mind letting me off; but I’ll write it for you on a piece of paper, and
you can read it along the road to Mr. Lothrop’s, if you want to. Do
you reckon that ‘ll do?”
“Oh, yes.”
So I wrote: “I put it in the coffin. It was in there when you was cry-
ing there, away in the night.  I was behind the door, and I was
mighty sorry for you, Miss Mary Jane.”
It made my eyes water a little to remember her crying there all by
herself in the night, and them devils laying there right under her own
roof, shaming her and robbing her; and when I folded it up and give
it to her I see the water come into her eyes, too; and she shook me by
the hand, hard, and says:
“Good-bye. I’m going to do everything just as you’ve told me; and
if I don’t ever see you again, I sha’n’t ever forget you. and I’ll think of
you a many and a many a time, and I’ll pray for you, too!”—and she
was gone.
Pray for me! I reckoned if she knowed me she’d take a job that was
more nearer her size. But I bet she done it, just the same—she was
just that kind.  She had the grit to pray for Judus if she took the
notion—there warn’t no back-down to her, I judge.  You may say
what you want to, but in my opinion she had more sand in her than
any girl I ever see; in my opinion she was just full of sand. It sounds
like flattery, but it ain’t no flattery. And when it comes to beauty—
and goodness, too—she lays over them all. I hain’t ever seen her since
that time that I see her go out of that door; no, I hain’t ever seen her
since, but I reckon I’ve thought of her a many and a many a million
times, and of her saying she would pray for me; and if ever I’d a
thought it would do any good for me to pray for her, blamed if I
wouldn’t a done it or bust.
Well, Mary Jane she lit out the back way, I reckon; because nobody
see her go. When I struck Susan and the hare-lip, I says:
“What’s the name of them people over on t’other side of the river
that you all goes to see sometimes?”
They says:
“There’s several; but it’s the Proctors, mainly.”
“That’s the name,” I says; “I most forgot it.  Well, Miss Mary Jane
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
194
Convert pdf to powerpoint slide - SDK application service:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to powerpoint slide - SDK application service:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
she told me to tell you she’s gone over there in a dreadful hurry—one
of them’s sick.”
“Which one?”
“I don’t know; leastways, I kinder forget; but I thinks it’s—”
“Sakes alive, I hope it ain’t Hanner?”
“I’m sorry to say it,” I says, “but Hanner’s the very one.”
“My goodness, and she so well only last week! Is she took bad?”
“It ain’t no name for it. They set up with her all night, Miss Mary
Jane said, and they don’t think she’ll last many hours.”
“Only think of that, now! What’s the matter with her?”
I couldn’t think of anything reasonable, right off that way, so I says:
“Mumps.”
“Mumps your granny! They don’t set up with people that’s got the
mumps.”
“They don’t, don’t they? You better bet they do with these mumps.
These mumps is different. It’s a new kind, Miss Mary Jane said.”
“How’s it a new kind?”
“Because it’s mixed up with other things.”
“What other things?”
“Well, measles, and whooping-cough, and erysiplas, and consump-
tion, and yaller janders, and brain-fever, and I don’t know what all.”
“My land! And they call it the mumps?”
“That’s what Miss Mary Jane said.”
“Well, what in the nation do they call it the mumps for?”
“Why, because it IS the mumps. That’s what it starts with.”
“Well, ther’ ain’t no sense in it. A body might stump his toe, and
take pison, and fall down the well, and break his neck, and bust his
brains out, and somebody come along and ask what killed him, and
some numskull up and say, ‘Why, he stumped his toe.’ Would ther’
be any sense in that? No. And ther’ ain’t no sense in this, nuther. Is it
ketching?”
“Is it ketching? Why, how you talk. Is a harrow catching—in the
dark? If you don’t hitch on to one tooth, you’re bound to on
another, ain’t you? And you can’t get away with that tooth with-
out fetching the whole harrow along, can you? Well, these kind of
mumps is a kind of a harrow, as you may say—and it ain’t no
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
195
SDK application service:VB.NET PowerPoint: Read, Edit and Process PPTX File
to convert PowerPoint to PDF, render PowerPoint PowerPoint to TIFF and convert PowerPoint to raster desired watermark on source PowerPoint slide at specified
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
Suitable for Processing PowerPoint Slide(s) in both Web & SDK, this VB.NET PowerPoint processing control add & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
slouch of a harrow, nuther, you come to get it hitched on good.”
“Well, it’s awful, I think,” says the hare-lip.
“I’ll go to Uncle Harvey and—”
“Oh, yes,” I says, “I would. Of course I would. I wouldn’t lose no
time.”
“Well, why wouldn’t you?”
“Just look at it a minute, and maybe you can see.  Hain’t your
uncles obleegd to get along home to England as fast as they can? And
do you reckon they’d be mean enough to go off and leave you to go
all that journey by yourselves? You know they’ll wait for you. So fur,
so good. Your uncle Harvey’s a preacher, ain’t he? Very well, then; is
a preacher going to deceive a steamboat clerk? is he going to deceive
a ship clerk?—so as to get them to let Miss Mary Jane go aboard?
Now you know he ain’t.
What will he do, then? Why, he’ll say, ‘It’s a greatpity, but my
church matters has got to get along the best way they can; for my
niece has been exposed to the dreadful pluribus-unum mumps, and
so it’s my bounden duty to set down here and wait the three months
it takes to show on her if she’s got it.’ But never mind, if you think
it’s best to tell your uncle Harvey—”
“Shucks, and stay fooling around here when we could all be having
good times in England whilst we was waiting to find out whether
Mary Jane’s got it or not? Why, you talk like a muggins.”
“Well, anyway, maybe you’d better tell some of the neighbors.”
“Listen at that, now. You do beat all for natural stupidness. Can’t
you see that they’d go and tell?  Ther’ ain’t no way but just to not tell
anybody at all.”
“Well, maybe you’re right—yes, I judge you are right.”
“But I reckon we ought to tell Uncle Harvey she’s gone out a while,
anyway, so he won’t be uneasy about her?”
“Yes, Miss Mary Jane she wanted you to do that.
She says, ‘Tell them to give Uncle Harvey and William my love and
a kiss, and say I’ve run over the river to see Mr.’—Mr.—what IS the
name of that rich family your uncle Peter used to think so much of?
—I mean the one that—”
“Why, you must mean the Apthorps, ain’t it?”
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
196
SDK application service:C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
Visual C# Codes to Process PowerPoint Slide; PowerPoint C#.NET Processor. C#.NET PowerPoint: Process and Edit PowerPoint Slide(s).
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:VB.NET PowerPoint: Read & Scan Barcode Image from PPT Slide
VB.NET PPT PDF-417 barcode scanning SDK to detect PDF-417 barcode image from PowerPoint slide. VB.NET APIs to detect and decode
www.rasteredge.com
“Of course; bother them kind of names, a body can’t ever seem to
remember them, half the time, somehow. Yes, she said, say she has run
over for to ask the Apthorps to be sure and come to the auction and
buy this house, because she allowed her uncle Peter would ruther they
had it than anybody else; and she’s going to stick to them till they say
they’ll come, and then, if she ain’t too tired, she’s coming home; and
if she is, she’ll be home in the morning anyway. She said, don’t say
nothing about the Proctors, but only about the Apthorps—which ‘ll
be perfectly true, because she is going there to speak about their buy-
ing the house; I know it, because she told me so herself.”
“All right,” they said, and cleared out to lay for their uncles, and
give them the love and the kisses, and tell them the message.
Everything was all  right  now. The  girls wouldn’t  say  nothing
because they wanted to go to England; and the king and the duke
would ruther Mary Jane was off working for the auction than around
in reach of Doctor Robinson. I felt very good; I judged I had done it
pretty neat—I reckoned Tom Sawyer couldn’t a done it no neater
himself. Of course he would a throwed more style into it, but I can’t
do that very handy, not being brung up to it.
Well, they held the auction in the public square, along towards the end
of the afternoon, and it strung along, and strung along, and the old man
he was on hand and looking his level piousest, up there longside of the
auctioneer, and chipping in a little Scripture now and then, or a little
goody-goody saying of some kind, and the duke he was around goo-goo-
ing for sympathy all he knowed how, and just spreading himself generly.
But by and by the thing dragged through, and everything was
sold—everything but a little old trifling lot in the graveyard. So
they’d got to work that off—I never see such a girafft as the king was
for wanting to swallow everything. Well, whilst they was at it a steam-
boat landed, and in about two minutes up comes a crowd a-whoop-
ing and yelling and laughing and carrying on, and singing out:
“Here’s your opposition line! here’s your two sets o’ heirs to old
Peter Wilks—and you pays your money and you takes your choice!”
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
197
SDK application service:VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
How to Convert PowerPoint Slide to PDF Using VB.NET Code in .NET. What VB.NET APIs can I use to convert PowerPoint slide to PDF document file?
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:VB.NET PowerPoint: Edit PowerPoint Slide; Insert, Add or Delete
To view more VB.NET PowerPoint slide processing functions read VB.NET PPT (.pptx) slide processing guide page & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
T
hey was fetching a very nice-looking old gentleman along, and
a nice-looking younger one, with his right arm in a sling. And, my
souls, how the people yelled and laughed, and kept it up. But I did-
n’t see no joke about it, and I judged it would strain the duke and the
king some to see any. I reckoned they’d turn pale. But no, nary a pale
did they turn.  The duke he never let on he suspicioned what was up,
but just went a goo-gooing around, happy and satisfied, like a jug
that’s googling out buttermilk; and as for the king, he just gazed and
gazed down sorrowful on them newcomers like it give him the stom-
achache in his very heart to think there could be such frauds and ras-
cals in the world. Oh, he done it admirable. Lots of the principal
people gethered around the king, to let him see they was on his side.
That old gentleman that had just come looked all puzzled to death.
Pretty soon he begun to speak, and I see straight off he pronounced
like an Englishman—not the king’s way, though the king’s was pretty
good for an imitation. I can’t give the old gent’s words, nor I can’t
imitate him; but he turned around to the crowd, and says, about like
this:
“This is a surprise to me which I wasn’t looking for; and I’ll
acknowledge, candid and frank, I ain’t very well fixed to meet it and
answer it; for my brother and me has had misfortunes; he’s broke his
arm, and our baggage got put off at a town above here last night in
the night by a mistake. I am Peter Wilks’ brother Harvey, and this is
his brother William, which can’t hear nor speak—and can’t even
make signs to amount to much, now’t he’s only got one hand to work
CHAPTER TWENTY-NINE
198
SDK application service:VB.NET PowerPoint: Extract & Collect PPT Slide(s) Using VB Sample
PowerPoint image insertion, please read this VB.NET PowerPoint slide processing tutorial to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
is used to note or comment PowerPoint (.pptx) slide as a kind of compensation for limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS Word and
www.rasteredge.com
them with. We are who we say we are; and in a day or two, when I
get the baggage, I can prove it. But up till then I won’t say nothing
more, but go to the hotel and wait.”
So him and the new dummy started off; and the king he laughs,
and blethers out:
“Broke his arm—very likely, ain’t it?—and very convenient, too, for
a fraud that’s got to make signs, and ain’t learnt how. Lost their bag-
gage! That’s mighty good!—and mighty ingenious—under the cir-
cumstances!
So he laughed again; and so did everybody else, except three or
four, or maybe half a dozen. One of these was that doctor; another
one was a sharp-looking gentleman, with a carpet-bag of the old-
fashioned kind made out of carpet-stuff, that had just come off of the
steamboat and was talking to him in a low voice, and glancing
towards the king now and then and nodding their heads—it was Levi
Bell, the lawyer that was gone up to Louisville; and another one was
a big rough husky that come along and listened to all the old gentle-
man said, and was listening to the king now. And when the king got
done this husky up and says:
“Say, looky here; if you are Harvey Wilks, when’d you come to this town?”
“The day before the funeral, friend,” says the king.
“But what time o’ day?”
“In the evenin’—‘bout an hour er two before sun-down.”
“How’d you come?”
“I come down on the Susan Powell from Cincinnati.”
“Well, then, how’d you come to be up at the Pint in the mornin’—
in a canoe?”
“I warn’t up at the Pint in the mornin’.”
“It’s a lie.”
Several of them jumped for him and begged him not to talk that
way to an old man and a preacher.
“Preacher be hanged, he’s a fraud and a liar. He was up at the Pint
that mornin’. I live up there, don’t I? Well, I was up there, and he was
up there. I see him there. He come in a canoe, along with Tim
Collins and a boy.”
The doctor he up and says:
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
199
SDK application service:VB.NET PowerPoint: How to Convert PowerPoint Document to TIFF in
PowerPoint is often used by programmers in many applications formats, such as JPEG, GIF and PDF, by using is designed by our programmers to convert PPT document
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:VB.NET PowerPoint: Render PowerPoint to REImage for Further
Doc Conversion Library can be used to convert PPT document or image pages, including but not limited to PowerPoint document slide/page, PDF file page and
www.rasteredge.com
“Would you know the boy again if you was to see him, Hines?”
“I reckon I would, but I don’t know. Why, yonder he is, now. I
know him perfectly easy.”
It was me he pointed at. The doctor says:
“Neighbors, I don’t know whether the new couple is frauds or not;
but if these two ain’t frauds, I am an idiot, that’s all. I think it’s our
duty to see that they don’t get away from here till we’ve looked into
this thing. Come along, Hines; come along, the rest of you. We’ll
take these fellows to the tavern and affront them with t’other couple,
and I reckon we’ll find out something before we get through.”
It was nuts for the crowd, though maybe not for the king’s friends;
so we all started. It was about sundown. The doctor he led me along
by the hand, and was plenty kind enough, but he never let go my
hand.
We all got in a big room in the hotel, and lit up some candles, and
fetched in the new couple. First, the doctor says:
“I don’t wish to be too hard on these two men, but I think they’re
frauds, and they may have complices that we don’t know nothing
about. If they have, won’t the complices get away with that bag of
gold Peter Wilks left? It ain’t unlikely. If these men ain’t frauds, they
won’t object to sending for that money and letting us keep it till they
prove they’re all right—ain’t that so?”
Everybody agreed to that. So I judged they had our gang in a pret-
ty tight place right at the outstart.
But the king he only looked sorrowful, and says:
“Gentlemen, I wish the money was there, for I ain’t got no disposi-
tion to throw anything in the way of a fair, open, out-and-out inves-
tigation o’ this misable business; but, alas, the money ain’t there; you
k’n send and see, if you want to.”
“Where is it, then?”
“Well, when my niece give it to me to keep for her I took and hid
it inside o’ the straw tick o’ my bed, not wishin’ to bank it for the few
days we’d be here, and considerin’ the bed a safe place, we not bein’
used to niggers, and suppos’n’ ‘em honest, like servants in England.
The niggers stole it the very next mornin’ after I had went down
stairs; and when I sold ‘em I hadn’t missed the money yit, so they got
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
200
clean away with it. My servant here k’n tell you ‘bout it, gentlemen.”
The doctor and several said “Shucks!” and I see nobody didn’t alto-
gether believe him. One man asked me if I see the niggers steal it. I
said no, but I see them sneaking out of the room and hustling away,
and I never thought nothing, only I reckoned they was afraid they
had waked up my master and was trying to get away before he made
trouble with them. That was all they asked me. Then the doctor
whirls on me and says:
“Are you English, too?”
I says yes; and him and some others laughed, and said, “Stuff!”
Well, then they sailed in on the general investigation, and there we
had it, up and down, hour in, hour out, and nobody never said a
word about supper, nor ever seemed to think about it—and so they
kept it up, and kept it up; and it was the worst mixed-up thing you
ever see. They made the king tell his yarn, and they made the old
gentleman tell his’n; and anybody but a lot of prejudiced chuckle-
heads would a seen that the old gentleman was spinning truth and
t’other one lies. And by and by they had me up to tell what I
knowed. The king he give me a left-handed look out of the corner of
his eye, and so I knowed enough to talk on the right side. I begun to
tell about Sheffield, and how we lived there, and all about the English
Wilkses, and so on; but I didn’t get pretty fur till the doctor begun to
laugh; and Levi Bell, the lawyer, says:
“Set down, my boy; I wouldn’t strain myself if I was you. I reckon
you ain’t used to lying, it don’t seem to come handy; what you want
is practice. You do it pretty awkward.”
I didn’t care nothing for the compliment, but I was glad to be let
off, anyway.
The doctor he started to say something, and turns and says:
“If you’d been in town at first, Levi Bell—”
The king broke in and reached out his hand, and says:
“Why, is this my poor dead brother’s old friend that he’s wrote so
often about?”
The lawyer and him shook hands, and the lawyer smiled and
looked pleased, and they talked right along awhile, and then got to
one side and talked low; and at last the lawyer speaks up and says:
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
201
“That ‘ll fix it. I’ll take the order and send it, along with your
brother’s, and then they’ll know it’s all right.”
So they got some paper and a pen, and the king he set down and
twisted his head to one side, and chawed his tongue, and scrawled off
something; and then they give the pen to the duke—and then for the
first time the duke looked sick. But he took the pen and wrote.  So
then the lawyer turns to the new old gentleman and says:
“You and your brother please write a line or two and sign your
names.”
The old gentleman wrote, but nobody couldn’t read it. The lawyer
looked powerful astonished, and says:
“Well, it beats me—and snaked a lot of old letters out of his pock-
et, and examined them, and then examined the old man’s writing,
and then them again; and then says: “These old letters is from Harvey
Wilks; and here’s these two handwritings, and anybody can see they
didn’t write them” (the king and the duke looked sold and foolish, I
tell you, to see how the lawyer had took them in), “and here’s this old
gentleman’s hand writing, and anybody can tell, easy enough, he did-
n’t write them—fact is, the scratches he makes ain’t properly writing
at all. Now, here’s some letters from—”
The new old gentleman says:
“If you please, let me explain. Nobody can read my hand but my
brother there—so he copies for me.  It’s his hand you’ve got there,
not mine.”
“Well!” says the lawyer, “this is a state of things. I’ve got some of
William’s letters, too; so if you’ll get him to write a line or so we can
com—”
“He can’t write with his left hand,” says the old gentleman. “If he
could use his right hand, you would see that he wrote his own letters
and mine too. Look at both, please—they’re by the same hand.”
The lawyer done it, and says:
“I believe it’s so—and if it ain’t so, there’s a heap stronger resem-
blance than I’d noticed before, anyway.  Well, well, well! I thought we
was right on the track of a slution, but it’s gone to grass, partly. But
anyway, one thing is proved—these two ain’t either of ‘em Wilkses”—
and he wagged his head towards the king and the duke.
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
202
Well, what do you think? That muleheaded old fool wouldn’t give
in then! Indeed he wouldn’t.  Said it warn’t no fair test. Said his
brother William was the cussedest joker in the world, and hadn’t
tried to write—he see William was going to play one of his jokes the
minute he put the pen to paper. And so he warmed up and went war-
bling right along till he was actuly beginning to believe what he was
saying himself; but pretty soon the new gentleman broke in, and says:
“I’ve thought of something. Is there anybody here that helped to
lay out my br—helped to lay out the late Peter Wilks for burying?”
“Yes,” says somebody, “me and Ab Turner done it. We’re both here.”
Then the old man turns towards the king, and says:
“Peraps  this  gentleman can  tell me what was tattooed on  his
breast?”
Blamed if the king didn’t have to brace up mighty quick, or
he’d a squshed down like a bluff bank that the river has cut
under, it took him so sudden; and, mind you, it was a thing that
was calculated to make most anybody sqush to get fetched such a
solid one as that without any notice, because how was he going
to know what was tattooed on the man? He whitened a little; he
couldn’t help it; and it was mighty still in there, and everybody
bending a little forwards and gazing at him. Says I to myself, now
he’ll throw up the sponge—there ain’t no more use. Well, did he?
A body can’t hardly believe it, but he didn’t. I reckon he thought
he’d keep the thing up till he tired them people out, so they’d
thin out, and him and the duke could break loose and get away.
Anyway, he set there, and pretty soon he begun to smile, and
says:
“Mf! It’s a very tough question, ain’t it! Yes, sir, I k’n tell you what’s
tattooed on his breast. It’s jest a small, thin, blue arrow—that’s what
it is; and if you don’t look clost, you can’t see it. Now what do you
say—hey?”
Well, I never see anything like that old blister for clean out-and-out
cheek.
The new old gentleman turns brisk towards Ab Turner and his
pard, and his eye lights up like he judged he’d got the king this time,
and says:
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
203
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested