing way; then he lined out two more for them to sing—and so on.
The people woke up more and more, and sung louder and louder;
and towards the end some begun to groan, and some begun to shout.
Then the preacher begun to preach, and begun in earnest, too; and
went weaving first to one side of the platform and then the other, and
then a-leaning down over the front of it, with his arms and his body
going all the time, and shouting his words out with all his might; and
every now and then he would hold up his Bible and spread it open,
and kind of pass it around this way and that, shouting, “It’s the
brazen serpent in the wilderness!  Look upon it and live!” And peo-
ple would shout out, “Glory!—A-a-men!” And so he went on, and
the people groaning and crying and saying amen:
“Oh, come to the mourners’ bench! come, black with sin! (amen!)
come, sick and sore! (amen!) come, lame and halt and blind! (amen!)
come, pore and needy, sunk in shame! (a-a-amen!) come, all that’s
worn and soiled and suffering!—come with a broken spirit! come
with a contrite heart! come in your rags and sin and dirt! the waters
that cleanse is free, the door of heaven stands open—oh, enter in and
be at rest!” (A-a-amen! Glory, glory hallelujah!)
And so on. You couldn’t make out what the preacher said any
more, on account of the shouting and crying. Folks got up every-
wheres in the crowd, and worked their way just by main strength to
the mourners’ bench, with the tears running down their faces; and
when all the mourners had got up there to the front benches in a
crowd, they sung and shouted and flung themselves down on the
straw, just crazy and wild.
Well, the first I knowed the king got a-going, and you could hear
him over everybody; and next he went a-charging up on to the plat-
form, and the preacher he begged him to speak to the people, and he
done it. He told them he was a pirate—been a pirate for thirty years
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
134
How to convert pdf to ppt for - control software platform:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
How to convert pdf to ppt for - control software platform:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
out in the Indian Ocean—and his crew was thinned out considerable
last spring in a fight, and he was home now to take out some fresh
men, and thanks to goodness he’d been robbed last night and put
ashore off of a steamboat without a cent, and he was glad of it; it was
the blessedest thing that ever happened to him, because he was a
changed man now, and happy for the first time in his life; and, poor
as he was, he was going to start right off and work his way back to
the Indian Ocean, and put in the rest of his life trying to turn the
pirates into the true path; for he could do it better than anybody else,
being acquainted with all pirate crews in that ocean; and though it
would take him a long time to get there without money, he would
get there anyway, and every time he convinced a pirate he would say
to him, “Don’t you thank me, don’t you give me no credit; it all
belongs to them dear people in Pokeville camp-meeting, natural
brothers and benefactors of the race, and that dear preacher there, the
truest friend a pirate ever had!”
And then he busted into tears, and so did everybody.  Then some-
body sings out, “Take up a collection for him, take up a collection!”
Well, a half a dozen made a jump to do it, but somebody sings out,
“Let him pass the hat around!” Then everybody said it, the preacher
too.
So the king went all through the crowd with his hat swabbing his
eyes, and blessing the people and praising them and thanking them
for being so good to the poor pirates away off there; and every little
while the prettiest kind of girls, with the tears running down their
cheeks, would up and ask him would he let them kiss him for to
remember him by; and he always done it; and some of them he
hugged and kissed as many as five or six times—and he was invited
to stay a week; and everybody wanted him to live in their houses, and
said they’d think it was an honor; but he said as this was the last day
of the camp-meeting he couldn’t do no good, and besides he was in
a sweat to get to the Indian Ocean right off and go to work on the
pirates.
When we got back to the raft and he come to count up he found
he had collected eighty-seven dollars and seventy-five cents. And then
he had fetched away a three-gallon jug of whisky, too, that he found
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
135
control software platform:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Download Free Trial. Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Easy converting! We try to make it as easy as possible to convert your PPTX/PPT files to PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
control software platform:How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word
How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word. Online C# Tutorial for Converting PDF, MS-Excel, MS-PPT to Word. PDF, MS-Excel, MS-PPT to Word Conversion Overview.
www.rasteredge.com
under a wagon when he was starting home through the woods.  The
king said, take it all around, it laid over any day he’d ever put in in
the missionarying line. He said it warn’t no use talking, heathens
don’t amount to shucks alongside of pirates to work a camp-meeting
with.
The duke was thinking he’d been doing pretty well till the king
come to show up, but after that he didn’t think so so much. He had
set up and printed off two little jobs for farmers in that printing-
office—horse bills—and took the money, four dollars. And he had
got in ten dollars’ worth of advertisements for the paper, which he
said he would put in for four dollars if they would pay in advance—
so they done it. The price of the paper was two dollars a year, but he
took in three subscriptions for half a dollar apiece on condition of
them paying him in advance; they were going to pay in cordwood
and onions as usual, but he said he had just bought the concern and
knocked down the price as low as he could afford it, and was going
to run it for cash. He set up a little piece of poetry, which he made,
himself, out of his own head—three verses—kind of sweet and sad-
dish—the name of it was, “Yes, crush, cold world, this breaking
heart”—and he left that all set up and ready to print in the paper,
and didn’t charge nothing for it. Well, he took in nine dollars and a
half, and said he’d done a pretty square day’s work for it.
Then he showed us another little job he’d printed and hadn’t
charged for, because it was for us. It had a picture of a runaway nig-
ger with a bundle on a stick over his shoulder, and “$200 reward”
under it. The reading was all about Jim, and just described him to a
dot. It said he run away from St. Jacques’ plantation, forty mile
below New Orleans, last winter, and likely went north, and whoever
would catch him and send him back he could have the reward and
expenses.
“Now,” says the duke, “after tonight we can run in the daytime if
we want to. Whenever we see anybody coming we can tie Jim hand
and foot with a rope, and lay him in the wigwam and show this
handbill and say we captured him up the river, and were too poor to
travel on a steamboat, so we got this little raft on credit from our
friends and are going down to get the reward. Handcuffs and chains
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
136
control software platform:How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF
How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF. Online C# Tutorial for Converting MS Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint to PDF. How to C#: Convert PPT to PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
control software platform:C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document. Provide Free Demo Code for PDF Conversion from Microsoft PowerPoint in C# Program.
www.rasteredge.com
would look still better on Jim, but it wouldn’t go well with the story
of us being so poor. Too much like jewelry. Ropes are the correct
thing—we must preserve the unities, as we say on the boards.”
We all said the duke was pretty smart, and there couldn’t be no
trouble about running daytimes. We judged we could make miles
enough that night to get out of the reach of the powwow we reck-
oned the duke’s work in the printing office was going to make in that
little town; then we could boom right along if we wanted to.
We laid low and kept still, and never shoved out till nearly ten
o’clock; then we slid by, pretty wide away from the town, and didn’t
hoist our lantern till we was clear out of sight of it.
When Jim called me to take the watch at four in the morning, he
says:
“Huck, does you reck’n we gwyne to run acrost any mo’ kings on
dis trip?”
“No,” I says, “I reckon not.”
“Well,” says he, “dat’s all right, den. I doan’ mine one er two kings,
but dat’s enough. Dis one’s powerful drunk, en de duke ain’ much
better.”
I found Jim had been trying to get him to talk French, so he could
hear what it was like; but he said he had been in this country so long,
and had so much trouble, he’d forgot it.
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
137
control software platform:C# TIFF: Learn to Convert MS Word, Excel, and PPT to TIFF Image
PPTXDocument doc = new PPTXDocument(@"demo.pptx"); if (null == doc) throw new Exception("Fail to load PowerPoint Document"); // Convert PPT to Tiff.
www.rasteredge.com
control software platform:VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
VB.NET PowerPoint processing control add-on can do PPT creating, loading We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
I
t was after sun-up now, but we went right on and didn’t tie up.
The king and the duke turned out by and by looking pretty rusty;
but after they’d jumped overboard and took a swim it chippered
them up a good deal. After breakfast the king he took a seat on the
corner of the raft, and pulled off his boots and rolled up his britches,
and let his legs dangle in the water, so as to be comfortable, and lit
his pipe, and went to getting his Romeo and Juliet by heart. When
he had got it pretty good him and the duke begun to practice it
together. The duke had to learn him over and over again how to say
every speech; and he made him sigh, and put his hand on his heart,
and after a while he said he done it pretty well; “only,” he says, “you
mustn’t bellow out Romeo! that way, like a bull—you must say it soft
and sick and languishy, so—R-o-o-meo! that is the idea; for Juliet’s a
dear sweet mere child of a girl, you know, and she doesn’t bray like a
jackass.”
Well, next they got out a couple of long swords that the duke
made out of oak laths, and begun to practice the sword fight—the
duke called himself Richard III.; and the way they laid on and
pranced around the raft was grand to see. But by and by the king
tripped and fell overboard, and after that they took a rest, and had a
talk about all kinds of adventures they’d had in other times along the
river.
After dinner the duke says:
“Well, Capet, we’ll want to make this a first-class show, you
know, so I guess we’ll add a little more to it. We want a little
CHAPTER TWENTY-0NE
138
control software platform:VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
VB.NET PowerPoint - Render PPT to PDF in VB.NET. How to Convert PowerPoint Slide to PDF Using VB.NET Code in .NET. Visual C#. VB.NET. Home > .NET Imaging SDK >
www.rasteredge.com
control software platform:VB.NET PowerPoint: Read & Scan Barcode Image from PPT Slide
VB.NET PPT PDF-417 barcode scanning SDK to detect PDF-417 barcode image from PowerPoint slide. VB.NET APIs to detect and decode
www.rasteredge.com
something to answer encores with, anyway.”
“What’s onkores, Bilgewater?”
The duke told him, and then says:
“I’ll answer by doing the Highland fling or the sailor’s hornpipe;
and you—well, let me see—oh, I’ve got it—you can do Hamlet’s
soliloquy.”
“Hamlet’s which?”
“Hamlet’s  soliloquy,  you  know;  the  most  celebrated  thing  in
Shakespeare. Ah, it’s sublime, sublime! Always fetches the house. I
haven’t got it in the book—I’ve only got one volume—but I reckon I
can piece it out from memory. I’ll just walk up and down a minute,
and see if I can call it back from recollection’s vaults.”
So he went to marching up and down, thinking, and frowning hor-
rible every now and then; then he would hoist up his eyebrows; next
he would squeeze his hand on his forehead and stagger back and kind
of moan; next he would sigh, and next he’d let on to drop a tear. It
was beautiful to see him. By and by he got it. He told us to give
attention. Then he strikes a most noble attitude, with one leg shoved
forwards, and his arms stretched away up, and his head tilted back,
looking up at the sky; and then he begins to rip and rave and grit his
teeth; and after that, all through his speech, he howled, and spread
around, and swelled up his chest, and just knocked the spots out of
any acting ever I see before. This is the speech—I learned it, easy
enough, while he was learning it to the king:
To be, or not to be; that is the bare bodkin 
That makes calamity of so long life;
For who would fardels bear, till Birnam Wood do come to 
Dunsinane,
But that the fear of something after death
Murders the innocent sleep,
Great nature’s second course,
And makes us rather sling the arrows of outrageous fortune
Than fly to others that we know not of.
There’s the respect must give us pause:
Wake Duncan with thy knocking! I would thou couldst;
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
139
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
The oppressor’s wrong, the proud man’s contumely,
The law’s delay, and the quietus which his pangs might take,
In the dead waste and middle of the night, when churchyards yawn
In customary suits of solemn black,
But that the undiscovered country from whose bourne no traveler   
returns,
Breathes forth contagion on the world,
And thus the native hue of resolution, like the poor cat i’ the adage, 
Is sicklied o’er with care, And all the clouds that lowered o’er our 
housetops, 
With this regard their currents turn awry, And lose the name of 
action.
‘Tis a consummation devoutly to be wished.
But soft you, the fair Ophelia:
Ope not thy ponderous and marble jaws, But get thee to a nun
nery—go!
Well, the old man he liked that speech, and he mighty soon got it so
he could do it first-rate. It seemed like he was just born for it; and
when he had his hand in and was excited, it was perfectly lovely the
way he would rip and tear and rair up behind when he was getting it
off.
The first chance we got the duke he had some show-bills printed;
and after that, for two or three days as we floated along, the raft was
a most uncommon lively place, for there warn’t nothing but sword
fighting and rehearsing—as the duke called it—going on all the time.
One morning, when we was pretty well down the State of Arkansaw,
we come in sight of a little one-horse town in a big bend; so we tied
up about three-quarters of a mile above it, in the mouth of a crick
which was shut in like a tunnel by the cypress trees, and all of us but
Jim took the canoe and went down there to see if there was any
chance in that place for our show.
We struck it mighty lucky; there was going to be a circus there that
afternoon, and the country people was already beginning to come in,
in all kinds of old shackly wagons, and on horses. The circus would
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
140
leave before night, so our show would have a pretty good chance.
The duke he hired the courthouse, and we went around and stuck up
our bills. They read like this:
Shaksperean Revival ! ! !
Wonderful Attraction!
For One Night Only!
The world renowned tragedians,
David Garrick the Younger, of Drury Lane Theatre London,
and
Edmund Kean the elder, of the Royal Haymarket Theatre,
Whitechapel, Pudding Lane, Piccadilly, London, and the
Royal Continental Theatres, in their sublime
Shaksperean Spectacle entitled
The Balcony Scene
in
Romeo and Juliet ! ! !
Romeo...................Mr. Garrick
Juliet..................Mr. Kean
Assisted by the whole strength of the company!
New costumes, new scenes, new appointments!
Also:
The thrilling, masterly, and blood-curdling
Broad-sword conflict In Richard III. ! ! !
Richard III.............Mr. Garrick
Richmond................Mr. Kean
Also:
(by special request)
Hamlet’s Immortal Soliloquy ! !
By The Illustrious Kean!
Done by him 300 consecutive nights in Paris!
For One Night Only, On account of imperative European engage-
ments!  Admission 25 cents; children and servants, 10 cents.
Then we went loafing around town. The stores and houses was most
all old, shackly, dried up frame concerns that hadn’t ever been paint-
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
141
ed; they was set up three or four foot above ground on stilts, so as to
be out of reach of the water when the river was over-flowed. The
houses had little gardens around them, but they didn’t seem to raise
hardly anything in them but jimpson-weeds, and sunflowers, and ash
piles, and old curled-up boots and shoes, and pieces of bottles, and
rags, and played-out tinware. The fences was made of different kinds
of boards, nailed on at different times; and they leaned every which
way, and had gates that didn’t generly have but one hinge—a leather
one. Some of the fences had been white-washed some time or anoth-
er, but the duke said it was in Clumbus’ time, like enough. There was
generly hogs in the garden, and people driving them out.
All the stores was along one street. They had white domestic
awnings in front, and the country people hitched their horses to the
awning-posts. There was empty drygoods boxes under the awnings,
and loafers roosting on them all day long, whittling them with their
Barlow knives; and chawing tobacco, and gaping and yawning and
stretching—a mighty ornery lot. They generly had on yellow straw
hats most as wide as an umbrella, but didn’t wear no coats nor waist-
coats, they called one another Bill, and Buck, and Hank, and Joe,
and Andy, and talked lazy and drawly, and used considerable many
cuss words.  There was as many as one loafer leaning up against every
awning-post, and he most always had his hands in his britches-pock-
ets, except when he fetched them out to lend a chaw of tobacco or
scratch. What a body was hearing amongst them all the time was:
“Gimme a chaw ‘v tobacker, Hank “
“Cain’t; I hain’t got but one chaw left. Ask Bill.”
Maybe Bill he gives him a chaw; maybe he lies and says he ain’t got
none. Some of them kinds of loafers never has a cent in the world,
nor a chaw of tobacco of their own. They get all their chawing by
borrowing; they say to a fellow, “I wisht you’d len’ me a chaw, Jack, I
jist this minute give Ben Thompson the last chaw I had”—which is a
lie pretty much everytime; it don’t fool nobody but a stranger; but
Jack ain’t no stranger, so he says:
“You give him a chaw, did you? So did your sister’s cat’s grand-
mother. You pay me back the chaws you’ve awready borry’d off’n me,
Lafe Buckner, then I’ll loan you one or two ton of it, and won’t
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
142
charge you no back intrust, nuther.”
“Well, I did pay you back some of it wunst.”
“Yes, you did—‘bout six chaws. You borry’d store tobacker and
paid back nigger-head.”
Store tobacco is flat black plug, but these fellows mostly chaws the
natural leaf twisted. When they borrow a chaw they don’t generly cut
it off with a knife, but set the plug in between their teeth, and gnaw
with their teeth and tug at the plug with their hands till they get it in
two; then sometimes the one that owns the tobacco looks mournful
at it when it’s handed back, and says, sarcastic:
“Here, gimme the chaw, and you take the plug.”
All the streets and lanes was just mud; they warn’t nothing else but
mud—mud as black as tar and nigh about a foot deep in some
places, and two or three inches deep in ALL the places. The hogs
loafed and grunted around everywheres. You’d see a muddy sow and
a litter of pigs come lazying along the street and whollop herself right
down in the way, where folks had to walk around her, and she’d
stretch out and shut her eyes and wave her ears whilst the pigs was
milking her, and look as happy as if she was on salary. And pretty
soon you’d hear a loafer sing out, “Hi! So boy! sick him, Tige!” and
away the sow would go, squealing most horrible, with a dog or two
swinging to each ear, and three or four dozen more a-coming; and
then you would see all the loafers get up and watch the thing out of
sight, and laugh at the fun and look grateful for the noise. Then
they’d settle back again till there was a dog fight. There couldn’t any-
thing wake them up all over, and make them happy all over, like a
dog fight—unless it might be putting turpentine on a stray dog and
setting fire to him, or tying a tin pan to his tail and see him run him-
self to death.
On the river front some of the houses was sticking out over the
bank, and they was bowed and bent, and about ready to tumble in,
The people had moved out of them. The bank was caved away under
one corner of some others, and that corner was hanging over.  People
lived in them yet, but it was dangersome, because sometimes a strip
of land as wide as a house caves in at a time. Sometimes a belt of land
a quarter of a mile deep will start in and cave along and cave along
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
143
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested